The March 2 - 3 tornado outbreak: one EF-4, 39 deaths

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:40 PM GMT on March 05, 2012

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A blanket of snow 2 - 4 inches deep fell yesterday on the regions of Southern Indiana and Northern Kentucky pounded by deadly tornadoes on Friday, adding to the misery of survivors. The violent tornado rampage killed 39 and injured hundreds more, wreaking property damage that will likely exceed $1 billion. Hardest hit were Kentucky and Southern Indiana, which suffered 21 and 12 dead, respectively. Three were killed in Ohio, and one each in Alabama and Georgia. The scale of the outbreak was enormous, with a preliminary total of 139 tornadoes touching down in eleven states, from southern Ohio to Northern Florida. The National Weather Service issued 297 tornado warnings and 388 severe thunderstorm warnings. At one point, 31 separate tornado warnings were in effect during the outbreak, and an area larger than Nebraska--81,000 square miles--received tornado warnings. Tornado watches were posted for 300,000 square miles--an area larger than Texas.


Video 1. Spectacular video of the EF-4 tornado that devastated Henrysville and Marysville, Indiana on March 2, 2012. You can see small satellite vorticies rotating on the side of the main vortex.


Video 2. Another video of the EF-4 tornado that devastated Henrysville and Marysville, Indiana on March 2, 2012, taken from a gas station.

The deadliest and most violent tornado: an EF-4
The deadliest and most violent tornado of the March 2, 2012 outbreak was an EF-4 with winds up to 175 mph that demolished much of Henryville, Chelsea, Marysville, and New Pekin, Indiana. Ten minutes after that tornado demolished much of Henryville, a weaker EF-1 tornado hit the town. The twin tornadoes killed twelve people. The Henryville tornado was the only violent EF-4 tornado of the outbreak.



Figure 1. Radar reflectivity image (top) and Doppler velocity image (bottom) of the two tornadoes that hit Henryville, Indiana on March 2, 2012. The first (rightmost) hook echo on the reflectivity image belonged to the only violent tornado of the outbreak, an EF-4 with winds of 166 - 200 mph. Ten minutes after that tornado demolished much of Henryville, a second tornado hit the town. These tornadoes also caused severe damage to the towns of Chelsea, Marysville, and New Pekin, and killed twelve people.

At least eleven other tornadoes in the outbreak have been classified as EF-3s with winds of 136 - 165 mph. Capitalclimate.com reports that the EF-3 tornadoes that crossed three Eastern Kentucky counties were the first tornadoes that strong ever observed, since tornado records began in 1950. The deadliest of the EF-3 tornadoes hit West Liberty, Kentucky, killing eight. Here's a summary of the deadly tornadoes of the outbreak taken from Wikipedia:

EF-4, 12 deaths, Henrysville, Indiana
EF-3, 8 deaths, West Liberty, Kentucky\
EF-2, 5 deaths, East Bernstadt, Kentucky
EF-3, 4 deaths, Crittenden, Kentucky
EF-3, 2 deaths, Holton, Indiana
EF-3, 3 deaths, Peach Grove, Ohio
EF-3, 2 deaths, Blaine, Kentucky
EF-3, 2 deaths, Salyersville, Kentucky
EF-2, 1 death, Jackson's Gap, Alabama


Figure 2. Damage in West Liberty, Kentucky after the March 2, 2012 EF-3 tornado. Image taken from from a Kentucky National Guard Blackhawk helicopter, while landing in West Liberty, KY (Morgan County).


Figure 3. Radar image of the West Liberty, Kentucky EF-3 tornado of March 2, 2012, showing a classic hook echo. The tornado carved a 60-mile-long path through Eastern Kentucky, causing extreme damage in West Liberty. The tornado killed six in West Liberty and two near Frenchburg. At least 75 people were injured. It was the first EF-3 tornado in Eastern Kentucky since 1988.


Video 3. A woman prays for deliverance of West Liberty as the ominous wall cloud of the developing tornado approaches the town.

Incredibly fast-moving storms
The speed with which some of the storms moved was truly exceptional, thanks to jet stream winds of up to 115 mph that pushed the thunderstorms forward at amazing speeds. A number of the tornadoes ripped through Kentucky with forward speeds of 70 mph, and two tornado warnings in Central Kentucky were issued for parent thunderstorms that moved at 85 mph. NWS damage surveys have not yet determined if one of the tornadoes from the outbreak has beaten the record for the fastest moving tornado, the 73 mph forward speed of the great 1925 Tri-State Tornado, the deadliest U.S. tornado of all-time.


Video 4. A family gets in their car in an attempt to flee the Borden, Indiana tornado of March 2, 2012. Unless you know what you're doing, fleeing a tornado in a car can be extremely dangerous, especially when the tornadoes are moving at speeds of 50 - 70 mph, as many were doing during the March 2, 2012 outbreak. Most tornado fatalities occur in mobile homes and cars.

Largest 5-day and 2nd largest 2-day tornado outbreak for so early in the year?
The March 2 tornado outbreak spawned 128 tornadoes, according to preliminary reports as of 8 am EST March 7 from NOAA's Storm Prediction Center. An additional 11 tornadoes (preliminary) touched down on March 3, in Florida and Georgia; 3 additional tornadoes touched down on March 1 (Wikipedia does a great job tallying the stats for this tornado outbreak.) These preliminary reports are typically over-counted by 15%, but a few delayed reports will likely come in, bringing the total number of tornadoes from the March 2 - 3 outbreak to 115 - 125, propelling it into second place for the largest two-day tornado outbreak so early in the year. The top five two-day tornado outbreaks for so early in the year, since record keeping began in 1950:

January 21 - 22, 1999: 129 tornadoes, 4 deaths
March 2 - 3, 2012: 139 tornadoes (preliminary), 39 deaths
February 5 - 6, 2008: 87 tornadoes, 57 deaths
February 28 - March 1, 1997: 60 tornadoes, 10 deaths
January 7 - 8, 2008: 56 tornadoes, 4 deaths

Though the 36 tornadoes that occurred during the February 28 - 29 Leap Day outbreak were part of a separate storm system, the five-day tornado total from February 28 - March 3, 2012 is likely to eclipse the late January 18 - 22, 1999 five-day tornado outbreak (131 tornadoes) as the most prolific five-day period of tornado activity on record for so early in the year.


Figure 4. A key ingredient for tornado formation is the presence of warm, moist air near the surface, which helps make the atmosphere unstable. On the day of the March 2, 2012 outbreak, record warm air surged northwards into the tornado formation region, setting or tying daily high temperature records at 28 airports in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia.

Ingredients for the tornado outbreak
This year's unusually mild winter has led to ocean temperatures across the Gulf of Mexico that are approximately 1°C above average--among the top ten warmest values on record for this time of year, going back to the 1800s. (Averaged over the month of February, the highest sea surface temperatures on record in the Gulf between 20 - 30°N, 85 - 95°W occurred in 2002, when the waters were 1.34°C above average). Friday's tornado outbreak was fueled, in part, by high instability created by unusually warm, moist air flowing north from the Gulf of Mexico due to the high water temperatures there. This exceptionally warm air set record high temperatures at 28 airports in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia the afternoon of the tornado outbreak (March 2.) Cold, dry air from Canada moved over the outbreak region at high altitudes. This created a highly unstable atmosphere--warm, low-density air rising in thunderstorm updrafts was able to accelerate rapidly upwards to the top of the lower atmosphere, since the surrounding air was cooler and denser at high altitudes. These vigorous updrafts needed some twisting motion to get them spinning and create tornadoes. Very strong twisting forces were present Friday over the tornado outbreak area, thanks to upper-level jet stream winds that blew in excess of 115 mph. These winds changed speed and direction sharply with height,imparting a shearing motion on the atmosphere (wind shear), causing the air to spin. High instability and a high wind shear are the two key ingredients for tornado formation.


Figure 5. The other key ingredient for tornado formation is the presence of very strong winds aloft that change speed and direction sharply with height. This change of wind imparts a shearing motion on the atmosphere (wind shear), causing the air to spin. Here, we see the upper-level wind speeds at the peak of the March 2, 2012 tornado outbreak. The jet stream can be seen as the U-shaped belt of strong winds. Jet stream winds in excess of 100 mph (deep blue colors) were present over the tornado outbreak area in this analysis of data from the NOAA North American Model (NAM) from 7 pm EST March 2, 2012. Image credit: NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory.

Another bad year for tornadoes in the U.S.--what's going on?
Last year's tornado season was incredibly severe, and we are off to one of the worst early-season starts to tornado season on record now in 2012. However, it is too soon to ring the alarm bells on climate change being responsible for this. The tornado data base going back to 1950 doesn't show an increasing trend in strong tornadoes in recent decades. While climate change could potentially lead to an increase in tornadoes, by increasing instability, it could also decrease them, by decreasing wind shear. I'd need to see a lot more bad tornado years before blaming climate change for the severe tornado seasons of the past two years. One thing that climate change may be doing, though, is shifting the season earlier in the year. The 5-day total of tornadoes from February 28 - March 3 will probably break the record of 131 set in 1999 for the largest tornado outbreak so early in the year. Warmer winters, and an earlier arrival of spring due to a warming climate, will allow tornado season to start earlier--and end earlier. This year's early start to tornado season is consistent with what we would expect from a warming climate. I have a more extensive article on this subject that has just been published by Weatherwise magazine, and a 2008 post, Are tornadoes getting stronger and more frequent? Dr. Jonathan Martin of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is doing interesting research on the type of situation we saw with some of the recent severe tornado outbreaks, when two branches of the jet stream, the polar jet and the subtropical jet, merge to form a "superjet." In a December 2011 interview with sciencedaily.com, he said: "There is reason to believe that in a warmer climate, this kind of overlapping of the jet streams that can lead to high-impact weather may be more frequent."

I don't see any storm systems coming over the next 10 days that could cause a major tornado outbreak, though March weather is too volatile to forecast reliably that far in advance. There is a storm system expected to develop on Thursday in the Plains we will have to watch, but so far, indications are that it will not be capable of generating a major tornado outbreak.

Portlight disaster relief charity responds to the tornado disaster
The Portlight disaster relief charity reports that volunteers from colleges and churches made a strong showing in tornado-devastated Harrisburg, Illinois on Sunday. Team Rubicon and Portlight will push east to Indiana, where volunteer work is still restricted because of gas leaks and continuing SAR (search and rescue) operations.

I'll edit this post with new stats on the tornado outbreak as they become available, and have an entirely new post on Wednesday.

Jeff Masters

Tornado (JimAtTn)
This picture of a small tornado was taken on Friday March 02, 2012 in southern Lincoln County, Tennessee about 7 miles south of Fayetteville. Photographer: Angela Currey-Echols
Tornado
3/2/12 Tornado (charles7013)
A tornado in Dodsen Brach TN.
3/2/12 Tornado
High Risk (LightningFastMedia)
Rotating wall cloud and a possible funnel yesterday, north of Evansville, IN.
High Risk
tornado damage 3/2/12 (clerese3)
3/2/12 tornado damage to a business I pass on my way to and from work. This was a beautiful brick building.
tornado damage 3/2/12
Tornado Damage - TN (GeorgiaPeach)
I uploaded this photo once already and it was rejected for having the wrong date. I explained before, but I will explain again. The tornado came through March 2nd but I had just gotten out of the hospital, so I didn't get out to take pictures of the damage until today. This is five miles from my house in Hamilton County, TN.
Tornado Damage - TN

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Quoting presslord:



AAARRRGGGHHH!!! It's my ex-wife!!!!!!!!!


Wowiie! I can concur!

Thanks for the pass along to Flood.
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local news stations have dozens and dozens of photos of damage in Henryville. That photo does not appear anywhere that I can find. Look at the shape of the right side of the driveway.

There's photos of total shacks that were not totally destroyed. But a home built up to current codes is completely wiped away? Defies common sense.
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Quoting JNCali:
Anyone ever figure the average distance a tornado can stretch or reach from the base of its 'cloud'? Looking at a radar image, is there a way to determine where a funnel would/could touch down?
As I was monitoring the rotating cell with a hook heading my direction it would have been nice to have an idea of how far a possible funnel would reach from the hook.. (if this is way stupid please feel free to ridicule) :)

"Textbook" supercell


Radar image of a violent tornadic supercell

There's a lot of basic but good info at SPC Tornado FAQ page where these two images came from. 'Course that's speaking to supercell tornadoes.

I read what you wrote earlier about the bat (lol Freudian typo) tub and mattress during a EF4 or 5. You're right. It would be much more comforting to be underground.
:)
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Quoting washingtonian115:
[Censored] and that was a nice house to...
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting Neapolitan:
To be honest, this may be partially an illusion of angle. Now, despite what some have suggested, it almost certainly the same homesite. But the Google StreetView "before" image shows that the main living quarters--that is, the house proper--sits on a foundation at a lower level than the driveway/walkway. In the second "after" image, the angle is such that the home's foundation--and much of the debris--lies out of sight below and behind the driveway. The house was destroyed, alright. But the damage is easily consistent with an EF-3.

It's already been rated an ~170 mph EF4...I think it's obviously higher, maybe EF5 strength, which would coincide with the images of soil/asphalt being ripped out of the ground in Henryville.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32505
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Just goes to show you that when tornadoes get to EF4/EF5 strength, no where above ground is safe...



They might need to do a reassessment...
To be honest, this may be partially an illusion of angle. Now, despite what some have suggested, the two images almost certainly the same homesite. But the Google StreetView "before" image shows that the main living quarters--that is, the house proper--sits on a foundation at a lower level than the driveway/walkway. In the second "after" image, the angle is such that the home's foundation--and much of the debris--lies out of sight below and behind the driveway. The house was destroyed, alright. But the damage is easily consistent with an EF-3 or EF-4.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13597
Quoting washingtonian115:
Damn and that was a nice house to...
yep 5 years old no more maybe less
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next question.. is there any source for tornado paths overlayed with the corresponding radar image?
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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
If anyone wants to watch a volcano this on in russia is supposed to be explosive. Saying explosion could push ash into the air 42,000ft plus.

Web Cam:
Link

Info:
Link

Going to have to scroll down a little on the info link.
thanks 27 i got it on the desk now watching could be interesting if i can catch the event
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Not that hard to see the resemblance IMO...the second picture is just closer.

Damn and that was a nice house to...
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Quoting Barefootontherocks:


If there is any doubt about EF4 vs. EF5, they'll send an NWS survey expert in.


Glad to hear it

i now have about...7% more confidence in NWS tornado rating thx to that statement:D
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting wxmojo:
Having discovered an odd strong correlation with Euclidian geometry in some earlier satelite imagery prompted me to look for some more. I must say there is plenty to be found. What would cause the presence of these geometric boundaries? I thought perhaps it was an artifact of compositing smaller images into the complete image, but the last image shows clearly were the curved sew lines are between at least a few of the single images. I thought it was perhaps a one-time image processing problem, but the same geometries persist even 24 hours later. I also saw them in images taken hours before and after these sets. 
Another question is, why would the cold front inflect its curvature on the March 4 0900 image? Is that a normal behavior of a large cold front?


Interesting.
Member Since: August 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3278
Quoting JNCali:
Anyone ever figure the average distance a tornado can stretch or reach from the base of its 'cloud'? Looking at a radar image, is there a way to determine where a funnel would/could touch down?
As I was monitoring the rotating cell with a hook heading my direction it would have been nice to have an idea of how far a possible funnel would reach from the hook.. (if this is way stupid please feel free to ridicule) :)


idk the answer to how far one can stretch down...might be how strong the vorticy is thats coming down. :D

i DO know that you are more likely to get a wedge tornado when the LCL(Lifted Condensation Level is low :P
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting SPLbeater:


i read a section of tornado rating and how the media AND in-experienced NWS surveyors plays big part in it.

less experienced, the more in awe they will be and will want to rate it higher(like some bloggers here who jump right to EF4-5 on 1 pic lol)
debris is a player no doubt bout that:D


If there is any doubt about EF4 vs. EF5, they'll send an NWS survey expert in.
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Anyone ever figure the average distance a tornado can stretch or reach from the base of its 'cloud'? Looking at a radar image, is there a way to determine where a funnel would/could touch down?
As I was monitoring the rotating cell with a hook heading my direction it would have been nice to have an idea of how far a possible funnel would reach from the hook.. (if this is way stupid please feel free to ridicule) :)
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Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:


I believe that is all about perspective. How close and at what angle. Both images are taken at different distances and different angles. One perspective changes from the other.

Imagine, if you will, someone holding a fish beside them and you take a picture from an angle more towards their side. Now take a picture with the same person holding the fish as far out in front of their body as they can. You move the camera in closer and take your picture more from a frontal angle. You will notice what appears to be a difference in scale and background images will appear to be at a different distance as well. ... Remember what looked like a huge rattle snake being held up by a stick? The snake was nowhere near as large as it looked in the picture. It is all in the perspective that the picture was taken. Angle and distance is key. I am sure there are some photographers on here that can explain this better than I can.


Perspective is why some of us can see animate shapes in clouds and some can't. Right?
:)
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Quoting Barefootontherocks:


That's so true! Another thing that's looked at in a survey to determine EF4 from EF5 is whether it was hit by flying debris that could have caused damage beyond what the wind did, for instance an airborne outbuilding or airborne mobile home or like that.


i read a section of tornado rating and how the media AND in-experienced NWS surveyors plays big part in it.

less experienced, the more in awe they will be and will want to rate it higher(like some bloggers here who jump right to EF4-5 on 1 pic lol)
debris is a player no doubt bout that:D
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
some folks seem to be missing an ability to move 3 dimensions around in their mind.. it's the same house, and if that 2nd pic encircling the features of the sidewalk do not clue one in, oh well. trees, as well as objects, appear further away when they are farther away... such as when two pics of the same thing are taken from different locations.. ;)
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Quoting DavidHOUTX:


What?


never mind i already saw the henryville torn pic
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Quoting nymore:
Before you can just look at a picture and say F5 here are a few things to consider. What is the wind load rating, what materials were used, how was it anchored, what type of trusses or joists are used and were they strapped. Among other things it also looks like a Walk out basement was in the picture. Look at the ground elevation.


That's so true! Another thing that's looked at in a survey to determine EF4 from EF5 is whether it was hit by flying debris that could have caused damage beyond what the wind did, for instance an airborne outbuilding or airborne mobile home or like that.
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Having discovered an odd strong correlation with Euclidian geometry in some earlier satelite imagery prompted me to look for some more. I must say there is plenty to be found. What would cause the presence of these geometric boundaries? I thought perhaps it was an artifact of compositing smaller images into the complete image, but the last image shows clearly were the curved sew lines are between at least a few of the single images. I thought it was perhaps a one-time image processing problem, but the same geometries persist even 24 hours later. I also saw them in images taken hours before and after these sets. 
Another question is, why would the cold front inflect its curvature on the March 4 0900 image? Is that a normal behavior of a large cold front?

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Additionally, soil/asphalt has been ripped out of the ground in parts of Henryville.

From past experience from Joplin...this was an EF5. Maybe the NWS didn't see this house or something, but...


construction of the building plays a big role in rating.

That house might not have had steel beams, or morter in between cinderblocks. the roof might have only had a few nails holding it on. ya never know :)
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
All I say say is how the heck Henryville/Marysville is not EF5? Doesn't really matters since so many people was killed in this storm.

Picture here:

Link
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If anyone wants to watch a volcano this on in russia is supposed to be explosive. Saying explosion could push ash into the air 42,000ft plus.

Web Cam:
Link

Info:
Link

Going to have to scroll down a little on the info link.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3851
Quoting BobWallace:


If one shot was taken with a longer lens and the photographer standing further away from the house the ridge/trees behind would appear closer.


I believe that is all about perspective. How close and at what angle. Both images are taken at different distances and different angles. One perspective changes from the other.

Imagine, if you will, someone holding a fish beside them and you take a picture from an angle more towards their side. Now take a picture with the same person holding the fish as far out in front of their body as they can. You move the camera in closer and take your picture more from a frontal angle. You will notice what appears to be a difference in scale and background images will appear to be at a different distance as well. ... Remember what looked like a huge rattle snake being held up by a stick? The snake was nowhere near as large as it looked in the picture. It is all in the perspective that the picture was taken. Angle and distance is key. I am sure there are some photographers on here that can explain this better than I can.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 4754
Quoting DavidHOUTX:


Haha I figured that is what you meant. I think the same thing, however it could be the same house just the picture being taken at a much closer proximity. The first picture could be taken from the street for all we know and just zoomed in. Id say it is a 50/50 chance of being the same house. We would need more pictures to confirm

If the first picture is from google earth then that would explain the small differences (trees, yard color, driveway color)
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 84 Comments: 7926
Quoting MAweatherboy1:

Lol... should'be specified The ones in the second picture are definitely closer to the house


Haha I figured that is what you meant. I think the same thing, however it could be the same house just the picture being taken at a much closer proximity. The first picture could be taken from the street for all we know and just zoomed in. Id say it is a 50/50 chance of being the same house. We would need more pictures to confirm
Member Since: August 18, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 635
Quoting DavidHOUTX:


I hope you're not just basing that off of the fact that there are no leaves lol

Lol... should'be specified The ones in the second picture are definitely closer to the house
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 84 Comments: 7926
Quoting JRRP:


Is rather cold in the Eastern Atlantic and combined with the big drought plaging the West Africa area, IMO,I think this 2012 season will focus the majority of the systems that will form as homegrowns.
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Quoting GeorgiaStormz:



What?


What?
Member Since: August 18, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 635
Quoting MAweatherboy1:
Look at the trees in the background... No way it's the same site


I hope you're not just basing that off of the fact that there are no leaves lol
Member Since: August 18, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 635
Quoting biff4ugo:
Dr. M.
If the climate is warmer...
Wouldn't that allow the tornado season to start earlier and end LATER? (rather than end earlier)


It's a question I'd like to see addressed.

My guess is, however, that if the peak season starts earlier it would also end earlier as far northern regions would heat up earlier reducing the temperature differential.

Peak tornado season is prior to the onset of summer heat, is it not?
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Post 179: Look at the trees in the background... No way it's the same site
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 84 Comments: 7926
Quoting hydrus:
This is true. ( excluding Irene maybe ). Bill Gates may have some competition when it comes to staving off natures fury.

Been trying to find the gif of the urrrp of Irene right when she came off Africa.

It was around ~1675 here

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comm ent.html?entrynum=1878&page=2#commenttop
Member Since: August 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3278
185. JRRP
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I think the only time the decision to declare a tornado an EF5 instead of EF4 was easy was Greensburg and Joplin. Both town was clearly destroyed by EF5 as 95% of Greensburg was blown away ,and in Joplin, wood sticking through the concrete curb and a chair was stuck into a concrete wall of that hospital. I remembered how people was reacting to Tuscaloosa tornado as an EF5 (they still do) when it was officially rated EF4. EF5 is meant for tornadoes that showed a clear display of power, which was very clearly shown in Greensburg and Joplin.
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Quoting RitaEvac:
I need more pics for confirmation, 2 don't cut it

Well, I'm afraid you're out of luck. I do not live in Henryville, IN, therefore I can't get any specific pictures. =)
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32505
Quoting DavidHOUTX:


How was that not an EF5 that did that? That is amazing



What?
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Quoting BobinTampa:
167 - look at the proximity of the trees. That's not the same site.


If one shot was taken with a longer lens and the photographer standing further away from the house the ridge/trees behind would appear closer.
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I need more pics for confirmation, 2 don't cut it
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 9645
Not that hard to see the resemblance IMO...the second picture is just closer.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32505
Before you can just look at a picture and say F5 here are a few things to consider. What is the wind load rating, what materials were used, how was it anchored, what type of trusses or joists are used and were they strapped. Among other things it also looks like a Walk out basement was in the picture. Look at the ground elevation.
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I've looked at a bunch of photos of the Henryville damage. It's horrific but nothing resembling wiping a 5000 sq foot house clean away with very little debris.

That said, that town got hit hard. Prayers for them.
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Quoting RitaEvac:


Exactly what I thought, not the same site, concrete driveway doesn't match, and the house slab would be big considering the size of it


Look closer at the image of the house, RitaEvac.

The garage and driveway are built on a higher elevation than is the main house. I would imagine that if you walked to the end of the garage and looked down that you would see the slab for the main house. That, and probably a considerable amount of guano. ;-) The concrete for the driveway, garage and the sidewalk all look to be correct.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 4754
Quoting BobinTampa:
144 - you sure that's the same homesite? The driveway shape isn't the same and the hill seems much closer to the home in the after photo. Plus, where's the slab? The tornado ripped up the entire slab?
Quoting BobinTampa:
167 - look at the proximity of the trees. That's not the same site.

It's the same site. The person that posted this on facebook specifically said that the first was Google Earth, and the second was an actual picture.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32505
a reference to Elvis inducted into a reasoning of what people see as nonsense? and you say I have too much imagination?
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the house is rather new i figure 5 years old maybe less
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Quoting BobinTampa:
167 - look at the proximity of the trees. That's not the same site.


I believe you are correct. I am looking closely at it now and the driveway isn't the same size. The curvature of the drive way to the sidewalk is not even close. The trees are also a lot farther in the first pic than the second.
Member Since: August 18, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 635
Dr. M.
If the climate is warmer...
Wouldn't that allow the tornado season to start earlier and end LATER? (rather than end earlier)
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Quoting BobinTampa:
144 - you sure that's the same homesite? The driveway shape isn't the same and the hill seems much closer to the home in the after photo. Plus, where's the slab? The tornado ripped up the entire slab?
It's the same homesite.

EDIT: after closer look, I believe you're correct. However, I think the home is in Henryville area.

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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