Nation's Icebox basks in 77°F warmth

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:08 PM GMT on March 18, 2012

Share this Blog
32
+

Each year, when the list of coldest U.S. cities is compiled, International Falls, Minnesota regularly winds up at the top of the list, earning its title as "Icebox of the Nation". The city once hit -55°F (on January 6, 1909), and takes pride in the distinction of being the coldest city in the U.S., having trademarked the term "Icebox of the Nation" in 1948. The city recently defended the trademark against the town of Fraser, Colorado, which sought to usurp the title as the Nation's Icebox. But yesterday, International Falls set a truly phenomenal weather record for warmth. The city's temperature soared to 77°F, which was 42° above the average high temperature for the date. Not only was it the city's hottest March temperature on record by 4°, it was just 4° shy of yesterday's high in Miami, Florida. But what was truly amazing is that the 77°F high in International Falls beat the previous record for the date by 22°! I talked to Christopher C. Burt, wunderground's weather historian, and he couldn't recall seeing a station with a century-plus period of weather records break a daily record by such a wide margin (International Falls' records go back to 1895.) Yesterday's temperatures in International Falls were but one chapter in the on-going story of one of the most extreme meteorological events in U.S. history. Never before has such an extended period of extreme and record-breaking warm temperatures affected such a large portion of the U.S. in March, going back to the beginning of record keeping in the late 1800s. The record-breaking warmth will continue through Thursday, and I'll have much more to say in Monday's post.

Jeff Masters

Haze Night (sally)
This is not what the sky should look like this time of year, What will it look like in July?
Haze Night

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 190 - 140

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14Blog Index

Quoting PensacolaDoug:
Re: 170


So you want the Gov to run everything? That's how China got that way. Think about it.


I can't imagine that any of us want the government to run everything. I've never heard even the most extreme left- or right-wing person suggest that happen.

But we clearly want the government (us) to control some things.

It's not business vs. government.

It's the most greedy vs. everyone else.

That's why we have guards at banks and locks on our doors. If the rest of us don't protect ourselves from the most greedy those greedy people will screw the rest of us over.

There is a legitimate argument of how much regulation is needed. Sometimes regulations get a bit too restrictive and need to be scaled back. Sometimes regulations are too loose and allow the rest of us to be harmed.

What would really help our country, IMHO, is if we would drop the "regulations are evil" type discussion and focus our concern on making regulations as least restrictive as possible while still being effective.

And to get to that point, we simply have to accept the fact that there is no way to write regulations so that they perfectly fit each person's needs. Like living in the same house with someone else, you don't always get your way. (If you live in a happy house.)
Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344
This next system is impressive by its size alone, nevermind the dynamics that will come into play when in the middle of the U.S.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1960: The smog war begins



The word smog itself is credited to the Weather Bureau, which coined the term for mixed smoke and fog in 1914. (It was widely met with derision. As Kokomo Times asked, But why end there? Let's call a mixture of snow and mud smud. A mixture of snow and soot snoot, and a mixture of snow and hail snail. Thus we might have a weather forecast: Snail today, turning to snoot tonight; tomorrow smoggy with smud.)

In 1928, Pittsburgh launched a War on Smog, in reaction to foul coal smoke that literally blackened the daytime skies. The Depression didnt help their cause, as people burned ever-cheaper coal, and 10 years later there were still days when headlamps were mandatory, if ineffectual against the apocalyptic blanket of filth. By then, it was a source of perverse pride prosperity smog, they called it, and other cities were positively envious, even as the health and safety detriment became obvious.




Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129089
187. skook
Quoting hydrus:
This storm reportedly was blowing cannons around. Some experts believe the winds were in excess of 200 mph..The Great Hurricane persisted near Barbados for about two days, producing violent winds which were described as "so deafening that people could not hear their own voices." The winds stripped the bark off trees before the hurricane downed every tree on the island.[2] This phenomenon has not been observed in any of the strongest modern-day tropical cyclones, so, according to meteorologist Dr. Jose Millas, for it to have been done by winds and rain alone would require winds over 200 mph (320 km/h).[7] The winds also destroyed every house on Barbados. Most ships at the bay broke free of their moorings from the hurricane's rough surf and all forts on the island were destroyed.[2] The winds and seas moved heavy cannons about 100 feet (30 m). About 4,500 people died on the island.[7]

In Saint Vincent, the hurricane destroyed 584 of the 600 houses in Kingstown. At Grenada, 19 Dutch ships were wrecked. On Saint Lucia, rough waves and a strong storm tide destroyed the fleet of British Admiral Rodney at Port Castries, with one ship destroying the city's hospital by being lifted on top of it. The hurricane destroyed all but two houses at Port Castries, and throughout the island about 6,000 perished.[2]

A fleet of 40 French ships involved in the American Revolutionary War capsized as a result of the hurricane off Martinique; about 4,000 soldiers drowned. The hurricane produced a 25-foot (7.6 m) storm surge on Martinique, destroying all houses in Saint-Pierre; 9,000 died on the island. Severe damage was reported on Dominica, Guadeloupe, Antigua, and Saint Kitts, though it is unknown if any died on those islands. Additionally, many ships were washed ashore on Saint Kitts. A powerful storm surge affected the island of Sint Eustatius, causing 4,000 to 5,000 fatalities.[2]

Heavy damage was reported in southern Puerto Rico, primarily in Cabo Rojo and Lajas. Severe damage also occurred in the eastern region of Santo Domingo. The hurricane later grounded 50 ships near Bermuda. Throughout its path, the hurricane killed over 20,000 people, possibly as high as 24,000, making it the deadliest hurricane in Atlantic hurricane history.[2][3]



I had no idea that they had extreme weather back in the 1700's. Thank you for the insight.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
186. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Brisbane Tropical Cyclone Warning Center
Tropical Cyclone Advice #14
TROPICAL LOW 17U
4:00 AM EST March 19 2012
================================

At 3:00 AM EST, Tropical Low (992 hPa) located at 17.0S 141.0E or 55 km north northeast of Karumba and 195 km east of Mornington Island has 10 minute sustained winds of 30 knots with gusts of 45 knots. The tropical low is reported as moving southwest at 1 knot.

Dvorak Intensity: Overland

Tropical Cyclone Watches/Warnings
=================================

The Cyclone WARNING for coastal and island communities from NT/Qld Border to Pormpuraaw, including Mornington and Sweers Islands, has been cancelled.

The Cyclone WATCH for coastal areas from Port McArthur to NT/Qld Border has been cancelled.

Forecast and Intensity
========================

12 HRS: 17.6S 140.9E - 30 knots (Tropical Low)
24 HRS: 18.2S 140.9E - 25 knots (Tropical Low)
48 HRS: 20.6S 142.8E - 25 knots (Tropical Low)
72 HRS: 21.8S 144.8E - 25 knots (Tropical Low)

Additional Information
======================

The system is currently over land and the forecast track has a southerly movement for the next 24 hours before turning south-southeast across central Queensland. Movement back over water is considered unlikely and therefore the chances of this low developing into a tropical cyclone are considered low.

Convection has eased near the system centre in the last 3-5 hours with convective bands persisting, chiefly over water, well to the north. The 12:48UTC Ascat pass showed near gales to the west of the system and also along the convective band to the north.

No further advices will be issued for this system unless it moves over water
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting BobWallace:


Places in the US used to look like that. Open hearth steel mills used to do that to US cities.

I can remember Gary, Indiana with that sort of air in the 1960s.

China is starting to work on their problems. The Chinese people have moved past the point where just getting enough food each day is a struggle. They are now starting to look at quality of life issues.
The factories were cranking back in those days.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting wxmod:
This is what your town would look like if big business could do whatever it wanted. China 2012.

Guardian photo


Places in the US used to look like that. Open hearth steel mills used to do that to US cities.

I can remember Gary, Indiana with that sort of air in the 1960s.

China is starting to work on their problems. The Chinese people have moved past the point where just getting enough food each day is a struggle. They are now starting to look at quality of life issues.
Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344
Quoting CybrTeddy:


I do not think that the 1780 hurricane was a classic Cape Verde hurricane, but rather it developed from a disturbance in the ITCZ around the 6th of October, 1780. I believe that because Tomas was also predicted to become a very powerful Major Hurricane in the month of October through the Eastern Caribbean, and that was how Tomas developed.
And if I was a betting man, I would say that there was a big fat upper level high pressure area over the region where the 1780 storm originated...To bad I dont have a weather chart for the Eastern Caribbean that week..:)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Levi32:


Oh so you meant direct landfalls.

Yeah...most of the damages occur in farming communities of central Jamaica. The tourist sector(lies mainly on the north coast) suffered minimal damages
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
At what point does a very late in the year storm become the next years first storm?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting chrisale:
When the days minimum (3C) in Winnipeg is 4C more than the normal high (-1C) then you know things are just weird.

(This is for yesterday the 17th)


It is quite amazing seeing this weird weather in Winnipeg, a city where we should see some snow at the time of year and some melting. But... ummm.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Damages from Ivan total 360 million dollars, suggesting that the worst of the storm missed us
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:

It past about 20 miles south of central Jamaica..it was about 50 miles south of the capital kingston


Oh so you meant direct landfalls.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:

It past about 20 miles south of Jamaica
Quoting weatherh98:


Impact doesn't necessarily mean direct hit, although it can mean direct hit you could interpret it as "effect"

Well I should have said direct impact
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hydrus:
And at that location for so late in the year. Martinique has no continental shelf, and for the storm surge to reach a height of 25 feet is almost impossible. The storm must have been massive and extremely intense.


I do not think that the 1780 hurricane was a classic Cape Verde hurricane, but rather it developed from a disturbance in the ITCZ around the 6th of October, 1780. I believe that because Tomas was also predicted to become a very powerful Major Hurricane in the month of October through the Eastern Caribbean, and that was how Tomas developed.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Here are a few impressive videos of the last eruption of the Soufriere Volcano on Febuary 11,2010. I dont want to see another big eruption again,but is still active and anything can occur.

Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Re: 170


So you want the Gov to run everything? That's how China got that way. Think about it.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CybrTeddy:


If I had to guess, if we went back and time and actually measured its intensity with modern day measuring devices, this would be without a doubt the strongest tropical cyclone on record. Probably around 865-867 mb with winds at an insane 175 knots. It must have been a truly unique storm indeed for a CV hurricane to gain that kind of intensity in mid-October.
And at that location for so late in the year. Martinique has no continental shelf, and for the storm surge to reach a height of 25 feet is almost impossible. The storm must have been massive and extremely intense.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting wxmod:
This is what your town would look like if big business could do whatever it wanted. China 2012.

Guardian photo


No need to bring that up and quarrel
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:

It past about 20 miles south of central Jamaica..it was about 50 miles south of the capital kingston


Impact doesn't necessarily mean direct hit, although it can mean direct hit you could interpret it as "effect"
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
170. wxmod
This is what your town would look like if big business could do whatever it wanted. China 2012.

Guardian photo
Member Since: October 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1765
Quoting Levi32:


What about Ivan in 2004?


Levi in the house!!!! And yea you are correct
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:

I wrote "one of", there is no disputing that Wilma was the most intense hurricane of all time
That's Okay Nigel. We knew what you meant. We love you man!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Ameister12:
One of the most mysterious hurricanes of all time is The Great Hurricane of 1780. Since it occurred hundreds of years ago, so much is unknown about this hurricane. All people know about it, is that it was the deadliest Atlantic hurricane, killing over 20,000 people and it could had winds up to 200 mph. I'd love to know more about this hurricane.

This storm reportedly was blowing cannons around. Some experts believe the winds were in excess of 200 mph..The Great Hurricane persisted near Barbados for about two days, producing violent winds which were described as "so deafening that people could not hear their own voices." The winds stripped the bark off trees before the hurricane downed every tree on the island.[2] This phenomenon has not been observed in any of the strongest modern-day tropical cyclones, so, according to meteorologist Dr. Jose Millas, for it to have been done by winds and rain alone would require winds over 200 mph (320 km/h).[7] The winds also destroyed every house on Barbados. Most ships at the bay broke free of their moorings from the hurricane's rough surf and all forts on the island were destroyed.[2] The winds and seas moved heavy cannons about 100 feet (30 m). About 4,500 people died on the island.[7]

In Saint Vincent, the hurricane destroyed 584 of the 600 houses in Kingstown. At Grenada, 19 Dutch ships were wrecked. On Saint Lucia, rough waves and a strong storm tide destroyed the fleet of British Admiral Rodney at Port Castries, with one ship destroying the city's hospital by being lifted on top of it. The hurricane destroyed all but two houses at Port Castries, and throughout the island about 6,000 perished.[2]

A fleet of 40 French ships involved in the American Revolutionary War capsized as a result of the hurricane off Martinique; about 4,000 soldiers drowned. The hurricane produced a 25-foot (7.6 m) storm surge on Martinique, destroying all houses in Saint-Pierre; 9,000 died on the island. Severe damage was reported on Dominica, Guadeloupe, Antigua, and Saint Kitts, though it is unknown if any died on those islands. Additionally, many ships were washed ashore on Saint Kitts. A powerful storm surge affected the island of Sint Eustatius, causing 4,000 to 5,000 fatalities.[2]

Heavy damage was reported in southern Puerto Rico, primarily in Cabo Rojo and Lajas. Severe damage also occurred in the eastern region of Santo Domingo. The hurricane later grounded 50 ships near Bermuda. Throughout its path, the hurricane killed over 20,000 people, possibly as high as 24,000, making it the deadliest hurricane in Atlantic hurricane history.[2][3]
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Ameister12:
One of the most mysterious hurricanes of all time is The Great Hurricane of 1780. Since it occurred hundreds of years ago, so much is unknown about this hurricane. All people know about this hurricane is that it was the deadliest Atlantic hurricane, killing over 20,000 people and it could had winds up to 200 mph. I'd love to know more about this hurricane.



If I had to guess, if we went back and time and actually measured its intensity with modern day measuring devices, this would be without a doubt the strongest tropical cyclone on record. Probably around 865-867 mb with winds at an insane 175 knots. It must have been a truly unique storm indeed for a CV hurricane to gain that kind of intensity in mid-October.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hydrus:
I was at a local t.v.station tracking Gilbert. It was an amazing storm and held the pressure record for the Atlantic Basin for 17 years.

A coconut farmer in eastern Jamaica lost over 40,000 of his 50,000 coconuts. Jamaica is quite hilly so there were some pretty ferocious winds
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
When the days minimum (3C) in Winnipeg is 4C more than the normal high (-1C) then you know things are just weird.

(This is for yesterday the 17th)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
One of the most mysterious hurricanes of all time is The Great Hurricane of 1780. Since it occurred hundreds of years ago, so much is unknown about this hurricane. All people know about it, is that it was the deadliest Atlantic hurricane, killing over 20,000 people and it could had winds up to 200 mph. I'd love to know more about this hurricane.

Member Since: August 9, 2009 Posts: 10 Comments: 5070
Quoting Levi32:


What about Ivan in 2004?

It past about 20 miles south of central Jamaica..it was about 50 miles south of the capital kingston
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
161. wxmod
Headline from the Guardian News "Tullow Oil confirms major find off coast of Ghana"
MODIS image today of Ghana in Africa smog.
Member Since: October 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1765
Quoting nigel20:
The last hurricane to impact Jamaica was hurricane Gilbert back in 88 at cat 3 strength, causing 5 billion in damages.
I was at a local t.v.station tracking Gilbert. It was an amazing storm and held the pressure record for the Atlantic Basin for 17 years.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:
The last hurricane to impact Jamaica was hurricane Gilbert back in 88 at cat 3 strength, causing 5 billion in damages.


What about Ivan in 2004?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The last hurricane to impact Jamaica was hurricane Gilbert back in 88 at cat 3 strength, causing 5 billion in damages.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
...the last 10 minutes
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129089
Quoting hydrus:
Where were you located when Ivan hit.?

I'm in Jamaica...I had two close encounters with hurricanes, the first being IVan and the second being hurricane dean
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:


Interesting, I've never noticed that there is a 188 day cycle between major earthquake events, starting with the Chile Earthquake. I don't think anything will happen on March 22nd or 23rd, but if it does, that would be very interesting indeed.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SPLbeater:
it has been 80F here or higher for the last 6 days in NC.

Wonder what them icebox natives are thinkin with this warmth lol


People are going "WTF???" here, kid. The average high here for this time of the year is in the 30s. We are 40 degrees above average.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hydrus:
I remember Ivan very well. We had just been hammered by Charley and some of Frances when the Mets had this thing hitting us at cat-5 strength. I thought you have got to be kidding me. Then, a little s.w.extension of the Bermuda High saved us from what would have been the end of a couple of counties in Florida...Hurricane Ivan beat the tar out of the Caribbean severely....Link

Yeah, I think it also had the highest storm surge at sea
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:

My first close experience with an hurricane was hurricane Ivan
Where were you located when Ivan hit.?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
It might hit 80F in Fargo this evening. This just ain't right. Yesterday there was a hot humid haze in the air. That is something I expect in July or Augist, NOT MARCH!!!

What the hell is causing this huge ridge in the jet stream? Something to do with the atmosphere shifting away from a very strong La Nina? Global Warming is definitely involved, but only by making this weirdness more common, what's PROXIMATE cause of this ridge???
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Think we're talking about the Atlantic basin, in which case Wilma was the most intense. =P

Nah man, I think you mean Jose.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:
One of the most intense hurricanes of all time (Hurricane Ivan)
I remember Ivan very well. We had just been hammered by Charley and some of Frances when the Mets had this thing hitting us at cat-5 strength. I thought you have got to be kidding me. Then, a little s.w.extension of the Bermuda High saved us from what would have been the end of a couple of counties in Florida...Hurricane Ivan beat the tar out of the Caribbean severely....Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Always use pressure when comparing hurricanes, not winds.

So yeah, with a 17 mbar advantage, Wilma is, and will likely be for a long time, the most intense hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic basin.


Wilma= most intense

Camille= most deadliest
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Aint it something, that when Camille made landfall it was basically an EF-5 tornado spread over about roughly 15 miles!! 0.o
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Nah, I think Wilma has that title.

I wrote "one of", there is no disputing that Wilma was the most intense hurricane of all time
Member Since: Posts: Comments:



Calamity knows no Borders, only men's minds and maps do..
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129089
Quoting SPLbeater:


Wimla lacked about 15 or 20 mph windspeeds to Camille.

if your talking bout pressure, then wilma has a 17mb advantage

Always use pressure when comparing hurricanes, not winds.

So yeah, with a 17 mbar advantage, Wilma is, and will likely be for a long time, the most intense hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic basin.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32501
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Think we're talking about the Atlantic basin, in which case Wilma was the most intense. =P


Wimla lacked about 15 or 20 mph windspeeds to Camille.

if your talking bout pressure, then wilma has a 17mb advantage
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting MAweatherboy1:

I give it to Super Typhoon Tip.

Think we're talking about the Atlantic basin, in which case Wilma was the most intense. =P
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32501
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Nah, I think Wilma has that title.

I give it to Super Typhoon Tip.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:
One of the most intense hurricanes of all time (Hurricane Ivan)

Nah, Wilma officially has that title.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32501

Viewing: 190 - 140

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
57 °F
Overcast