Summer in March: more all-time March temperature records in U.S., Canada

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:53 PM GMT on March 21, 2012

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Summer in March continued for the eighth day yesterday, toppling dozens of records for hottest March day in both the U.S. and Canada. Nearly every major airport in Michigan's Lower Peninsula tied or set records for their hottest March temperature, including Detroit (82°), Flint (84°F), Saginaw (83°F), Grand Rapids (83°), Muskegon (82°), Lansing (83°), Alpena (84°), Gaylord (80°), Pellston (84°), Traverse City (86°), and Houghton Lake (81°). Most of these records will be broken again today or tomorrow. Detroit's current string of six days over 70° is unprecedented so early in the year. One has to go back over 125 years to find an early-season warm spell that compares, and even that streak occurred in April, a full month later (April 16 - 24, 1886.)

Pellston, Michigan in the Northern Lower Peninsula is called "Michigan's Icebox", since it frequently records the coldest temperatures in the state, and in the entire nation. But the past four days, Pellston has topped out at 80° - 84°F, the first 80°F March days in their history. Yesterday's 84° reading broke the previous record for the date (55° in 1976 and 1948) by an unbelievable 29°, and was 44°F above average. Nearby Traverse City hit 86°F yesterday, which was 45°F above the average high for the date, and was the fourth consecutive day with a hottest March temperature on record.


Figure 1. Summer-like temperatures this March in the Midwest have heated up Lake Michigan to record warm levels for this time of year. The average temperature of the lake is characteristic of what occurs in June. Image credit: NOAA. Thanks to wunderground member Neapolitan for posting this image in my blog comments.

Hot times in Lake Michigan
The NWS in Chicago reported yesterday that the Windy City's high of 85°F that day boosted the average temperature for the month to levels that would make March the 7th warmest April in the city's 140-year record. The unprecedented March warmth in the states surrounding Lake Michigan have heated the lake to temperatures never seen before this early in the year. Water temperatures at the South Lake Michigan buoy were 46 - 47°F yesterday (8°C), which is about 10°F above average for this time of year, and typical of early June temperatures.

Record March warmth spreads into New England
Temperatures across much of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine yesterday were the warmest on record for so early in the year. Burlington, Vermont's 80°F was 39°F above the average high for the date, and the earliest 80° reading in recorded history. Concord, New Hampshire (81°) and Bangor, Maine (78°), also had their warmest temperatures for so early in the year. The 73°F recorded in Caribou, Maine tied for that city's highest March temperature on record, and broke the record for the date by a remarkable 23°F.

Record warmth continues in Canada
Numerous all-time warmest March temperatures were recorded in Ontario, Canada yesterday, including Windsor at 27°C (previous record, 26.6°C), Sarnia (26°C, previous record 25.6°C), and London (25°C, previous record 24.8°C). High temperatures for Wednesday and Thursday across Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia are likely to break records for hottest March day for most of the major cities in these provinces, including Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, St. Johns, and Halifax.


Figure 2. The jet stream pattern features a large, southwards dipping bulge over the Western U.S., creating a trough of low pressure with cold and snow, and a large, northwards looping bulge over the Central U.S., creating a record-strength ridge of high pressure. The Western U.S. trough has cut off into a "cut-off low" that will slowly drift eastwards during the remainder of the week.

Summer in March ends by Friday
The unprecedented Summer in March conditions are due to a loop in the jet stream that has created a large upper-level ridge of high pressure that is stuck in place over the Eastern U.S. Since the jet stream acts as the boundary between cold air to the north and warm air to the south, and the large loop in the jet places its axis far to the north of the eastern U.S., summer-like warmth has developed over the eastern half of the U.S. Conversely, colder than average temperatures have developed over the western third of the U.S. behind the southwards-dipping loop of the jet stream. This jet stream pattern is too extreme to be stable, and the big loop over the Western U.S. has broken off to form a giant eddy. The resulting area of low pressure is known as a "cut-off low", because it is cut off from the jet stream. The cut-off low will drift slowly eastwards during the week, gradually bringing an end to "Summer in March" over the Eastern half of the U.S. by Friday.

How rare is this Summer in March heat event?
One measure of how record-breaking this "Summer in March" heat wave has been is the impact it had on NOAA's National Climatic Data Center web site. The extremes section of the their web site has been down since last Friday, since their software has been unable to handle both the huge number of records being set and the huge demand from people wanting to see these records. The web site came back on-line this morning with software re-engineered to handle the load, but only with data through Sunday.

We can also quantify how rare a meteorological event is by looking at statistics of past years. By averaging together at least 30 years of data to take a representative snapshot of the climate, we can generate a mean and a standard deviation of the data. The standard deviation gives a measure of how much the data fluctuates around the mean.

In comparing deviations from normal across wide regions, it helps to normalize the deviations. A temperature deviation of 3 degrees C may be not that unusual in one region, but may be very significant in another. The solution is to use climatological anomalies (which we often refer to by the Greek letter, sigma.) Calculating the climatological anomaly is a two step process. First, we calculate the difference between a quantity (i.e., temperature) and it's 30-year average value. Then we normalize the difference by dividing it with the 30-year standard deviation. From statistical theory, we know how unusual climatological anomalies are by value:

Odds of a deviation > 1 climatological anomaly=31.7%
Odds of a deviation > 2 climatological anomalies=4.5%
Odds of a deviation > 3 climatological anomalies=0.27%
Odds of a deviation > 4 climatological anomalies=6.34/1000%
Odds of a deviation > 5 climatological anomalies=5.7/100000%
Odds of a deviation > 6 climatological anomalies=1.9/1000000%

So, if we have a 30-year history of high temperatures for a particular date, we'd expect 20 of those years to be 1-sigma years, when the temperature is plus or minus 34% of average (ten colder years, and ten warmer years.) Rare 2-sigma events occur 4.5% of the time, so we should have about 16 of these per year. Even rarer 3-sigma events occur just 0.27% of the time, or just one day per year, on average. Truly extreme 4-sigma events should only occur once every 43 years. Much of Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, Northeast Iowa, and the eastern Dakota have experienced multiple 4-sigma days over the past week.

Wunderground is computing 30-year means of the weather for each day of the year using data from the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) (NOMADS data repository). Here is a description how a reanalysis works. CFSR is notable because it is the first reanalysis to use a coupled atmosphere-ocean model. As a result, CFSR has physically consistent estimates of the conditions of the atmosphere, ocean, and land. CFSR has data from 1979 (When polar-orbiting satellites became able to estimate vertical profiles of temperature) to 2010. We can take the mean and standard deviation for each calendar day using this history, and compare it to the current forecast from the GFS model. The result is an image showing how far from average the temperatures are. Yesterday, the analysis showed that Michigan experienced temperatures that were 4 - 5 climatological anomalies warmer than average (4-sigma to 5-sigma), the type of extreme that occurs between once every 43 years and once every 4779 years. Of course, using 30 years of data to estimate extreme events with a return period of centuries is a sketchy proposition. However, keep in mind that had we used a century-long climatology instead of using the past 30 years, yesterday's warmth would have been classified as much more extreme, since the climate has warmed considerably in the past 30 years. It is highly unlikely the warmth of the current "Summer in March" heat wave could have occurred unless the climate was warming.


Figure 3. Climatological anomalies for March 20, 2012. Michigan experienced temperatures that were 4 - 5 climatological anomalies warmer than average (4-sigma to 5-sigma), the type of extreme that occurs between once every 43 years and once every 4779 years. Wunderground plans to make these plots available in real time on our web site later this year.

Heavy rains create flash flood concerns in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma
Widespread rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches have fallen over the past two days in Eastern Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, Western Arkansas, and Louisiana over the past two days, creating a serious flash flood hazard. So far, no major river flooding has been reported, and it appears the damage from this flood event will be limited. A few rainfall amounts from the event, from 7 pm CDT Sunday - 3 am CDT Wednesday, taken from the latest NWS Storm Summary:

...TEXAS...
ORANGE 9.68
WACO 6.17
FORT HOOD AAF/KILLEEN 5.43
DALLAS LOVE FIELD 4.49
NWS FORT WORTH 4.13

...OKLAHOMA...
LANGLEY 7.16
NORMAN 5.55
TULSA 4.52
MCALESTER 4.02
OKLAHOMA CITY 3.18

...LOUISIANA...
FORT POLK 6.14
SHREVEPORT 4.06
LAKE CHARLES 2.11

...ARKANSAS...
FORT SMITH 3.49
BENTONVILLE 3.09
LITTLE ROCK 2.22
FAYETTEVILLE 2.08


Jeff Masters

Hot Hot Hot (llpj04)
wait ......we are suppose to play this in the summer
Hot Hot Hot
HOT !!!!!!!! (emixam101)
5h05 PM today, the Local Weather Station in Beauceville reported 22C, (73F) ! An ALL TIME RECORD ALL MARCH MONTHS CONFUSED SINCE 1871 ! The previous record was 20.6C (69F) recorded on March 30th 1977.We also broke the daily record of 12C (54F) recorded on 1970.On local thermomethers with sun sensation, put them up to 29C (84F) ! Guys in Arizona, DON'T SEARCH THE HEAT ! IT IS IN QUEBEC AS INSANE AS I LOOKS !!!!!! I LOVE IT, KEEP THE SNOW !!! :)))P
HOT !!!!!!!!
Happy Spring! (gardner48197)
Happy First Day of Spring everyone!
Happy Spring!

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Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:


The CSU folks are banking on El Nino comming by June or July,but I think it will be by the fall that El Nino will come albeit weak.


However, these guys - who have been pretty much spot on for the last 5 years, believe we're heading for neutral well into the second half of autumn.
The 2011–12 La Niña event is nearing its end, with most indicators approaching or at neutral values. Climate models surveyed by the Bureau of Meteorology suggest that the Pacific Ocean will continue to warm over the coming months, with a neutral ENSO state expected to persist at least through the second half of autumn. While La Niña is nearing its end, waters around Australia remain warmer than normal, maintaining the potential for increased rainfall over the continent.
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Rain rates and precip totals are really starting to add up in SE Mississippi (my part of the state) as well into extreme SE Louisiana. Flooding concerns will only grow throughout the night as more rain develops on areas that have seen anywhere from 3-8 inches already. We also have that newly published tornado watch.

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Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:


The CSU folks are banking on El Nino comming by June or July,but I think it will be by the fall that El Nino will come albeit weak.

I think so too, but JMO
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 7877
Quoting KoritheMan:
El Nino may very well develop (history certainly dictates that it should). I vividly recall the abrupt and rapid transition from neutral to El Nino during the summer of 2006, which significantly hindered Atlantic hurricane activity. Despite all of my doubts and reasoning that we will not see El Nino appreciably affect this year's hurricane season, there is that particular bit to remember...
I think a weak El nino will form.I've always said that from the beginning
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Magnitude 4.4 - CRETE, GREECE
2012 March 22 00:38:13 UTC



Earthquake Details

This event has been reviewed by a seismologist.

Magnitude 4.4

Date-Time
Thursday, March 22, 2012 at 00:38:13 UTC
Thursday, March 22, 2012 at 02:38:13 AM at epicenter
Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones
Location
35.571 N, 26.069 E
Depth
20.8 km (12.9 miles)
Region
CRETE, GREECE
Distances
89 km (55 miles) ENE of Iraklion, Crete, Greece
181 km (112 miles) SSE of Naxos, Cyclades Islands, Greece
186 km (115 miles) E of Chania, Crete, Greece
339 km (210 miles) SE of ATHENS, Greece
Location Uncertainty
horizontal /- 20 km (12.4 miles); depth /- 11.3 km (7.0 miles)
Parameters
NST= 44, Nph= 44, Dmin=99.1 km, Rmss=1.41 sec, Gp=112,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=6
Source
Magnitude: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
Location: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
Event ID
usc0008n0c
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127636
El Nino may very well develop (history certainly dictates that it should). I vividly recall the abrupt and rapid transition from neutral to El Nino during the summer of 2006, which significantly hindered Atlantic hurricane activity. Despite all of my doubts and reasoning that we will not see El Nino appreciably affect this year's hurricane season, there is that particular bit to remember...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


Magnitude 4.6 - SOUTHERN GREECE
2012 March 20 23:51:07 UTC


Earthquake Details

This event has been reviewed by a seismologist.

Magnitude 4.6

Date-Time
Tuesday, March 20, 2012 at 23:51:07 UTC
Wednesday, March 21, 2012 at 01:51:07 AM at epicenter
Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones
Location
36.022°N, 24.468°E
Depth
60.8 km (37.8 miles)
Region
SOUTHERN GREECE
Distances
69 km (42 miles) NE of Chania, Crete, Greece
97 km (60 miles) NW of Iraklion, Crete, Greece
145 km (90 miles) SW of Naxos, Cyclades Islands, Greece
227 km (141 miles) SSE of ATHENS, Greece
Location Uncertainty
horizontal +/- 20.7 km (12.9 miles); depth +/- 7.4 km (4.6 miles)
Parameters
NST= 79, Nph= 81, Dmin=261.6 km, Rmss=1.22 sec, Gp=133°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=7
Source
Magnitude: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
Location: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
Event ID
usc0008mfq
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127636
Quoting nigel20:
Almost look like a candy cane
Yes..And its moved about 3 feet in 4 days.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20536
Quoting Neapolitan:
I've always loved the closing paragraph of that lovely piece:
'
"The events that have lead to this wild weather are reversing, and for this large area of the U.S., this will be the wildest year, between winter snow, summer heat and the hurricane season, that I will ever see in my lifetime."

Yes. Except for 2011. And 2012...


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Quoting WxGeekVA:
What it's like logging into Wunderground during off-season:



Hint: I'm not on the elevator.
That's just to damn funny!!
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Quoting wxmod:


Do you have some problem with looking objectively at satellite imagery and comparing it with imagery readily available on the NASA website? There's no conspiracy in my observing. This is what it is. You're sounding a little like a fanatic religious person, unable to see what you're not allowed to.


Not at all. I am just careful around you because, well, you've postulated many conspiracies.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I think that we would have seen more of a negative SOI than it currently is if we are to get an El Niño this fall. I think we'll probably reach a warm Neutral state, and maybe eclipse El Niño very briefly, but it will not stay and definitely not continue on to the moderate phase like some are saying.


The CSU folks are banking on El Nino comming by June or July,but I think it will be by the fall that El Nino will come albeit weak.
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14062
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I think that we would have seen more of a negative SOI than it currently is if we are to get an El Niño this fall. I think we'll probably reach a warm Neutral state, and maybe eclipse El Niño very briefly, but it will not stay and definitely not continue on to the moderate phase like some are saying.


We'll see. The CSU team seems to think El Nino will be significant enough to tone down this hurricane season. Also, anytime the Euro is forecasting a full blown El Nino or a full blown anything, it's wise to listen.
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Quoting wxmod:


Do you have some problem with looking objectively at satellite imagery and comparing it with imagery readily available on the NASA website? There's no conspiracy in my observing. This is what it is. You're sounding a little like a fanatic religious person, unable to see what you're not allowed to.
Alright I'm going to ask you to stop this. Your observations are not fact. I'm looking at a picture with clouds and that is all. Until you can provide factual evidence with a source other than your own I will not consider your post valid.
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We need to have troll drills, you know to get in shape
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Hint: I'm not on the elevator.

Was the stairs dark ?
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127636


coming march 23
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North Carolina
------------------------------------------------- --
1925 UNK 2 SE STOKES PITT NC 3569 7723

EMERGENCY MANAGER REPORTED POWERLINES DOWN. DAMAGE TO A CARPORT AND BARN.
------------------------------------------------- -
High wind report
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
What it's like logging into Wunderground during off-season:



Hint: I'm not on the elevator.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
466. wxmod
Quoting KoritheMan:


A tacit conspiracy is still a conspiracy. Right?


Do you have some problem with looking objectively at satellite imagery and comparing it with imagery readily available on the NASA website? There's no conspiracy in my observing. This is what it is. You're sounding a little like a fanatic religious person, unable to see what you're not allowed to.
Member Since: October 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1741
North Carolina
------------------------------------------------- --
1500 WENONA WASHINGTON NC 3573 7663

A VERY WEAK AND BRIEF TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN NEAR WENONA THIS MORNING. THE TORNADO WAS SPOTTED IN AN OPEN FIELD AND DID NO DAMAGE.
------------------------------------------------- -
EF0
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting Xyrus2000:


My cherry tree in the backyard is blooming (multiple flowers), and will probably reach full bloom in the near future. I'm about 30 minutes northeast of DC.
Well it's not the fastest the trees have bloomed around here.1991 is still the earliest that the Cherry Blossom have bloomed.
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Quoting MississippiWx:


Just part of the stair-stepping process. You can see how it crashed from the 30 range down to 0, only to go up again. However, for everyone step it climbs back up, it seems it takes two steps down.

I think that we would have seen more of a negative SOI than it currently is if we are to get an El Niño this fall. I think we'll probably reach a warm Neutral state, and maybe eclipse El Niño very briefly, but it will not stay and definitely not continue on to the moderate phase like some are saying.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31537
Lots lightning flashing with these storms on the westside of FL. Big time seabreeze collision occured about 2 hours ago there.

Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
Quoting Chucktown:
Nice read explaining the recent record warmth for those who (like myself) don't believe it's being caused by some sort of climate change.

Link


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Quoting KoritheMan:


Yeah well, if it's any consolation, all the bad weather seems to either miss me, or I inadvertently miss it when it doesn't. Like today.
Today was cloudy and sunny.I'm glad to have rain around these parts since it keeps the pollen down.
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Im tired.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 7877
Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:
Not so fast for El Nino to show up as the SOI continues to rise,tonight at positive 6.9.



Just part of the stair-stepping process. You can see how it crashed from the 30 range down to 0, only to go up again. However, for everyone step it climbs back up, it seems it takes two steps down.
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GOM Sea Height Anomaly




Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127636
Quoting wxmod:
The heart of the storm in gulf today and what appears to be the straight line path of a ship along side it. This "ship trail" as NASA calls them, is about ten miles wide.
MODIS satellite photo


A tacit conspiracy is still a conspiracy. Right?
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Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:
Not so fast for El Nino to show up as the SOI continues to rise,tonight at positive 6.9.


For an el nino to occur we would need a prolong period of negative SOI, so the longer SOI remains postive the more difficult it will be to have an el nino any time soon
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 7877
453. wxmod
The heart of the storm in gulf today and what appears to be the straight line path of a ship along side it. This "ship trail" as NASA calls them, is about ten miles wide.
MODIS satellite photo
Member Since: October 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1741
Jax82 Only 71 more days til Hurricane season 2012 begins! Here's a list of this seasons names...
380 TomTaylor "hmm, not really diggin these names. lol . Beryl? Kirk? Leslie? Nadine? Sandy? Valerie? Maybe it's just me but these names just don't sound worthy enough..."

Member Since: August 21, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 4860
Nice read explaining the recent record warmth for those who (like myself) don't believe it's being caused by some sort of climate change.

Link
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Not so fast for El Nino to show up as the SOI continues to rise,tonight at positive 6.9.

Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14062
Quoting aspectre:
254 Neapolitan "Warmest astronomical winter on record in Washington, D.C.
Remarkably, Washington only logged 24 days when temperatures reached 32 or lower, the fewest such days on record."

D.C. reminded me of cherry blossoms... which in turn reminded of cherries... which in turn reminded me that many of our nut&fruit trees require a minimum number of days near-freezing or below for the fruiting process to achieve optimal levels. Too little, and the crops become small to none.

257 drought "The hot weather is ruining the pussy willows for Buffalo's [DyngusDay] festival on April 9.

Will too few cold temperature days lead to no cherry blossom season in DC?
Which led me to search for an article about those minimums. Haven't found it yet, but did find an interesting one on Fruit Growers and a Changing Climate.


My cherry tree in the backyard is blooming (multiple flowers), and will probably reach full bloom in the near future. I'm about 30 minutes northeast of DC.
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Quoting weatherh98:


Pacific plate bein subducted under the continents which are moving over it

That's what I was wondering...if subduction zones had anything do do with the frequent activity
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 7877
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Tectonic plates.

Yeah, I know that, but is it because there are more subduction zone plates or something else?
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 7877
Quoting dogsgomoo:
Hurricane Kirk eh?

"Increase warp speed to Cat-2 captain!"

That's the best I can do and even I know it's abysmal.


Cleverbot says Kirk will be a bad storm this year...
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Hurricane Kirk eh?

"Increase warp speed to Cat-2 captain!"

That's the best I can do and even I know it's abysmal.
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Quoting Xandra:

According to Bastardi, two years ago, U.S has reached its peak in major extreme weather ;)

Hurricanes, Global Warming or Cooling: The Weather Year of a Lifetime

by Joe Bastardi on June 29, 2010


...This past winter, now this summer and this hurricane season... well, I will never get a chance at hitting such major extreme weather events in the U.S. again. I don't plan on dying anytime soon; it's just that as far as the overall pattern recognition skills I use to come up with my ideas go, they will never line up like this again.

I realize there may have been individual events that outstrip individual events of this past year: bigger hurricanes, higher record highs, lower record lows, a snowstorm that might be bigger for a place, etc. But in terms of the frequency of headline-grabbing weather, it won't happen again in my lifetime. Here I am with 35 years of experience with the weather (45-50 if you count all the schooling my dad gave me with his insight when I was younger) that has reached its peak...


I've always loved the closing paragraph of that lovely piece:
'
"The events that have lead to this wild weather are reversing, and for this large area of the U.S., this will be the wildest year, between winter snow, summer heat and the hurricane season, that I will ever see in my lifetime."

Yes. Except for 2011. And 2012...
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Quoting weatherh98:


That would be a smart storm

Definitely
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 7877
Quoting weatherh98:


It kind of looks like a.... Dare I say it HOT TOWER:P

It is a weird system, had a tornado warning at school today and I noticed it like 20 minutes before they made us go in the hall... I kept telling my teacher we were under one and she was like, yea in soviet Russia...



Quoting Grothar:


If your teacher still thinks Russia is Soviet, I would change schools fast.


Quoting yqt1001:


In soviet russia meme references you!

Nah, I actually had a teacher say OVER9000(!!!!!) once. Best teacher ever though.



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Quoting Neapolitan:
Even as the current historic heat wave starts to fade, more unseasonable warmth is on tap for next week

hot

I guess you guys will have an extended summer
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 7877
Quoting nigel20:

Though this was a minor quake, but why do you think the "Ring of Fire" is so active earthquake and volcano wise?


Pacific plate bein subducted under the continents which are moving over it
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Quoting Xandra:

According to Bastardi, two years ago, U.S has reached its peak in major extreme weather ;)

Hurricanes, Global Warming or Cooling: The Weather Year of a Lifetime

by Joe Bastardi on June 29, 2010


...This past winter, now this summer and this hurricane season... well, I will never get a chance at hitting such major extreme weather events in the U.S. again. I don't plan on dying anytime soon; it's just that as far as the overall pattern recognition skills I use to come up with my ideas go, they will never line up like this again.

I realize there may have been individual events that outstrip individual events of this past year: bigger hurricanes, higher record highs, lower record lows, a snowstorm that might be bigger for a place, etc. But in terms of the frequency of headline-grabbing weather, it won't happen again in my lifetime. Here I am with 35 years of experience with the weather (45-50 if you count all the schooling my dad gave me with his insight when I was younger) that has reached its peak...



LOL. What was last year to him then?
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31537
Quoting washingtonian115:
K-man always sneekly gets on when I'm not on.


Yeah well, if it's any consolation, all the bad weather seems to either miss me, or I inadvertently miss it when it doesn't. Like today.
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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
You should hear the crap that is being said in my gov/econ class. Almost every conversation has the United States trying to destroy China. My favorite line was we replaced the term slavery with "Mandatory Teamwork".
We are working our way up in time we are still back about 40 years in Asia we will get to china I'm sure hahahah, my teacher relates everything to gold. I guess she's kind of right because gold makes the world go round but it get aggervating about what each country does with gold
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K-man always sneekly gets on when I'm not on.
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Quoting nigel20:

Though this was a minor quake, but why do you think the "Ring of Fire" is so active earthquake and volcano wise?
Tectonic plates.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.