Torrential rains in Oklahoma; Summer in March continues for Midwest

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:07 PM GMT on March 20, 2012

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A significant flood event is underway in Eastern Oklahoma, where widespread rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches have fallen since yesterday. Up to four more inches of rain is likely today, and the National Weather Service in Tulsa is warning of the potential for "widespread and potentially catastrophic areal flooding and river flooding" should some of the higher rainfall amounts being forecast materialize. Numerous main-stem rivers across eastern Oklahoma and northwest Arkansas are now approaching flood stage, and will likely experience moderate to major flooding into Wednesday. Rainfall has also been heavy over Eastern Texas, with widespread amounts of 2 - 4 inches. These heavy rains are causing some street flooding, but in general, will be a benefit, as moderate to severe drought conditions still cover most of the region.


Figure 1. Radar-estimated rainfall for Eastern Oklahoma since March 19, 2012, as estimated by the Tulsa, Oklahoma radar.

The storm system responsible is a massive, slow-moving trough of low pressure over the Western U.S. that is colliding with the warmest and moistest air mass ever recorded in March in the Central and Eastern U.S. According to the NWS in Minneapolis, Minnesota, moisture flowing northwards into Minnesota along the cold front early this week had the highest levels of moisture ever recorded so early in the year. At the boundary between the Western U.S. trough of low pressure and Central U.S. ridge of high pressure, a cold front is lifting huge quantities of moisture-laden air aloft, forcing torrential rains to fall. The cold front is also expected to trigger a Slight Risk of severe weather over East Texas, Western Louisiana, and Southern Arkansas today, says NOAA's Storm Prediction Center. Severe thunderstorm watches are already posted for much of East Texas, as seen on our Severe Weather Map. Three tornadoes were reported yesterday in Texas, and eleven touched down the previous day in Oklahoma, Nebraska, and South Dakota. The tornado that hit North Platte, Nebraska two days ago was rated a strong EF-3, and injured four people.


Figure 2. Predicted rainfall amounts for the 2-day period Tuesday morning through Thursday morning show an area of 3+ inches (orange colors) is expected over Eastern Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Southwest Missouri. Image credit: NOAA HPC.

Summer in March continues for the Midwest
The ongoing March heat wave in the Midwest will continue to set all-time heat records through Thursday, gradually shifting its peak intensity eastwards during the week. A few highlights from yesterday's records:

Pellston, Michigan in the Northern Lower Peninsula is called "Michigan's Icebox", since it frequently records the coldest temperatures in the state, and in the entire nation. But the past three days, Pellston has topped out at 80° - 82°F, the first 80°F March days in their history. Yesterday's 82° reading broke the previous record for the date (56° in 1976) by an amazing 26°, and was 44°F above average. Nearby Traverse City hit 83°F yesterday, the third consecutive day the city has experienced its hottest March temperature on record.

International Falls, Minnesota hit 78°F yesterday, 42° above average, and the 2nd hottest March temperature on record in the Nation's Icebox. The record of 79°F was set the previous day. Remarkably, the low temperature for International Falls bottomed out at 60°F yesterday, tying the previous record high for the date. I've never seen a station with a century-long data record have its low temperature for the date match the previous record high for the date. Yesterday was the seventh consecutive day that International Falls broke or tied a daily record. That is spectacularly hard to do for a station with a century-long weather record. The longest string of consecutive records being broken I'm aware of is nine days in a row, set June 2 - 10, 1911 in Tulsa, Oklahoma (with weather records going back to 1905.) International Falls has a good chance of surpassing nine consecutive records this week.

Record heat in Canada
Record-breaking heat has also penetrated into the Prairie provinces of Canada over the past week. Winnipeg, Manitoba has broken its record high for the past five days in a row, and hit 24°C (75.2°F) yesterday, its hottest March temperature on record. Forecast high temperatures for Wednesday and Thursday across Ontario are near 26°C, which will threaten the records for hottest March day in history for Windsor, London, Hamilton, and Toronto.


Figure 3. The jet stream pattern features a large, southwards dipping bulge over the Western U.S., creating a trough of low pressure with cold and snow, and a large, northwards looping bulge over the Central U.S., creating a record-strength ridge of high pressure.

Why the record early-season warmth?
The unusual warmth is due to a loop in the jet stream that has created a large upper-level ridge of high pressure that is stuck in place over the Eastern U.S.--a phenomenon known as a "blocking pattern." Since the jet stream acts as the boundary between cold air to the north and warm air to the south, and the large loop in the jet places its axis far to the north of the eastern U.S., summer-like warmth has developed over the eastern half of the U.S. Conversely, colder than average temperatures have developed over the western third of the U.S. behind the southwards-dipping loop of the jet stream. This jet stream pattern is too extreme to be stable, and the big loop over the Western U.S. will break off and form a giant eddy on Wednesday. The resulting area of low pressure will be known as a "cut-off low", because it will be cut off from the jet stream. The cut-off low will drift slowly eastwards during the week, gradually bringing an end to "Summer in March" over the Eastern half of the U.S.

Jeff Masters

Lake Fog After T-storm (spacey84)
Lake Fog After T-storm
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Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129093
235. Skyepony (Mod)
This article has the scary sea ice graph too... An eminent UK engineer is suggesting building cloud-whitening towers in the Faroe Islands as a "technical fix" for warming across the Arctic...instead of the going with the idea of cloud-whitening from ships.
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Quoting SteveDa1:


What bothers me is that every plant and bird around here thinks its mid-spring. It can still easily reach -10C(14F), though where I am. Birds are chirping, all deciduous trees are budding, flowers that usually come out in late April or early May are poking through the earth.

Overnight lows of -20C or -4F are still very possible in northern Ontario and in north-western Quebec (the north-western part of the southern-half of the province for those of you unfamiliar to the region) where its also been unbelievably mild.

Eh, they'll probably be alright...

i saw a robin today at lunch on the ninth floor on the balconey rail
robins dont show up here till mid april or ater depending on snow cover
which of coarse there is none we have same thing here with the plants and bugs
everything comes early as for the bugs if we get a cold snap that will kill off the normal seasonal population
as i believe once out
there will be nothing else
if everything hatches then gets killed off by a sudden cold snap
trees and such will be ok as long as its not a deep prolonged freeze they will just slow the growth
as for the birds be ok as long as they dont start laying eggs to be frozen in a cold snap that would be bad but they will lay another set iam sure if first don't make it
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Okay, got it. The NCDC station database is down at the moment, so I can't look up the Pellston (KPLN) data. But not so far away from there, International Falls, Minnesota--which has a period of record more than 100 years long--beat a daily record by 22 degrees on March 17, 18 degrees yesterday, and 13 degrees on both the 16th and the 18th.


Wow that's incredible.
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232. Skyepony (Mod)
Another thought on the earthquake pattern.. doesn't that have something to do with Spring & Fall Equinox?


Check out this yearly minimum Ice Graph from University of Washington.

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Quoting atl134:


Well okay I meant stations that have extensive historical records, and I only pay attention to so much so I know I've missed or forgotten others others. What Michigan station is it and how long is its history?
Okay, got it. The NCDC station database is down at the moment, so I can't look up the Pellston (KPLN) data. But not so far away from there, International Falls, Minnesota--which has a period of record more than 100 years long--beat a daily record by 22 degrees on March 17, 18 degrees yesterday, and 13 degrees on both the 16th and the 18th.
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Good evening. Another 80 degree day up here today! Should easily reach 80 tomorrow and try for (though likely fall just short of) 90 on Thursday. Smashing records every day :)
Happy first day of Spring.
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March 19, 2012
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8324
Quoting RitaEvac:
All you folks up north are gonna burn up and perish, while us in the south will be.....just fine


What bothers me is that every plant and bird around here thinks its mid-spring. It can still easily reach -10C(14F), though, where I am. Birds are chirping, all deciduous trees are budding, flowers that usually come out in late April or early May are poking through the earth.

Overnight lows of -20C or -4F are still very possible in northern Ontario and in north-western Quebec (the north-western part of the southern-half of the province for those of you unfamiliar to the region) where its also been unbelievably mild.

Eh, they'll probably be alright...
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March 19, 2011
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8324
The rain started here in Louisiana (about halfway up the west side midpoint) at about 12:45. The news just said we've had between five to ten inches so far in my town. The storm has pretty much stalled over us. It's been pouring since it started. We were in the same severe drought as Texas, but now we're flooding very badly. Trees are coming down as the roots are being soaked and with high winds, they're falling left and right. Roads are all being closed as so many are now under water. The sheriff's department has declared the schools closed for tomorrow due to the flooding. We're supposed to get alot more rain as it's not supposed to stop until after tomorrow. So far we're the only Parish (county in any other state) to be closed, but I think by tomorrow morning more will be closed. My family and I are staying home, listening to the rain and thunder, and staying safe. Maybe a family game night tonight.
Member Since: August 22, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 3160
Quoting Jedkins01:



In general the column of air in Florida is going to be much warmer higher up in the cloud growth region than many areas further north. That being said radar beams tilt upward, and we know that ice shows a lot stronger reflectivity than liquid water. That is why we get less hail here generally speaking.

Furthermore, in a more tropical environment, because of less ice, there ends up being a greater volume of water overall that is actually hitting the ground, so the radar misses some of this action.


Therefore, a a convective cloud in a column of relatively warm air has the potential to drop a lot greater volume of water then a cloud with more ice in it, even though the radar might think the cloud with more ice has heavier precip.


Ice actually is less reflective than water. The reason bright-banding occurs is because of melting ice, that is, water coating ice, which acts similar to a much larger raindrop and is reflected back much more than straight water or ice.

Tropical rainfall rates have less to do with the ice and more to do with the sub-freezing level collision-coalescence (warm rain) processes that can occur in very moist environments. Sometimes in these heavy showers/storms dominated by the warm rain process and not the Burgeron process, most raindrops will form below the radar beam and not be detected. There may also be a larger proportion of smaller drops - yet similar volume of water - and radar will show a lower reflectivity.
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Also that cell in Caswell co. NC might need a re-issue depending on if it quits training.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Looks like the rain is trying to make a come back for Houston!
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Quoting CycloneUK:


I have no quarrel with the science that the earths axis shifts after Earthquakes, but it is claiming that the earths axis shift actually causes the Earthquakes and making predictions about when the next one will strike, with no basis, is sensastionalist nonsense.
But fun sensationalist nonsense....

BTW, it's hotter in Chicago right now than in Nassau, which is currently at 81..... lol... typical summer setup.... in March!

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March 19, 2012
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8324
That cell west of Farmville VA might need a warning if its current trend continues...VIL reflecting 45 kg/m^2 with it.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
March 19, 2011
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8324
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Sheared cells over Houston/Galveston

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Quoting Jedkins01:



Be warned that the radar estimates are way off, Waco had around 5 to 6.5 inches of rain which is a very large amount but the radar says they had 12-15, not even close.

Like I've said before, after frequently scrutinizing radar estimates frequently Ive found that they are often off by a substantial amount and sometimes way off. Not to say they estimates are always wrong but it seems they are wrong more often then not, either overestimated or underestimated.


Hopefully the dual-pole upgrade will help take care of that issue.


Although I noticed that local channel rain estimates are often that much worse than NWS radar. I can remember many times watching the local weather and it would bug me when a less experienced person would only show estimates over the Tampa Bay area instead of actual totals because for whatever reason radar seems to very frequently undershoot rainfall amounts here.

It would be something ridiculous like "Tampa and Clearwater area got a around an inch" while in reality actual rain gauges recorded a bit above 3 inches.



I'm wondering if it has to do with each radar site, like I noticed that each radar site in Florida will show sometimes a lot different totals for the same areas, it seems like some radar sites do better while others undershoot or overshoot for whatever reason.


Bright-banding appears to be the culprit. You can see the characteristic ring around the radar at a similar height ARL. Isn't there a closer radar to Waco?
For our best-estimate rainfall estimates, the NWS river forecast centers use a multisensor approach, which ties rain gauges, radar estimates, satellite estimates, and forecaster experience together to improve the estimate. Radar rainfall is expected to improve with dual-pol but will still just be a remote-sensed estimate and will be prone to errors especially at distance. There are 3 main radar-rainfall relationships used based upon empirical data, and the assumption is that situations will fall into those categories. Each provides a substantially different estimate for rainfall at high reflectivities.

Typically, there is higher error with using only one of those methods which is why tying them all together is the method used.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Did you mean just in Vermont? Because there was one broken in Michigan today by 28 degrees (if not more).


Well okay I meant stations that have extensive historical records, and I only pay attention to so much so I know I've missed or forgotten others others. What Michigan station is it and how long is its history?
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SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING
NCC069-183-202245-
/O.NEW.KRAH.SV.W.0019.120320T2158Z-120320T2245Z/

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE RALEIGH NC
558 PM EDT TUE MAR 20 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN RALEIGH HAS ISSUED A

* SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING FOR...
SOUTH CENTRAL FRANKLIN COUNTY IN CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA
EAST CENTRAL WAKE COUNTY IN CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA

* UNTIL 645 PM EDT

* AT 556 PM EDT...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM 6 MILES WEST OF BUNN...OR 11 MILES SOUTH OF LOUISBURG...MOVING SOUTHWEST AT 10 MPH. QUARTER SIZED HAIL AND WINDS IN EXCESS OF 58 MPH ARE LIKELY WITH THIS STORM.

* LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE...
ROLESVILLE...

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

STRAIGHT LINE WINDS CAN BLOW DOWN TREES...POWER LINES...AND DAMAGE MOBILE HOMES AND OTHER BUILDINGS. SEEK SHELTER IN A STURDY STRUCTURE UNTIL THE STORM HAS PASSED. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS AS FLYING DEBRIS GENERATED BY DAMAGING WINDS CAN BE DEADLY.

PLEASE REPORT SEVERE WEATHER TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BY CALLING...1...8 7 7...6 3 3...6 7 7 2 OR NOTIFY YOUR LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

&&

LAT...LON 3594 7818 3580 7835 3572 7846 3584 7861
3604 7834
TIME...MOT...LOC 2159Z 038DEG 10KT 3593 7836

$$

VINCENT
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Study Reveals Disturbing Human Behavior During Tornadoes

Last May's tornado in Joplin, Missouri was one of the most devastating in U-S history. It killed 159 people and injured more than 1,000. In a study, the National Weather Service discovered something very disturbing about how people react to tornado warnings. It's behavior that could prove deadly here as well.

Posted: 6:00 PM Mar 19, 2012
Reporter: John Stofflet
Email Address: jstofflet@nbc15.com

Posted Monday, March 19, 2012--6:00 p.m.

A National Weather Service study shows most people in Joplin, Missouri did not take shelter immediately when they found out a tornado was headed toward them. That tornado last May killed 159 people and injured more than 1,000.

It's something Wisconsin Emergency Management officials are concerned could also prove deadly here this tornado season. Tod Pritchard with Wisconsin Emergency Management says, "We're really focusing on three words here--.Listen, Act, and Live."

The National Weather Service study shows the people of Joplin were warned about the massive tornado heading their way, but many didn't head straight for shelter. Pritchard says, "We can have all the systems in the world, but if you don't listen, and you don't act, you're in danger. A lot of people, when they heard the first warning, they didn't take action."

For example, the study shows people heard a tornado siren, and then spent time double-checking the warnings by watching t.v. , calling a friend, even looking on Facebook. "They had to get a second confirmation, or a third or a fourth...up to nine confirmations in some cases. Those critical seconds ticking by were very costly. A lot of people lost their lives in spending too much time doing that."

Emergency Management officials in Joplin say one couple heard tornado sirens, heard a warning on the radio, but went to a restaurant anyway. There was a "Closed" sign posted because of the approaching storm. They still didn't seek shelter, but went to another restaurant. The tornado hit that restaurant, and they only survived because the restaurant manager got them safely into a walk- in freezer right before it hit.

Using lessons learned from examples like that in Joplin, Wisconsin Emergency Management wants to remind you of the three words that could save countless lives here this tornado season--Listen, Act, and Live.

"We want people to take action. When you hear David George talking about how severe this storm is, or that there's been a tornado sighted, don't just spend the next five or ten minutes trying to confirm information that you already know....take action. Listen to those warning signs. Do something. Find the safest shelter you can. You're going to have a much better chance of survival, if you do those three things."

For lifesaving tornado safety advice for you and your family, go to http://readywisconsin.wi.gov/


Not particularly surprising considering the percentage of tornado warnings that verify let alone the portion of the warnings that verify. This isn't necessarily the NWS's fault though... we get skewered when we miss events, right then and there. We overwarn, the consequences are not as obvious and take time to emerge. It's a game of short-term results at the expense of long-term confidence.

Until the people the NWS serves collectively understand the inherent uncertainty and agree that some weaker tornadoes will, and should be, missed so that tornado warnings mean business, it is unlikely we will see major changes.
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Quoting atl134:
Burlington, VT has decimated its record high getting to 80 today (previous record 70). I don't think I've ever seen a record broken by 10 degrees before.
Did you mean just in Vermont? Because there was one broken in Michigan today by 28 degrees (if not more).
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All you folks up north are gonna burn up and perish, while us in the south will be.....just fine
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Burlington, VT has decimated its record high getting to 80 today (previous record 70). I don't think I've ever seen a record broken by 10 degrees before.
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Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8324
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
ULL CUTOFF
MARK
33.66N/99.99W


That seems to be turning into a pronounced anticlockwise rotation over Northern Texas.
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Interesting TAwx13
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8324
ULL CUTOFF
MARK
33.66N/99.99W
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203. Skyepony (Mod)
I see we got the expected earthshaking. Excessive length of day had kind of settled. We certainly aren't in the same spot we were last time this year. Will be interesting to see if today's quake massed with our time & space..



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Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:


Yes,is like a sneak preview or first salvo as the December forecast was the last one by them because of not a good skill forecast.

Definitely
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8324
Study Reveals Disturbing Human Behavior During Tornadoes

Last May's tornado in Joplin, Missouri was one of the most devastating in U-S history. It killed 159 people and injured more than 1,000. In a study, the National Weather Service discovered something very disturbing about how people react to tornado warnings. It's behavior that could prove deadly here as well.

Posted: 6:00 PM Mar 19, 2012
Reporter: John Stofflet
Email Address: jstofflet@nbc15.com

Posted Monday, March 19, 2012--6:00 p.m.

A National Weather Service study shows most people in Joplin, Missouri did not take shelter immediately when they found out a tornado was headed toward them. That tornado last May killed 159 people and injured more than 1,000.

It's something Wisconsin Emergency Management officials are concerned could also prove deadly here this tornado season. Tod Pritchard with Wisconsin Emergency Management says, "We're really focusing on three words here--.Listen, Act, and Live."

The National Weather Service study shows the people of Joplin were warned about the massive tornado heading their way, but many didn't head straight for shelter. Pritchard says, "We can have all the systems in the world, but if you don't listen, and you don't act, you're in danger. A lot of people, when they heard the first warning, they didn't take action."

For example, the study shows people heard a tornado siren, and then spent time double-checking the warnings by watching t.v. , calling a friend, even looking on Facebook. "They had to get a second confirmation, or a third or a fourth...up to nine confirmations in some cases. Those critical seconds ticking by were very costly. A lot of people lost their lives in spending too much time doing that."

Emergency Management officials in Joplin say one couple heard tornado sirens, heard a warning on the radio, but went to a restaurant anyway. There was a "Closed" sign posted because of the approaching storm. They still didn't seek shelter, but went to another restaurant. The tornado hit that restaurant, and they only survived because the restaurant manager got them safely into a walk- in freezer right before it hit.

Using lessons learned from examples like that in Joplin, Wisconsin Emergency Management wants to remind you of the three words that could save countless lives here this tornado season--Listen, Act, and Live.

"We want people to take action. When you hear David George talking about how severe this storm is, or that there's been a tornado sighted, don't just spend the next five or ten minutes trying to confirm information that you already know....take action. Listen to those warning signs. Do something. Find the safest shelter you can. You're going to have a much better chance of survival, if you do those three things."

For lifesaving tornado safety advice for you and your family, go to http://readywisconsin.wi.gov/
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Winds switching back towards easterly direction, temp and dewpoint climbing slowly back up
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Quoting nigel20:

That should be interesting


Yes,is like a sneak preview or first salvo as the December forecast was the last one by them because of not a good skill forecast.
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Quoting CycloneUK:


I have no quarrel with the science that the earths axis shifts after Earthquakes, but it is claiming that the earths axis shift actually causes the Earthquakes and making predictions about when the next one will strike, with no basis, is sensastionalist nonsense.


It may be, and it could be a very huge coincidence, but quite curious ever since the 2010 Chile earthquake, there has been a major quake every 180-185 days. Science is never complete - so simply the answer is 'we don't know'.
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Quoting Thrawst:
Meh, 78 degrees and sunny in Nassau weather... perfect weather. my tennis tournament starts today. wish me luck!
Hey, dude.... was about to say I wonder how long this great weather will last.... lol

All the best with the tennis... u got great wx for it.
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Quoting Patrap:


You may want to read your Local NWS current Discussion


Uh oh the kid on the polar express is out of the bag
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Quoting nigel20:

I think the axis of the earth was shifted +10cm in the Japanese quake

Here you go:
http://content.usatoday.com/communities/sciencefa ir/post/2011/03/japan-earthquake-shifted-earth-axi s-shorter-day-nasa/1#.T2jzHdmV2g4
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Quoting RitaEvac:


Makes me wonder if that rain streaming in over the NW gulf will start to fill back west and start coming into the Houston/Galveston areas. In the mid and upper levels the ULL is pulling in warm gulf moisture.


You may want to read your Local NWS current Discussion
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129093
Amazing to me How Wet we have been and How Dry Lake Travis still is.

Despite a Wet winter, Lake Travis, which is northwest of Austin, TX is still nearly 50 feet below full pool: http://travis.uslakes.info/Level.asp



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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
the rain will not make it pass orleans as entire cut off now pulls everything in north and west as it commences to fill in


Makes me wonder if that rain streaming in over the NW gulf will start to fill back west and start coming into the Houston/Galveston areas. In the mid and upper levels the ULL is pulling in warm gulf moisture.
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Quoting Jedkins01:
are you referring to the Earth's axis being shifted from a very severe earth quake as superstitious nonsense? Because if you are, you are incorrect, that is actually sound science as crazy as it sounds. Granted its a very small shift, but still crazy none the less.

I think the axis of the earth was shifted +10cm in the Japanese quake
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8324
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING
NCC013-049-147-202130-
/O.NEW.KMHX.SV.W.0006.120320T2102Z-120320T2130Z/

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEWPORT/MOREHEAD CITY NC
502 PM EDT TUE MAR 20 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NEWPORT HAS ISSUED A

* SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING FOR...
SOUTHEASTERN PITT COUNTY IN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
WEST CENTRAL BEAUFORT COUNTY IN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH CENTRAL CRAVEN COUNTY IN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA

* UNTIL 530 PM EDT

* AT 459 PM EDT...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM OVER CHOCOWINITY...MOVING SOUTHWEST AT 15 MPH. QUARTER SIZED HAIL AND WINDS IN EXCESS OF 58 MPH ARE LIKELY WITH THIS STORM.

* LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE...
WILMAR...

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

LARGE HAIL WILL DAMAGE VEHICLES...WINDOWS AND SOME ROOFS. SEVERE WINDS WILL BLOW DOWN TREES...POWER LINES...AND CAN DAMAGE MOBILE HOMES AND OTHER BUILDINGS. SEEK SHELTER IN A STURDY STRUCTURE UNTIL
THE STORM HAS PASSED. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS.

PLEASE REPORT SEVERE WEATHER TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BY CALLING...1...8 0 0...8 8 9...6 8 8 9.... WHEN YOU CAN DO SO SAFELY

&&

LAT...LON 3551 7694 3547 7697 3548 7699 3547 7698 3526 7718 3542 7738 3563 7710 TIME...MOT...LOC 2102Z 042DEG 13KT 3550 7710

$$

5
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
NWS Slidell, La. Disco
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129093
Quoting Patrap:


the rain will not make it pass orleans as entire cut off now pulls everything in north and west as it commences to fill in
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Quoting CycloneUK:



I have no quarrel with the science that the earths axis shifts after Earthquakes, but claiming that the earths axis shift actually causes the Earthquakes and making predictions about when the next one will strike with no basis, is sensastionalist nonsense.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.