Nation's Icebox basks in 77°F warmth

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:08 PM GMT on March 18, 2012

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Each year, when the list of coldest U.S. cities is compiled, International Falls, Minnesota regularly winds up at the top of the list, earning its title as "Icebox of the Nation". The city once hit -55°F (on January 6, 1909), and takes pride in the distinction of being the coldest city in the U.S., having trademarked the term "Icebox of the Nation" in 1948. The city recently defended the trademark against the town of Fraser, Colorado, which sought to usurp the title as the Nation's Icebox. But yesterday, International Falls set a truly phenomenal weather record for warmth. The city's temperature soared to 77°F, which was 42° above the average high temperature for the date. Not only was it the city's hottest March temperature on record by 4°, it was just 4° shy of yesterday's high in Miami, Florida. But what was truly amazing is that the 77°F high in International Falls beat the previous record for the date by 22°! I talked to Christopher C. Burt, wunderground's weather historian, and he couldn't recall seeing a station with a century-plus period of weather records break a daily record by such a wide margin (International Falls' records go back to 1895.) Yesterday's temperatures in International Falls were but one chapter in the on-going story of one of the most extreme meteorological events in U.S. history. Never before has such an extended period of extreme and record-breaking warm temperatures affected such a large portion of the U.S. in March, going back to the beginning of record keeping in the late 1800s. The record-breaking warmth will continue through Thursday, and I'll have much more to say in Monday's post.

Jeff Masters

Haze Night (sally)
This is not what the sky should look like this time of year, What will it look like in July?
Haze Night

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Quoting nigel20:
One of the most intense hurricanes of all time (Hurricane Ivan)

Nah, Wilma officially has that title.
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THE MOST intense hurricane of all time(the official windspeed here says 190mph, but in Pass Christian there were recordings of 200 mph windspeeds for 10 minutes)
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting hydrus:
I was living in Port Charlotte in 2004. My parents lived in Desoto County. It was absolutely hell that year...hell...This next system has one of the most intense dry lines I have ever seen...Link

My first close experience with an hurricane was hurricane Ivan
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One of the most intense hurricanes of all time (Hurricane Ivan)
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Quoting nigel20:

Very nice post...look at those SST anomalies, I'm not sure if we will have an el nino as strong any time soon. 2004 was very active with 15 storms 9 hurricanes and 6 major... we also had one of the most intense hurricane of all time, hurricane Ivan
I was living in Port Charlotte in 2004. My parents lived in Desoto County. It was absolutely hell that year...hell...This next system has one of the most intense dry lines I have ever seen...Link
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Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 420 Comments: 127543
gee i is bored 2day
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Quoting FatPenguin:


thanks for the info. something else I noticed was that it looks like the display on the wunderground extreme page maxes out at 500 records. If one day has more than that, I wonder how you can get the total?
The NCDC page shows them all on a map by day or month, though there's no facility for checking by week or some arbitrary date range. It's not nearly so user-friendly or attractive as the WU records page--but it will list more than 500 records at a time.
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Quoting hydrus:
It officially became El-nino 9/10/04 and was considered neutral before that date. Didnt last long The 97 Nino was rather intense. Map of Atlantic major hurricanes during post-"Modoki" seasons, including 1987, 1992, 1995, 2003 and 2005.

Very nice post...look at those SST anomalies, I'm not sure if we will have an el nino as strong any time soon. 2004 was very active with 15 storms 9 hurricanes and 6 major... we also had one of the most intense hurricane of all time, hurricane Ivan
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Quoting AstroHurricane001:


Hey, I uploaded this image to Wikipedia, using a new platform developed by the NOAA:

The northern gulf coast took a beating.
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130. flsky
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
This was great! Thanks so much for posting it. Do you know about The Cloud Appreciation Society? http://cloudappreciationsociety.org/
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Quoting Jedkins01:
Omg that is random.
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No offense to the good people of International Falls, but you don't need to go to a small-town to get stunning records.

Winnipeg, Manitoba (capital of the province of Manitoba, Canada):

It is currently (@12PM CST) 20C (68F) and forecast to reach 23C (73.4F)



The Average Max for March 18: -0.7C (30.7F) (diff of 23.7C (42.7F))
The Extreme Max for March 18 since 1938: 8.8C (47.8F) in 2000 (diff of 14.2C (25.6F)
The Extreme Max for Month of March: 23.3C (73.9F) on March 27 1946

The temperature is forecast to reach 25C tomorrow the 19th.
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Quoting hydrus:
It officially became El-nino 9/10/04 and was considered neutral before that date. Didnt last long The 97 Nino was rather intense. Map of Atlantic major hurricanes during post-"Modoki" seasons, including 1987, 1992, 1995, 2003 and 2005.


Hey, I uploaded this image to Wikipedia, using a new platform developed by the NOAA:

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Haven't seen this many pro-AGW posts in centuries!

Quoting LargoFl:


If the glaciers melt…
1)sea levels will rise, coastal areas will flood.
2)the salinity of the water will change (this is the one you need to worry about).
The amount of salt in the oceans help the waters circulate, exchanging heat for both air and water.
If this ‘oceanic conveyor’ speeds or slows it means that areas that are warm will grow colder or hotter (depending on if the salt content lowers or rises…most likely lower since most glaciers are stored fresh water). Some already dry areas will get drier. and basically be a real crisis.

Axis tilt…
we already tilt at 23 1/2 degrees. the only thing that would dramatically cause the earth to tilt is if we were struck by an outside force. And if that happened it would be so dramatic that everything on earth..even microbes would be wiped out. That being known..why worry?

anyone agree or disagree?


The melting of all mountain glaciers on the planet would probably contribute about 0.5 - 1.0 metres of sea level rise, but it's the melting from places such as Greenland and Antarctica that are the real risk. So far, some of the larger ice caps are actually increasing in mass due to higher snowfall caused by warmer temperatures, but the equillibrium line of increasing (from snowfall) vs. decreasing (from ice melt) ice mass seems to be shifting uphill both on many mountain glaciers and in Greenland. "Saltwater intrusion" is another potential problem, as saline seawater enters the groundwater that coastal communities depend on; this is made worse by increased extraction of water. A major often-undiscussed problem is the threat of major pollution, eutrophication, toxic waste and dead zones in industrial coastal regions innundated by a rising sea. Ocean currents may actually encourage higher rates of sea level rise in areas north of the Gulf Stream, near Boston, NYC and Washington DC from the melting in Greenland. Shifts in ocean currents do occur naturally, but changes in wind patterns, storm activity, salinity, temperature and temperature/pressure gradient can all affect major currents, as well as precipitation cycles. Although recent research showed that atmospheric currents may be responsible for more precipitation/heat transport to Europe than the Gulf Stream [citation needed], the oceanic heat conveyer still plays a major role. As previously mentioned, slight changes in acidity, salinity etc. of the ocean can cause the bloom of trillions of jellyfish, choking out other oceanic life.

Precipitation shifts will likely occur on a non-linear basis, meaning that although most interior continental climates will likely get drier, it could mean long periods of drought interspersed by periods of torrential rain that wash away topsoil. Better agricultural methods are thus in need to compensate for the potential loss in food productivity. However, certain other areas such as Patagonia and Siberia will likely get much wetter, potentially opening up new farmland, but that will have its own challenges. According to the UCAR model (too scary and unbelievable to post again), much of the US Plains and Canadian Prairies could become a semi-arid landscape and then a true desert by the latter half of the 21st century. There are also scientists who maintain that warmer climates mean higher precipitation: the North African Monsoon was active during the early Holocene Climatic Optimum, when the Sahara was a grassland.

In the oceans, areas of greater evaporation may get more saline, while the poles could be saturated by melting ice caps; today, it is under the high pressure zones of the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea where the greatest salinity exists. However, the melting will likely not affect axial tilt to any great extent, although the pole may shift by about 500 metres (for a collapse of the W Antartic Ice Sheet - WAIS). There was another study that suggested strong circumpolar winds around Antarctica could keep the sea level rise from reaching the rest of the world's coaslines for about five decades [citation needed], although the risk of tsunamis from large-scale collapses poses another risk [citation needed].

Additionally, there is evidence that during the Eemian (the interglacial prior to this one), West Antarctica may have been largely ice-free, yet the central dome survived Eemian, allowing sea levels to be up to 20 feet higher than today (in combination with some melting of Greenland).

Scientific journal references (abstracts are available for free):

Fogwill et al (2011)

Barnes (2010)

Meanwhile, here's some info on the Chandler wobble you may be interested in, from Wikipedia. The true causes are still inconclusive.

Quoting barbamz:
Early Spring Drives Butterfly Population Declines:
'Ahead-Of-Time' Snowmelt Triggers Chains of Events in the Mormon Fritillary Butterfly
ScienceDaily (Mar. 16, 2012) —
Early snowmelt caused by climate change in the Colorado Rocky Mountains snowballs into two chains of events: a decrease in the number of flowers, which, in turn, decreases available nectar. The result is decline in a population of the Mormon Fritillary butterfly, Speyeria mormonia.
More: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/1203 16101634.htm

Sunday-greetings to the sweating US from Germany, Barb


There has hardly been any snow during the winter across most of North America in 2011-2012 (though there were notable exceptions of snowfall records, especially on the west coast in Washington and Oregon). Biome shifts can occur more quickly than some species can adapt.

How's the weather in Germany? Obviously during the past winter there has been some above-normal snowfall in places such as Spain, Italy, Bosnia, Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania and Russia. Yet I just checked some forecasts (Hannover and Frankfurt) and much of Germany seems to be slightly above normal in terms of temperatures, too!
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Quoting nigel20:

Not sure, what post was it?
It officially became El-nino 9/10/04 and was considered neutral before that date. Didnt last long The 97 Nino was rather intense. Map of Atlantic major hurricanes during post-"Modoki" seasons, including 1987, 1992, 1995, 2003 and 2005.
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124. flsky
Quoting Ameister12:
The week will start out hot, getting into the low eighties. Temperatures should cool down a bit on Friday and Saturday, but it's still above average for this time of year.

Too bad we have no idea where this is....
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Quoting nigel20:

Not sure, what post was it?
# 290 I believe..
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Quoting nigel20:

Look at the trees, it's like a bomb went off in the area
monster
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Quoting Neapolitan:
Just as with HAMWeather, some of WU's weather records are culled from the NCDC weather records site, which went down on Friday (possibly due to overload) and hasn't yet been brought back online; the site says only "The NCDC extremes project is down for maintenence until further notice.". I can say this, however: the cumulative total of record highs for the last four days has been in the thousands; it was well over a thousand just for Thursday alone--the last day for which records are available--and that wasn't even the warmest day of the heat wave.


thanks for the info. something else I noticed was that it looks like the display on the wunderground extreme page maxes out at 500 records. If one day has more than that, I wonder how you can get the total?
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Nobody has posted about it yet, so..

"The Tri-State Tornado of Wednesday, March 18, 1925, was the deadliest tornado in U.S. history. With 695 confirmed fatalities, the tornado killed more than twice as many as the second deadliest, the 1840 Great Natchez Tornado. The continuous ≥219 mile (≥352 km) track left by the tornado was the longest ever recorded in the world: the tornado crossed from southeastern Missouri, through Southern Illinois, then into southwestern Indiana. While not officially rated by NOAA, it is recognized by many as an F5 tornado, the maximal damage rating issued on the Fujita scale, and the rating is widely accepted by many."




Look at the trees, it's like a bomb went off in the area
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Quoting Jedkins01:
good keep eatin its the only sure way to kill ya
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Quoting Jedkins01:



now i have dark knight mares :)
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Nobody has posted about it yet, so..

"The Tri-State Tornado of Wednesday, March 18, 1925, was the deadliest tornado in U.S. history. With 695 confirmed fatalities, the tornado killed more than twice as many as the second deadliest, the 1840 Great Natchez Tornado. The continuous ≥219 mile (≥352 km) track left by the tornado was the longest ever recorded in the world: the tornado crossed from southeastern Missouri, through Southern Illinois, then into southwestern Indiana. While not officially rated by NOAA, it is recognized by many as an F5 tornado, the maximal damage rating issued on the Fujita scale, and the rating is widely accepted by many."



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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:



even with cool temps
one thing i notice is how the lower warmer water is now at 40 n or higher where this time last season it was 36 37 degrees north so overall warm water has advanced 3 or 4 degrees further north

in simple form the green has expanded

As I said yesterday if the trade winds decline a bit, then the SST's can marm quite rapidly
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even with cool temps
one thing i notice is how the lower warmer water is now at 40 n or higher where this time last season it was 36 37 degrees north so overall warm water has advanced 3 or 4 degrees further north

in simple form the green has expanded
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Quoting Ameister12:
SPC just included my area under a slight risk for severe weather.



Lucky.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
The week will start out hot, getting into the low eighties. Temperatures should cool down a bit on Friday and Saturday, but it's still above average for this time of year.
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
you will when a cat 4 or greater comes barreling along dont worry you will get all the water rise you need then
watch out s fl.
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Quoting hydrus:
Busy..Did you catch my 04 El-Nino post last night.?

Not sure, what post was it?
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Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:


Hi my friend. Did you see posts #66 and #77? That one is relativly close to my neck of the woods.

Yeah, I saw those post...you're in puerto rico which is pretty close as you stated
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Quoting nigel20:

I'm good...how have you been hydrus?
Busy..Did you catch my 04 El-Nino post last night.?
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Quoting nigel20:

The ground in some of these areas is already saturated, so as you said more.rain will only compound the problem
Yep..And if the next cut off low rides further south than forecast by the GFS, there will be two more big weather events to contend with. The second being the most hazardous...GFS..Link
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Quoting hydrus:
Wuzup Nigel.

I'm good...how have you been hydrus?
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SPC just included my area under a slight risk for severe weather.

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Quoting ScottLincoln:


How lucky... I get to go to evening shifts when the hydropocalypse comes back for seconds.
And if this materializes, it will likely mean major flooding concerns for portions of the mid-west, mid-south and northern gulf states. I dont see much of a pattern change either..THEREAFTER...THE GUIDANCE DISAGREES REGARDING THE LONGITUDE WHERE
TROUGHING IS EXPECTED ACROSS THE EASTERN PACIFIC BY NEXT
WEEKEND...WITH THE 00Z ECMWF NOW WELL ON THE WESTERN FRINGE OF
ECMWF ENSEMBLE SPREAD. THE 00Z GEFS MEAN IS THE MOST PROGRESSIVE
AND THE 00Z CANADIAN/00Z GFS SPLIT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE 00Z
GEFS/ECMWF ENSEMBLE MEANS. PREFER A BLEND OF THE 00Z GFS/ECMWF
ENSEMBLE MEAN...LEANING SLIGHTLY HEAVIER ON THE MEAN TO HOLD THE
FEATURE SLIGHTLY MORE WEST OF OVERALL GUIDANCE CONCENSUS
CONSIDERING UPSTREAM FLOW AMPLITUDE.

WEATHER-WISE...MODERATE TO HEAVY RAINS ARE EXPECTED TO SPREAD FROM
THE MS VALLEY ACROSS THE MID-SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST/MID-ATLANTIC
STATES WITH TIME. THE STORM PREDICTION CENTER INDICATES SOME
THUNDERSTORMS COULD BE SEVERE IN THE SYSTEMS WARM SECTOR ON
WEDNESDAY ACROSS THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI VALLEY/CENTRAL GULF COAST.
THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND NORTHERN CONTINENTAL DIVIDE ARE EXPECTED
TO BE MOIST EARLY ON...BUT WITH THE POSSIBILITY OF A DEEP CYCLONE
PINCHING OFF AT THE BASE OF THE EASTERN PACIFIC TROUGH AS IT EDGES
EASTWARD...PRECIPITATION SHOULD SHIFT SOUTHWARD INTO CALIFORNIA
AND NEVADA BY NEXT WEEKEND.

ROTH/SCHICHTEL
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Quoting hydrus:
This is not good. There will be a break after this, but the next system will most likely compound the flooding..

The ground in some of these areas is already saturated, so as you said more.rain will only compound the problem
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Not everywhere is hot... Take a look at Arizona.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/18/us/winter-storm/ind ex.html?hpt=hp_t3

Link

Been really hot here and does feel more like June than March...
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Quoting nigel20:
Good morning guys


Hi my friend. Did you see posts #66 and #77? That one is relativly close to my neck of the woods.
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Quoting SteveDa1:


I would like to say something, if I may...

Although there is nothing wrong with speculating, there is a limit to the amount of warmth summer can produce. In spring, it can be very cold but also very warm. The amount of heat needed to produce a warm spell of this magnitude in the summer is probably impossible in our current times. There is a reason why, in the summer, records never get broken by more than a few degrees, if so rarely, because warmth is king all the time.

For example, in Montreal, Quebec, the warmest day on record is 37.6�C with is only about 12 degrees C above the normal. The warmest March temperature on record is 25.6�C and that is about 20 degrees Celsius above the normal.


In the summer, temperatures tend to be driven more by cloudcover/rainfall and how much solar energy makes it to the surface. In the winter, temperatures tend to be driven by airmasses as well as the type and magnitude of advection.

Also, with more moisture in the air, it is harder to break the dust bowl records without a major drought covering a large portion of the central US.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3167
Each one of these MODIS satellite photos from China today is about 500 miles from top to bottom. The gray is thick smog that would be categorized as dangerous to breath. All this is drifting across the Pacific and into your house.


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Quoting ScottLincoln:


How lucky... I get to go to evening shifts when the hydropocalypse comes back for seconds.

SHORT RANGE FORECAST DISCUSSION
NWS HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL PREDICTION CENTER CAMP SPRINGS MD
442 AM EDT SUN MAR 18 2012

VALID 12Z SUN MAR 18 2012 - 12Z TUE MAR 20 2012

...UNSETTLED CONDITIONS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE ACROSS THE WESTERN
U.S....

...SEVERE WEATHER AND FLASH FLOODING WILL BE POSSIBLE IN AREAS
FROM THE SOUTHERN PLAINS UP INTO THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY...

...ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES SHOULD REMAIN IN THE FORECAST FROM
THE PLAINS TO THE EASTERN SEABOARD...


HIGHLY AMPLIFIED FLOW ACROSS THE CONUS WILL SET THE STAGE FOR AN
ACTIVE WEATHER PATTERN DURING THE SHORT RANGE PERIOD. WIDESPREAD
MODERATE TO HEAVY PRECIPITATION WILL CONTINUE OVER MUCH OF THE
WESTERN U.S. ON SUNDAY...WHILE AN ANOMALOUS UPPER TROUGH DIGS
FARTHER INTO THE WEST AND AN ASSOCIATED COLD FRONT PUSHES TOWARDS
THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN ROCKIES. TEMPERATURES BEHIND THE FRONT
WILL BE LOW ENOUGH TO SUPPORT SNOW IN MOST LOCATIONS...AND
ALTHOUGH PRECIPITATION SHOULD BE WIDELY SCATTERED ACROSS THE
WEST...STRONG WINDS SHOULD ALLOW FOR SIGNIFICANT SNOWFALL
ACCUMULATIONS ALONG FAVORED SLOPES OF TERRAIN. PERIODS OF HEAVY
SNOW ARE EXPECTED ACROSS THE MOGOLLON RIM AND SAN JUAN RANGES IN
THE WAKE OF THE COLD FRONT...AND AS THE ANCHORING SURFACE LOW
TRACKS FARTHER NORTHEAST...HEAVY SNOW WILL ALSO BE POSSIBLE OVER
PORTIONS OF THE NORTHERN ROCKIES.

EARLY MONDAY...THE COLD FRONT WILL BEGIN TO PUSH OUT INTO THE HIGH
PLAINS. STRONG SOUTHERLY FLOW AHEAD OF THIS SYSTEM WILL STREAM
PLENTY OF GULF MOISTURE NORTHWARD OVER THE SOUTHERN AND CENTRAL
PLAINS...TRIGGERING SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ACROSS THE REGION.
AS THE FRONT SLOWLY MOVES EASTWARD ON MONDAY AND THE LOW LEVEL
SOUTHERLY FLOW INCREASES...THE AREA OF PRECIPITATION WILL EXPAND
NORTHWARD INTO THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY. SEVERE WEATHER AND
FLASH FLOODING WILL BOTH BE A MAJOR CONCERN WITH THIS SYSTEM.


MEANWHILE...THE ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES WILL CONTINUE ACROSS
MUCH OF THE EASTERN U.S...BENEATH A STRONG UPPER RIDGE. DESPITE
THE WARMTH...SOME LIGHT SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE POSSIBLE
ACROSS PORTIONS OF THE OHIO VALLEY AND NORTHERN MID-ATLANTIC
STATES AS A WEAK DISTURBANCE CROSSES THE REGION.


GERHARDT

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Quoting nigel20:
Good morning guys
Wuzup Nigel.
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Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:
Good morning to all. pottery,79F and sunny in San Juan,however some high clouds sometimes block all the sunshine,but with low swells,is a great day to be at the beach.

On another topic,it has really cooled in the equatorial Pacific area of Nino 1-2 west of SouthAmerica from last month to right now.

As of March 17:



On Febuary 17:


I've also notice the cooling, seems as if the chance of an el nino is looking less likely
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Good morning guys
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Quoting hydrus:
This is not good. There will be a break after this, but the next system will most likely compound the flooding..


How lucky... I get to go to evening shifts when the hydropocalypse comes back for seconds.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3167
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Quoting CybrTeddy:
For the first time since September, WU is forecasting 90 degree temperatures for my area in Florida.



Which makes sense, as long as the peak of summer is mid-June.

Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:


Lesson #2: Get a new pen. Or use pencil.

Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:


Here are a couple of impressive sattelite loops when Soufriere erupted on Febuary 12,2010.





Here is when the eruption started,and look at the shadow created by the very high ash thrown up.



The Soufriere Hills eruption in Feb. 2010 likely contributed to the severity of the devastating Madeira flood/landslide of February 20, killing at least 42, and also Cyclone Xynthia, which impacted Europe on February 26 to March 1, killing at least 63. A warmer eastern Atlantic that year fuelled by El Nino, the NAO conditions and generally warmer SSTs can't have helped make the situation any less devastating, either.

Quoting hydrus:
This is not good. There will be a break after this, but the next system will most likely compound the flooding..


Drought to flood, flood to drought, drought to flood again. The hydrologic cycle has become very chaotic in recent years.

Quoting adamjwpg31:
Suppose to be 26C in Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada today. Tommorow, same temperature with the possibility of Thunderstorms. Is this March? Is this some really weird science fiction movie? I hope this is not a preview of what is to come with a changing climate. Normally in Winnipeg the Red River would be frozen and the snow would start to melt. I could understand 26C this time next month. But March 18? Is something wrong here??


Any risk of ice jams this year? Large-scale multi-week-long heat waves have become rather common in recent years, even at times you might not expect. In mid-December to early January, 2010-2011, a large area of eastern Nunavut and Greenland was under the influence of a strong ridge of high pressure (the Greenland block), causing many regions to be 20-30C warmer than normal (i.e. Coral Harbour). Manitoba is now also on the western end of a ridge. As the ridge moves out, an influx of colder air from the north and west will fuel a tornado outbreak during the week across the southern US plains.

The jet stream locking pattern has been in place on and off for the past few years, recently contributing simultaneously to the Russian heatwave/peat bog fires and the Pakistan floods in 2010. The pattern was repeated in 2011, though both the Russian fires and Pakistan floods that year, as well as floods in neighbouring China, were not as severe. Some experts attribute the pattern to low solar activity (and generally there is a 2.2-year lag), but that does not explain why the other anomalies such as the Arctic dipole have been so active in high-solar activity years as well, mostly within the past decade.
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Quoting adamjwpg31:
Suppose to be 26C in Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada today. Tommorow, same temperature with the possibility of Thunderstorms. Is this March? Is this some really weird science fiction movie? I hope this is not a preview of what is to come with a changing climate. Normally in Winnipeg the Red River would be frozen and the snow would start to melt. I could understand 26C this time next month. But March 18? Is something wrong here??


Is that a rhetorical question?
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.