Tropical Cyclone Irina kills 72 on Madagascar

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:13 PM GMT on March 07, 2012

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Heavy rains from Tropical Cyclone Irina have killed 72 people on Madagascar and left 70,000 homeless, according to news reports. Irina never reached hurricane strength, but dumped heavy rains on the island over an extended period, February 29 - March 2. The area affected was remote, so the reports of the disaster only today reached the outside world. Irina is the deadliest tropical cyclone of 2012 thus far, and the second deadly storm to affect the island in recent weeks; Tropical Cyclone Giovanna hit the island two weeks ago as a Category 3 storm, killing 35 and leaving 240,000 homeless. Irina is expected to dissipate over cold waters southwest of Madagascar over the next day.


Figure 1. Tropical Cyclone Irina over Madagascar at 07:15 UTC March 1, 2012. At the time, Irina was a tropical storm with 65 mph winds. Image credit: NASA.

I'll have a new post on Thursday.

Jeff Masters

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Well, all I can say is that we sent our kids to public school and they turned out fine. I am sure when they get out of jail, they will thank us both!
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 68 Comments: 25287
Quoting presslord:


Moses, Noah, Cleopatra...


Hey, we had some good times.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 68 Comments: 25287
Kids do sometimes need to learn how to take standardized tests. And like it or not, they still have to take the SAT as part of their college application.

My job is to coordinate a program that remediates children so they do better on the portions of the tests they are failing. Sometimes it just takes someone to sit down with a child and explain the rules of the game and then give them practice playing it. Like it or not, kids have to learn rules and standard practices. Those with parents who are academically oriented will do better at taking tests (on rules and standard practice, aka benchmark standards) than those who don't.

So we help kids learn the rules who don't have that advantage from home. I've never met a student who wants to fail.
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@ Bluestorm, great stuff! These r the stories I love to hear.

For me the key word in your story was PARENTS. Your parents didn't just settle for whatever Wake County said. I respect parents who want to homeschool because they are concerned about their children's performance. However, far too many parents abdicate or cede their role in their children's education to the teacher, school and/or school district. [One of my fave amusements here is standing in the grocery line on school holiday weekends and hearing parents complaining about their childen being off from school "what r we supposed to do with them?" lol]

Anyway kudos to you, for your hard work and positive attitude, AND to your sensible parents!
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Quoting Grothar:
If I had been homeschooled, I would...never had had a crush on my 6th grade teacher, Miss Slater...
I hope not; developing a crush on a teacher is normal and healthy, but if you're homeschooled, well, that's just wrong. ;-)
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13455
Quoting presslord:


Moses, Noah, Cleopatra...


Don't forget his father Adam too, he told dad not to take a bite of that apple, but noooooo...
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Good afternoon from muggy-ville. Just got a little shower here. Still yet to be seen if we're going to get any heavy rains from this next system.

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Quoting BahaHurican:
Agreed. One of the legacies of the most recent Bush was n inadvertent kind of dumbing down of education which basically placed teachers in practically a professional straightjacket. While I agree standards are necessary and should be set, there should be room for teachers to tweak things a bit more. What we have now is a system that almost seems to frown on pushing children to their greatest potential or going outside the box to give additional information, to engage children's interest and minds.

And a lot of problems in public school systems are problems with the system itself. The biggest single one IMO is the lack of sufficient qualified AND dedicated teachers. I'm not denigrating the ones who are there; I'm saying just about every school district could use more of them.

Additionally, I don't agree with the blogger who dismisses the early years as not being that important academically. It is rather the converse. The early years are foundational, and when students have poor experiences in primary and middle school, high school is to all intents and purposes a waste of time. Meanwhile, a student who learned well up to grade 8 can almost teach himself what he needs to know, through reading and questioning, after that point. The socializing skills also matter, I agree. But those basics of computation and comprehension and expression are vital.

OK, off my soapbox.... lotsa educators in my family.... lol


I was the first person in my family (either side) to go to a four year college. (My mother was a nurse, and she is the exception) Most of my family were very successful roofers, brick layers, mechanics, etc., and were some of the happiest people I've ever met in my life. That being said, there was not much importance placed on "higher learning" in my family. It was my teachers and coaches that pushed me to my fullest potential. These wonderful people truly helped me become the person I am today, and without them, well..who knows? I'm just glad they were there!
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Quoting Neapolitan:
I've known well-adjusted home-schooled kids who could absolutely run academic circles around most public school students--but I've also known home-schooled graduates who had trubblez speelink thayr oan namz. By the same token, I've known public school graduates who went on to great success, and others who became as derelict as derelict can be. In short, then, it seems to me there's a huge spread in students, teachers, and teaching methods.

Having said all that: I've raised my children mostly in Florida, and I'm complete aware of the inanity of teaching to the FCAT. For instance, our nation's history is rich and profound, yet FCAT-oriented teaching insists on drilling into the kids an endless list of names and dates, names, and dates, names and dates. It seems to me pointless, pathetic, and a near-complete waste of time.

But, still--not all public schools, public school teachers, or public school students are the same, so it's unfair to paint them with the same brush.



I was home schooled but I know students who are in public school and have done really great. Although I do agree that FCAT is bad, the reason why public schools have issues is more than the system having flaws, its that American society is degrading and today's youth aren't exactly being raised properly in many cases. I mean, home schooling can definitely give the student an advantage because the schooling is adjusted to fit the student rather than a growing child having to fit into a system. However, just because public schooling doesn't offer the best environment for kids doesn't mean it should be trashed as if it is useless either.

I do believe public schools need reforming though, bringing ethics into schools as well as school security and behavior standards might help. Students can call teachers motherf***ers and the poor teachers really can't do anything about it. If grade school was ran the way college was we wouldn't have such education problems. You can't act up in college, period!

Imagine if students started talking trash to professors repeatedly or starting fights on property or bullying? You just can't get away with it...


Anyways, I certainly think Home schooling can provide the best opportunity for learning and child development, but public schools still must exist for obvious reasons. There definitely needs to be serious reform of the way the public school system is run, though.


Ultimately, there also needs to be a society change as well, even with grand public school reform, it can't fix all the dysfunctional family situations that are so widespread now.

People as a whole must change, government can be reformed but people have to change for things to really get better.
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Quoting muddertracker:


I can't argue with any of that. It makes sense, and I fully support a parent's right to choose what is best for their children. I just get riled up when all teachers get lumped together as one "entity" that does nothing but teach to the test. (Although, I admit, that does happen in some places.)
Agreed. One of the legacies of the most recent Bush was n inadvertent kind of dumbing down of education which basically placed teachers in practically a professional straightjacket. While I agree standards are necessary and should be set, there should be room for teachers to tweak things a bit more. What we have now is a system that almost seems to frown on pushing children to their greatest potential or going outside the box to give additional information, to engage children's interest and minds.

And a lot of problems in public school systems are problems with the system itself. The biggest single one IMO is the lack of sufficient qualified AND dedicated teachers. I'm not denigrating the ones who are there; I'm saying just about every school district could use more of them.

Additionally, I don't agree with the blogger who dismisses the early years as not being that important academically. It is rather the converse. The early years are foundational, and when students have poor experiences in primary and middle school, high school is to all intents and purposes a waste of time. Meanwhile, a student who learned well up to grade 8 can almost teach himself what he needs to know, through reading and questioning, after that point. The socializing skills also matter, I agree. But those basics of computation and comprehension and expression are vital.

OK, off my soapbox.... lotsa educators in my family.... lol
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I go to what is called an Early College High School. It just basically means that the work is more plentiful and harder, but there are more benefits. When I graduate from High School, I will already have my Bachelor's Degree.

Debating on either to go to University of Oklahoma for Severe Weather, University of North Carolina for Meteorology in general, or University of Miami for Tropical Weather.


Even though I go to regular school, I took 4 AP classes and got 4 more coming up in my senior year :)

I thought UNC-Chapel Hill doesn't have meteorology? Do you mean NC State? It's one of top 5 in meteorology and it's also where NWS Raleigh is located at.

I'm debating on:

NC State
University of Missouri-Columbia (MIZZOU)
UNC Asheville
Plymouth State in New Hampshire
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125. Jax82
Rotational signatures of the March 2nd Tornadoes.

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Quoting presslord:


Moses, Noah, Cleopatra...


lol!
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Quoting Grothar:
I am not a proponent of homeschooling. However, I am not totally opposed to it. I have been on both sides of this, as a student and a teacher.

If I had been homeschooled, I would probably only have learned six languanges and not eight. I would never had had a crush on my 6th grade teacher, Miss Slater. I would never had seen the interaction of adults and children over a long period of time. I would not have learned all the social skills necessary to have made my way in life.

I cannot imagine my life without all of the different people whom I met in my younger years. Many of whom had a profound influence on who I am today.

Although my education was in different countries, I probably learned the most interacting with people of different races and cultures more here than abroad. It gave me a perspective which I could never have possibly learned at home.

I am not saying this to offend anyone or say what you are doing is wrong. As a teacher, the students who were homeschooled mostly did much better academically than others. However, they were the most difficult to teach. Their social skills were not the best and many had an an attitude of over-exaggerated worth of self. It was my experience that their view of the world was very narrow.

Good teaching is simply not a case of imparting your knowledge and view on your students, but rather getting them to think AND reason. Homeschooled students were almost impossible to get to accept or even consider new ideas.

Part II tomorrow.


Moses, Noah, Cleopatra...
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
good to hear from ya gro sorry you forgot what to say


lol


Twit!
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 68 Comments: 25287
I am not a proponent of homeschooling. However, I am not totally opposed to it. I have been on both sides of this, as a student and a teacher.

If I had been homeschooled, I would probably only have learned six languanges and not eight. I would never had had a crush on my 6th grade teacher, Miss Slater. I would never had seen the interaction of adults and children over a long period of time. I would not have learned all the social skills necessary to have made my way in life.

I cannot imagine my life without all of the different people whom I met in my younger years. Many of whom had a profound influence on who I am today.

Although my education was in different countries, I probably learned the most interacting with people of different races and cultures more here than abroad. It gave me a perspective which I could never have possibly learned at home.

I am not saying this to offend anyone or say what you are doing is wrong. As a teacher, the students who were homeschooled mostly did much better academically than others. However, they were the most difficult to teach. Their social skills were not the best and many had an an attitude of over-exaggerated worth of self. It was my experience that their view of the world was very narrow.

Good teaching is simply not a case of imparting your knowledge and view on your students, but rather getting them to think AND reason. Homeschooled students were almost impossible to get to accept or even consider new ideas.

Part II tomorrow.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 68 Comments: 25287
good to hear from ya gro sorry you did not forget what to say


lol
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:
" Quoting yqt1001:


He's homeschooled, he's already hurt socially."








Point goes to ... Ah, heck! ... I give up! ... Anybody got a coin to toss? LOL ... Just kidding, people. I saw. I could not resist. This is the result.
Yeah... pretty good discussion, IMO.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I go to what is called an Early College High School. It just basically means that the work is more plentiful and harder, but there are more benefits. When I graduate from High School, I will already have my Bachelor's Degree.

Debating on either to go to University of Oklahoma for Severe Weather, University of North Carolina for Meteorology in general, or University of Miami for Tropical Weather.


Cody, you should to to the finest place for education. Go to the University of Miami!
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Here is another way by using the KP index, This is not absolute but a rule of thumb.

KP-0


KP-1


KP-2


KP-3


KP-4


KP-5


KP-6


KP-7


KP-8


KP-9


I know this is a long post but hope it helps some of you. Source University of Fairbanks
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Problem with public school education is mainly that parents who care take their kids out. A lot of the other parents don't have the time, energy or inclination to monitor their children's school progress as they should. So solveable problems don't get solved in timely fashion, or may never be solved. [one example = SPELLING]

Additionally, no matter how great your teacher is, it's really hard for him or her to do the kind of job kids need when their class sizes are as big as they are. Instead of mandating 25 or less in classes, where students can get the attention they need, school administrative policy is pushing class sizes up. The single advantage home schooling has over public school is manifest in the numbers; like SPL, homeschoolers get the individualized attention they need and can pretty much work at their own pace. Public school kids have to go with the program, even if it isn't fitting their needs, and teachers have to divide themselves into smaller and smaller pieces to make it work. Put it another way; SPL didn't skip gr. 6, he finished it before everybody else.



You are correct, sir.
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Quoting Grothar:
May I say something?

But you already did?
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31409
Quoting Grothar:
May I say something?
come on speak up we are waiting
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
I go to what is called an Early College High School. It just basically means that the work is more plentiful and harder, but there are more benefits. When I graduate from High School, I will already have my Bachelor's Degree.

Debating on either to go to University of Oklahoma for Severe Weather, University of North Carolina for Meteorology in general, or University of Miami for Tropical Weather.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31409
FREEZE LINE pulls up significantly as model progress in the run

looks like large scale warm up with little cool air for the run

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Can you see the Aurora? This image shows Geomagnetic lines of latitude which are different from regular lines of latitude as the Geomagnetic North Pole is not where the Geographic North Pole is located.

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Quoting SPLbeater:


my mom wants me to take a year at some pre-college place, before i go to NSCU for my 4 years. that way the year at the pre-college place can give me sort of a boost in college, and i wont enter at a younger age.

And my mom dont really do much schooling with me, she does that wit my brother who has textbooks and stuff. my cirriculum is on computer. das why i am here throughout the day. work school 10 minutes/Wunderground 5 minutes/work school 10 minutes/Wunderground 5 minutes :D


You mean NC State?
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Quoting Grothar:
May I say something?


Attention, please. We have a long honored and valued friend that wishes to use the podium.

Please, Grothar. You have the podium.


BTW, great to see ya!
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 4737
For school thing... (hope you can read my crappy English)

Remember how I'm deaf? It affected me a lot and it was such a struggle to where I am. When I was just one year old, even before I learned English or got cochlear implant, I learned to do A-Z and count to 10 EVEN THOUGH I couldn't hear my parents. I had surgery for cochlear implant when I was just two years old. I entered kindergarten when I was just 5 years old in Wake County. Because of my deafness (got cochlear implant though), I struggled to listen and teachers would kick the crap out of me all the time because I wasn't doing what they wanted me to do. Wake County gave me IQ test and I failed it bad (it was rigged, I later found out). Because I failed the test, my parents started to search for private deaf school and we found it in St. Louis. Missouri gave me IQ test and I had a high IQ, it turns out. When I started at that private school, everybody was amazed how smart I was even though I didn't know English. I was having good grades and was just the smartest deaf student that school ever had in 175 years history. Eventually when I finally spoke my first sentence in English when I was 8, my parents and school decided to make me skip 3rd grade and go to 4th grade. I was still at the top of my class that time when I reach 6th grade. Everybody at that school stays until they reached 8th grade before going to public high school, but I was so smart that my parents decided to sent me to public elementary school (got downgraded from 6th to 5th so I can be the same age as others). Then I was on honor roll from 6th to 8th grade in middle school, and I won school's first ever Geography Bee when I was 8th grade, beating 1000 others hearing students. Before starting high school, I moved back to North Carolina (not Wake County, thanks goodness!!!). I entered in the first AP class when I was in 10th grade last year and had finished 4 AP classes so far now with 4 more coming up in my senior year. I'm on the pace to graduate with high honors and above 4.0 GPA and I already got mails from many major college, but thanks to my good friends at NWS Raleigh, I'm very likely to attends NC State. Not too bad for deaf child who learned English just 5 years ago :) AND Wake County REJECTED me? No wonders they're the embarrassment of education in North Carolina... but now I'm looking toward to the future in meteorology :)
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Problem with public school education is mainly that parents who care take their kids out. A lot of the other parents don't have the time, energy or inclination to monitor their children's school progress as they should. So solveable problems don't get solved in timely fashion, or may never be solved. [one example = SPELLING]

Additionally, no matter how great your teacher is, it's really hard for him or her to do the kind of job kids need when their class sizes are as big as they are. Instead of mandating 25 or less in classes, where students can get the attention they need, school administrative policy is pushing class sizes up. The single advantage home schooling has over public school is manifest in the numbers; like SPL, homeschoolers get the individualized attention they need and can pretty much work at their own pace. Public school kids have to go with the program, even if it isn't fitting their needs, and teachers have to divide themselves into smaller and smaller pieces to make it work. Put it another way; SPL didn't skip gr. 6, he finished it before everybody else.


I can't argue with any of that. It makes sense, and I fully support a parent's right to choose what is best for their children. I just get riled up when all teachers get lumped together as one "entity" that does nothing but teach to the test. (Although, I admit, that does happen in some places.)
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" Quoting yqt1001:


He's homeschooled, he's already hurt socially."




Quoting GeorgiaStormz:


Really, because i am homeschooled too.




Point goes to ... Ah, heck! ... I give up! ... Anybody got a coin to toss? LOL ... Just kidding, people. I saw. I could not resist. This is the result.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 4737
Quoting Grothar:
May I say something?
Well, we already know u CAN say some thing.... in 5 different languges... lol
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Quoting muddertracker:


I usually don't, and probably shouldn't now, but I can't help myself. Where on earth do you live? I am sure the public school teachers in your area would be damn proud of your comments. Not all teachers are great, but most are. They work their asses off for little pay and get second guessed at every turn. For every teacher that gets bad press and does stupid crap, there are hundreds, if not thousands, that do the right thing and are teaching for the right reasons. Generalizations = bad.
Problem with public school education is mainly that parents who care take their kids out. A lot of the other parents don't have the time, energy or inclination to monitor their children's school progress as they should. So solveable problems don't get solved in timely fashion, or may never be solved. [one example = SPELLING]

Additionally, no matter how great your teacher is, it's really hard for him or her to do the kind of job kids need when their class sizes are as big as they are. Instead of mandating 25 or less in classes, where students can get the attention they need, school administrative policy is pushing class sizes up. The single advantage home schooling has over public school is manifest in the numbers; like SPL, homeschoolers get the individualized attention they need and can pretty much work at their own pace. Public school kids have to go with the program, even if it isn't fitting their needs, and teachers have to divide themselves into smaller and smaller pieces to make it work. Put it another way; SPL didn't skip gr. 6, he finished it before everybody else.
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May I say something?
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 68 Comments: 25287
New Days 1-3 HPC QPF graphic:

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101. Skyepony (Mod)
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
sea ice will all but be gone this season in late aug september skye watch and see


Totally agree.. I'm right next to you in the Doom Camp on sea ice.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37300
Quoting WatchingThisOne:


"Severe" geomagnetic storm, per NOAA:

Power systems: possible widespread voltage control problems and some protective systems will mistakenly trip out key assets from the grid.

Spacecraft operations: may experience surface charging and tracking problems, corrections may be needed for orientation problems.

Other systems: induced pipeline currents affect preventive measures, HF radio propagation sporadic, satellite navigation degraded for hours, low-frequency radio navigation disrupted, and aurora has been seen as low as Alabama and northern California (typically 45° geomagnetic lat.)


So you might not see it at 37 degrees.

Thanks Patrap! for keep us up to date on this. As soon as I heard about it I came here for info, and there you were!


Im north of Bama... haha so maybe!
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Quoting Skyepony:


I have friends that are teachers that told me to homeschool if I could. I know one that quit teaching so she could homeschool. FL is now all about passing the FCAT. The better the school does as a whole the more money they get. Teacher's hands are tied..they aren't happy either. No one is hating on teachers here.


Huge lead opens up in the ice..East Siberia
sea ice will all but be gone this season in late aug september skye watch and see
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
98. Skyepony (Mod)
The east wind is bringing me rain now:)

Chicklit~ You can probably appreciate my thoughts more than most since we are in the same school district (or close) & you get the each to their own. Here on the space coast there is a higher than average number of over-educated nerds..many of whom can homeschool, gaining probably the biggest advantage..letting you control your schedule to enjoy life. Another reason for this spike is the sharp rise in ADD & Autism.. These kids aren't fairing well in public school.

Think about had your Mom had the internet. Many kids school online. The gifted classes..they bus those kids to a few schools one day a week for that. Homeschoolers can go pass the gifted test & participate in that too. They can go to classes they select in school too. Most go to the High School to take driver's ed. I know some in things like drama..though homeschool in this area is so big they have their own sports teams, bands, co-ops & such.

Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37300
Quoting yqt1001:


He's homeschooled, he's already hurt socially.


Really, because i am homeschooled too.
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


Even here at 37 north?


"Severe" geomagnetic storm, per NOAA:

Power systems: possible widespread voltage control problems and some protective systems will mistakenly trip out key assets from the grid.

Spacecraft operations: may experience surface charging and tracking problems, corrections may be needed for orientation problems.

Other systems: induced pipeline currents affect preventive measures, HF radio propagation sporadic, satellite navigation degraded for hours, low-frequency radio navigation disrupted, and aurora has been seen as low as Alabama and northern California (typically 45° geomagnetic lat.)


So you might not see it at 37 degrees.

Thanks Patrap! for keep us up to date on this. As soon as I heard about it I came here for info, and there you were!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Neapolitan:
I've known well-adjusted home-schooled kids who could absolutely run academic circles around most public school students--but I've also known home-schooled graduates who had trubblez speelink thayr oan namz. By the same token, I've known public school graduates who went on to great success, and others who became as derelict as derelict can be. In short, then, it seems to me there's a huge spread in students, teachers, and teaching methods.

Having said all that: I've raised my children mostly in Florida, and I'm complete aware of the inanity of teaching to the FCAT. For instance, our nation's history is rich and profound, yet FCAT-oriented teaching insists on drilling into the kids an endless list of names and dates, names, and dates, names and dates. It seems to me pointless, pathetic, and a near-complete waste of time.

But, still--not all public schools, public school teachers, or public school students are the same, so it's unfair to paint them with the same brush.
I believe that the kids today are having more issues with some of the students that attend public schools, the teachers are under payed and 97% of them do a terrific job. The kids that are bullied or ridiculed for whatever reason are at risk to a number of problems. When I was going to school, it was the bullies at the bus stop, or even in the hallways that were the main problem, not the teachers. I was short up until the 9th grade, and had my share of fights because of my height. 10th grade rolled around, and I shot up over half a foot which resolved a majority of the bully problems...Man is it cloudy here..
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lol
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Quoting BHicks94:
Looking to find out if there is the possibility of a precipitation event in the Florida Panhandle in 10 days. Can anyone share any models that might give a clue? Thanks.


GFS 10 day precipitation loop
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481


Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Looking to find out if there is the possibility of a precipitation event in the Florida Panhandle in 10 days. Can anyone share any models that might give a clue? Thanks.
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Quoting yqt1001:


The early grades aren't really a challenge to anyone (well, shouldn't be!). They mostly exist for the social aspect. You don't have to be smart to graduate grade 6. Elementary curriculum, as it is now, is more of a way for kids to learn social skills, teamwork, leadership etc as some extracurricular activities that aid in that area of growth aren't available for many kids.

Now yes, you do learn important things in those grades, but I never noticed that I was actually learning anything until grade 9. It's great if you can skip a grade, in the short term. I agree. Though it isn't a great option in the longer term. I never skipped a grade, but I did miss 4 out of 6 months of grade 9, and wow, I missed a lot.

I'm on course to go to college when I am 17, however my parents strongly recommend that I do not go until I am 18.

About homeschooling, yeah it has benefits. I fail to see large benefits over public schooling though.


my mom wants me to take a year at some pre-college place, before i go to NSCU for my 4 years. that way the year at the pre-college place can give me sort of a boost in college, and i wont enter at a younger age.

And my mom dont really do much schooling with me, she does that wit my brother who has textbooks and stuff. my cirriculum is on computer. das why i am here throughout the day. work school 10 minutes/Wunderground 5 minutes/work school 10 minutes/Wunderground 5 minutes :D
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
I've known well-adjusted home-schooled kids who could absolutely run academic circles around most public school students--but I've also known home-schooled graduates who had trubblez speelink thayr oan namz. By the same token, I've known public school graduates who went on to great success, and others who became as derelict as derelict can be. In short, then, it seems to me there's a huge spread in students, teachers, and teaching methods.

Having said all that: I've raised my children mostly in Florida, and I'm complete aware of the inanity of teaching to the FCAT. For instance, our nation's history is rich and profound, yet FCAT-oriented teaching insists on drilling into the kids an endless list of names and dates, names, and dates, names and dates. It seems to me pointless, pathetic, and a near-complete waste of time.

But, still--not all public schools, public school teachers, or public school students are the same, so it's unfair to paint them with the same brush.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13455
Quoting Skyepony:
On the homeschool subject... I've seen many kids pulled from Jr High because of social problems the last 5 or so years. A few had even stopped speaking. After a year or so out, usually "unschooling" they begin accelerating to where they are entering college 1-3 years early & fitting in as well as learning fine. I've taught horse riding to homeschoolers on & off for longer than I care to mention..The few that the parents fail to let out of the house always stick in people's mind..Looking back over the years at what the homeschoolers grew up to accomplish compared to the public school kids..hands down the homeschoolers got the better head start. These days getting the social aspect is way easier with all the online interaction. Even SPLbeater~ knows more about hanging out with a bunch of the type of people planning on working with one day... Conversing with more geeks a day than even the gifted or honored classes at school could offer. Homeschooling & public school has changed in the last few decades. 20% of the kids in the county here are homeschooled. Public schools here are great at teaching kids to misbehave, be foul mouthed & how to pass the FCAT.

SPL~ Just be ready to test into at least Calculus before starting college.



Amen

Thank you

Amen

OK :D
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.