My worst global warming fear: buckeyes in Ann Arbor

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:53 PM GMT on February 10, 2012

Share this Blog
42
+

Last week, I blogged about how wintertime minimum temperatures in the U.S. have risen so much in recent decades, that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) had to update their Plant Hardiness Zone Map for gardeners for the first time since 1990. The Plant Hardiness Zone Map is the standard by which gardeners and growers can determine which plants are most likely to thrive at a location. I got to looking at the new zone map for Ann Arbor, Michigan, where I live, and saw how we've shifted one 5-degree Fahrenheit half-zone warmer. Ann Arbor used to be in Zone 5, but is now solidly in the warmer Zone 6. This got me to wondering, what sort of plants in Zone 6, until now rare or unknown in Ann Arbor, might migrate northwards in coming decades into the city? Then, with a sudden chill, I contemplated a truly awful possibility: The Ohio Buckeye Tree.


Figure 1. Comparison of the 1990 and 2012 USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Maps. Image credit: USDA and Arbor Day Foundation.

Buckeyes in Ann Arbor? The Horror!
For those of you unfamiliar the the buckeye tree, it is the emblem of Ohio State University. The Buckeyes of Ohio State have one of the most fierce rivalries in sports with that "school up north", the University of Michigan. As someone who spent twelve years of my life as a student at the University of Michigan, the thought of Buckeye trees in Ann Arbor is not one I care to contemplate. But the USDA Forest Service has published a Climate Change Tree Atlas which predicts that the most favorable habitat for the Ohio Buckeye Tree can be expected to move northwards with a warming climate. While they give their model for the Buckeye Tree a rating of "low reliability", it is nonetheless chilling to contemplate the potential infestation of Ann Arbor with this loathsome invader. I can only sadly predict that to stem the invasion, non-ecologically-minded University of Michigan students will unleash genetically engineered wolverines that eat buckeye seeds.


Figure 2. Potential changes in the mean center of distribution of the Ohio Buckeye tree. The green oval shows the current center of the range of the Buckeye Tree, well to the south of Ann Arbor. In a scenario where humans emit relatively low amounts of heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide (light blue oval), the most favorable climate for the Buckeye Tree edges into Southern Michigan, and marches into Ann Arbor under the medium and high scenarios for emissions (other ovals.) Image credit: USDA Forest Service Climate Change Tree Atlas.

Libyan snowstorm triggered major Saharan dust storm
On February 6, a rare snow storm hit North Africa, bringing 2 - 3 inches of snow to Tripoli, Libya. It was the first snow in Tripoli since at least 2005, and may be the heaviest snow the Libyan capital has seen since February 6, 1956. The storm responsible for the North African snow also had strong winds that kicked up a tremendous amount of dust over Algeria during the week. This dust became suspended in a flow of air moving to the southwest, and is now over the Atlantic Ocean.


Figure 3. Dust storm on February 7, 2012, off the coast of West Africa, spawned by a storm that brought snow to North Africa on February 6. Note the beautiful vorticies shed by the Cape Verde Islands, showing that the air is flowing northeast to southwest. The red squares mark where fires are burning in West Africa. Image credit: NASA.

Have a great weekend, everyone, and I'll be back Monday with a new post.

Jeff Masters

BUCKEYE BIRTH (WHIPPME)
NO SILLY NOT THE FOOTBALL TEAM .......THE REAL THING
BUCKEYE BIRTH

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 820 - 770

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19Blog Index

Quoting KoritheMan:

It doesn't take a major hurricane to produce flash flooding.


Obviously, but with Cat 3 sustained winds, damage to all vegetation will be severe, thus exacerbating mudslides by removing more vegetation that could potentially anchor the soil. Madagascar had another major cyclone several years back (Ivan). A buddy of mine was doing his PhD work over there. Damage was catastrophic. Madagascar is probably one of the two worst places in the world for mudslides (the other is probably Haiti). Both are mountainous, and both have been stripped of vegetation by inhabitants looking for fuel-wood.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KoritheMan:
On a related note, I've always wanted to donate to Portlight post-disaster relief, but I never really had the money. But now that I'm working, I'm going to make a contribution following any upcoming US disaster.
You are " The Man" :)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
Quoting KoritheMan:

Indeed. Nature doesn't give a you know what about our plights.
And Madagascar has had its share quite recently...And in the same area...Wiki...Cyclone Ivan was a powerful tropical cyclone that struck Madagascar in February 2008. Forming from a persistent area of convection on February 7, Ivan initially tracked southeastward, before looping to the west-southwest. Encountering favourable conditions, it strengthened to attain peak winds on February 17 before striking northeastern Madagascar. It degenerated into a remnant low pressure area as it crossed the island, and briefly re-organized into a weak tropical depression before dissipating on February 22.

Ivan caused heavy damage in Madagascar, leaving severe flooding and wind damage. In Sainte Marie Island, the worst hit area, 90% of the infastructure was destroyed, and 70% of the structures were destroyed. On mainland Madegascar, over 400,000 acres (1,600 km2) of cultivated crops were destroyed, leaving hundreds of families without food. In addition, severe flooding and high winds in Toamasina left the entire city without electricity or drinkable water. In all, over 330,000 people were left homeless, and the storm caused 93 deaths.Cyclone Ivan moved ashore on Madagascar near the city of Toamasina on February 17, producing winds of 125 mph (200 km/h).[19] According to local news agencies, Sainte Marie island off the coast of Madagascar was the highest affected area, with 9 people killed and 90 % of the island's infrastructure destroyed, including a hotel which collapsed.[20] On the island, all flights were suspended or canceled during the storm, and most areas were left without electric power.[20] Also, 75 percent of the structures on the island were completely destroyed.[21]

On mainland Madagascar, 100,000 acres (400 km2) of rice crops were destroyed, and 300,000 acres (1,200 km2) of other cultivated crops were destroyed.[22] Because of this, many families had little or no food to eat.[22] In Analanjirofo, the worst hit region on the mainland Madagascar, 80,000 people were left homeless, and most of the schools, houses and other structures were lost as a result of the flooding and high wind.[22] Another major aspect of the damage there was the Antaratasy bridge, a connector between the region of Atsinanana and cities to the north, which was completely destroyed, isolating several people from their families.[23] Its collapse, in addition to the extensive damage to communications, made it difficult or impossible to contact people who may have been affected by Ivan.[23]

In the city of Toamasina, all water and electricity were cut off as a result of the storm.[23] High winds downed trees and power lines, and rising flood waters were the focus of concern.[23] In the city and surrounding areas, 31 cases of cholera were reported along the Zambeze river valley as a result of the storm.[24]

In the region of Alaotra Mangoro Region, almost 23,000 people were in need of assistance, and flooding caused extensive damage.[25] In the Analamanga Region, 18,000 people were reported to be left without shelter, and in the Atsinanana Region, up to 13,000 people were left homeless.[25] In total, 190,000 people were homeless as a result of the cyclone[26] and a total of 93 fatalities occurred.[27]
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
On a related note, I've always wanted to donate to Portlight post-disaster relief, but I never really had the money. But now that I'm working, I'm going to make a contribution following any upcoming US disaster.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The storm is well insulated from the dry air to the Sw. It wont affect this impact, as its expected to be a Tropical Storm when Exiting the Island and Impacting points west as one as well.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KoritheMan:

It doesn't take a major hurricane to produce flash flooding.
Lol...I was flooded by an invest.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526

Quoting hydrus:
We live here by natures consent. And this storm is proof of that.
Indeed. Nature doesn't give a you know what about our plights.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


hopefully
the dry air takes this evil vision from our sight
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KoritheMan:

Preexisting saturated grounds from Funso's rains could indeed exacerbate the flood potential there.

Even if the water was upwelled, it has had time to warm a couple degrees. I'd wager the subsurface has, too.
We live here by natures consent. And this storm is proof of that.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
Quoting KoritheMan:

It doesn't take a major hurricane to produce flash flooding.
You know how these annular storms are. This thing will remain intense almost halfway across, if not even further...Scary stuff.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526

Quoting hydrus:
I am afraid Mozambique will have tremendous flooding with this system. I thought Funso might have cooled the water a bit, but not enough to weaken the storm.
Preexisting saturated grounds from Funso's rains could indeed exacerbate the flood potential there.

Even if the water was upwelled, it has had time to warm a couple degrees. I'd wager the subsurface has, too.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I am afraid Mozambique will have tremendous flooding with this system. I thought Funso might have cooled the water a bit, but not enough to weaken the storm.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526

Quoting MidnightLightning:
Looking bad for Madagascar. Much of the island has been severely deforested by the inhabitants for fuel-wood. Mudslides will be as bad there as in Haiti. Hopefully some significant weakening occurs, but given the annular nature of Giovanna, this is unlikely.
It doesn't take a major hurricane to produce flash flooding.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Looking bad for Madagascar. Much of the island has been severely deforested by the inhabitants for fuel-wood. Mudslides will be as bad there as in Haiti. Hopefully some significant weakening occurs, but given the annular nature of Giovanna, this is unlikely.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting yqt1001:
More light, so a clearer image of Giovanna. The only thing that is missing is the closed south east side of the eyewall, otherwise it would be the perfect storm.



I think you are right there. It seems there is dry air coming in from the south east. I hate the upside down storms. You have to reverse your thinking. It is the same when storms in the Northern Hemisphere begin entrain dry air from the North west.

Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25395

Quoting RTSplayer:
they updated forward motions to 18mph, which is a good thing.

50% faster movement translates to 2/3rds the average max rainfall potential.


Bad thing is that, if it's sunrise right now, then that puts it landfalling sometime near midnight.
Faster forward motion also maximizes the inland wind gust potential relative to storm movement.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SPLbeater:
well goodnight all
Good night SPL..:)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
794:

Heard about that a few years ago, but it was in early development.


they are trying to advance the 3-d printer technology to the point that the printer can print "most" of the components to a copy of itself. i.e. self-replication, or very nearly so.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
Quoting WxGeekVA:


At this point, the difference between it's current strength and category 5 strength is nominal. No matter what now, it is going to be a massive disaster for a large portion of Madagascar.
This makes me sad. These people have been hit a lot in the past 5 years or so. The tsunami was pretty bad there too.....


Sixth cyclone hits Madagascar; impact "like tsunami"
Successive cyclones bring Madagascar to its knees
IRIN
April 3, 2007


JOHANNESBURG, 3 April 2007 (IRIN) - As the sixth mayor cyclone to hit Madagascar this season tears across the northeast of the impoverished Indian ocean island, a relentless succession of natural disasters has left nearly half a million people in desperate need of humanitarian assistance.


HOW TO HELP MADAGASCAR

care.org
medair.org
unicef.org

Please specify that donations should go to Madagascar relief!
Tropical cyclone Jaya made landfall on Madagascar's northeastern coast on Tuesday on a projected trajectory that will see it rage through areas already devastated by cyclone Indlala just over two weeks ago.

"This is the worst cyclone season in the recorded history of the country," Dusan Zupka, the Senior Emergency Coordination Officer assigned to Madagascar by the United Nations (UN) Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in Geneva, told IRIN.

According to the latest UN situation report, almost 130,000 people were "directly affected by cyclone Indlala" and "at least 88 people were killed and 30 disappeared, with about 30,000 left homeless or deprived of all their belongings."


Cyclone aftermath in northern Madagascar. ┬ę Episcopal relief and development
Natural disasters have been tormenting the island since the end of last year; Indlala followed in the wake of five destructive cyclones and unprecedented flooding. "Since December 2006, approximately 450,000 people have become the victims of natural disasters all over Madagascar," said a UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) statement.

"If we cannot speak of a tsunami here in Madagascar, we can at least say that the affects of the natural disasters are somewhat similar to that in the aftermath of the [2004 Asian] tsunami," said Bruno Maes, the UNICEF Representative in Madagascar.

"Considering the low level of human development [in Madagascar], the consequences are huge," Zupka said. Madagascar already faces serious challenges: More than 85 percent of its 19.1 million people live on less than US$2 a day, according to the 2006 United Nations Human Development report, and food insecurity and malnutrition are chronic, particularly in the drought-prone south.

"Due to the flooding, tens of thousands of hectares of rice, the basic food source for the Malagasy, have also been destroyed," the UNICEF statement said. "With the increased food insecurity and shortage, there is the risk of increased malnutrition."

Access to affected areas is a major obstacle to the delivery of humanitarian assistance, and although assessments are underway, immediate needs are critical.

Communication infrastructure, roads, schools and health centres have been severely damaged; provision of food, potable water, shelter, medicines, sanitation facilities, dealing with waterborne diseases and finding alternative means of transportation - like helicopters - until roads are fixed, are essential.

Officials have warned that in-country supplies are drained. "We are overstretched in terms of human capacity and financial resources," Zupka said, adding that international donors had been generous and that "all UN agencies have boosted capacity [in Madagascar].




Zupka expressed concern over the lack of international media attention the emergency in Madagascar had received, considering the extent of the multiple disasters and the vulnerability of the island and its people. "It is striking that so little attention is being paid to a crisis that affects so many that are already vulnerable because of poverty," he commented.

With the cyclone season continuing until the end of April or early May, expectations are that Jaya will not be the last disaster to strike the island.



Hurricanes hurt conservation efforts in Madagascar
Madagascar needs relief help after deadly cyclones




Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
800. j2008
Surpriseing fact for this year so far, 2 out of 3 Severe TC have been annular (Jasmine and Giovanna) while Funso was the only one that wasnt. I'm going to head out tonight, keep an eye on Giovanna, I'll cheak back in in the morning.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
well goodnight all
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting RTSplayer:


Probably.

I thought so 3 or 4 frames ago, but that's just me.

I could be wrong, but day time heating should warm up the cloud tops quite a bit and knock it down a peg.


Its been fighting dry air for most of the day. On the water vapor you could see a slug of dry ar out of the southwest just eat away the southern CDO earlier.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
Quoting RTSplayer:





nope.

http://www.cfnews13.com/article/weather/2010/sept ember/143029/Do-hurricanes-get-stronger-during-the -day-versus-night


Water temperature stays about the same day or night.

Air temperature drops significantly for night.

This maximizes the difference in heat between the water and air over night, and therefore makes a more efficient heat engine, at least within certain reasonable limits, based on the laws of thermodynamics.


i.e.

efficiency = 1 - Tc/Th

In Kelvin of course.

Which means that since Th isn't changing much, (neglecting upwelling,) then the colder the cloud tops the smaller Tc, therefore stronger the theoretical maximum winds are, at least in general. There are exceptions.


http://wind.mit.edu/~emanuel/holem/holem.html

Two examples I can cite on that are Celia and Katrina.


---

I don't expect Giovanna to become a category 5 storm, because it's actually jogged south a bit during the day (their night,) and the water is cooler. Additionally, by the time it gets through this cycle, it will be too close to land to reintensify significantly.


At this point, the difference between it's current strength and category 5 strength is nominal. No matter what now, it is going to be a massive disaster for a large portion of Madagascar.
Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting yqt1001:


Wrong way around. The heat from the sun makes the pressures lower, allowing for deeper convection. It's called the diurnal pressure cycle.


Quoting yqt1001:


Wrong way around. The heat from the sun makes the pressures lower, allowing for deeper convection. It's called the diurnal pressure cycle.



nope.

http://www.cfnews13.com/article/weather/2010/sept ember/143029/Do-hurricanes-get-stronger-during-the -day-versus-night


Water temperature stays about the same day or night.

Air temperature drops significantly for night.

This maximizes the difference in heat between the water and air over night, and therefore makes a more efficient heat engine, at least within certain reasonable limits, based on the laws of thermodynamics.


i.e.

efficiency = 1 - Tc/Th

In Kelvin of course.

Which means that since Th isn't changing much, (neglecting upwelling,) then the colder the cloud tops the smaller Tc, therefore stronger the theoretical maximum winds are, at least in general. There are exceptions.


http://wind.mit.edu/~emanuel/holem/holem.html

Two examples I can cite on that are Celia and Katrina.


---

I don't expect Giovanna to become a category 5 storm, because it's actually jogged south a bit during the day (their night,) and the water is cooler. Additionally, by the time it gets through this cycle, it will be too close to land to reintensify significantly.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
She,s moving at 18 mph..Thats how fast Charley wuz movin when we got whacked..So whoever is on the south side of this monster could see gusts near 200 mph.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
Quoting hydrus:
Yes. The S.W. quadrant has been having trouble getting the convection wrapped up there. Might be some shear issues. If it does not achieve the uniform C.D.O., it will not strengthen...Could weaken a bit..They do mention it being annular tho...remarks:
130300z position near 18.3s 53.4e.
Tropical cyclone (tc) 12s (giovanna), located approximately 400 nm
east of Antananarivo, Madagascar, had tracked west-southwestward at
14 knots over the past six hours. Animated infrared satellite
imagery shows the system has reintensified coincident with the
emergence of a highly symmetrical 40-nm diameter eye. A 130000z SSMI
microwave image shows the eye is enveloped by a continuous ring of
ultra-deep convection, which is in turn surrounded by a concentric
ring of shallow reflectivities, characteristic of intense annular
cyclones. The initial position was placed with high confidence over
the eye feature and the initial intensity was based on Dvorak

estimates from pgtw and fmee. Upper level analysis indicates the
cyclone has formed its own mesoscale anticyclone that is providing
excellent radial outflow. Tc 12s is expected to continue tracking
along the northern periphery of a subtropical ridge extension to the
south. It will make landfall over the central eastern coast of
Madagascar shortly before tau 24, then exit into the Mozambique
Channel by tau 48 before making a secondary and final landfall into
southern Mozambique. The available numerical guidance is in close
agreement with the exception of GFDN that brings the vortex poleward
after tau 72. This track forecast is in line with consensus. Maximum
significant wave height at 130000z is 28 feet. Next warnings at
131500z and 140300z.//


Even if it doesn't weaken, it will still be at least a cat 3 on landfall, if not a cat 4. The U.S. can't even withstand a cat 4 what would make anyone think that Madagascar can?



After seeing the first visible images Madagascar residents react to the terrible news...
Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468
More light, so a clearer image of Giovanna. The only thing that is missing is the closed south east side of the eyewall, otherwise it would be the perfect storm.

Member Since: November 19, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 1285
Looking carefully at the Balance of the systems outflow and note the Hot Towers forming well away from the Inner eyewall.

Thats a bad sign.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Strong Cyclone Giovanna WunderMap®
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting GeorgiaStormz:


Still hoping for a little snow in GA before the rain comes!


thats crazy....that NWS must be wanting snow so bad they are dreaming and putting their dreams on their site...its not even going to snow/sleet/frz rain in atlanta, let alone a mix just north of macon. it will be all rain from north atlanta south, helen, ga up to the nc border will get some snow, but thats it!
Member Since: August 4, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 570
Quoting Patrap:
This is the tell all tale...from hydrus post


Upper level analysis indicates the
cyclone has formed its own mesoscale anticyclone that is providing
excellent radial outflow.


Were going to see a severe Cyclone Impact a Major Coastal region will limited response capability at best.

ReliefWEB is aware and monitoring the Islands request and updates.
bummer...My prayers for them..Unfortunately, I know how some of them feel right now...and a lot of that feeling lies in the pit of the stomach.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
Excellent Outflow, excellent inflow at the surface.

Warm sustaining SST's and Low Shear.







Member Since: Posts: Comments:
This is the tell all tale...from hydrus post


Upper level analysis indicates the
cyclone has formed its own mesoscale anticyclone that is providing
excellent radial outflow.


Were going to see a severe Cyclone Impact a Major Coastal region with limited response capability at best.

ReliefWEB is aware and monitoring the Islands request and updates.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
First vis of the day.

Member Since: November 19, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 1285
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Definite weakening is occurring at this time. The eye is becoming cloud-filled.

Yes. The S.W. quadrant has been having trouble getting the convection wrapped up there. Might be some shear issues. If it does not achieve the uniform C.D.O., it will not strengthen...Could weaken a bit..They do mention it being annular tho...remarks:
130300z position near 18.3s 53.4e.
Tropical cyclone (tc) 12s (giovanna), located approximately 400 nm
east of Antananarivo, Madagascar, had tracked west-southwestward at
14 knots over the past six hours. Animated infrared satellite
imagery shows the system has reintensified coincident with the
emergence of a highly symmetrical 40-nm diameter eye. A 130000z SSMI
microwave image shows the eye is enveloped by a continuous ring of
ultra-deep convection, which is in turn surrounded by a concentric
ring of shallow reflectivities, characteristic of intense annular
cyclones. The initial position was placed with high confidence over
the eye feature and the initial intensity was based on Dvorak

estimates from pgtw and fmee. Upper level analysis indicates the
cyclone has formed its own mesoscale anticyclone that is providing
excellent radial outflow. Tc 12s is expected to continue tracking
along the northern periphery of a subtropical ridge extension to the
south. It will make landfall over the central eastern coast of
Madagascar shortly before tau 24, then exit into the Mozambique
Channel by tau 48 before making a secondary and final landfall into
southern Mozambique. The available numerical guidance is in close
agreement with the exception of GFDN that brings the vortex poleward
after tau 72. This track forecast is in line with consensus. Maximum
significant wave height at 130000z is 28 feet. Next warnings at
131500z and 140300z.//
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20526
0300Z Image
Enhanced Infrared (IR) Imagery (4 km Mercator)

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting GeorgiaStormz:
Hi yall, im a 15 year old boy who has followed weather for as long as i can remember but only remember events back to '08(like the 3/15/08 outbreak).
I have lurked here for 2 or 3 years


Welcome Georgia! Nice to meet you. I'm a relative new comer to weather watching. Though I do remember an event or two going a little farther back than '08. Lol. Found WU in '08. Been hooked ever since. Learned a lot here. Pipe in any time. :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


Still hoping for a little snow in GA before the rain comes!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Definite weakening is occurring at this time. The eye is becoming cloud-filled.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31519
Quoting SPLbeater:


wow....im learning!!!!!this is rare lol


Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468
Hi yall, im a 15 year old boy who has followed weather for as long as i can remember but only remember events back to '08(like the 3/15/08 outbreak).
I have lurked here for 2 or 3 years
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hydrus:
You learning is rare..?


here it is xD
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
773. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
755. RTSplayer 2:37 AM GMT on February 13, 2012


Is that 1 minute or 10 minute? I forget.

gotta be 1 minute.

No way this is a 10 minute sustained at 125kts. That'd be um...


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii always uses the 1 minute wind average.
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 50 Comments: 44811
772. j2008
Quoting Patrap:
Improving Dvorak





I agree looks much more complete, ring of cold convection is completely filled in around the eye, looks prime for more intensification. Also appears to be starting to band around the southern side which has been weak all day.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hydrus:
You learning is rare..?

That is rather worrying.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:
Improving Dvorak Loop


..click image for loop

</a>


Actually, it seems weaker to me too after watching that loop....
Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468

Viewing: 820 - 770

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.