Bill Read to retire as director of the National Hurricane Center

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:28 PM GMT on January 16, 2012

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Bill Read, the director of the National Hurricane Center (NHC) since 2008, announced Saturday that he will be retiring on June 1, ending four and one-half years as the nation's most visible meteorologist. Read took the post of NHC director after Bill Proenza stepped down following a stormy six-month tenure where much of staff revolted against him. In the wake of the turmoil stirred up by Proenza, Read brought stability to the Hurricane Center. Conversations I've had with staff at NHC indicated that Read was an excellent manager of people, and was well-respected among his employees. His management ability, easy-going style, and solid communication skills made Read an excellent choice for director of NHC, and he will be missed. “I will have been in charge just shy of four and a half years on June 1,” Read wrote in a letter to hurricane center staff . “I had no idea I would ever be considered for such an honor. It’s been quite a ride and I’m blessed to hit the exit ramp in my career after working with you all.”

Previously, Read served as director of Houston's National Weather Service office, a post he took in 1992. Read was called in to work at NHC three times between 1992 and 2005 to help out with hurricane emergencies. Prior to his job in Houston, Read served in the U.S. Navy, where his duties included an assignment as an on-board meteorologist with the Hurricane Hunters. He began his career in 1977 with the National Weather Service test and evaluation division in Sterling, VA.


Figure 1. Bill Read at the National Hurricane Center forecast desk. Image credit: NOAA.

National Hurricane Center Directors:
Gordon Dunn, 1965 - 1967
Robert Simpson, 1967 - 1973
Neil Frank, 1973 - 1987
Bob Sheets, 1987 - 1995
Robert Burpee, 1995 - 1997
Jerry Jarrell, 1998 - 2000
Max Mayfield, 2000 - 2007
Bill Proenza, January - July, 2007
Ed Rappaport (interim), July 2007 - January 2008
Bill Read, 2008 - 2012

Who will the next director of NHC be?
The retirement of Bill Read means that a search for NHC's eleventh director must be complete before hurricane season arrives. While I haven't had time to ask them if they are interested, here are four candidates who would make excellent directors of NHC:

Dr. Ed Rappaport, Deputy Director of NHC since 2000. Dr. Rappaport served as interim director of NHC during the hurricane season of 2007, and did a great job. He did not want to be the permanent director, though, and it is uncertain if would want the position now. In a Q and A interview posted on the NHC web site last year, Dr. Rappaport said, "The responsibilities are immense and, to date, the circumstances have not been right for me to be the director full time. But I will consider it the next time the opportunity arises. For such a critical position, one which has such important responsibilities, great visibility, many challenges and the long periods of travel, everything has to be aligned right within your professional and personal life to make the commitment that is required to do the job well." I have to believe that if he wants the job, the next director of NHC will be Ed Rappaport.

James Franklin, Branch Chief of the NHC Hurricane Specialists Unit. Since 2008, Franklin has been responsible for the quality of hurricane forecasts coming out of NHC, a tough, high-pressure job that he has handled remarkably well. Before arriving at NHC, Mr. Franklin worked as a hurricane research scientist for NOAA's Hurricane Research Division.

Dr. Chris Landsea, NHC Science and Operations Officer since 2005. Between 1995 - 2004, Dr. Landsea worked as a hurricane research scientist for NOAA's Hurricane Research Division. Dr. Landsea has testified in front of Congress several times on the issue of hurricanes and global warming, and has excellent public communication skills.

Dr. Rick Knabb, tropical weather expert for the Weather Channel. Dr. Knabb served as a senior hurricane specialist at NHC from 2005 - 2008, then took a position as deputy director and director of operations of the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) and NWS Forecast Office in Honolulu, Hawaii. In 2010, he joined the Weather Channel.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting SPLbeater:


0.o
Actually that may be a conservative amount of planets seeing that some may have more than 1 like our solar system. Could be more like 150 billion planets.
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OH MY GOSH!!! THUNDER OUTSIDE!!! WOOOOHOOO!!!!
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting bappit:


"Would that be something like all poodles are dogs but not all dogs are poodles?" Nooooo. Look it up in Wikipedia while you still can.

"I still ask can you prove it false?" Nooooooo, and you cannot prove it is true either. What I'm saying is that it is irrelevant. If you insist on bring animals into this, then your question is an example of a rabbit hole. If you still insist on bringing animals into it, I don't want to talk to you.

"It is ok I know you are trying to dodge the direct question" Yes, I usually try to avoid pointless questions (has a direct question even been asked?), but I do like to point them out. Is that a bad thing?
doesn't burning fossil fuels or biomass produce the stored co2?

BTW direct question are you are douche. yes or no
Member Since: July 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2260
Quoting nymore:
Would that be something like all poodles are dogs but not all dogs are poodles? I still ask can you prove it false? It is ok I know you are trying to dodge the direct question


"Would that be something like all poodles are dogs but not all dogs are poodles?" Nooooo. Look it up in Wikipedia while you still can.

"I still ask can you prove it false?" Nooooooo, and you cannot prove it is true either. What I'm saying is that it is irrelevant. If you insist on bringing animals into this, then your question is an example of a rabbit hole. If you still insist on bringing animals into it, I don't want to talk to you.

"It is ok I know you are trying to dodge the direct question" Yes, I usually try to avoid pointless questions (has a direct question even been asked?), but I do like to point them out. Is that a bad thing?
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 6158
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Link I found this very interesting. Lets say that only .0001% of planets have life. That's still 10 million planets.


0.o
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
your: possessive pronoun
you're: you are (contraction)

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I don't see any geiger counters there....


Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9882
Quoting Patrap:
Sound dosent travel in the Vacuum of Space so ya gonna have to yell really Loud.




Dave Bowman: Alright, HAL. I'll go in through the emergency airlock.
HAL: Without your space helmet, Dave? You're going to find that rather difficult.
One of my favorites...Pretty good special effects for 1968 too.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22728
Link I found this very interesting. Lets say that only .0001% of planets have life. That's still 10 million planets.
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Sound Waves May Be
Used To Generate Energy,
Produce Weapons And More

By Michael Fitzpatrick
http://www.telegraph.co.uk
4-3-00


Sound, as any deafened rocker will tell you, can be surprisingly powerful. So powerful, in fact, that scientists are discovering just what a little bit of pumped-up volume is capable of - from levitating objects in space to rearranging our internal organs.

To prove how potent sound waves can be, a selection of unfortunate laboratory animals were placed on the receiving end of this more sinister use of acoustic technology. When high-powered infrasound was directed at the subjects, it caused internal bleeding and even destroyed body tissue. Good news if you happen to be a military scientist looking to develop a sound-wave weapon.

Encouraged by the lab results, militarists around the world are working on such sound arms, which they hope to put to use in conflicts. On the battlefield, they say, an array of loudspeakers could be directed at the enemy, who would be blasted by very powerful infrasound - very low-frequency sound waves below the hearing threshold of the human ear. With such a weapon, devastating attacks could be made without ever firing a conventional shot...................

Link
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9882
Quoting Xyrus2000:


Now you know that's not true. If it wasn't for Grothar rubbing two sticks together the sun would have never ignited in the first place. :D
He is resourceful...He,s a polyglot too, he speaks about 100,000 languages..:0
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22728
There have been 6 reported tornadoes today; 4 confirmed. Two EF0s and two EF1s. Of the two that haven't been confirmed by the NWS offices yet, both of them were spotted by the public, and the one in Mississippi has, unfortunately, produced heavy damage and injuries.
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Anyway, my vote is Franklin to at least get a promotion. His NHC updates are the best.
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Quoting bappit:

So you are saying it fails Karl Popper's falsifiability test? That means you're statement is unscientific.

(Trying to maintain a your/you're balance for PressLord's sake.)
Would that be something like all poodles are dogs but not all dogs are poodles? I still ask can you prove it false? It is ok I know you are trying to dodge the direct question
Member Since: July 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2260
Quoting bappit:

I see it in the movies all the time so it must.

BTW, I like the "ya" solution to the your/you're problem.


I fancy the Teacher, he was a fine Man,, with insight that amazes one.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129910
Quoting WxGeekVA:


There is a place on the web where you do have more freedom of speech to conduct a debate, and you can still discuss the weather with friendly people....... And I'm sure you know what it is.
Lol I want an in-person debate. My conversations are much soother in person.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Watch. Enjoy. And realize how very tiny and insignificant you really are.

Makes me all the more excited for the future and what we can find.
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Quoting Patrap:
Sound dosent travel in the Vacuum of Space so ya gonna have to yell really Loud.

I see it in the movies all the time so it must.

BTW, I like the "ya" solution to the your/you're problem.
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 6158
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
I wish I can have a conversation with you face to face. Would love to have a constructive argument with you. Your almost an opposite with me in ideology.


There is a place on the web where you do have more freedom of speech to conduct a debate, and you can still discuss the weather with friendly people....... And I'm sure you know what it is.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nymore:
Can you prove my statement false?

So you are saying it fails Karl Popper's falsifiability test? That means you're statement is unscientific.

(Trying to maintain a your/you're balance for PressLord's sake.)
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 6158
Sound dosent travel in the Vacuum of Space so ya gonna have to yell really Loud.




Dave Bowman: Alright, HAL. I'll go in through the emergency airlock.
HAL: Without your space helmet, Dave? You're going to find that rather difficult.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129910
Quoting SPLbeater:


well, i dont really bring that out unless i must for correct information. becuase there are things you cannot say without including the Lord. And then everybody starts bashin me for it, quite commical i think lol xD
I wish I can have a conversation with you face to face. Would love to have a constructive argument with you. Your almost an opposite with me in ideology.
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Quoting WxGeekVA:


You may find it funny, but everyone else finds it.... not quite appropriate for a blog dealing with science we could say. "Enjoy your belief, but keep it to yourself and those who you know share the same," my father told me.


Like i said, I dont randomly bring it out for no reason. I include it in correct information, in a reply or a solo statement.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Good Evening, Wunderbloggers.
Looks like some rain is moving into the Panhandle tonight.
Link
Appreciate your perspective Video Neap, but I am still sure I am more important to me than I am to anybody else!
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Quoting AtHomeInTX:
Strange Sounds Rays Baseball Game evening of Earthquake East Coast U.S.



With so many countries now with space programs and the ability to place satellites in orbit, I would not doubt that those sounds are some kind of orbital experiment... Looking to calibrate the perfect sound weapon...
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9882
Watch. Enjoy. And realize how very tiny and insignificant you really are.

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Quoting WxGeekVA:


Dude.... Even if you disagree with his views, what has he ever done to you personally. IMO he isn't a troll, but just a misguided kid who will grow up like me and realize the error of what he is saying. I mean, when I was 13 I thought some things that were totally false. I didn't really like when people tried to pick on me because of that for being different. So if you think he is a "sociopath" or a troll,m go ahead and put him on ignore. But don't be rude about it.


As Judge Judy says..."He is not fully cooked yet."
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Wikipedia will look like this...This is what you will see starting at midnight. Simply change the zip code in the URL and your representatives will come up on the right.

(Pay no attention to the image I posted earlier, that was just a potential design. This is how Wikipedia WILL look at Midnight.)
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Quoting SPLbeater:


well, i dont really bring that out unless i must for correct information. becuase there are things you cannot say without including the Lord. And then everybody starts bashin me for it, quite commical i think lol xD


You may find it funny, but everyone else finds it.... not quite appropriate for a blog dealing with science we could say. "Enjoy your belief, but keep it to yourself and those who you know share the same," my father told me.
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Quoting Xyrus2000:


I would love to be immortal. An eternity to observe and study. Finding new answers and discovering the 10 new questions that were hiding beneath it. Then endless possibilities and challenges. I'd be quite happy being an eternal student of this universe.
That was my point of why being immortal would be worth it. Cause there is an eternity of knowledge waiting to accompany us. It would be a very difficult rode but I think the quest is worth it. Still given the option I would still have to think about it for a long time and deiced whether the trade-offs are worth it.
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Quoting hydrus:
The Sun was 40 years old when u were born....Hello Gro..:)


Now you know that's not true. If it wasn't for Grothar rubbing two sticks together the sun would have never ignited in the first place. :D
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Quoting WxGeekVA:


Like misguided in the excessive almost preaching about God and Jesus and the like..... You wouldn't be labelled as a troll/sociopath/religious nut if you just toned it down like 2 notches. I'm fine with your beliefs, everyone should be entitled to their own but just try to keep it down, okay?


well, i dont really bring that out unless i must for correct information. becuase there are things you cannot say without including the Lord. And then everybody starts bashin me for it, quite commical i think lol xD
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting SPLbeater:


misguided? ok what are you reffering to here...i cant see his comments...


Like misguided in the excessive almost preaching about God and Jesus and the like..... You wouldn't be labelled as a troll/sociopath/religious nut if you just toned it down like 2 notches. I'm fine with your beliefs, everyone should be entitled to their own but just try to keep it down, okay?
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Quoting petewxwatcher:


Frontline is tonight. Jan 17th on my station.

Yup.
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 6158
Quoting KoritheMan:
...One thing's for sure, though: I definitely wouldn't choose immortality if given the option.


I would love to be immortal. An eternity to observe and study. Finding new answers and discovering the 10 new questions that were hiding beneath it. Then endless possibilities and challenges. I'd be quite happy being an eternal student of this universe.
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Quoting bappit:


Awww, come on. You aren't going to go back to the big bang? Yeah, people weren't around then but that is not really relevant to a point like you are making. Or ... why not say we changed the atmosphere when we first evolved as a species? Wait, did Neanderthals beat us to it? This is confusing.
Can you prove my statement false?
Member Since: July 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2260
Quoting AtHomeInTX:
Strange Sounds Rays Baseball Game evening of Earthquake East Coast U.S.



my gosh..im glad i havnt heard that, sounds like something from, like Star Trek!
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting hydrus:
lol Hello Xyrus.

Is it a bad thing for a troll to be a sociopath? That could be adaptive for someone trolling.

I grabbed Wikipedia before the lights go out tomorrow.

"Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is described by the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, fourth edition (DSM-IV-TR), as an Axis II personality disorder characterized by "...a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood."[1]"
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 6158
Quoting WxGeekVA:


Dude.... Even if you disagree with his views, what has he ever done to you personally. IMO he isn't a troll, but just a misguided kid who will grow up like me and realize the error of what he is saying. I mean, when I was 13 I thought some things that were totally false. I didn't really like when people tried to pick on me because of that for being different. So if you think he is a "sociopath" or a troll, go ahead and put him on ignore. But don't be rude about it.


misguided? ok what are you reffering to here...i cant see his comments...
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
January 17, 2012, 3:54 PM
A Fresh Look at Nuclear Power, from Fukushima to the Hudson
By ANDREW C. REVKIN


Tonight, the PBS program Frontline is running “Nuclear Aftershocks,” a 50-minute documentary examining the implications of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear calamity for the future of nuclear power in the United States and elsewhere.

Over the weekend I watched a near-final version of the program, and I found it a powerful, fair and – given the time constraints — comprehensive report on the benefits and risks of one of the handful of energy technologies that can provide electric power in bulk without greenhouse gases.

The guide to the issues is Miles O’Brien, a veteran television science reporter (foolishly fired by CNN in 2008) who traveled to three continents to tell the tale.

He examines Japan’s difficult and costly cleanup, the resulting pulse of public fears about radiation there (and elsewhere) and corporate and government decisions that resulted in the construction of such a vulnerable power plant complex in a tsunami zone.

He shifts to Germany, which abruptly pulled the plug on its nuclear program and now faces a looming power gap that analysts say, despite growth in solar and other renewable power sources there, can only be filled with fossil fuels (mainly coal) – raising concerns of climate scientists. The program contains a fresh interview with James Hansen, the NASA climate scientist who’s become an energetic advocate for new nuclear technologies, splitting on this issue with some other climate campaigners focused on solar and other renewable energy technologies.

Then O’Brien travels up the Hudson to the Indian Point nuclear power plant to examine the debate over efforts by its owner, Entergy, to renew the plant’s license for another 20 years. O’Brien visits the building housing the pool for spent nuclear fuel that I toured last year).

Toward the end of the film, he gets stuck in a routine traffic jam on a village road that is theoretically an official evacuation route.

Public concerns about the plant are addressed through that scene and at other points — including an interview with Lynn Sykes, an emeritus geology professor at Columbia University who insists the earthquake risk to the plant is greater than Entergy or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have calculated.

But the piece doesn’t exploit the high “dread to risk ratio” on nuclear energy, as some in the media have.

For example, an interview with David Lochbaum, the lead nuclear analyst for the Union of Concerned Scientists, includes his longstanding concerns about the tendency of nuclear regulators to routinely approve exemptions to some longstanding safety rules (this is also a big concern of Richard Brodsky, a former state legislator from the region).

But the interview includes important nuances (a rare thing). One is Lochbaum crediting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry with at least a couple of proactive decisions – including the commission insisting on flood protections that had been fought by the owners of the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant north of Omaha, Neb. – and that proved critical in limiting risk from last year’s floods.

“Fort Calhoun was a stellar example of the NRC taking proactive action to protect people living in Nebraska,” Lochbaum says. What is lacking at the commission, he stresses, is consistency.




I encourage you to watch the show (a trailer is above). Here’s a brief exchange I had with O’Brien (with a few bits of e-mail shorthand cleaned up):

Q.
You powerfully captured the issue of “disaster memory” (or amnesia!), which transcends nuclear risk. Did you come away with your own sense of whether we, as a species, can overcome that bad habit?

A.
I am afraid it is human nature. A lifetime is 100 years if we are lucky and eat well — and it is hard for us to comprehend the time scales of the universe. Even if we are careful students of the historical record, it is not enough in this case to give us a proper sense of the risk.

For instance, the assumption is the Ramapo fault [near Indian Point] is inactive. How can we be certain? Certainly the historical record of the “New World” barely scratches the surface (if you will). Tectonic time is a whole different ballgame. It is interesting how this brings us into the climate change debate. And at its core (again, if you will) is whether we truly believe that science and scientists are worth listening to. It seems we only listen when we hear things that are indeed convenient. It appears that was the case at Tepco [relevant Times story].

Q.
In the program, the radiation fears of folks in Japan, Germany and New York were counterposed against a couple of experts on risk, but the piece might have benefitted from the voice of one of the environmentalists who’ve become nuclear proponents (Stewart Brand, George Monbiot, or the like) or an expert in the psychology of risk (Paul Slovic, David Ropeik, etc.). Jim Hansen’s worries are all focused on [the greenhouse gas] CO2 so he’s not directly addressing the risk question (for example, the reality that coal produces more radiation and deaths than nuclear, etc.). My guess is this is also a time/space issue, but I’d be eager to hear your thoughts.

A.
It was a matter of time. We thought about including all of those people at one point or another, but in the end I felt Hansen was most on point for the Germany conundrum. I think a lot of what the others would say is infused in the piece anyway. But the short answer is, even 50 minutes is not enough!

Q.
. One technical element that’s missing is dry cask storage, which has gained credence as a safe mid- to long-term on-site storage option (at Indian Point and elsewhere). It’s certainly earthquake- and flood-proof (and almost certainly terror-proof). I’m presuming you did some reporting on that that couldn’t fit. If so what are your impressions?

A.
We did, and we saw the casks at Indian Point. It is the only reasonable solution that I can see to that problem. Centralizing the waste is never going to happen – just as reprocessing remains a nonstarter. So the casks are becoming the default solution — and it does not seem to be such a bad way to go. The waste issue is not an easy one to get into — and so again, for time, we saved it for another piece.
It’s a credit to PBS and the program’s backers that this film was made; it would also be great to see this kind of inquiry continue. I hope O’Brien and his team get the chance to do a sequel.


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129910
Quoting dabirds:
360) Wanted to bring that element in as well, but felt I couldn't write it well enough. Nicely put!


Thanks man.
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Quoting nymore:
The second man learned to control fire is the time we changed the atmosphere and I am pretty sure that was more than 100 years ago Patrap.


Awww, come on. You aren't going to go back to the big bang? Yeah, people weren't around then but that is not really relevant to a point like you are making. Or ... why not say we changed the atmosphere when we first evolved as a species? Wait, did Neanderthals beat us to it? This is confusing.
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 6158
Strange Sounds Rays Baseball Game evening of Earthquake East Coast U.S.

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Quoting Xyrus2000:


Yeah. For a sociopath.
lol Hello Xyrus.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22728
Quoting bappit:
Anyone watching Frontline tomorrow? There's a documentary on Fukushima to air, Nuclear Aftershocks.

In a review of the program Maggie Koerth-Baker makes this comment. Yeah, she's pushing a book to come out this spring, but here's the info.

"This is another thing that Nuclear Aftershocks doesn't get into very deeply, but it is extremely important to remember that coal has immediate health consequences, not just long-term climate change consequences. For instance, a 2007 study found that, in the European Union, air pollution from coal power plants killed almost 25 people per terawatt-hour of electricity produced. Currently, the EU gets around 1000 terawatt-hours of electricity from coal every year. Let that sink in."



Frontline is tonight. Jan 17th on my station.
Member Since: March 24, 2011 Posts: 3 Comments: 392
Quoting Xyrus2000:


Yeah. For a sociopath.


Dude.... Even if you disagree with his views, what has he ever done to you personally. IMO he isn't a troll, but just a misguided kid who will grow up like me and realize the error of what he is saying. I mean, when I was 13 I thought some things that were totally false. I didn't really like when people tried to pick on me because of that for being different. So if you think he is a "sociopath" or a troll, go ahead and put him on ignore. But don't be rude about it.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Anyone watching Frontline tomorrow? There's a documentary on Fukushima to air, Nuclear Aftershocks.

In a review of the program Maggie Koerth-Baker makes this comment. Yeah, she's pushing a book to come out this spring, but here's the info.

"This is another thing that Nuclear Aftershocks doesn't get into very deeply, but it is extremely important to remember that coal has immediate health consequences, not just long-term climate change consequences. For instance, a 2007 study found that, in the European Union, air pollution from coal power plants killed almost 25 people per terawatt-hour of electricity produced. Currently, the EU gets around 1000 terawatt-hours of electricity from coal every year. Let that sink in."

Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 6158
Anybody know where to find a VIL loop from the NWS? or is it not public?(<--stupid question, I know)
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Has canes been around lately? Grothar, you still shop at Sears?
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Well, this is the first time i have been able to observe real-time VIL data in thunderstorms. and i think it is CoOoOoOoOl lol
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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