Summer in March: more all-time March temperature records in U.S., Canada

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:53 PM GMT on March 21, 2012

Share this Blog
31
+

Summer in March continued for the eighth day yesterday, toppling dozens of records for hottest March day in both the U.S. and Canada. Nearly every major airport in Michigan's Lower Peninsula tied or set records for their hottest March temperature, including Detroit (82°), Flint (84°F), Saginaw (83°F), Grand Rapids (83°), Muskegon (82°), Lansing (83°), Alpena (84°), Gaylord (80°), Pellston (84°), Traverse City (86°), and Houghton Lake (81°). Most of these records will be broken again today or tomorrow. Detroit's current string of six days over 70° is unprecedented so early in the year. One has to go back over 125 years to find an early-season warm spell that compares, and even that streak occurred in April, a full month later (April 16 - 24, 1886.)

Pellston, Michigan in the Northern Lower Peninsula is called "Michigan's Icebox", since it frequently records the coldest temperatures in the state, and in the entire nation. But the past four days, Pellston has topped out at 80° - 84°F, the first 80°F March days in their history. Yesterday's 84° reading broke the previous record for the date (55° in 1976 and 1948) by an unbelievable 29°, and was 44°F above average. Nearby Traverse City hit 86°F yesterday, which was 45°F above the average high for the date, and was the fourth consecutive day with a hottest March temperature on record.


Figure 1. Summer-like temperatures this March in the Midwest have heated up Lake Michigan to record warm levels for this time of year. The average temperature of the lake is characteristic of what occurs in June. Image credit: NOAA. Thanks to wunderground member Neapolitan for posting this image in my blog comments.

Hot times in Lake Michigan
The NWS in Chicago reported yesterday that the Windy City's high of 85°F that day boosted the average temperature for the month to levels that would make March the 7th warmest April in the city's 140-year record. The unprecedented March warmth in the states surrounding Lake Michigan have heated the lake to temperatures never seen before this early in the year. Water temperatures at the South Lake Michigan buoy were 46 - 47°F yesterday (8°C), which is about 10°F above average for this time of year, and typical of early June temperatures.

Record March warmth spreads into New England
Temperatures across much of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine yesterday were the warmest on record for so early in the year. Burlington, Vermont's 80°F was 39°F above the average high for the date, and the earliest 80° reading in recorded history. Concord, New Hampshire (81°) and Bangor, Maine (78°), also had their warmest temperatures for so early in the year. The 73°F recorded in Caribou, Maine tied for that city's highest March temperature on record, and broke the record for the date by a remarkable 23°F.

Record warmth continues in Canada
Numerous all-time warmest March temperatures were recorded in Ontario, Canada yesterday, including Windsor at 27°C (previous record, 26.6°C), Sarnia (26°C, previous record 25.6°C), and London (25°C, previous record 24.8°C). High temperatures for Wednesday and Thursday across Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia are likely to break records for hottest March day for most of the major cities in these provinces, including Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, St. Johns, and Halifax.


Figure 2. The jet stream pattern features a large, southwards dipping bulge over the Western U.S., creating a trough of low pressure with cold and snow, and a large, northwards looping bulge over the Central U.S., creating a record-strength ridge of high pressure. The Western U.S. trough has cut off into a "cut-off low" that will slowly drift eastwards during the remainder of the week.

Summer in March ends by Friday
The unprecedented Summer in March conditions are due to a loop in the jet stream that has created a large upper-level ridge of high pressure that is stuck in place over the Eastern U.S. Since the jet stream acts as the boundary between cold air to the north and warm air to the south, and the large loop in the jet places its axis far to the north of the eastern U.S., summer-like warmth has developed over the eastern half of the U.S. Conversely, colder than average temperatures have developed over the western third of the U.S. behind the southwards-dipping loop of the jet stream. This jet stream pattern is too extreme to be stable, and the big loop over the Western U.S. has broken off to form a giant eddy. The resulting area of low pressure is known as a "cut-off low", because it is cut off from the jet stream. The cut-off low will drift slowly eastwards during the week, gradually bringing an end to "Summer in March" over the Eastern half of the U.S. by Friday.

How rare is this Summer in March heat event?
One measure of how record-breaking this "Summer in March" heat wave has been is the impact it had on NOAA's National Climatic Data Center web site. The extremes section of the their web site has been down since last Friday, since their software has been unable to handle both the huge number of records being set and the huge demand from people wanting to see these records. The web site came back on-line this morning with software re-engineered to handle the load, but only with data through Sunday.

We can also quantify how rare a meteorological event is by looking at statistics of past years. By averaging together at least 30 years of data to take a representative snapshot of the climate, we can generate a mean and a standard deviation of the data. The standard deviation gives a measure of how much the data fluctuates around the mean.

In comparing deviations from normal across wide regions, it helps to normalize the deviations. A temperature deviation of 3 degrees C may be not that unusual in one region, but may be very significant in another. The solution is to use climatological anomalies (which we often refer to by the Greek letter, sigma.) Calculating the climatological anomaly is a two step process. First, we calculate the difference between a quantity (i.e., temperature) and it's 30-year average value. Then we normalize the difference by dividing it with the 30-year standard deviation. From statistical theory, we know how unusual climatological anomalies are by value:

Odds of a deviation > 1 climatological anomaly=31.7%
Odds of a deviation > 2 climatological anomalies=4.5%
Odds of a deviation > 3 climatological anomalies=0.27%
Odds of a deviation > 4 climatological anomalies=6.34/1000%
Odds of a deviation > 5 climatological anomalies=5.7/100000%
Odds of a deviation > 6 climatological anomalies=1.9/1000000%

So, if we have a 30-year history of high temperatures for a particular date, we'd expect 20 of those years to be 1-sigma years, when the temperature is plus or minus 34% of average (ten colder years, and ten warmer years.) Rare 2-sigma events occur 4.5% of the time, so we should have about 16 of these per year. Even rarer 3-sigma events occur just 0.27% of the time, or just one day per year, on average. Truly extreme 4-sigma events should only occur once every 43 years. Much of Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, Northeast Iowa, and the eastern Dakota have experienced multiple 4-sigma days over the past week.

Wunderground is computing 30-year means of the weather for each day of the year using data from the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) (NOMADS data repository). Here is a description how a reanalysis works. CFSR is notable because it is the first reanalysis to use a coupled atmosphere-ocean model. As a result, CFSR has physically consistent estimates of the conditions of the atmosphere, ocean, and land. CFSR has data from 1979 (When polar-orbiting satellites became able to estimate vertical profiles of temperature) to 2010. We can take the mean and standard deviation for each calendar day using this history, and compare it to the current forecast from the GFS model. The result is an image showing how far from average the temperatures are. Yesterday, the analysis showed that Michigan experienced temperatures that were 4 - 5 climatological anomalies warmer than average (4-sigma to 5-sigma), the type of extreme that occurs between once every 43 years and once every 4779 years. Of course, using 30 years of data to estimate extreme events with a return period of centuries is a sketchy proposition. However, keep in mind that had we used a century-long climatology instead of using the past 30 years, yesterday's warmth would have been classified as much more extreme, since the climate has warmed considerably in the past 30 years. It is highly unlikely the warmth of the current "Summer in March" heat wave could have occurred unless the climate was warming.


Figure 3. Climatological anomalies for March 20, 2012. Michigan experienced temperatures that were 4 - 5 climatological anomalies warmer than average (4-sigma to 5-sigma), the type of extreme that occurs between once every 43 years and once every 4779 years. Wunderground plans to make these plots available in real time on our web site later this year.

Heavy rains create flash flood concerns in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma
Widespread rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches have fallen over the past two days in Eastern Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, Western Arkansas, and Louisiana over the past two days, creating a serious flash flood hazard. So far, no major river flooding has been reported, and it appears the damage from this flood event will be limited. A few rainfall amounts from the event, from 7 pm CDT Sunday - 3 am CDT Wednesday, taken from the latest NWS Storm Summary:

...TEXAS...
ORANGE 9.68
WACO 6.17
FORT HOOD AAF/KILLEEN 5.43
DALLAS LOVE FIELD 4.49
NWS FORT WORTH 4.13

...OKLAHOMA...
LANGLEY 7.16
NORMAN 5.55
TULSA 4.52
MCALESTER 4.02
OKLAHOMA CITY 3.18

...LOUISIANA...
FORT POLK 6.14
SHREVEPORT 4.06
LAKE CHARLES 2.11

...ARKANSAS...
FORT SMITH 3.49
BENTONVILLE 3.09
LITTLE ROCK 2.22
FAYETTEVILLE 2.08


Jeff Masters

Hot Hot Hot (llpj04)
wait ......we are suppose to play this in the summer
Hot Hot Hot
HOT !!!!!!!! (emixam101)
5h05 PM today, the Local Weather Station in Beauceville reported 22C, (73F) ! An ALL TIME RECORD ALL MARCH MONTHS CONFUSED SINCE 1871 ! The previous record was 20.6C (69F) recorded on March 30th 1977.We also broke the daily record of 12C (54F) recorded on 1970.On local thermomethers with sun sensation, put them up to 29C (84F) ! Guys in Arizona, DON'T SEARCH THE HEAT ! IT IS IN QUEBEC AS INSANE AS I LOOKS !!!!!! I LOVE IT, KEEP THE SNOW !!! :)))P
HOT !!!!!!!!
Happy Spring! (gardner48197)
Happy First Day of Spring everyone!
Happy Spring!

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 285 - 235

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13Blog Index

Quoting Neapolitan:
It's been raining steadily in Bonita Springs for the past two hours or so. Not heavily--but steadily.


Rain went all around me today. Hopefully we can get some tomorrow.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The Macon Georgia Cherry Blossom Festival. 350,000 Yoshino cherry trees. It's something to see!
Member Since: March 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 114
283. wxmod
Quoting Xyrus2000:


Assuming you believe in conspiracy theories. There is no scientific evidence backing up your claims. And no, MODIS pictures of condensation trails do not count as scientific evidence.


You're are the one with no proof that your ideas are correct. Elevated aluminum in such ridiculous places as the glaciers of Mt Shasta, expansive so called "contrails covering thousands of square miles and just the FACT that the HAARP exists are proof. More proof is that WXmod has been going on for over 70 years and is a huge industry around the world. Just as technology didn't stop with the atom bomb, technology in WXmod moves forward. Does this idea make you upset for some reason?
Here is some more proof:

There is almost no cloud cover over about half of the land mass of the world. Please open the MODIS website and take a good look at the world.
Member Since: October 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1744
There was a segment about the Washington DC cherry blossom festival on CNN today. The blooms are peaking today and tomorrow. Over 70% have opened.

The festival runs through April 9 so it's an early peak.


I don't think the Washington DC cherry blossom festival is in danger from global warming yet.

Macon GA has a cherry blossom festival too with more than 10 x the number of cherry trees Washington DC has. The same kind, Japanese Yoshino cherry. And they are doing fine.

Quoting aspectre:
254 Neapolitan "Warmest astronomical winter on record in Washington, D.C.
Remarkably, Washington only logged 24 days when temperatures reached 32 or lower, the fewest such days on record."

D.C. reminded me of cherry blossums... which in turn reminded of cherries... which in turn reminded me that many of our nut&fruit trees require a minimum number of days near-freezing or below for the fruiting process to achieve optimal levels. Too little, and the crops become small to none.

257 drought "The hot weather is ruining the pussy willows for Buffalo's [DyngusDay] festival on April 9.

Will too few cold temperature days lead to no cherry blossum season in DC?
Which led me to search for an article about those minimums. Haven't found it yet, but did find an interesting one on Fruit Growers and a Changing Climate.
Member Since: March 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 114
Quoting StormTracker2K:
Seabreeze collision about to happen on the westside of FL.
It's been raining steadily in Bonita Springs for the past two hours or so. Not heavily--but steadily.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SPLbeater:


That low looks better then some tropical storms i know of...like 2011 DON!

Don was smaller.
Member Since: July 19, 2011 Posts: 12 Comments: 2198
Quoting drought:
Don was a tasty snack last year. Like cotton candy, just dissolved away!





or 2010 Bonnie...was a blob that instead of strengthening, went by by
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Jedkins01:



I actually do plan on buying an electric car in the future, I won't invest in a hybrid because to me there is no point in something that still uses gas.


Here's where a hybrid, a plug-in hybrid/PHEV, makes sense.

Let's suppose you have only one car in the household, your normal day's drive is ~30 miles or less, but you do take frequent longer trips.

Then you could get a PHEV, run on electricity most of the time, but still be able to stretch it out with gas when you need to go distances.

--

Aside from that, a non-electric hybrid like the Prius can get you 50MPG which is a great improvement over the average US car (25MPG). And if you drive distance every day a hybrid would make a lot of sense.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Don was a tasty snack last year. Like cotton candy, just dissolved away!



Quoting SPLbeater:


That low looks better then some tropical storms i know of...like 2011 DON!
Member Since: March 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 114
Atlanta and Athens GA broke their records for consecutive March days above 80 yesterday. However both those cities are staying in the 70s today so their streaks are over.

Not so in central GA. Columbus GA broke their record for consecutive 80+ days in March today and Macon GA tied their record.

This graphic gives the count as of early this morning so it does not include today's readings.

Member Since: March 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 114
Quoting bappit:

Teleology has no purpose here.
so your postulating that storms are random acts of nature?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Seabreeze collision about to happen on the westside of FL.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:


That low looks better then some tropical storms i know of...like 2011 DON!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31608
Quoting entrelac:
Hence the weird obsession with the old style light bulbs.


Ya know a month or so ago i destroyed some CD's, and kicked a few in a creek. Then my cameras batteries died, so I threw them in the creek as well. I use regular light bulbs, but these new CFL's are pretty fun.
Its fun to shatter them, and then go pick the pieces up.I dont feel like opening any windows, so I dont. Then we sweep it up immediately So we can throw it away.


xD
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Grothar:


Puce.


Sorry, could you please be more specific?

Puce ranges from reddish-brown to purplish-brown.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
269. wxmod
This is a photo of an ice core. Each layer in the core represents one year. You can see how much snow fell in winter or how much dust fell on the snow in summer. This core is from thousands of feet below the present surface of the ice. It is a very accurate record of what has happened on Earth.
Member Since: October 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1744
Quoting Grothar:


Hi, Grothar. Should the southern tip of that system hang below the 25th, you may get some of that rain you have been wanting. ;-)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JNCali:
Some people just haven't figured out that weather is not a random act of nature. We have storms for a reason, they are a necessary part of our global climate helping to regulate the globe's temperature (at least) right? Could you imagine if the wind just stopped? I suppose we'd turn into Mars real quick

Interesting.
I would naively postulate that we have been having "frozen weather," for want of a better term I don't know, or haven't yet invented for the last year.
1, Almost no rain.
2, Almost no winds.
3, Almost no frosts or long cold spells.
4, Almost unbroken sunshine.
5, No thunderstorms.
Result:- Drought, rivers with no water in them, very little green plant growth, reduced bird and animal activity, long periods of unusual quiet in the countryside.
Human response:- Drop in income, increase in complaining, reduced vehicle activities, reduced social activities, confusion. Bewilderment.
Member Since: January 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2066
Does anybody have any good news?
I can think of one: Texas finally got some decent rain :)
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11210
254 Neapolitan "Warmest astronomical winter on record in Washington, D.C.
Remarkably, Washington only logged 24 days when temperatures reached 32 or lower, the fewest such days on record."

D.C. reminded me of cherry blossoms... which in turn reminded of cherries... which in turn reminded me that many of our nut&fruit trees require a minimum number of days near-freezing or below for the fruiting process to achieve optimal levels. Too little, and the crops become small to none.

257 drought "The hot weather is ruining the pussy willows for Buffalo's [DyngusDay] festival on April 9.

Will too few cold temperature days lead to no cherry blossom season in DC?
Which led me to search for an article about those minimums. Haven't found it yet, but did find an interesting one on Fruit Growers and a Changing Climate.
Member Since: August 21, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 4860
Quoting oracle28:


No. Even worse, public schooled. :)

Just seems odd that man is causing the warming, but some highly populated areas are cooler than average.


The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind. ... Really, it is.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I had no idea there was a festival for pussy willows. Who knew?
Member Since: March 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 114
This is kind of interesting:

Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, reached 82 today, breaking its record for the day by 25 degrees, and breaking the all-time March high temperature record there by seven degrees. In fact, only six days in April have seen a higher record high. It's never been so warm there before April 16th, and, in fact, today was the only time Sault Ste. Marie has hit the 80-degree mark in the months from November through March.

(To give you an idea how cool that location is, consider this: the record high there on May 14 is 82, the same as today's high.)

Temperature records in Sault Ste. Marie go back to 1888.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Jedkins01:




Furthermore, there's also the citizen problem, the general American public seems to be obsessed with old and inefficient technology and anyone who recycles, lives smarter, more efficient, and less wasteful, is somehow a wacked out hippy. I'm not trying to be prejudice, but there are a lot of people down south where I live that I would imagine wouldn't exactly be on board for electric cars and other better, greener technology, regardless of if its even more powerful, and more useful. Some people would rather have a loud and smoggy gas engine over a powerful, clean and quiet electric engine. And some people would rather be comfortable with dumping electronics, batteries, toxic chemicals, plastic cups and bottles etc. rather than recycling them because being harsh and destructive is somehow regarded as more "manly" and "tough" in parts of our society...

Anyways...
Hence the weird obsession with the old style light bulbs.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JNCali:
Some people just haven't figured out that weather is not a random act of nature. We have storms for a reason, they are a necessary part of our global climate helping to regulate the globe's temperature (at least) right? Could you imagine if the wind just stopped? I suppose we'd turn into Mars real quick

Teleology has no purpose here.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Nasty storm around Petersburg VA...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Here is something you might not know. The hot weather is ruining the pussy willows for Buffalo's Pussy Willow festival on April 9.
Member Since: March 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 114
Everyone has covered the temperature records pretty well. Thought I'd toss in Bangor ME. Their old record today was 64, but today they are 82, their earliest 80 degree day on record, their hottest day in March and their warmest day until April 11.

Buffalo, NY also had their earliest 80 degree day today.

Member Since: March 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 114
Quoting Xyrus2000:


The guy who wrote it doesn't know much about physics. Trying to stop a hurricane, even with nuclear bombs, is like trying to stop a locomotive by farting in its general direction.
Some people just haven't figured out that weather is not a random act of nature. We have storms for a reason, they are a necessary part of our global climate helping to regulate the globe's temperature (at least) right? Could you imagine if the wind just stopped? I suppose we'd turn into Mars real quick
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Found this at the Washington Post in the "Capital Weather Gang" blog:

Warmest astronomical winter on record in Washington, D.C.

The winter of 2011-2012, by the astronomical definition, was the warmest on record in Washington, D.C. according to the National Weather Service. The average temperature was 45.6 degrees, nearly two degrees above the previous record holder of 1989-90, when the average temperature was 43.7 degrees. Records have been maintained since 1871.

Remarkably, Washington only logged 24 days when temperatures reached 32 or lower, the fewest such days on record.

- - -

The exceptionally warm winter follows a number of other notably warm seasons in Washington in the last two years:

* Astronomical spring in 2010 was the warmest on record

* Meteorological summer in 2010 was the hottest on record

* Astronomical summer in 2010 was the second hottest on record

* Meteorological summer in 2011 was the second hottest on record
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
240:

We've already heard about potential links between low solar activity and jet stream locking patterns and now a new link: the SSTs of the North Atlantic Ocean. I've also speculated on the effects that short-term storm tracks have on ocean currents and intrusions of both warm air and warm water into the Arctic, which occurred during the Dec 2010-Jan 2011 "winter heat wave" in western Greenland and eastern Nunavut, which persisted to allow half of Hudson Bay to be ice-free well into mid-January. Perhaps the AMO (Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation) is in itself both the cause and effect of these jet stream locking patterns, and when enough glacial ice melts from Greenland, maybe it gets cold enough to reverse the whole trend and start the cycle again. It's possible that continued global warming will dramatically alter these existing cycles. Also, consider the fact that the West Greenland/Irminger Currents helped send more warm water up toward western Greenland causing farther melting during the Late Holocene Climatic Optimum, when temperatures were about 0.5-1C warmer than today (evidence: more icebergs from West Greenland demostrated in sediment cores) - this may mean disruptions to the salinity cycle and more rapid melting of Greenland in a warmer world.
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 8 Comments: 2835
Quoting an extract from:-159. aspectre

* Food costs in developing nations and newly industrialized nations make up a far higher percentage of the cost of living for the average citizen than in the FirstWorld.

This is a very interesting subject to analyse?
If a person for example me was earning $600 a week and spending $150 a week on food with related products, I am using 25% of my income for basic survival needs.
As the incidence of work in my life has declined and I am at best now due to the depression,massive financial crisis and inability to find much work only earning about $200 a week, maximum. Out of this all my main bills have to be paid and many of them have increased, food prices have increased and diesel costs $8 a gallon.
I have got food bills down to about $80 a week by buying more basics, so the percentage of my income going on food is about 40% ( if I was not economising it would be 75% based on $150 a week.) Keep in mind I am not in the 3rd world but in Europe.
State unemployment, welfare, here is about $500, ( 426 Euros,) a month for families and we have about 25% unemployment.
With the current drought prices of all fresh foods have risen and other foods are being dragged up in price as well.
Member Since: January 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2066
Quoting oracle28:


No. Even worse, public schooled. :)

Just seems odd that man is causing the warming, but some highly populated areas are cooler than average.


There is nothing odd about it. CO2 and other greenhouse gases are well mixed. In a relatively short period of time these gases are mixed and carried to all parts of the globe. Winds and weather are very good at transporting all sorts things throughout the atmosphere.

You are also not looking at climate, you are looking a weather. Climate is long term trends, weather is short term noise. The typical climatological baseline for a quantity uses 30 years of data (at least).

Global warming refers to the increase in global average temperature. Regional climate is still dictated by the dominant weather patterns in that area. Therefore, the planet on average getting warmer does not necessarily everywhere on Earth gets warmer.

That being said, warmer average temperatures means more energy within the system and increased water vapor, which ends up destabilizing current climate/weather patterns and leads to more extreme weather conditions.

There are several good introductory texts on the subjects of climate and weather, as well as a lot of resources on the web.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Oh Marguisty, you're so wrong..



That is comical
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting weathermanwannabe:
128. wial 1:56 PM EDT on March 21, 2012

These are huge issues and I very concerned, as the Father of two children, as to what difficulties they may face (whether real-world or weather related) in the next several decades. Having Children changes your perspective on life; these issues might not affect me personally in the next 20 years in my current life of relative comfort but I can tell you, I am starting to look hard at my personal "footprint" and making changes in my life as an example for my kids..... Our next family car in the very near future is going to be electric or a hybrid regardless of what happens.



I actually do plan on buying an electric car in the future, I won't invest in a hybrid because to me there is no point in something that still uses gas. Personally, I would invest in the company Tesla, they are making electric cars that can not only contend with the performance of gasoline cars but beat them as well, granted they are expensive but not for what you are getting. Plus I hear they might team with Toyota, which could mean better and more powerful electric cars for cheaper cost.


See, I am very much for green living, I recycle as much as possible, I try not to waste, or throw away toxic objects into the trash, and hopefully if I can graduate college with a good paying job I plan on investing in personal solar and wind power for my home as well as an electric car. I do care about the environment very much, it is my home, and I love life, regardless of if its human or not. I like frogs, snakes, lizards, primates, plants, mammals, and insects alike. The world would be a ugly(and also uninhabitable) place without them.

However the difference is, I don't panic about GW, I don't let it drive me to the point where it means willing to give up human rights for green change. I'm all for government encouraging people with tax credits and other incentives for greener products. But, they seem to be overall more worried about restricting freedom rather than investing in green technology that will really work.


Furthermore, there's also the citizen problem, the general American public seems to be obsessed with old and inefficient technology and anyone who recycles, lives smarter, more efficient, and less wasteful, is somehow a wacked out hippy. I'm not trying to be prejudice, but there are a lot of people down south where I live that I would imagine wouldn't exactly be on board for electric cars and other better, greener technology, regardless of if its even more powerful, and more useful. Some people would rather have a loud and smoggy gas engine over a powerful, clean and quiet electric engine. And some people would rather be comfortable with dumping electronics, batteries, toxic chemicals, plastic cups and bottles etc. rather than recycling them because being harsh and destructive is somehow regarded as more "manly" and "tough" in parts of our society...

Anyways...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting yqt1001:
Today, I found a new perspective on how dull and plain life has become.

This guess teacher came into class today to speak about the wonders of the world of skilled trades and how your life could be much better.

It's not the topic that bugged me (although it did since I have been brainwashed to think that university = best life, but this isn't always true as I learned), it's something she said which I do not remember that reminded me that in this world your sole purpose is to provide services so other people can provide services to the people who actually control the world. Made me really want to be on the top of that chain and do something great.

I have another desire to rise from who I am now and enact change..or go power crazy (more likely). We'll see.


Provide inspiration, and the chain-link fence shall (perhaps) dissolve.



Rain to flood in Texas: the beginning of the end of the year-long South Plains drought

Courtesy Glenn Schroeder, KRMG News Talk Radio.
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 8 Comments: 2835
Quoting StormTracker2K:


Yes, most of the Gulf is 75 or higher right now.

Thanks much
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 7888
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25575
Quoting Patrap:
..hey Bob, what kinda shape charge do we use for a EF-5, the Blue or the Magenta?


Puce.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25575
Quoting Xyrus2000:


Assuming you believe in conspiracy theories. There is no scientific evidence backing up your claims. And no, MODIS pictures of condensation trails do not count as scientific evidence.
I also believe this assumption is correct.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
Quoting wxmod:


This is already being done with aluminum oxide and HAARP. No bombs required. Sometimes a lot more harm than good!


Assuming you believe in conspiracy theories. There is no scientific evidence backing up your claims. And no, MODIS pictures of condensation trails do not count as scientific evidence.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
233) Doubt it will be StL, they'll get a vet to backup Bradford.

greens and yellows getting curved west now. Maybe they'll get here sometime tonight and I'll be able to find some morels this weekend! Afraid its going to be an early & short season this year! No luck in my spot last night, but some have started finding them.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Oh Marguisty, you're so wrong..


I read that as meaning we will have
* Way above average number of storms
* SE and Texas coasts in the clear
* Highly active Caribbean
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hello Dr Jeff,
Thanks for the update and your coverage of the past week's record warmth / extreme wx pattern. As you previously stated - 'The unusual warmth is due to a loop in the jet stream that has created a large upper-level ridge of high pressure that is stuck in place over the Eastern U.S.--a phenomenon known as a "blocking pattern"'... and listed factors of La Nina, MJO and the NAO, I thought you might find the following study results interesting, warranting inclusion as being quite salient to the discussion.

This NASA-funded study posted Nov 3 2011 references the freak "Snowmageddon" / hvy snow events and cold Winter wx of previous two years, but I believe it's prudent to consider it offers evidence that our warm 2011-12 Winter, (including the recent high amplitudinal jet configuration / resultant record warmth under strong ridging anomaly), and other weather / climate change extremes over the N Hemisphere involving atmospheric blocking could well be linked to the long-term cyclical variability of the Atlantic Ocean... Widely known in general terms, but it's degree of influence and implications yet to be fully understood, only now beginning to be better resolved, certainly demands further study / scrutiny.

Here are pertinent statements from NASA's "Stalled Weather Systems More Frequent in Decades of Warmer Atlantic" worth considering -

Blocking events occur when one of the jet streams — fast-flowing air currents traveling around the Earth in the upper part of the troposphere — pinches off large masses of air from the normal wind flow for an extended period. These kinks in the jet stream typically last at least five days but can persist for weeks. They can cause weather patterns to stall over one area and fuel floods, droughts, and other extreme weather events.

In the North Atlantic, atmospheric blocking centers generally form over Greenland and Western Europe. A blocking event that took place over Greenland in the winter of 2009-10 ultimately led to intense blizzards in the East Coast of the United States, in an episode popularly known as Snowmageddon.

Now, a team of researchers lead by Sirpa Häkkinen, an oceanographer at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., has reanalyzed atmospheric data from the 20th century and concluded that blocking events occurred up to 30 percent more often from the 1930s to the 1960s and during a period that started in the late 1990s and continues to the present.

At first, the researchers thought the increase in blocking events during these periods might be explained by a climatic phenomenon called the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The NAO fluctuates between periods of high and low atmospheric pressure, without a predictable pattern, and strongly influences weather in Europe and the United States.

"The NAO is the usual suspect for all atmospheric changes in the northern hemisphere," Häkkinen said.

But since 1996, the NAO has been in an almost a neutral state, while blocking events have continued to be abnormally frequent, especially after 2000.

Häkkinen’s team then looked at how a cyclical series of natural changes in sea surface temperatures, known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Ocean Variability (AMV), was behaving in the decades when there were more clusters of blocking events. The AMV switches phases every few decades.

The researchers observed the frequency of blocked weather events in the North Atlantic – from the equator to Greenland – over the entire twentieth century and compared it to the evolution of ocean surface temperatures for the same area. They then removed the effect that global warming has on water temperatures, and found that decades with more frequent, recurring blocking events in the North Atlantic corresponded to those decades when the North Atlantic Ocean was warmer than usual, as it is now.

The team also found that these short-term weather blocking events impact beyond the atmosphere and may ultimately alter ocean currents.

A series of connected changes begin because clusters of blocking events can divert the normal track of the storms crossing the Atlantic, which in turn can alter the twisting motion that the wind has on ocean waters, or wind curl. Depending on how wind curl works, it can speed up or slow down the large, circulating currents in the ocean known as gyres. When a blocking event reverses the rotation of the wind curl, the winds push against the direction of the whirlpool-like North Atlantic subpolar gyre, slowing its rotation. A slower, weaker gyre allows subtropical waters that would normally be trapped in the whirlpool-like flow to escape and move northward.

"These warmer and more saline waters then invade the subpolar ocean and cause a series of impacts," said Peter Rhines, an oceanographer at the University of Washington, Seattle, and co-author of the new study. "They erode the base of glaciers, contributing to the melting of the Greenland ice sheet. And the change in temperature and freshness of the waters can alter subpolar ecosystems, too."


G'day!
Member Since: September 21, 2005 Posts: 94 Comments: 4788
Quoting JTDailyUpdate:
Interesting Letter to the Editor I found


Wants to neutralize storms
To the editor:

Something we've never tried is to neutralizing storms by interrupting their wind force and destructive suction.

I envision dropping a bomb into the center of a tornado or hurricane in an area which would be least destructive to the landscape and an ocean path.

I reason that depending on the force required that a bomb could interrupt the cause and effect of the wind turbulence and by such an interruption knock the power out of the turbulence.

Some of our scientists should be able to determine how much counteracting force would be required to interrupt the wind force. We, with our incalculable offsetting force, could try out the experiment in the Kansas or Nebraska plains without much damage to the terrain or better yet attempt to neutralize the force over the ocean and drop the bomb with our U.S. Air Force.

Nothing tried, nothing gained and think of the benefits if it works.

John N. Dodgen

Humboldt

Link


The guy who wrote it doesn't know much about physics. Trying to stop a hurricane, even with nuclear bombs, is like trying to stop a locomotive by farting in its general direction.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
221 help4u "Talking about climate change how about saints getting nailed for a bounty too hurt players during games!!Way too go NFL!!"

They're lucky I ain't a prosecutor with jurisdiction: they and their coaches would facing be charges of felony assault with intent to cause great bodily harm and conspiracy to commit felony assault with intent to cause great bodily harm.
And even luckier that I ain't the Queen of Hearts.
Member Since: August 21, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 4860
Quoting nigel20:

Is the warmer GOM helping to induce moisture in the system?


Yes, most of the Gulf is 75 or higher right now.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25575

Viewing: 285 - 235

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Mostly Cloudy
62 °F
Mostly Cloudy