The March 2 - 3 tornado outbreak: one EF-4, 39 deaths

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:40 PM GMT on March 05, 2012

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A blanket of snow 2 - 4 inches deep fell yesterday on the regions of Southern Indiana and Northern Kentucky pounded by deadly tornadoes on Friday, adding to the misery of survivors. The violent tornado rampage killed 39 and injured hundreds more, wreaking property damage that will likely exceed $1 billion. Hardest hit were Kentucky and Southern Indiana, which suffered 21 and 12 dead, respectively. Three were killed in Ohio, and one each in Alabama and Georgia. The scale of the outbreak was enormous, with a preliminary total of 139 tornadoes touching down in eleven states, from southern Ohio to Northern Florida. The National Weather Service issued 297 tornado warnings and 388 severe thunderstorm warnings. At one point, 31 separate tornado warnings were in effect during the outbreak, and an area larger than Nebraska--81,000 square miles--received tornado warnings. Tornado watches were posted for 300,000 square miles--an area larger than Texas.


Video 1. Spectacular video of the EF-4 tornado that devastated Henrysville and Marysville, Indiana on March 2, 2012. You can see small satellite vorticies rotating on the side of the main vortex.


Video 2. Another video of the EF-4 tornado that devastated Henrysville and Marysville, Indiana on March 2, 2012, taken from a gas station.

The deadliest and most violent tornado: an EF-4
The deadliest and most violent tornado of the March 2, 2012 outbreak was an EF-4 with winds up to 175 mph that demolished much of Henryville, Chelsea, Marysville, and New Pekin, Indiana. Ten minutes after that tornado demolished much of Henryville, a weaker EF-1 tornado hit the town. The twin tornadoes killed twelve people. The Henryville tornado was the only violent EF-4 tornado of the outbreak.



Figure 1. Radar reflectivity image (top) and Doppler velocity image (bottom) of the two tornadoes that hit Henryville, Indiana on March 2, 2012. The first (rightmost) hook echo on the reflectivity image belonged to the only violent tornado of the outbreak, an EF-4 with winds of 166 - 200 mph. Ten minutes after that tornado demolished much of Henryville, a second tornado hit the town. These tornadoes also caused severe damage to the towns of Chelsea, Marysville, and New Pekin, and killed twelve people.

At least eleven other tornadoes in the outbreak have been classified as EF-3s with winds of 136 - 165 mph. Capitalclimate.com reports that the EF-3 tornadoes that crossed three Eastern Kentucky counties were the first tornadoes that strong ever observed, since tornado records began in 1950. The deadliest of the EF-3 tornadoes hit West Liberty, Kentucky, killing eight. Here's a summary of the deadly tornadoes of the outbreak taken from Wikipedia:

EF-4, 12 deaths, Henrysville, Indiana
EF-3, 8 deaths, West Liberty, Kentucky\
EF-2, 5 deaths, East Bernstadt, Kentucky
EF-3, 4 deaths, Crittenden, Kentucky
EF-3, 2 deaths, Holton, Indiana
EF-3, 3 deaths, Peach Grove, Ohio
EF-3, 2 deaths, Blaine, Kentucky
EF-3, 2 deaths, Salyersville, Kentucky
EF-2, 1 death, Jackson's Gap, Alabama


Figure 2. Damage in West Liberty, Kentucky after the March 2, 2012 EF-3 tornado. Image taken from from a Kentucky National Guard Blackhawk helicopter, while landing in West Liberty, KY (Morgan County).


Figure 3. Radar image of the West Liberty, Kentucky EF-3 tornado of March 2, 2012, showing a classic hook echo. The tornado carved a 60-mile-long path through Eastern Kentucky, causing extreme damage in West Liberty. The tornado killed six in West Liberty and two near Frenchburg. At least 75 people were injured. It was the first EF-3 tornado in Eastern Kentucky since 1988.


Video 3. A woman prays for deliverance of West Liberty as the ominous wall cloud of the developing tornado approaches the town.

Incredibly fast-moving storms
The speed with which some of the storms moved was truly exceptional, thanks to jet stream winds of up to 115 mph that pushed the thunderstorms forward at amazing speeds. A number of the tornadoes ripped through Kentucky with forward speeds of 70 mph, and two tornado warnings in Central Kentucky were issued for parent thunderstorms that moved at 85 mph. NWS damage surveys have not yet determined if one of the tornadoes from the outbreak has beaten the record for the fastest moving tornado, the 73 mph forward speed of the great 1925 Tri-State Tornado, the deadliest U.S. tornado of all-time.


Video 4. A family gets in their car in an attempt to flee the Borden, Indiana tornado of March 2, 2012. Unless you know what you're doing, fleeing a tornado in a car can be extremely dangerous, especially when the tornadoes are moving at speeds of 50 - 70 mph, as many were doing during the March 2, 2012 outbreak. Most tornado fatalities occur in mobile homes and cars.

Largest 5-day and 2nd largest 2-day tornado outbreak for so early in the year?
The March 2 tornado outbreak spawned 128 tornadoes, according to preliminary reports as of 8 am EST March 7 from NOAA's Storm Prediction Center. An additional 11 tornadoes (preliminary) touched down on March 3, in Florida and Georgia; 3 additional tornadoes touched down on March 1 (Wikipedia does a great job tallying the stats for this tornado outbreak.) These preliminary reports are typically over-counted by 15%, but a few delayed reports will likely come in, bringing the total number of tornadoes from the March 2 - 3 outbreak to 115 - 125, propelling it into second place for the largest two-day tornado outbreak so early in the year. The top five two-day tornado outbreaks for so early in the year, since record keeping began in 1950:

January 21 - 22, 1999: 129 tornadoes, 4 deaths
March 2 - 3, 2012: 139 tornadoes (preliminary), 39 deaths
February 5 - 6, 2008: 87 tornadoes, 57 deaths
February 28 - March 1, 1997: 60 tornadoes, 10 deaths
January 7 - 8, 2008: 56 tornadoes, 4 deaths

Though the 36 tornadoes that occurred during the February 28 - 29 Leap Day outbreak were part of a separate storm system, the five-day tornado total from February 28 - March 3, 2012 is likely to eclipse the late January 18 - 22, 1999 five-day tornado outbreak (131 tornadoes) as the most prolific five-day period of tornado activity on record for so early in the year.


Figure 4. A key ingredient for tornado formation is the presence of warm, moist air near the surface, which helps make the atmosphere unstable. On the day of the March 2, 2012 outbreak, record warm air surged northwards into the tornado formation region, setting or tying daily high temperature records at 28 airports in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia.

Ingredients for the tornado outbreak
This year's unusually mild winter has led to ocean temperatures across the Gulf of Mexico that are approximately 1°C above average--among the top ten warmest values on record for this time of year, going back to the 1800s. (Averaged over the month of February, the highest sea surface temperatures on record in the Gulf between 20 - 30°N, 85 - 95°W occurred in 2002, when the waters were 1.34°C above average). Friday's tornado outbreak was fueled, in part, by high instability created by unusually warm, moist air flowing north from the Gulf of Mexico due to the high water temperatures there. This exceptionally warm air set record high temperatures at 28 airports in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia the afternoon of the tornado outbreak (March 2.) Cold, dry air from Canada moved over the outbreak region at high altitudes. This created a highly unstable atmosphere--warm, low-density air rising in thunderstorm updrafts was able to accelerate rapidly upwards to the top of the lower atmosphere, since the surrounding air was cooler and denser at high altitudes. These vigorous updrafts needed some twisting motion to get them spinning and create tornadoes. Very strong twisting forces were present Friday over the tornado outbreak area, thanks to upper-level jet stream winds that blew in excess of 115 mph. These winds changed speed and direction sharply with height,imparting a shearing motion on the atmosphere (wind shear), causing the air to spin. High instability and a high wind shear are the two key ingredients for tornado formation.


Figure 5. The other key ingredient for tornado formation is the presence of very strong winds aloft that change speed and direction sharply with height. This change of wind imparts a shearing motion on the atmosphere (wind shear), causing the air to spin. Here, we see the upper-level wind speeds at the peak of the March 2, 2012 tornado outbreak. The jet stream can be seen as the U-shaped belt of strong winds. Jet stream winds in excess of 100 mph (deep blue colors) were present over the tornado outbreak area in this analysis of data from the NOAA North American Model (NAM) from 7 pm EST March 2, 2012. Image credit: NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory.

Another bad year for tornadoes in the U.S.--what's going on?
Last year's tornado season was incredibly severe, and we are off to one of the worst early-season starts to tornado season on record now in 2012. However, it is too soon to ring the alarm bells on climate change being responsible for this. The tornado data base going back to 1950 doesn't show an increasing trend in strong tornadoes in recent decades. While climate change could potentially lead to an increase in tornadoes, by increasing instability, it could also decrease them, by decreasing wind shear. I'd need to see a lot more bad tornado years before blaming climate change for the severe tornado seasons of the past two years. One thing that climate change may be doing, though, is shifting the season earlier in the year. The 5-day total of tornadoes from February 28 - March 3 will probably break the record of 131 set in 1999 for the largest tornado outbreak so early in the year. Warmer winters, and an earlier arrival of spring due to a warming climate, will allow tornado season to start earlier--and end earlier. This year's early start to tornado season is consistent with what we would expect from a warming climate. I have a more extensive article on this subject that has just been published by Weatherwise magazine, and a 2008 post, Are tornadoes getting stronger and more frequent? Dr. Jonathan Martin of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is doing interesting research on the type of situation we saw with some of the recent severe tornado outbreaks, when two branches of the jet stream, the polar jet and the subtropical jet, merge to form a "superjet." In a December 2011 interview with sciencedaily.com, he said: "There is reason to believe that in a warmer climate, this kind of overlapping of the jet streams that can lead to high-impact weather may be more frequent."

I don't see any storm systems coming over the next 10 days that could cause a major tornado outbreak, though March weather is too volatile to forecast reliably that far in advance. There is a storm system expected to develop on Thursday in the Plains we will have to watch, but so far, indications are that it will not be capable of generating a major tornado outbreak.

Portlight disaster relief charity responds to the tornado disaster
The Portlight disaster relief charity reports that volunteers from colleges and churches made a strong showing in tornado-devastated Harrisburg, Illinois on Sunday. Team Rubicon and Portlight will push east to Indiana, where volunteer work is still restricted because of gas leaks and continuing SAR (search and rescue) operations.

I'll edit this post with new stats on the tornado outbreak as they become available, and have an entirely new post on Wednesday.

Jeff Masters

Tornado (JimAtTn)
This picture of a small tornado was taken on Friday March 02, 2012 in southern Lincoln County, Tennessee about 7 miles south of Fayetteville. Photographer: Angela Currey-Echols
Tornado
3/2/12 Tornado (charles7013)
A tornado in Dodsen Brach TN.
3/2/12 Tornado
High Risk (LightningFastMedia)
Rotating wall cloud and a possible funnel yesterday, north of Evansville, IN.
High Risk
tornado damage 3/2/12 (clerese3)
3/2/12 tornado damage to a business I pass on my way to and from work. This was a beautiful brick building.
tornado damage 3/2/12
Tornado Damage - TN (GeorgiaPeach)
I uploaded this photo once already and it was rejected for having the wrong date. I explained before, but I will explain again. The tornado came through March 2nd but I had just gotten out of the hospital, so I didn't get out to take pictures of the damage until today. This is five miles from my house in Hamilton County, TN.
Tornado Damage - TN

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420. KoritheMan
3:41 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
lol I know that but I'm not really looking over the full conversation. Bad habit I have.


Short attention span?
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
419. hurricanehunter27
3:38 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting KoritheMan:


I thought it was kinda obvious given the context. o_O

We dink with each other all the time. It's how bros give love.
lol I know that but I'm not really looking over the full conversation. Bad habit I have.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
418. KoritheMan
3:37 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Sorry just cant tell if its in good spirits or not.


I thought it was kinda obvious given the context. o_O

We screw with each other all the time. It's how bros give love.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
417. hurricanehunter27
3:36 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting KoritheMan:


Someone needs to lighten up.
Sorry just cant tell if its in good spirits or not.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
416. ScottLincoln
3:35 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting Jedkins01:



Don't get me wrong, this is post is not about cracking on the NWS. They overall do a great job, but every once in a great while it seems someone on the night crew is goofing off...


They just need to fill in more utter weather geeks for those late night hours. I will stay up tracking closley all freakin night just for a line of strong thunderstorms and I don't even get paid for it!


By the time it is reported, about the only reason they wouldn't issue a warning is if they don't believe the report, or believe the report was a fluke and the storm wont produce anymore, so they just missed it and it's over. Sounds like your anecdote is one where they probably could have done better.

I'm grabbing that data for the Charlotte area while I'm still in a GR2Analyst mood. Just got done looking at Harveyville, KS. That storm was just about unwarnable. Tornado formed right on the edge of town and then was gone the next scan. Dual-pol just showed possible debris after the tornado lifted. Statistically-speaking that is a very unusual situation.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3169
415. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
3:32 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting Patrap:


Thank's, service was a distinct privilege and Honor,

I was fortunate to serve a year at Camp Hansen in Okinawa, where the Typhoon is a almost yearly occurrence.

Also its where my Father served in the USMC during the last Battle of WW-2. I have photos here in the Photos section on my wunderblog.

Also I served in Europe with wunderblogger Grothar during a NATO Cold Weather Air Operation in Tromso, Norway,in Spring of 84..but we didnt find that out till we met here.

One should cross the Atlantic or Pacific once in a Ship during their life, as I highly recommend it.

So itsa small World one could say in a way too.
speaking of grothar any one hear from him been a while
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
414. Jedkins01
3:32 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Here in Florida, a couple summers back we had a late night severe thunderstorm around 1:30 that produced a confirmed wind gust to 62 mph here by airport near my house, it produced violent wind damage throughout the county including building damage, down trees and several thousand without power, and then went on to spawn a tornado in Manatee County which destroyed some rural homes( I don't remember what it was rated in the end but it was confirmed a tornado buy damage surveys).

The crazy thing about all this was NO warnings were issued at all. I remember having the local 24 news channel Bay News 9 on and when they were tracking the storm approaching the coast near Clearwater Beach, they were for sure a warning was going to be issued, and they were confused when no warnings at all were issued. That was by far one of the strongest thunderstorm cells Ive seen, not even so much because of the strong winds but it was the most incredible lightning and down pour events Ive seen around here. And that is saying something because we get a very large number of torrential rain and frequent lightning events...

The atmosphere wasn't even favorable for tornadoes or damaging wind,s its just the cell was so darn powerful that it produced severe weather anyway. Either way, I never did see an explanation from the NWS for that event, but here the cell was severe for a long time and produced damage over a wide area. That being said, someone on the night crew was sleeping. Ive seen some questionable events where warnings should have been issued but weren't like the powerful storms here Saturday night, but never have I seen something blown as bad as that late summer night a couple years back...


Don't get me wrong, this post is not about cracking on the NWS. They overall do a great job, but every once in a great while it seems someone on the night crew is goofing off...


They just need to fill in more utter weather geeks for those late night hours. I will stay up tracking closely all freakin night just for a line of strong thunderstorms and I don't even get paid for it!
Member Since: August 21, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 7299
413. KoritheMan
3:31 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting hurricanehunter27:

Ok your bickering is taking up blog space.


Someone needs to lighten up.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
412. SPLbeater
3:31 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Seen the video of why the Greenville NWS missed it, and they said that 'Nobody was sleeping on the job' and that 95% they hit accurately. they are trying to improve on how they cannot miss. They say it formed from ground up literally..a result, everyones Weather radio was silent.

Im glad that Raleigh NWS doesnt do that lol.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
411. hurricanehunter27
3:30 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:


i love all music its a great form of expression
And I have huge respect for that. Most people dont view music as a tool for expression.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
410. Patrap
3:29 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
I love when that happens. Also thank you for telling me about the photos.


Anytime,

Sharing is what this site does best I feel.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127628
409. JNCali
3:28 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting Patrap:



Novelty, from the Global conscience we have created.

"High novelty" ..one could say JNCali..


Shopping carts lie in a pond next to Wal-Mart in Harrisburg, Illinois, a day after it was hit by a tornado, Thursday, March 1, 2012. (Abel Uribe/Chicago Tribune/MCT)

Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/2012/03/01/2174291/the-dai ly-edit-030212.html?KeepThis=true&TB_iframe=tr ue&h eight=515&width=910#storylink=cpy



Novelty? more like creepy!.. George Nori on line 2
Member Since: September 9, 2010 Posts: 5 Comments: 1034
408. hurricanehunter27
3:28 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Make me?

* TropicalAnalystwx13 hides

Oh wait, I'm not scared of you. =P
Quoting KoritheMan:


Quiet, boy.

Ok your bickering is taking up blog space.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
407. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
3:28 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting hurricanehunter27:

I get the feeling that you have a very broad taste in music.


i love all music its a great form of expression
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
406. Jedkins01
3:28 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Yeah, not a very good excuse...



Here in Florida, a couple summers back we had a late night severe thunderstorm around 1:30 that produced a confirmed wind gust to 62 mph here by airport near my house, it produced violent wind damage throughout the county including building damage, down trees and several thousand without power, and then went on to spawn a tornado in Manatee County which destroyed some rural homes( I don't remember what it was rated in the end but it was confirmed a tornado buy damage surveys).

The crazy thing about all this was NO warnings were issued at all. I remember having the local 24 news channel Bay News 9 on and when they were tracking the storm approaching the coast near Clearwater Beach, they were for sure a warning was going to be issued, and they were confused when no warnings at all were issued. That was by far one of the strongest thunderstorm cells Ive seen, not even so much because of the strong winds but it was the most incredible lightning and down pour events Ive seen around here. And that is saying something because we get a very large number of torrential rain and frequent lightning events...

The atmosphere wasn't even favorable for tornadoes or damaging wind,s its just the cell was so darn powerful that it produced severe weather anyway. Either way, I never did see an explanation from the NWS for that event, but here the cell was severe for a long time and produced damage over a wide area. That being said, someone on the night crew was sleeping. Ive seen some questionable events where warnings should have been issued but weren't like the powerful storms here Saturday night, but never have I seen something blown as bad as that late summer night a couple years back...
Member Since: August 21, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 7299
405. KoritheMan
3:28 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Make me?

* TropicalAnalystwx13 hides

Oh wait, I'm not scared of you. =P


You will be when I call your parents.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
404. SPLbeater
3:27 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting ScottLincoln:


Anyone know the time that the Charlotte, NC, tornado occurred? I might grab the data and analyze it myself.


well, there were high wind reports coming in after 2AM to SPC:

0736Z- Charlotte-Mecklenburg Fire Marshall reports damage in far eastern Mecklenburg(county), there is damage in the Plaza road area.

And Charlotte is in central Mecklenburg county NC, so i would say tornado touchdown just after 2:30 AM March 3rd:D
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
403. hurricanehunter27
3:27 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting Patrap:


I was fortunate to serve a year at Camp Hansen in Okinawa, where the Typhoon is a almost yearly occurrence.

Also its where my Father served in the USMC during the last Battle of WW-2. I have photos here in the Photos section on my wunderblog.

Also I served in Europe with wunderblogger Grothar during a NATO Cold Weather Air Operation in Tromso, Norway,in Spring of 84..but we didnt find that out till we met here.

So itsa small World one could say in a way too.
I love when that happens. Also thank you for telling me about the photos.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
402. TropicalAnalystwx13
3:26 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting KoritheMan:


Quiet, boy.

Make me?

* TropicalAnalystwx13 hides

Oh wait, I'm not scared of you. =P
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31519
401. KoritheMan
3:24 AM GMT on March 06, 2012
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Don't talk back.


Quiet, boy.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Thank you for your service. Did they station you anywere outside the US? If you dont mind please tell. I love a good story if you have one.


Thank's, service was a distinct privilege and Honor,

I was fortunate to serve a year at Camp Hansen in Okinawa, where the Typhoon is a almost yearly occurrence.

Also its where my Father served in the USMC during the last Battle of WW-2. I have photos here in the Photos section on my wunderblog.

Also I served in Europe with wunderblogger Grothar during a NATO Cold Weather Air Operation in Tromso, Norway,in Spring of 84..but we didnt find that out till we met here.

One should cross the Atlantic or Pacific once in a Ship during their life, as I highly recommend it.

So itsa small World one could say in a way too.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127628
Quoting KoritheMan:


Quiet, boy.

Don't talk back.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31519
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

That's just ridiculous, you need to go sit in the corner and think about what you have done.


Quiet, boy.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
Quoting ScottLincoln:


Uh, good. Nice to know if they are beneficial to at least a few people.

Anyone know the time that the Charlotte, NC, tornado occurred? I might grab the data and analyze it myself.
of course they are. It's nice having an NWS employee on here who knows what he's talking about.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
Quoting KoritheMan:


If only one of them would decapitate my idiot managers.

*innocently whistles*
DOOH!
Member Since: September 9, 2010 Posts: 5 Comments: 1034
Quoting JNCali:
That just spurned a horrible thought.. imagine being in a Walmart parking lot and a tornado gobbles up those 2 thousand shopping carts and heads your direction.. there's a middle class nightmare if I ever heard one!



Novelty, from the Global conscience we have created.

"High novelty" ..one could say JNCali..


Shopping carts lie in a pond next to Wal-Mart in Harrisburg, Illinois, a day after it was hit by a tornado, Thursday, March 1, 2012. (Abel Uribe/Chicago Tribune/MCT)

Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/2012/03/01/2174291/the-dai ly-edit-030212.html?KeepThis=true&TB_iframe=true&h eight=515&width=910#storylink=cpy



Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127628
Quoting KoritheMan:


If only one of them would decapitate my idiot managers.

*innocently whistles*

That's just ridiculous, you need to go sit in the corner and think about what you have done.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31519
Quoting JNCali:
That just spurned a horrible thought.. imagine being in a Walmart parking lot and a tornado gobbles up those 2 thousand shopping carts and heads your direction.. there's a middle class nightmare if I ever heard one!


If only one of them would decapitate my idiot managers.

*innocently whistles*
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
Quoting Patrap:
One can feel free to serve America in one of the Armed Forces as well.

It's a all volunteer force so one has to make that decision from within.

Looking back in my life, at 20, it was the best decision I could have made at the time.

But that was 1980, in a Galaxy and time, long, long ago..
Thank you for your service. Did they station you anywere outside the US? If you dont mind please tell. I love a good story if you have one.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
Quoting hydrus:
Do you notice anything at the bottom of your posts 362 and 363?


No?
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Lol I did not even read what you were quoting and I had to say something when I saw your comment regardless. To be honest I dont care for what your discussing.


Blunt, are we? I like that.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
Quoting Patrap:
Space around Sol is Kinda like a Wal Mart parking lot, if you hang out there long nuff, a rogue 94 Saturn will find you and dent ya purty good.
That just spurned a horrible thought.. imagine being in a Walmart parking lot and a tornado gobbles up those 2 thousand shopping carts and heads your direction.. there's a middle class nightmare if I ever heard one!
Member Since: September 9, 2010 Posts: 5 Comments: 1034
One can feel free to serve America in one of the Armed Forces as well.

It's a all volunteer force so one has to make that decision from within.

Looking back in my life, at 20, it was the best decision I could have made at the time.

But that was 1980, in a Galaxy and time, long, long ago..and far away now.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127628
Quoting Patrap:
Space around Sol is Kinda like a Wal Mart parking lot, if you hang out there long nuff, a rogue 94 Saturn will find you and dent ya purty good.


lol
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
Quoting KoritheMan:


Very interesting. Thanks for sharing.
Do you notice anything at the bottom of your posts 362 and 363?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:



I get the feeling that you have a very broad taste in music.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
Quoting TomTaylor:
Well you shouldn't. I know you can't vote yet, but the government effects you in countless ways everyday, and you also have the ability to influence the government.

Also, if you are ever unhappy with the US government, remember the best thing you can do is to get involved in some form of political participation. Whether it's voting, campaigning, litigating, or signing a petition, if you wish to see a change, make that change happen.

All those folks who are unhappy with the government and say screw the government, but continue to sit there and do nothing are doing no good for anyone.


Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Quoting KoritheMan:


No they're not. I was just illustrating that age isn't just a number. Not only in terms of legal benefits, but experiential benefits as well. For example, I look at myself just three years ago and realize how flagrantly immature I was. And I'm sure I'll do the same three years from now.

Humans never stop growing. There is always room for improvement, and life provides plenty of avenues for that.
Lol I did not even read what you were quoting and I had to say something when I saw your comment regardless. To be honest I dont care for what your discussing.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
Space around Sol is Kinda like a Wal Mart parking lot, if you hang out there long nuff, a rogue 94 Saturn will find you and dent ya purty good.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127628
Quoting KoritheMan:
Just finished working out. Anyone ever try these? They're called "M100", or mandatory 100. Ideally you're supposed to do all three exercises in the video 100 times each within a period of just a couple of minutes without stopping. I can't do anywhere near that, but I'm slowly working myself up.

I dare anyone to try them.
Looks very intense.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:
Story Linked from a wunderblogger in Dr. Ricky Roods current entry.




The tectonic' effects of the collision of one spherule with another during the cosmic impact. (Credit: Image courtesy of University of California - Santa Barbara)


New Research Supports Theory of Extraterrestrial Impact
ScienceDaily (Mar. 5, 2012)


A 16-member international team of researchers that includes James Kennett, professor of earth science at UC Santa Barbara, has identified a nearly 13,000-year-old layer of thin, dark sediment buried in the floor of Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico. The sediment layer contains an exotic assemblage of materials, including nanodiamonds, impact spherules, and more, which, according to the researchers, are the result of a cosmic body impacting Earth.
These new data are the latest to strongly support of a controversial hypothesis proposing that a major cosmic impact with Earth occurred 12,900 years ago at the onset of an unusual cold climatic period called the Younger Dryas. The researchers' findings appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Conducting a wide range of exhaustive tests, the researchers conclusively identified a family of nanodiamonds, including the impact form of nanodiamonds called lonsdaleite, which is unique to cosmic impact. The researchers also found spherules that had collided at high velocities with other spherules during the chaos of impact. Such features, Kennett noted, could not have formed through anthropogenic, volcanic, or other natural terrestrial processes. "These materials form only through cosmic impact," he said.
The data suggest that a comet or asteroid -- likely a large, previously fragmented body, greater than several hundred meters in diameter -- entered the atmosphere at a relatively shallow angle. The heat at impact burned biomass, melted surface rocks, and caused major environmental disruption. "These results are consistent with earlier reported discoveries throughout North America of abrupt ecosystem change, megafaunal extinction, and human cultural change and population reduction," Kennett explained.
The sediment layer identified by the researchers is of the same age as that previously reported at numerous locations throughout North America, Greenland, and Western Europe. The current discovery extends the known range of the nanodiamond-rich layer into Mexico and the tropics. In addition, it is the first reported for true lake deposits.
In the entire geologic record, there are only two known continent-wide layers with abundance peaks in nanodiamonds, impact spherules, and aciniform soot. These are in the 65-million-year-old Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary layer that coincided with major extinctions, including the dinosaurs and ammonites; and the Younger Dryas boundary event at 12,900 years ago, closely associated with the extinctions of many large North American animals, including mammoths, mastodons, saber-tooth cats, and dire wolves.
"The timing of the impact event coincided with the most extraordinary biotic and environmental changes over Mexico and Central America during the last approximately 20,000 years, as recorded by others in several regional lake deposits," said Kennett. "These changes were large, abrupt, and unprecedented, and had been recorded and identified by earlier investigators as a 'time of crisis.' "
Other scientists contributing to the research include Isabel Israde-Alcántara and Gabriela Dominguez-Vásquez of the Universidad Michoacana de San Nicólas de Hidalgo; James L. Bischoff of the U.S. Geological Survey; Hong-Chun Li of National Taiwan University; Paul S. DeCarli of SRI International; Ted E. Bunch and James H. Wittke of Northern Arizona University; James C. Weaver of Harvard University; Richard B. Firestone of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Allen West of GeoScience Consulting; Chris Mercer of the National Institute for Materials Science; Sujing Zie and Eric K. Richman of the University of Oregon, Eugene; and Charles R. Kinzie and Wendy S. Wolbach of DePaul University.


Very interesting. Thanks for sharing.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
That's aprrox half of the Precession Time cycle, or 26,000 years for a complete circuit.



Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127628
Quoting KoritheMan:


How do you know?

I just do.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31519
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

You're not a ninja.


How do you know?
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
Story Linked from a wunderblogger in Dr. Ricky Roods current entry.




The tectonic' effects of the collision of one spherule with another during the cosmic impact. (Credit: Image courtesy of University of California - Santa Barbara)


New Research Supports Theory of Extraterrestrial Impact
ScienceDaily (Mar. 5, 2012)


A 16-member international team of researchers that includes James Kennett, professor of earth science at UC Santa Barbara, has identified a nearly 13,000-year-old layer of thin, dark sediment buried in the floor of Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico. The sediment layer contains an exotic assemblage of materials, including nanodiamonds, impact spherules, and more, which, according to the researchers, are the result of a cosmic body impacting Earth.
These new data are the latest to strongly support of a controversial hypothesis proposing that a major cosmic impact with Earth occurred 12,900 years ago at the onset of an unusual cold climatic period called the Younger Dryas. The researchers' findings appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Conducting a wide range of exhaustive tests, the researchers conclusively identified a family of nanodiamonds, including the impact form of nanodiamonds called lonsdaleite, which is unique to cosmic impact. The researchers also found spherules that had collided at high velocities with other spherules during the chaos of impact. Such features, Kennett noted, could not have formed through anthropogenic, volcanic, or other natural terrestrial processes. "These materials form only through cosmic impact," he said.
The data suggest that a comet or asteroid -- likely a large, previously fragmented body, greater than several hundred meters in diameter -- entered the atmosphere at a relatively shallow angle. The heat at impact burned biomass, melted surface rocks, and caused major environmental disruption. "These results are consistent with earlier reported discoveries throughout North America of abrupt ecosystem change, megafaunal extinction, and human cultural change and population reduction," Kennett explained.
The sediment layer identified by the researchers is of the same age as that previously reported at numerous locations throughout North America, Greenland, and Western Europe. The current discovery extends the known range of the nanodiamond-rich layer into Mexico and the tropics. In addition, it is the first reported for true lake deposits.
In the entire geologic record, there are only two known continent-wide layers with abundance peaks in nanodiamonds, impact spherules, and aciniform soot. These are in the 65-million-year-old Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary layer that coincided with major extinctions, including the dinosaurs and ammonites; and the Younger Dryas boundary event at 12,900 years ago, closely associated with the extinctions of many large North American animals, including mammoths, mastodons, saber-tooth cats, and dire wolves.
"The timing of the impact event coincided with the most extraordinary biotic and environmental changes over Mexico and Central America during the last approximately 20,000 years, as recorded by others in several regional lake deposits," said Kennett. "These changes were large, abrupt, and unprecedented, and had been recorded and identified by earlier investigators as a 'time of crisis.' "
Other scientists contributing to the research include Isabel Israde-Alcántara and Gabriela Dominguez-Vásquez of the Universidad Michoacana de San Nicólas de Hidalgo; James L. Bischoff of the U.S. Geological Survey; Hong-Chun Li of National Taiwan University; Paul S. DeCarli of SRI International; Ted E. Bunch and James H. Wittke of Northern Arizona University; James C. Weaver of Harvard University; Richard B. Firestone of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Allen West of GeoScience Consulting; Chris Mercer of the National Institute for Materials Science; Sujing Zie and Eric K. Richman of the University of Oregon, Eugene; and Charles R. Kinzie and Wendy S. Wolbach of DePaul University.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127628
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Lol the goverment is always right! Right? Right......


No they're not. I was just illustrating that age isn't just a number. Not only in terms of legal benefits, but experiential benefits as well. For example, I look at myself just three years ago and realize how flagrantly immature I was. And I'm sure I'll do the same three years from now.

Humans never stop growing. There is always room for improvement, and life provides plenty of avenues for that.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
Quoting KoritheMan:
Just finished working out. Anyone ever try these? They're called "M100", or mandatory 100. Ideally you're supposed to do all three exercises in the video 100 times each within a period of just a couple of minutes without stopping. I can't do anywhere near that, but I'm slowly working myself up.

I dare anyone to try them.

You're not a ninja.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31519
Quoting KoritheMan:


The United States government says otherwise.
Lol the goverment is always right! Right? Right......
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3841
Just finished working out. Anyone ever try these? They're called "M100", or mandatory 100. Ideally you're supposed to do all three exercises in the video 100 times each within a period of just a couple of minutes without stopping. I can't do anywhere near that, but I'm slowly working myself up.

I dare anyone to try them.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977
Quoting TomTaylor:
Scott, I like your posts...lol


Uh, good. Nice to know if they are beneficial to at least a few people.

Anyone know the time that the Charlotte, NC, tornado occurred? I might grab the data and analyze it myself.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3169

Quoting SPLbeater:


Mom pointed out why english is hard to learn.

Bomb,
Comb,
Tomb are all spelled similar, but the o is different in dem all!
It's that darn phonics!
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 557 Comments: 19977

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.