2011: Year of the Tornado

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:25 PM GMT on December 27, 2011

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The year 2011 will forever be known as Year of the Tornado in the U.S. A series of violent severe storms swept across the Plains and Southeast U.S., bringing an astonishing six billion-dollar disasters in a three-month period. The epic tornado onslaught killed 552 people and caused $25 billion in damage. Three of the five largest tornado outbreaks on record hit in a six-week period, including the largest and most expensive tornado outbreak in U.S. history--the $10.2 billion dollar Southeast U.S. Super Outbreak, April 25 - 28. Even more stunning was the $9 billion late-May tornado outbreak that brought an EF-5 tornado to Joplin, Missouri. The Joplin tornado did $3 billion in damage and killed 158 people--the largest death toll from a U.S. tornado since 1947, seventh deadliest tornado in U.S. history, and the most expensive tornado in world history. In a year of amazing weather extremes, this year's tornado season ranks as the top U.S. weather story of 2011.


Video 1. Remarkable video of the tornado that hit Tuscaloosa, Alabama on April 27, 2011. Fast forward to minute four to see the worst of the storm.



Figure 1. A truly frightening radar image: multiple hook echoes from at least ten supercell thunderstorms cover Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee during the height of the April 27, 2011 Super Outbreak. A multi-hour animation is available here.

A record six EF-5 tornadoes confirmed in 2011
Six top-end EF-5 tornadoes hit the U.S. in 2011, tying this year with 1974 for the greatest number of these most destructive tornadoes. The EF-5 tornadoes of 2011:

1) The April 27, 2011 Neshoba/Kemper/Winston/Noxubee Counties, Mississippi tornado (3 killed, 29 mile path length.)

2) The April 27, 2011 Smithville, Mississippi tornado (22 killed, 15 mile path length.)

3) The April 27, 2011 Hackleburg, Alabama tornado (71 killed, 25 mile path length.)

4) The April 27, 2011 Rainsville/Dekalb County, Alabama tornado (26 killed, 34 mile path length.)

5) The May 22, 2011 Joplin Missouri tornado (158 killed, 14 mile path length.)

6) The May 24, 2011 Binger-El Reno-Peidmont-Guthrie, Oklahoma tornado. (9 killed, 75 mile path length.)


Figure 2. Aerial view of damage from the May 22, 2011 Joplin, Missouri tornado. Image credit: Wikipedia.


Figure 3. EF-5 damage from the April 27, 2011 Neshoba tornado in Mississippi. The tornado was so powerful that it dug out the ground to a depth of two feet over an area 25 - 50 yards wide and several hundred yards long. Image credit: NWS.

A few other remarkable statistics on the tornado season of 2011, compiled from NOAA's official press release, the NOAA Extreme Weather 2011 page, and Wikipedia's excellent tornado pages:

- The tornado death toll of 552 in 2011 ties 1936 as the second deadliest year for tornadoes in U.S. history. Only 1925, with 794 fatalities, was deadlier. In 1936, violent tornadoes hit Tupelo Mississippi (216 killed), and Gainesville, Georgia (203 killed.) During the 1930s, the tornado death rate per million people was 60 - 70 times as great as in the year 2000 (Figure 4), implying that this year's tornadoes may have killed tens of thousands of people if we did not have our modern tornado modern warning system.


Figure 4. Death rate per million people per year in U.S., 1875-2011. Thin line with dots is raw rate, curved thick line is death rate, filtered by 3-point median and 5-point running mean filter, and straight solid lines are least squares fit to filtered death rate for 1875-1925 and 1925-2011. Dashed lines are estimates of 10th and 90th percentile death rates from 1925-2000. The death rate fell from 8 per million to .12 per million between 1940 and 2010. Image credit: A Brief History of Deaths from Tornadoes in the United States, Harold Brooks and Charles Doswell III, and updated by Harold Brooks in 2011.

- April 2011 had the most tornadoes of any month in U.S. history--753. The previous record was 542, set in May 2003. The previous busiest April was in 1974, with 267 tornadoes. The average number of tornadoes for the month of April during the past decade was 161, and the 30-year average for April tornadoes was 135.

- On April 27, 199 confirmed tornadoes touched down. This is the largest 1-day tornado total on record, beating the 148 recorded in 24 hours on April 3 - 4, 1974.

The year 2011 now has three of the top five tornado outbreaks on record (note, though, that reliable records for number of tornadoes only extend back in time to about the early 1990s):

- The April 25 - 28, 2011 Super tornado outbreak, with 343 tornadoes, is now the largest tornado outbreak in U.S. history. The previous record (3 days or less duration) was 148 tornadoes, set during the April 3 - 4, 1974 Super Outbreak.

- The May 22 - 27, 2011 tornado outbreak, with 180 confirmed tornadoes, ranks as the 4th largest 6-day or shorter tornado outbreak on record. A May 2003 6-day outbreak had 289 tornadoes, and a May 2004 6-day outbreak had 229 tornadoes.

- The April 14 - 16, 2011 tornado outbreak, with 177 confirmed tornadoes, ranks as the second largest tornado outbreak of three days or less duration on record, and 5th largest outbreak of six or fewer days duration.

- The May 22, 2011 Joplin, Missouri tornado killed 158 people and injured 1150, making it the deadliest U.S. tornado since 1947, and 7th deadliest in history. The $3 billion estimate of insured damage makes it the most expensive tornado in world history.

- Preliminary damage estimates from Munich Re insurance company put 2011's insured losses due to U.S. thunderstorms and tornadoes at $25 billion, more than double the previous record set in 2010.

- The year 2011 now ranks in 2nd place behind 1973 for greatest number of tornadoes greater than EF-0 strength (EF-1, EF-2, EF-3, EF-4 and EF-5 strength, Figure 5.)


Figure 5. Number of EF-1, EF-2, EF-3, EF-4 and EF-5 tornadoes from 1950 to 2011. The total shown for 2011 is preliminary and uses unofficial numbers through November 17, but 2011 now ranks in 2nd place behind 1973. There is not a decades-long increasing trend in the numbers of tornadoes stronger than EF-0, implying that climate change, as yet, is not having a noticeable impact on U.S. tornadoes. However, statistics of tornado frequency and intensity are highly uncertain. Major changes in the rating process occurred in the mid-1970s (when all tornadoes occurring prior to about 1975 were retrospectively rated), and again in 2001, when scientists began rating tornadoes lower because of engineering concerns and unintended consequences of National Weather Service policy changes. Also, beginning in 2007, NOAA switched from the F-scale to the EF-scale for rating tornado damage, causing additional problems with attempting to assess if tornadoes are changing over time. Data provided by Harold Brooks, NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory.

Other posts looking back at the remarkable weather events of 2011
Deadliest weather disaster of 2011: the East African drought
Tropical Storm Lee's flood in Binghamton: was global warming the final straw?
Wettest year on record in Philadelphia; 2011 sets record for wet/dry extremes in U.S.
Hurricane Irene: New York City dodges a potential storm surge mega-disaster

The NWS posted a summary of the records set during the tornado season of 2011 in February 2012.

Jeff Masters

Joplin Tornado Damage (thebige)
Joplin Tornado Damage
Tornado - Pine Apple,AL (EarlBcom)
Tornado just south of Pine Apple, AL on around 5:40pm. This storm was a part of the Alabama tornado outbreak on April 15, 2011. earlb.com VIDEO - See video of tornado at earlb.com
Tornado - Pine Apple,AL
As Is (teach50)
My husband and I were visiting my parents in Birmingham, Alabama. We decided to take a day trip to Tuscaloosa to see the damage from the April 27 tornado. It was a sight that I will never forget. Blocks and blocks of flattened houses and stores. This area has not been touched in 2 months. It was so moving that I started to cry thinking of all these poor people.
As Is

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262. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Fiji Meteorological Services
Tropical Disturbance Summary
TROPICAL DISTURBANCE 02F
9:00 AM FST December 29 2011
===================================

At 21:00 PM UTC, Tropical Disturbance 02F (1002 hPa) located at 17.1S 168.9W is reported as slowly moving. Position poor based on multispectral infrared and visible imagery with animation and latest ASCAT pass. Sea surface temperature is around 29C.

Organization has not improved significantly and convection remains persistent in the past 24 hours. Cyclonic circulation is from surface to 850 HPA. The system lies under an upper diffluent region and highly sheared environment.

Global models have picked up the system and are slowly moving it southeastward with little intensification.

The potential for this disturbance to form into a tropical cyclone within the next 24-48 hours is LOW.
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 48 Comments: 43702
Quoting Neapolitan:
It has been very warm across a lot of the U.S. for the past several weeks. For instance, Minneapolis has averaged more than 12 degrees above normal over the past two-and-a-half weeks; Miami has been above normal on all but five of the past 45 days; Chicago, which is having one of its wettest years ever, has nontheless received just 1.7" of snow, far less than the year-end normal of nearly 9"; and if Central Park doesn't get some measurable snow in the next 79 hours, this will be only the third year in the past 140 that NYC has seen no December snow.


While other parts of the world are seeing just the opposite:

26 provinces in Thailand declared cold spell disaster zones (philstar.com) Updated December 28, 2011 04:28 PM

BANGKOK (Xinhua) -- A total of 26 provinces in northern and central parts of Thailand have been declared cold spell disaster zones, the National Disaster Warning Centre said on Wednesday.

The provinces are Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, Mae Hong Son, Phrae, Uttaradit, Phitsanulok, Nan, Tak, Phayao, Lampang, Lamphun, Petchabun in the North, Sakon Nakhon, Loei, Nong Khai, Nakhon Phanom, Ubon Ratchathani, Mahasarakham, Mukdahan, Kalasin, Buri Ram, Si Sa Ket, Bueng Khan, Udon Thani in the Northeast, and Suphanburi and Ratchaburi in the central part.

In total 277 districts or 25,780 villages were included in the cold spell disaster zones, according to the report.

Link

Apparently, been that way for a few days:

"...12/26/2011...Twenty-two provinces have been declared cold-spell disaster zones..."

"...27/12/2011...Altogether 221 districts in 23 provinces have been declared cold spell disaster zones..."

Looks like this "weather" has been happening for about the past two weeks.

And, in India:

"...NEW DELHI, Dec. 19 (Xinhua) At least 26 people have died so far this year as cold waves intensified across northern India, including the national capital where air and rail services are affected, said meteorological officials on Monday.

Most of these deaths have been reported from the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, where six people lost their lives on Sunday night. Meerut, a city about 100 km north of Delhi, was the coldest place, recording a low of 2.2 degrees Celsius.

Not only the cold wave have intensified in the past 24 hours, fog also tightened its grip over the national capital which has witnessed a minimum temperature of five degrees Celsius, three notches below normal.

Moreover, air and rail services have been affected in the national capital where at least 14 flights were delayed at the Indira Gandhi International Airport and some 30 trains have been rescheduled..."
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Jeff did a fine job!!!
Member Since: August 13, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10458
wow it got quiet quick lol
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting Ameister12:
It took the Joplin tornado only 30 seconds after it formed to become a wedge tornado. Amazing!

Damn that was a horrible tornado. Radar pic.. Hospital in Joplin..
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Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125753
It took the Joplin tornado only 30 seconds after it formed to become a wedge tornado. Amazing!

Member Since: August 9, 2009 Posts: 10 Comments: 4505
Quoting StormTracker2K:
All though both the Tuscaloosa and Jopling tornadoes were both EF-5 I think the Joplin tornado had wind speeds well over 300 mph based on damage assements (stronger than that of the Tuscaloosa Tornado).

I don't think the Tuscaloosa tornado was an EF-5. The final report had the winds at 190mph (a strong EF-4).
Member Since: August 9, 2009 Posts: 10 Comments: 4505
Thanks for the heads up Doc, I'll try to catch you on the only true fair and balanced news program. btw - some great pics on NASA's daily image gallery - amazing how some of the galaxies resemble hurricanes (or vice versa).
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Quoting StormTracker2K:
How wide was the Joplin Tornado? It looks like 1 1/2 to 2 miles wide.


It was 3/4 to a mile wide. It looks so large because of how close the chasers were, but still, it's an extremely large tornado.
Member Since: August 9, 2009 Posts: 10 Comments: 4505
In case you missed it TAWX13...

Quoting TomTaylor:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Gah, you always leave people hanging........This would mean what exactly?
This means areas of warm and cool weather or storminess vs pleasant weather will shift accordingly to the pattern change. Of course, areas with anomalous ridging can still have a storm pass through and areas with anomalous troughing can still get pleasant weather, but the longwave pattern dictates the average weather one can expect to find for an area until the pattern changes again.

As a general rule, cold air advection is found on the backside of troughs or in front of ridges, while warm air advection is found ahead of a trough or behind a ridge. Ridges obviously bring pleasant and calm weather while troughs bring stormy weather. Generally speaking, the more amplified the pattern, the shorter the wavelengths will be. Also, under more amplified patterns, the pattern tends to be more stuck or stagnant, whereas less amplified patterns are more progressive. This can lead to extended periods of time with similar weather. Also worth noting that a more amplified pattern does not produce stronger storms as it is usually a sign of a weaker pressure gradient between the polar region and the midlatitude. However,since a more amplified pattern means storms dig down further and ridges push more poleward, this pattern brings unusually strong storms for lower latitudes as well as exceptionally fair weather to higher latitudes.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
All though both the Tuscaloosa and Jopling tornadoes were both EF-5 I think the Joplin tornado had wind speeds well over 300 mph based on damage assements (stronger than that of the Tuscaloosa Tornado).
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Quoting Neapolitan:

There are a (luckily decreasing) number of people convinced against all logic that caring for our environment makes one a socialist ala Stalin. You know: imposing fuel consumption standards, say, or asking Big Energy to divert just a tiny portion of its hundreds of billions of dollars in annual highly destructive profit toward researching alternate forms of energy generation = door-smashing, jack-booted fascism. Or something like that.

Some folks would do themselves a favor by switching from the (un)fair and (anything but) balanced network. At least once in a while...


What a load.....
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Like Neapolitan said earlier that tornado season is just 2 months away give or take. Amazing! I'm willing to go out on a limb and say this going to be another devasting tornado year coming in 2012 as it looks like the same perameters are going to be in place again thanks to this nagging La-Nina.
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How wide was the Joplin Tornado? It looks like 1 1/2 to 2 miles wide.

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Upper to mid level cut off low causing a ruckus in the east Pacific

Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
what a difference a mid-day nap can make xD
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
While next weeks potential storm across the eastern US could bring very cool temperatures to the southern US, keep in mind it won't be bringing much precipitation and the precipitation it does bring will be mostly confined to the northern states. The reason for this is the strong surface high over the southwest and central us will prevent this low from diving significantly southward. This keeps the actual center of the low mostly over Canada, although it may briefly cross over into the US, which confines most of the precipitation to the north. Furthermore, this storm should not carry much moisture with it in the first place since it will lose most of its moisture in the mountains of the Pacific NW, it will be totally cut off from moisture in the Pacific due to the strong ridge building behind it, and, since it is so far north, it won't be able to pull much moisture out of the Gulf of Mexico.


Strong surface high on the 12z GFS at 63hrs preventing the low from diving down






12z GFS 60hr precipitation total at 144hrs

Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
Quoting JeffMasters:
I'm scheduled to appear live for 9 minutes with NOAA administrater Kathleen Sullivan around 6:25 pm EST
tonight on PBS Newshour. We'll be discussing the extreme weather of 2011 in the context of climate change.

Have a great rest of 2011, everyone!

Jeff Masters

Thanks! I'll be tuning in...
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
241. JeffMasters (Admin)
I'm scheduled to appear live for 9 minutes with NOAA administrater Kathleen Sullivan around 6:25 pm EST
tonight on PBS Newshour. We'll be discussing the extreme weather of 2011 in the context of climate change.

Have a great rest of 2011, everyone!

Jeff Masters
Quoting StormTracker2K:
We may have one more chance to get a freeze down here but if we don't soon then it looks as if we may have to wait until next year. Sorry folks but unfortunately the Euro is now following the GFS and keep the core of the cold away from FL. Now that's not to say we won't have a night or two next week in the mid to upper 30's but thats it.

I'm fine with it staying warm down here; I won't complain if there are no hard freezes. But it's been into the 30s as late as April here in Naples, so we still have another 12 or 13 weeks of cold weather possible (though it's never frozen past the end of February). I'm not ready to put away my jacket just yet... ;-)
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13306
Thats one looooooooong cold front. HPC Day 6


Member Since: September 23, 2005 Posts: 13 Comments: 10473
Quoting StormTracker2K:
We may have one more chance to get a freeze down but if we don't soon then it looks as if we may have to wait until next year. Sorry folks but unfortunately the Euro is now following the GFS and keep the core of the cold away from FL. Now that's not to say we won't have a night or two next week in the mid to upper 30's but thats it.
ECMWF may be coming more inline with the GFS, but from the 0z to the 12z run, the ECMWF has backed off a bit on the cold snap, while the GFS has intensified the cold snap from its 0z to 12z run.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
We may have one more chance to get a freeze down here but if we don't soon then it looks as if we may have to wait until next year. Sorry folks but unfortunately the Euro is now following the GFS and keep the core of the cold away from FL. Now that's not to say we won't have a night or two next week in the mid to upper 30's but thats it.
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Models are now just giving FL a glancing blow from the cold next week. What a bummer as I was hoping for a nice cold snap down here. The Euro has most of the cold moving toward the Mid Atlantic now basically mirroring the GFS. A quick shot of cold next week for C FL maybe 24hrs then gone.



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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
People won't forget this:









WOW! That is all I can say.
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Quoting GeoffreyWPB:


Min. Temps 1/4

Max. Temps 1/4
Thanks Geoffrey, They will definitely be falling LOL. I know they really do no harm, but are pests and the cold does kill some of them.
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I'd heard the--false--story about the Richelieu Apartments for years and years. Interesting that it was classified as a civil defense shelter, but that was a long time ago. Thanks for the post Geoff.
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 5563

Quoting DavidHOUTX:


LOL I was being sarcastic!



Ah ok then. My slap self on forehead moment. Just ignore me anyway. Lol.

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
People won't forget this:








I know I'll never forget watching ABC 33/40 broadcast the Tuscaloosa tornado as it went through Tuscaloosa and Birmingham and Mike Bettes report live moments after the Joplin tornado hit. Who could ever forget seeing such tragic events happen right in front of your eyes.
Member Since: August 9, 2009 Posts: 10 Comments: 4505
227. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Darwin Tropical Cyclone Warning Center
Tropical Cyclone Advice #40
TROPICAL LOW, FORMER GRANT (04U)
5:00 AM CST December 29 2011
===================================

At 3:30 AM CST, Tropical Low, Former Grant (998 hPa) located at 14.4S 138.0E, or 180 km east southeast of Alyangula and 285 km north northwest of Mornington Island. The low is reported as moving east at 10 knots.

Dvorak Intensity: T1.0/1.0/S0.0/24 HRS

Ex-tropical cyclone Grant is located in the Gulf of Carpentaria and is expected to continue moving steadily east, and may redevelop into a tropical cyclone on Friday.

GALES are not expected in coastal areas of Queensland in the next 24 hours, however gales may develop later.

HEAVY RAIN potentially leading to flooding is expected to develop across the Peninsula and northern parts of the Gulf Country districts in Queensland during Thursday and Friday.

Tides will be HIGHER THAN NORMAL between Thursday Island and Mornington Island in Queensland. Large waves may produce MINOR FLOODING along the foreshore.

Cyclone Watches/Warnings
=======================

A Cyclone WATCH is current for a developing tropical low for coastal areas from Thursday Island to Gilbert River Mouth in Queensland.

Forecast and Intensity
=======================

12 HRS: 14.3S 139.3E - 25 knots (Tropical Low)
24 HRS: 14.1S 140.6E - 30 knots (Tropical Low)
48 HRS: 14.1S 143.4E - 30 knots (Tropical Low)
72 HRS: 14.2S 147.6E - 25 knots (Tropical Low)

Additional Information
=====================

Position poor primarily based on surface observations. System lies in a moderately sheared environment of 15-30 kt. LLCC exposed with deep convection displaced to the southeast. Due to the presence of a mid level trough, shear is expected to remain at least at moderate levels throughout the systems presence in the Gulf of Carpentaria. As such, the development rate of this system is expected to be slow with only a slight chance of redevelopment into a cyclone prior to crossing the coast of Cape York Peninsula.

The system is expected to move steadily to the east under the influence of the mid level trough and strong W steering in an increasing monsoon flow to the north.

The next tropical cyclone bulletin from Brisbane Tropical Cyclone Warning Center will be issued at 1:30 AM UTC..
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 48 Comments: 43702
Quoting AtHomeInTX:




Ummmmm...not exactly.


LOL I was being sarcastic!
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People won't forget this:







Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 109 Comments: 30310
Quoting BobinTampa:
I'm going out on a limb and say that if you asked some folks two months from now what 2011 was known for, about 10% or less of them would say 'tornado.'

So 'forever' might be a bit of a stretch. I think more people would remember it as the year Kim Kardashian got divorced.

I highly doubt it. This year's tornado year truly is unforgettable.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 109 Comments: 30310
Quoting washingtonian115:
Mmmmm ........2011???.


well, had alot of tropical storms from frontal system that were short lived...and IRENE...so i wouldnt count 2011. lol


btw...ROFL at another avatar xD
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
I'm going out on a limb and say that if you asked some folks two months from now what 2011 was known for, about 10% or less of them would say 'tornado.'

So 'forever' might be a bit of a stretch. I think more people would remember it as the year Kim Kardashian got divorced.
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2010 actually caused more damage and killed more people than 2011. Now 2011 estimates are still preliminary and are only .041 billion less than 2010 at this point, but the point still rests. 2011 was pretty boring as far as hurricanes goes, but some of the TS's sure accomplished amazing feats. (forming in 40kts wind shear, strengthening in 40kts wind shear)
Member Since: November 19, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 1285
Quoting SPLbeater:


totoally forgot that, ok scratch 2010 out xD
Mmmmm ........2011???.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 15738
Quoting HurrikanEB:
Dr. Masters said the tornado season was the top US weather story of the year. What would you guys say was the top weather story of 2011 internationally?

Off hand, the most significant ones that come to my mind are the:
-On going Philippines disaster/recovery
-Japanese quake/tsunami
-Christchurch new zealand
-Southern drought/fires

(it's not weather, but i don't mind if you include earthquakes, ect...)


i pick...#2
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Dr. Masters said the tornado season was the top US weather story of the year. What would you guys say was the top weather story of 2011 internationally?

Off hand, the most significant ones that come to my mind are the:
-On going Philippines disaster/recovery
-Japanese quake/tsunami
-Christchurch new zealand
-Southern drought/fires

(it's not weather, but i don't mind if you include earthquakes, ect...)
Member Since: May 2, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 1289
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

2010 was nice to the United States, but everywhere else, it was a horrible season.

* Alex devastated Mexico.

* Igor became the most destructive hurricane in Newfoundland history and the 3rd most destructive Canada hurricane in recorded history.

* Karl severely affected Mexico.

* Matthew caused severe flooding in Central America.

* Nicole soaked the Greater Antilles (Caribbean Islands) and East USA.

* Tomas produced torrential rains across Haiti.


totoally forgot that, ok scratch 2010 out xD
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting AtHomeInTX:



If that was the infamous hurricane party place then yes.


sure was. 30 people decided to ride out Camille some few yards from the beach and only 3 survived. building was wiped off earth
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting AtHomeInTX:



If that was the infamous hurricane party place then yes.
I still shake my head at that story till this day.It's sad that some people didn't take the warning series and had to learn the hard way.I think only two people survived out of the whole scenario.
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

2010 was nice to the United States, but everywhere else, it was a horrible season.

* Alex devastated Mexico.
* Igor became the most destructive hurricane in Newfoundland history and the 3rd most destructive Canada hurricane in recorded history.
* Karl severely affected Mexico.
* Matthew caused severe flooding in Central America.
* Nicole soaked the Greater Antilles (Caribbean Islands) and East USA.
* Tomas produced torrential rains across Haiti.
I'm sorry I had that "Only thinking of the United States" mentality again while typing my comment.(Slaps forehead).
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 15738
Quoting SPLbeater:


sounds like my story lol. wants alot of activity but dont want any1 hurt. guess thats why 2010 was nice

2010 was nice to the United States, but everywhere else, it was a horrible season.

* Alex devastated Mexico.

* Igor became the most destructive hurricane in Newfoundland history and the 3rd most destructive Canada hurricane in recorded history.

* Karl severely affected Mexico.

* Matthew caused severe flooding in Central America.

* Nicole soaked the Greater Antilles (Caribbean Islands) and East USA.

* Tomas produced torrential rains across Haiti.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 109 Comments: 30310
Quoting SPLbeater:


sounds like my story lol. wants alot of activity but dont want any1 hurt. guess thats why 2010 was nice
09 was just...dead.At the supposed "height of the season" there was no cyclones to track.Even 06 had two tropical cyclones to track at that same time.Seeing less damage but more tropical cylones is always a plus in my book.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 15738

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.