The March 2 - 3 tornado outbreak: one EF-4, 39 deaths

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:40 PM GMT on March 05, 2012

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A blanket of snow 2 - 4 inches deep fell yesterday on the regions of Southern Indiana and Northern Kentucky pounded by deadly tornadoes on Friday, adding to the misery of survivors. The violent tornado rampage killed 39 and injured hundreds more, wreaking property damage that will likely exceed $1 billion. Hardest hit were Kentucky and Southern Indiana, which suffered 21 and 12 dead, respectively. Three were killed in Ohio, and one each in Alabama and Georgia. The scale of the outbreak was enormous, with a preliminary total of 139 tornadoes touching down in eleven states, from southern Ohio to Northern Florida. The National Weather Service issued 297 tornado warnings and 388 severe thunderstorm warnings. At one point, 31 separate tornado warnings were in effect during the outbreak, and an area larger than Nebraska--81,000 square miles--received tornado warnings. Tornado watches were posted for 300,000 square miles--an area larger than Texas.


Video 1. Spectacular video of the EF-4 tornado that devastated Henrysville and Marysville, Indiana on March 2, 2012. You can see small satellite vorticies rotating on the side of the main vortex.


Video 2. Another video of the EF-4 tornado that devastated Henrysville and Marysville, Indiana on March 2, 2012, taken from a gas station.

The deadliest and most violent tornado: an EF-4
The deadliest and most violent tornado of the March 2, 2012 outbreak was an EF-4 with winds up to 175 mph that demolished much of Henryville, Chelsea, Marysville, and New Pekin, Indiana. Ten minutes after that tornado demolished much of Henryville, a weaker EF-1 tornado hit the town. The twin tornadoes killed twelve people. The Henryville tornado was the only violent EF-4 tornado of the outbreak.



Figure 1. Radar reflectivity image (top) and Doppler velocity image (bottom) of the two tornadoes that hit Henryville, Indiana on March 2, 2012. The first (rightmost) hook echo on the reflectivity image belonged to the only violent tornado of the outbreak, an EF-4 with winds of 166 - 200 mph. Ten minutes after that tornado demolished much of Henryville, a second tornado hit the town. These tornadoes also caused severe damage to the towns of Chelsea, Marysville, and New Pekin, and killed twelve people.

At least eleven other tornadoes in the outbreak have been classified as EF-3s with winds of 136 - 165 mph. Capitalclimate.com reports that the EF-3 tornadoes that crossed three Eastern Kentucky counties were the first tornadoes that strong ever observed, since tornado records began in 1950. The deadliest of the EF-3 tornadoes hit West Liberty, Kentucky, killing eight. Here's a summary of the deadly tornadoes of the outbreak taken from Wikipedia:

EF-4, 12 deaths, Henrysville, Indiana
EF-3, 8 deaths, West Liberty, Kentucky\
EF-2, 5 deaths, East Bernstadt, Kentucky
EF-3, 4 deaths, Crittenden, Kentucky
EF-3, 2 deaths, Holton, Indiana
EF-3, 3 deaths, Peach Grove, Ohio
EF-3, 2 deaths, Blaine, Kentucky
EF-3, 2 deaths, Salyersville, Kentucky
EF-2, 1 death, Jackson's Gap, Alabama


Figure 2. Damage in West Liberty, Kentucky after the March 2, 2012 EF-3 tornado. Image taken from from a Kentucky National Guard Blackhawk helicopter, while landing in West Liberty, KY (Morgan County).


Figure 3. Radar image of the West Liberty, Kentucky EF-3 tornado of March 2, 2012, showing a classic hook echo. The tornado carved a 60-mile-long path through Eastern Kentucky, causing extreme damage in West Liberty. The tornado killed six in West Liberty and two near Frenchburg. At least 75 people were injured. It was the first EF-3 tornado in Eastern Kentucky since 1988.


Video 3. A woman prays for deliverance of West Liberty as the ominous wall cloud of the developing tornado approaches the town.

Incredibly fast-moving storms
The speed with which some of the storms moved was truly exceptional, thanks to jet stream winds of up to 115 mph that pushed the thunderstorms forward at amazing speeds. A number of the tornadoes ripped through Kentucky with forward speeds of 70 mph, and two tornado warnings in Central Kentucky were issued for parent thunderstorms that moved at 85 mph. NWS damage surveys have not yet determined if one of the tornadoes from the outbreak has beaten the record for the fastest moving tornado, the 73 mph forward speed of the great 1925 Tri-State Tornado, the deadliest U.S. tornado of all-time.


Video 4. A family gets in their car in an attempt to flee the Borden, Indiana tornado of March 2, 2012. Unless you know what you're doing, fleeing a tornado in a car can be extremely dangerous, especially when the tornadoes are moving at speeds of 50 - 70 mph, as many were doing during the March 2, 2012 outbreak. Most tornado fatalities occur in mobile homes and cars.

Largest 5-day and 2nd largest 2-day tornado outbreak for so early in the year?
The March 2 tornado outbreak spawned 128 tornadoes, according to preliminary reports as of 8 am EST March 7 from NOAA's Storm Prediction Center. An additional 11 tornadoes (preliminary) touched down on March 3, in Florida and Georgia; 3 additional tornadoes touched down on March 1 (Wikipedia does a great job tallying the stats for this tornado outbreak.) These preliminary reports are typically over-counted by 15%, but a few delayed reports will likely come in, bringing the total number of tornadoes from the March 2 - 3 outbreak to 115 - 125, propelling it into second place for the largest two-day tornado outbreak so early in the year. The top five two-day tornado outbreaks for so early in the year, since record keeping began in 1950:

January 21 - 22, 1999: 129 tornadoes, 4 deaths
March 2 - 3, 2012: 139 tornadoes (preliminary), 39 deaths
February 5 - 6, 2008: 87 tornadoes, 57 deaths
February 28 - March 1, 1997: 60 tornadoes, 10 deaths
January 7 - 8, 2008: 56 tornadoes, 4 deaths

Though the 36 tornadoes that occurred during the February 28 - 29 Leap Day outbreak were part of a separate storm system, the five-day tornado total from February 28 - March 3, 2012 is likely to eclipse the late January 18 - 22, 1999 five-day tornado outbreak (131 tornadoes) as the most prolific five-day period of tornado activity on record for so early in the year.


Figure 4. A key ingredient for tornado formation is the presence of warm, moist air near the surface, which helps make the atmosphere unstable. On the day of the March 2, 2012 outbreak, record warm air surged northwards into the tornado formation region, setting or tying daily high temperature records at 28 airports in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia.

Ingredients for the tornado outbreak
This year's unusually mild winter has led to ocean temperatures across the Gulf of Mexico that are approximately 1°C above average--among the top ten warmest values on record for this time of year, going back to the 1800s. (Averaged over the month of February, the highest sea surface temperatures on record in the Gulf between 20 - 30°N, 85 - 95°W occurred in 2002, when the waters were 1.34°C above average). Friday's tornado outbreak was fueled, in part, by high instability created by unusually warm, moist air flowing north from the Gulf of Mexico due to the high water temperatures there. This exceptionally warm air set record high temperatures at 28 airports in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia the afternoon of the tornado outbreak (March 2.) Cold, dry air from Canada moved over the outbreak region at high altitudes. This created a highly unstable atmosphere--warm, low-density air rising in thunderstorm updrafts was able to accelerate rapidly upwards to the top of the lower atmosphere, since the surrounding air was cooler and denser at high altitudes. These vigorous updrafts needed some twisting motion to get them spinning and create tornadoes. Very strong twisting forces were present Friday over the tornado outbreak area, thanks to upper-level jet stream winds that blew in excess of 115 mph. These winds changed speed and direction sharply with height,imparting a shearing motion on the atmosphere (wind shear), causing the air to spin. High instability and a high wind shear are the two key ingredients for tornado formation.


Figure 5. The other key ingredient for tornado formation is the presence of very strong winds aloft that change speed and direction sharply with height. This change of wind imparts a shearing motion on the atmosphere (wind shear), causing the air to spin. Here, we see the upper-level wind speeds at the peak of the March 2, 2012 tornado outbreak. The jet stream can be seen as the U-shaped belt of strong winds. Jet stream winds in excess of 100 mph (deep blue colors) were present over the tornado outbreak area in this analysis of data from the NOAA North American Model (NAM) from 7 pm EST March 2, 2012. Image credit: NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory.

Another bad year for tornadoes in the U.S.--what's going on?
Last year's tornado season was incredibly severe, and we are off to one of the worst early-season starts to tornado season on record now in 2012. However, it is too soon to ring the alarm bells on climate change being responsible for this. The tornado data base going back to 1950 doesn't show an increasing trend in strong tornadoes in recent decades. While climate change could potentially lead to an increase in tornadoes, by increasing instability, it could also decrease them, by decreasing wind shear. I'd need to see a lot more bad tornado years before blaming climate change for the severe tornado seasons of the past two years. One thing that climate change may be doing, though, is shifting the season earlier in the year. The 5-day total of tornadoes from February 28 - March 3 will probably break the record of 131 set in 1999 for the largest tornado outbreak so early in the year. Warmer winters, and an earlier arrival of spring due to a warming climate, will allow tornado season to start earlier--and end earlier. This year's early start to tornado season is consistent with what we would expect from a warming climate. I have a more extensive article on this subject that has just been published by Weatherwise magazine, and a 2008 post, Are tornadoes getting stronger and more frequent? Dr. Jonathan Martin of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is doing interesting research on the type of situation we saw with some of the recent severe tornado outbreaks, when two branches of the jet stream, the polar jet and the subtropical jet, merge to form a "superjet." In a December 2011 interview with sciencedaily.com, he said: "There is reason to believe that in a warmer climate, this kind of overlapping of the jet streams that can lead to high-impact weather may be more frequent."

I don't see any storm systems coming over the next 10 days that could cause a major tornado outbreak, though March weather is too volatile to forecast reliably that far in advance. There is a storm system expected to develop on Thursday in the Plains we will have to watch, but so far, indications are that it will not be capable of generating a major tornado outbreak.

Portlight disaster relief charity responds to the tornado disaster
The Portlight disaster relief charity reports that volunteers from colleges and churches made a strong showing in tornado-devastated Harrisburg, Illinois on Sunday. Team Rubicon and Portlight will push east to Indiana, where volunteer work is still restricted because of gas leaks and continuing SAR (search and rescue) operations.

I'll edit this post with new stats on the tornado outbreak as they become available, and have an entirely new post on Wednesday.

Jeff Masters

Tornado (JimAtTn)
This picture of a small tornado was taken on Friday March 02, 2012 in southern Lincoln County, Tennessee about 7 miles south of Fayetteville. Photographer: Angela Currey-Echols
Tornado
3/2/12 Tornado (charles7013)
A tornado in Dodsen Brach TN.
3/2/12 Tornado
High Risk (LightningFastMedia)
Rotating wall cloud and a possible funnel yesterday, north of Evansville, IN.
High Risk
tornado damage 3/2/12 (clerese3)
3/2/12 tornado damage to a business I pass on my way to and from work. This was a beautiful brick building.
tornado damage 3/2/12
Tornado Damage - TN (GeorgiaPeach)
I uploaded this photo once already and it was rejected for having the wrong date. I explained before, but I will explain again. The tornado came through March 2nd but I had just gotten out of the hospital, so I didn't get out to take pictures of the damage until today. This is five miles from my house in Hamilton County, TN.
Tornado Damage - TN

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Well, as in, amazing/unheard of for March.
So are you saying somthing greater than or equal to the March 2nd event?
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719. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Perth Tropical Cyclone Warning Center
Tropical Cyclone Bulletin
TROPICAL LOW 15U
9:00 AM WST March 7 2012
=============================

At 8:00 AM WST, Tropical Low (1000 hPa) located at 13.9S 97.9E has 10 minute sustained winds of 25 knots with gusts of 45 knots. The low is reported as moving southwest at 10 knots.

Dvorak Intensity: T2.0/2.0/D1.0/24 HRS

Forecast and Intensity
=======================
12 HRS: 14.7S 95.9E - 30 knots (Tropical Low)
24 HRS: 15.5S 93.2E - 35 knots (CAT 1)
48 HRS: 16.2S 88.6E - 55 knots (CAT 2)
72 HRS: 17.4S 85.1E - 65 knots (CAT 3)

Additional Information
=====================
The system has continued to develop overnight with a clear low level center to the east of cold convection. DT is fluctuating as the distance from the low level circulation center to the convection increases and decreases but MET=PAT=FT=2.0.

Conditions appear favourable for the system to continue to develop and it is forecast to reach cyclone intensity in 24 hours time. It should continue to develop over the next 72 hours and then weaken as the system comes under increased shear.

The system is being steered by a mid-level ridge and a general southwestwards movement is expected to continue through until Saturday when a more southerly track is forecast.

The next tropical cyclone bulletin from Perth Tropical Cyclone Warning Center on Tropical Low 15U will be issued at 7:30 AM UTC..
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Quoting hydrus:
That is a huge slot of dry air.


yeah that small black oval towards the bottom, thats gotta be 0% humidity :D
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That is a huge slot of dry air. It looks about 4000 miles long.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

500 mb. winds



Surface temperatures:



Moisture:



Instability:



Sounding:



Looks like a significant rainfall situation. All of Texas is hoping this pans out
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Quoting Neapolitan:
We'll know more shortly, but: possible telecommunications disruptions, power outages, brilliant aurora, etc. It all remains to be seen which if any of those will occur, and if they do, how intense they'll be...
I saw a brilliant aurora over the U.P. of Michigan many years ago. It was incredible
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

500 mb. winds



Surface temperatures:



Moisture:



Instability:



Sounding:



hmm...might be a lil somthin. i have doubts of it succeeding the March 2nd outbreak...
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This would mean very unsettled weather for the western two thirds of the U.S.
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Major X5.4 Solar Flare + CME - Presentation (3/7/2012) - SolarHam.com

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Quoting SPLbeater:


could u show the graphic once more plz?

500 mb. winds



Surface temperatures:



Moisture:



Instability:



Sounding:

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Quoting presslord:


How might this manifest itself here on the third rock?
In the form of beer, but be careful, or you may end up having a "Coronal Mass Ejection" which is a waste of good Mexican brew.JMO
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Gee how dumb could i be....i had to look up what an air parcel is...and when i found the definition, i slap myself. "you stupid idiot, any weather junkie should REMEMBER that.."
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Well, as in, amazing/unheard of for March.


could u show the graphic once more plz?
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Quoting Neapolitan:
We'll know more shortly, but: possible telecommunications disruptions, power outages, brilliant aurora, etc. It all remains to be seen which if any of those will occur, and if they do, how intense they'll be...


I think that should get here about 2 or 3 p.m. central tomorrow.

At least the N. hemisphere is angled slightly away.

What we need
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..earlier from solarham

Updated 3/7/2012 @ 00:30 UTC
Major X5.4 Solar Flare in Progress
The second strongest solar flare of Cycle 24 in terms of X-Ray Flux, just peaked around Active Sunspot 1429. This major event measured X5.4 at 00:24 UTC and triggered a strong R3 Level Radio Blackout. A coronal mass ejection will likely result and due to the sunspots more geoeffective position, there will be a chance for some sort of impact. Stay Tuned to SolarHam.com for images, video and more details should a CME be produced.
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NASA SDO Page
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Quoting presslord:


How might this manifest itself here on the third rock?
We'll know more shortly, but: possible telecommunications disruptions, power outages, brilliant aurora, etc. It all remains to be seen which if any of those will occur, and if they do, how intense they'll be...
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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
What do you mean by "Unprecedented"?

Well, as in, amazing/unheard of for March.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31882
Rocketdyne radiation is still abundant
By Susan Abram, Staff Writer
Posted: 03/05/2012 07:49:52 PM PST
Updated: 03/05/2012 07:51:34 PM PST

Some levels of radioactive chemicals found on a portion of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory site were as much as 1,000 times higher than standards, according to federal data released on Monday.
Acting as an independent monitor, officials with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted radiological surveys on a portion of the land known as Area IV, where a partial meltdown of a nuclear reactor occurred in 1959.

That portion is currently overseen by the Department of Energy.

The results of the radiological survey show that of the 437 samples collected, 75 exceeded standards agreed upon by the DOE and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control in a cleanup agreement signed in December 2010.
Seven radioactive isotopes, including one known as cesium-137, measured at levels between 100 to 1,000 times higher than the standards. Other radionuclides that suggest nuclear presence include strontium-90, tritium, plutonium, and carbon-14.

The recent data is significant to residents, activists and public officials who have fought for years for the removal of radiation and chemical contaminants at the former Rocketdyne site, which is nestled in the hills between Chatsworth and Simi Valley and was purchased by the Boeing Co. in 1996.
The numbers provides hard evidence that not only do the radioactive materials exist, but that the levels are higher than expected.

"This confirms what we were worried about," said Assemblywoman Julia Brownley, D-Santa Monica, who has sought a complete cleanup of the former Rocketdyne rocket engine testing laboratory. Brownley released the data to the public on Monday.

"This begins to answer critical questions about what's still up there, where, how much, and how bad," she said in a statement.
Brownley called the findings "extremely disappointing, especially because the site has already undergone two cleanup efforts by its owner, The Boeing Co., and the Department of Energy. Each declared the land fully cleaned."

A spokesman for the Department of Energy didn't say if the agency was surprised or disappointed by the levels, but that clean-up would continue.

"We really are still looking at the data," said John Jones, federal project manager with the DOE. "The bottom line is we will clean up as we agreed to in our committment to the 2010 Administrative Order on Consent for Remedial Action."
Boeing officials emphasized that they have completed significant cleanup activities alongside the DOE and NASA, which also owns a portion of the land.

"The preliminary data does not pertain to the portions of the site that Boeing is responsible for cleaning up," Boeing officials said in a statement.
"We continue to be open to working with the EPA, the Department of Energy, NASA and the state to find the most effective ways to clean up Santa Susana and preserve the land for future generations."

Officials with the state Department of Toxic Substances Control would not say if the levels found at the site posed an immediate danger.

"When we deal with things, we deal with long term risk exposure," said Mark Malinowski, with the DTSC.
A final report on the radiological survey is expected at the end of the year, Malinowski said.

But activists reacted similarly to Brownley, saying the data prove that prior clean up efforts were ineffective. They wonder what else can be brewing within the rocks, the earth, and the groundwater within the 2,849-acre property.
"People have been waiting for this information for years," said Dan Hirsch, president of the activist group Committee to Bridge the Gap.

"All those years, we were told it was clean. This data prove we're not just a bunch of unknowledgeable people, but that everyday people are proven right."

There was some victory in 2010 when both the DOE and NASA agreed to adhere to a high level of clean-up standards mandated under state bill 990.
However, Boeing officials said that decontaminating its property to those standards would destroy the natural resources on the site. A federal judge agreed with Boeing last year.

But the EPA's recent findings prove that all past remediation efforts have failed, said Denise Duffield, executive director for Physicians for Social Responsibility-Los Angeles.
"These are remarkable findings," Duffield said. "The new EPA data show extensive radioactive contamination remaining at the site and underscores the need for the site to be cleaned up to background without delay."

http://www.contracostatimes.com/california/ci_201 08641/rocketdyne-radiation-is-still-abundant
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Quoting SPLbeater:


too dramatic. might see somethin that is rated M...

wow your 42 geez by the way you interact here i thought you was 25 or somethin!
I'm still a kid at heart.My dad is 73 and still acts like a kid at times.That's where I get it from.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
BREAKING: 2012-03-07 01:03 Strong Solar Eruption; Earth-Directed CME Likely

An R3 (Strong) Radio Blackout is now in progress, beginning about 7:00 p.m. EST today. The site of the eruption, previously active Region 1429, is now near center disk, so there's high-potential of an earth-directed CME. In addition, expect the imminent beginning of a Solar Radiation Storm. Analysis now occurring on both fronts, watch here for updates.

Uh-oh


How might this manifest itself here on the third rock?
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[SDO] AIA 171

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www.solarham.com


ALERT: Type II Radio Emission
Begin Time: 2012 Mar 07 0017 UTC

Estimated Velocity: 2273 km/s

Description: Type II emissions occur in association with eruptions on the sun and typically indicate a coronal mass ejection is associated with a flare event.


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Quoting pcbhere:
My adult son and I are volunteering this weekend for clean-up duty in Henryville. I wanted to take my 11 year old granddaughter to help. Do you all think that this would be a good experience for her or too traumatic?


too dramatic. might see somethin that is rated M...
Quoting washingtonian115:
Agreed.I still eat oreos but not as much when I was a kid/teen/young adult.I'm 42 now and it get's harder to loose weight the older you get XD.


wow your 42 geez by the way you interact here i thought you was 25 or somethin!
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BREAKING: 2012-03-07 01:03 Strong Solar Eruption; Earth-Directed CME Likely

An R3 (Strong) Radio Blackout is now in progress, beginning about 7:00 p.m. EST today. The site of the eruption, previously active Region 1429, is now near center disk, so there's high-potential of an earth-directed CME. In addition, expect the imminent beginning of a Solar Radiation Storm. Analysis now occurring on both fronts, watch here for updates.

Uh-oh
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Quoting hydrus:
This is the eatenest( my own word ) weather blog I have ever seen. Seems like at least once a week somebody brings up food and I get hungry..Yall like pizza.?
That looks so good.Noooo.Must-resist-pizza!.
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All I can say is don't post pictures of fish. People got 24 hour bans here for doing that during the season....
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Quoting redwagon:

I actually meant invest in cattle. The live ones, not the steaks.

Gonna be a big moooove in cattle back to Texas now we're assured of pasture, after our inferno last year.
I'm not kidding, if you have family or friends with extra cows and bulls, buy them and sell them to ranchers here.
Lol.. I will look into it. There is certainly no shortage of cows around here...or horses.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Before I forget--and having absolutely nothing to do with weather--happy 100th birthday, Oreo. May you be around for another 100--or at least until I'm no longer in need of your unhealthy, three-layered goodness.

Oreo
This is the eatenest( my own word ) weather blog I have ever seen. Seems like at least once a week somebody brings up food and I get hungry..Yall like pizza.?
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From solarham.com

A bright Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is now seen in the new STEREO Behind COR2 images.

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Quoting hydrus:
I was eyeballing some ribeyes today. The gang wanted chicken instead. I am hoping the drought stricken areas will get the rain they need without severe flooding issues. Its a wait and see.

I actually meant invest in cattle. The live ones, not the steaks.

Gonna be a big moooove in cattle back to Texas now we're assured of pasture, after our inferno last year.
I'm not kidding, if you have family or friends with extra cows and bulls, buy them and sell them to ranchers here.
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Quoting MAweatherboy1:
I saw this earlier today and found it very interesting... Does anyone have a possible explanation?
Here's a quick little paper on the subject. Link.

The paper explains that locally, vegetation has increased and reforestation has occurred likely contributing to the decrease in wind speeds. Furthermore, on a larger scale, climate change has been observed to move the storm track further north in the northern hemisphere possibly weakening the winds in the area.

Another thing they didn't mention is that with climate change we have also seen a decrease in the pressure gradient between the poles and the arctic (since the arctic has warmed faster than the tropics) which would certainly contribute to lower wind speeds.
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Updated 3/6/2012 @ 13:45 UTC

Solar Update

Solar activity continues at moderate levels. Sunspot 1429 remains a powerful sunspot cluster and has produced at least 8 low level M-Class solar flares within the past 24 hours. The latest event was an M2.1 flare at 12:41 UTC Tuesday morning. Existing Sunspot 1428 continues to transit the southern hemisphere, but remains quiet. Sunspot 1431 also in the south, appears to be fading. There will remain the threat for another major solar flare within the next 24-48 hours.

AR11429 (Tuesday) - SDO

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Definitely not saying that this will come true given its time out on the GFS model, but if this were to come to fruition, an Unprecedented outbreak would occur. The first outbreak comes at 288 hours across the Central/Southern plains, and then continues into 312 hours in the Northern/Central plains. Typically, this is very long range, but I've come to trust it more considering that March 2-3 used to be in the long range like this, and also the fact that the GFS was showing the exact same thing yesterday. Something to watch...





What do you mean by "Unprecedented"?
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Quoting Jedkins01:


Me too! I might drink milk after eating them, but I never really got into dipping them in milk. I would often like to take them apart as a kid and eat em piece by piece. These days I don't eat them as often for obvious health reasons, yes I'm 21, but its good to be healthy when I'm young then change my ways when I'm old and decaying. The saying ":you're only young once" is a very foolish saying if its used too much for everything.
Agreed.I still eat oreos but not as much when I was a kid/teen/young adult.I'm 42 now and it get's harder to loose weight the older you get XD.
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Thank you the opinions. She wants to go and she has seen the local news coverage. I know that watching the telecasts cannot compare to witnessing the destruction firsthand. My heart tells me that it will be a good experience for all of us.

Instead of taking her to the mall, we will get down and dirty and, hopefully, make a small dent in the clean-up!
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I live in southern IN, and often work near Fredericksburg, where the EF 4 started. I drive on IN 60 through New Pekin at least 4 times a month. The damage over here is heartbreaking. The one positive in this story is that warnings were in place, people knew to take cover, and knew where the tornados were and their approximate track. Kudos to modern meteorology, or this outbreak would have killed hundreds more.
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Quoting washingtonian115:
I love Oreo....I never liked putting them in the milk like others.I just like them the way they were.


Me too! I might drink milk after eating them, but I never really got into dipping them in milk. I would often like to take them apart as a kid and eat em piece by piece. These days I don't eat them as often for obvious health reasons, yes I'm 21, but its good to be healthy when I'm young then change my ways when I'm old and decaying. The saying ":you're only young once" is a very foolish saying if its used too much for everything.
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Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127805
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Quoting RTSplayer:



It's called "Idolatry".


I know what it is, but seriously, its 2012. I mean, Idolatry still exists today, but generally it takes on forms of valuable things like nice cars and beautiful women, not chicken nuggets that look like George Washington and a grilled Cheese sandwich that looks like the virgin Mary. Good freaking grief people.
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I love Oreo....I never liked putting them in the milk like others.I just like them the way they were.
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..all Hail Oreo's!!!


Bringer of Milk and satisfaction.

"Ommmmmmmmmmmmm"...............

A Ha ahhhhhhhhhh.... a ahhhhhhhh..


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Before I forget--and having absolutely nothing to do with weather--happy 100th birthday, Oreo. May you be around for another 100--or at least until I'm no longer in need of your unhealthy, three-layered goodness.

Oreo
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Quoting Jedkins01:



I'm still in a rage of confusion trying to figure out why anyone would do that, my gosh, did they inject amoebas into their brain?



It's called "Idolatry".
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

That's ridiculous, it's just a freaking chicken nugget.



I'm still in a rage of confusion trying to figure out why anyone would do that, my gosh, did they inject amoebas into their brain?
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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