2011: Year of the Tornado

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:25 PM GMT on December 27, 2011

Share this Blog
45
+

The year 2011 will forever be known as Year of the Tornado in the U.S. A series of violent severe storms swept across the Plains and Southeast U.S., bringing an astonishing six billion-dollar disasters in a three-month period. The epic tornado onslaught killed 552 people and caused $25 billion in damage. Three of the five largest tornado outbreaks on record hit in a six-week period, including the largest and most expensive tornado outbreak in U.S. history--the $10.2 billion dollar Southeast U.S. Super Outbreak, April 25 - 28. Even more stunning was the $9 billion late-May tornado outbreak that brought an EF-5 tornado to Joplin, Missouri. The Joplin tornado did $3 billion in damage and killed 158 people--the largest death toll from a U.S. tornado since 1947, seventh deadliest tornado in U.S. history, and the most expensive tornado in world history. In a year of amazing weather extremes, this year's tornado season ranks as the top U.S. weather story of 2011.


Video 1. Remarkable video of the tornado that hit Tuscaloosa, Alabama on April 27, 2011. Fast forward to minute four to see the worst of the storm.



Figure 1. A truly frightening radar image: multiple hook echoes from at least ten supercell thunderstorms cover Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee during the height of the April 27, 2011 Super Outbreak. A multi-hour animation is available here.

A record six EF-5 tornadoes confirmed in 2011
Six top-end EF-5 tornadoes hit the U.S. in 2011, tying this year with 1974 for the greatest number of these most destructive tornadoes. The EF-5 tornadoes of 2011:

1) The April 27, 2011 Neshoba/Kemper/Winston/Noxubee Counties, Mississippi tornado (3 killed, 29 mile path length.)

2) The April 27, 2011 Smithville, Mississippi tornado (22 killed, 15 mile path length.)

3) The April 27, 2011 Hackleburg, Alabama tornado (71 killed, 25 mile path length.)

4) The April 27, 2011 Rainsville/Dekalb County, Alabama tornado (26 killed, 34 mile path length.)

5) The May 22, 2011 Joplin Missouri tornado (158 killed, 14 mile path length.)

6) The May 24, 2011 Binger-El Reno-Peidmont-Guthrie, Oklahoma tornado. (9 killed, 75 mile path length.)


Figure 2. Aerial view of damage from the May 22, 2011 Joplin, Missouri tornado. Image credit: Wikipedia.


Figure 3. EF-5 damage from the April 27, 2011 Neshoba tornado in Mississippi. The tornado was so powerful that it dug out the ground to a depth of two feet over an area 25 - 50 yards wide and several hundred yards long. Image credit: NWS.

A few other remarkable statistics on the tornado season of 2011, compiled from NOAA's official press release, the NOAA Extreme Weather 2011 page, and Wikipedia's excellent tornado pages:

- The tornado death toll of 552 in 2011 ties 1936 as the second deadliest year for tornadoes in U.S. history. Only 1925, with 794 fatalities, was deadlier. In 1936, violent tornadoes hit Tupelo Mississippi (216 killed), and Gainesville, Georgia (203 killed.) During the 1930s, the tornado death rate per million people was 60 - 70 times as great as in the year 2000 (Figure 4), implying that this year's tornadoes may have killed tens of thousands of people if we did not have our modern tornado modern warning system.


Figure 4. Death rate per million people per year in U.S., 1875-2011. Thin line with dots is raw rate, curved thick line is death rate, filtered by 3-point median and 5-point running mean filter, and straight solid lines are least squares fit to filtered death rate for 1875-1925 and 1925-2011. Dashed lines are estimates of 10th and 90th percentile death rates from 1925-2000. The death rate fell from 8 per million to .12 per million between 1940 and 2010. Image credit: A Brief History of Deaths from Tornadoes in the United States, Harold Brooks and Charles Doswell III, and updated by Harold Brooks in 2011.

- April 2011 had the most tornadoes of any month in U.S. history--753. The previous record was 542, set in May 2003. The previous busiest April was in 1974, with 267 tornadoes. The average number of tornadoes for the month of April during the past decade was 161, and the 30-year average for April tornadoes was 135.

- On April 27, 199 confirmed tornadoes touched down. This is the largest 1-day tornado total on record, beating the 148 recorded in 24 hours on April 3 - 4, 1974.

The year 2011 now has three of the top five tornado outbreaks on record (note, though, that reliable records for number of tornadoes only extend back in time to about the early 1990s):

- The April 25 - 28, 2011 Super tornado outbreak, with 343 tornadoes, is now the largest tornado outbreak in U.S. history. The previous record (3 days or less duration) was 148 tornadoes, set during the April 3 - 4, 1974 Super Outbreak.

- The May 22 - 27, 2011 tornado outbreak, with 180 confirmed tornadoes, ranks as the 4th largest 6-day or shorter tornado outbreak on record. A May 2003 6-day outbreak had 289 tornadoes, and a May 2004 6-day outbreak had 229 tornadoes.

- The April 14 - 16, 2011 tornado outbreak, with 177 confirmed tornadoes, ranks as the second largest tornado outbreak of three days or less duration on record, and 5th largest outbreak of six or fewer days duration.

- The May 22, 2011 Joplin, Missouri tornado killed 158 people and injured 1150, making it the deadliest U.S. tornado since 1947, and 7th deadliest in history. The $3 billion estimate of insured damage makes it the most expensive tornado in world history.

- Preliminary damage estimates from Munich Re insurance company put 2011's insured losses due to U.S. thunderstorms and tornadoes at $25 billion, more than double the previous record set in 2010.

- The year 2011 now ranks in 2nd place behind 1973 for greatest number of tornadoes greater than EF-0 strength (EF-1, EF-2, EF-3, EF-4 and EF-5 strength, Figure 5.)


Figure 5. Number of EF-1, EF-2, EF-3, EF-4 and EF-5 tornadoes from 1950 to 2011. The total shown for 2011 is preliminary and uses unofficial numbers through November 17, but 2011 now ranks in 2nd place behind 1973. There is not a decades-long increasing trend in the numbers of tornadoes stronger than EF-0, implying that climate change, as yet, is not having a noticeable impact on U.S. tornadoes. However, statistics of tornado frequency and intensity are highly uncertain. Major changes in the rating process occurred in the mid-1970s (when all tornadoes occurring prior to about 1975 were retrospectively rated), and again in 2001, when scientists began rating tornadoes lower because of engineering concerns and unintended consequences of National Weather Service policy changes. Also, beginning in 2007, NOAA switched from the F-scale to the EF-scale for rating tornado damage, causing additional problems with attempting to assess if tornadoes are changing over time. Data provided by Harold Brooks, NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory.

Other posts looking back at the remarkable weather events of 2011
Deadliest weather disaster of 2011: the East African drought
Tropical Storm Lee's flood in Binghamton: was global warming the final straw?
Wettest year on record in Philadelphia; 2011 sets record for wet/dry extremes in U.S.
Hurricane Irene: New York City dodges a potential storm surge mega-disaster

The NWS posted a summary of the records set during the tornado season of 2011 in February 2012.

Jeff Masters

Joplin Tornado Damage (thebige)
Joplin Tornado Damage
Tornado - Pine Apple,AL (EarlBcom)
Tornado just south of Pine Apple, AL on around 5:40pm. This storm was a part of the Alabama tornado outbreak on April 15, 2011. earlb.com VIDEO - See video of tornado at earlb.com
Tornado - Pine Apple,AL
As Is (teach50)
My husband and I were visiting my parents in Birmingham, Alabama. We decided to take a day trip to Tuscaloosa to see the damage from the April 27 tornado. It was a sight that I will never forget. Blocks and blocks of flattened houses and stores. This area has not been touched in 2 months. It was so moving that I started to cry thinking of all these poor people.
As Is

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 62 - 12

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13Blog Index

Quoting WxGeekVA:


GFS Nor'easter at hr 300 on 18Z run.... Different time frame but has the same general idea as the Euro...


is the GFS starting to agree with the Euro now? I think i read somewhere it was showing a much weaker system.... a link on the other blog maybe?

Edit: Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Anytime hydrus,


5 Saints to Go to Pro Bowl
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127599
Quoting Patrap:
CMC MODEL LOOP http://www.meteo.psu.edu/~gadomski/CMCTROPATL_0z/ cmcloop.html
Thanks Pat.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20517
CMC MODEL LOOP http://www.meteo.psu.edu/~gadomski/CMCTROPATL_0z/ cmcloop.html
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127599
A nice week coming up for West Palm Beach...

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Could someone please post a link to the latest CMC run?..I can not pull it up on the computer.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20517
Quoting AtHomeInTX:
Can't put it any more eloquently than washingtonian did! I don't ever want to tangle with a tornado.  I don't know how many go unreported in a given year but I was surprised that the recent tornado in Louisiana was the 1881st confirmed tornado of 2011. I had no idea THAT many happened! Kind of a scary thought.
Thanks.Tornadoes look more pretty when there out in the open.Not when there tearing stuff apart.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16423
Quoting Ameister12:

The 2nd image isn't the Yazoo City Tornado. It was the Roanoke F4 tornado that demolished the Parsons Manufacturing Plant on July 13, 2004. Link


Quoting Articuno:

O_________O @ the 3rd one, to close for comfort!


I also believe that picture #3 is not of Yazoo City, nor of a tornado. I think that is the widely-passed-off-as-something-else photo of the parent storm/mesocyclone that produced the "Little Sioux Scout Camp tornado" in western Iowa.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting WxGeekVA:


GFS Nor'easter at hr 300 on 18Z run.... Different time frame but has the same general idea as the Euro...
i hope we finally get something series out of this.No rain this time please....
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16423
Springfield Massachusetts tornado on June 1st. Some of the worst storms i've seen in this area in my lifetime. It was a bad year for everybody.







Member Since: Posts: Comments:


GFS Nor'easter at hr 300 on 18Z run.... Different time frame but has the same general idea as the Euro...
Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468
Can't put it any more eloquently than washingtonian did! I don't ever want to tangle with a tornado.  I don't know how many go unreported in a given year but I was surprised that the recent tornado in Louisiana was the 1881st confirmed tornado of 2011. I had no idea THAT many happened! Kind of a scary thought.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Chucktown:


Just stirrin the pot - Press put me up to it. Blame it on him :)


Im gonna quote ya on dat.

Have a Happy New Year over dere chuck.


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127599
La Nina and increased tornadic activity? //www.spc.noaa.gov/publications/schaefer/el_nino.h tm
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Tornadoes suck when they arn't minding there buisness.Damn.I hope next tornado season isn't like that.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16423
Thanks Jeff,
Is it possible that we are better at detecting tornados now than in the past?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:


LOL! Is that near you?

No, I am not in Mississippi, I am in Maryland
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:
Seems dey dont let the TV Weather guy out too much.

:)

NOAA

Global Climate Change Indicators
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Climatic Data Center


Many lines of scientific evidence show the Earth's climate is changing. This page presents the latest information from several independent measures of observed climate change that illustrate an overwhelmingly compelling story of a planet that is undergoing global warming. It is worth noting that increasing global temperature is only one element of observed global climate change. Precipitation patterns are also changing; storms and other extremes are changing as well.

How do we know the Earth's climate is warming?


Thousands of land and ocean temperature measurements are recorded each day around the globe. This includes measurements from climate reference stations, weather stations, ships, buoys and autonomous gliders in the oceans. These surface measurements are also supplemented with satellite measurements.

These measurements are processed, examined for random and systematic errors, and then finally combined to produce a time series of global average temperature change. A number of agencies around the world have produced datasets of global-scale changes in surface temperature using different techniques to process the data and remove measurement errors that could lead to false interpretations of temperature trends.

The warming trend that is apparent in all of the independent methods of calculating global temperature change is also confirmed by other independent observations, such as the melting of mountain glaciers on every continent, reductions in the extent of snow cover, earlier blooming of plants in spring, a shorter ice season on lakes and rivers, ocean heat content, reduced arctic sea ice, and rising sea levels.


Just stirrin the pot - Press put me up to it. Blame it on him :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Seems dey dont let the TV Weather guy out too much.

:)

NOAA

Global Climate Change Indicators
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Climatic Data Center


Many lines of scientific evidence show the Earth's climate is changing. This page presents the latest information from several independent measures of observed climate change that illustrate an overwhelmingly compelling story of a planet that is undergoing global warming. It is worth noting that increasing global temperature is only one element of observed global climate change. Precipitation patterns are also changing; storms and other extremes are changing as well.

How do we know the Earth's climate is warming?


Thousands of land and ocean temperature measurements are recorded each day around the globe. This includes measurements from climate reference stations, weather stations, ships, buoys and autonomous gliders in the oceans. These surface measurements are also supplemented with satellite measurements.

These measurements are processed, examined for random and systematic errors, and then finally combined to produce a time series of global average temperature change. A number of agencies around the world have produced datasets of global-scale changes in surface temperature using different techniques to process the data and remove measurement errors that could lead to false interpretations of temperature trends.

The warming trend that is apparent in all of the independent methods of calculating global temperature change is also confirmed by other independent observations, such as the melting of mountain glaciers on every continent, reductions in the extent of snow cover, earlier blooming of plants in spring, a shorter ice season on lakes and rivers, ocean heat content, reduced arctic sea ice, and rising sea levels.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127599
Quoting StormTracker2K:
Also seems more and more the south has become Tornado Alley lately. The last 5 or 6 years has featured some of the most deadly tornado outbreaks across the Deep South and not in the conventional Tornado Alley (Midwest). Is this tied to GW?


When was global warming proven? Have I been asleep for awhile? News to me...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
41. MTWX
Quoting MTWX:

We get our fair share down here every year. What has made them stand out over the last few years is the fact they have struck greater populated areas. Historically, Alabama has the highest number of tornados a year by land area... Let me find a link...

I got my tornado tidbits mixed up, Alabama just has the highest rate of strong to violent tornadoes (EF-3+)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
39. MTWX
Quoting StormTracker2K:
Also seems more and more the south has become Tornado Alley lately. The last 5 or 6 years has featured some of the most deadly tornado outbreaks across the Deep South and not in the conventional Tornado Alley (Midwest). Is this tied to GW?

We get our fair share down here every year. What has made them stand out over the last few years is the fact they have struck greater populated areas. Historically, Alabama has the highest number of tornados a year by land area... Let me find a link...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Also seems more and more the south has become Tornado Alley lately. The last 5 or 6 years has featured some of the most deadly tornado outbreaks across the Deep South and not in the conventional Tornado Alley (Midwest). Is this tied to GW?
Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
37. Skyepony (Mod)
Sean Collins died.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37388
36. MTWX
Quoting nfloridandr:
i had the priveledge of responding to the tuscaloosa tornado recovery. words cannot describe. stories forever embedded in memory.

I too worked in response to the 2011 Super outbreak. I was in the Cullman/Arab area. The tornado damage throught the country this year has been astounding!! I do agree with Dr. Masters though on his point, "this year's tornadoes may have killed tens of thousands of people if we did not have our modern tornado modern warning system."
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Ameister12:

The 2nd image isn't the Yahoo City Tornado. It was the Roanoke F4 tornado that demolished the Parsons Manufacturing Plant on July 13, 2004.



oops! I must of read wrong. Weird that was listed as the Yazoo tornado. Anyways point being is that each year more and more devasting events are happening.
Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651

TS Thane
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting StormTracker2K:
It seems to me that these extreme events are happening a lot more often now than before. I just don't think there is a such thing of an 1 & 10,000 event anymore. IMO. If you look at 2010 there was some exteme severe events with one being the Yazoo City tornado (monster).

Yazoo City 2010.





The 2nd image isn't the Yazoo City Tornado. It was the Roanoke F4 tornado that demolished the Parsons Manufacturing Plant on July 13, 2004. Link

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Articuno:

O_________O @ the 3rd one, to close for comfort!


LOL! Is that near you?
Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
Quoting StormTracker2K:
It seems to me that these extreme events are happening a lot more often now than before. I just don't think there is a such thing of an 1 & 10,000 event anymore. IMO. If you look at 2010 there was some exteme severe events with one being the Yazoo City tornado (monster).

Yazoo City 2010.





O_________O @ the 3rd one, to close for comfort!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Then you go back to the Greensburg Tornado just a few years ago. My point is it seems like every year we are seeing these massives destructive events occuring when before we never seen this atleast not this frequent. Some think that GW contributes to higher mositure (Water Vapor) content being ejected into the jetstream causing these destructive events on a yearly basis now it seems.

May 4th 2007.



Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
The Vilonia tornado had one of the strongest signatures as well.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:
It seems to me that these extreme events are happening a lot more often now than before. I just don't think there is a such thing of an 1 & 10,000 event anymore. IMO. If you look at 2010 there was some exteme severe events with one being the Yazoo City tornado (monster).

Yazoo City 2010.

The Yahoo City tornado signature is definitely one of the strongest signatures I have ever seen.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
It seems to me that these extreme events are happening a lot more often now than before. I just don't think there is a such thing of an 1 & 10,000 event anymore. IMO. If you look at 2010 there was some exteme severe events with one being the Yazoo City tornado (monster).

Yazoo City 2010.




Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
What a year. I remember before I got on a plane in West Palm Beach, FL, that morning, at the newspaper stand, there was a stack of copies of the New York Times and the front page photo was of an insurgent attack on an airforce base in Pakistan. The sky was dark in the photo and there were fires lit from the rocket attack and burning fuel. When I landed at LaGuardia Airport in the afternoon the stack of New York Times at the newspaper stand the front page had changed to a photo of the devastation in Joplin, MO after the tornado complete with a similar image of destruction, a dark sky, and fires lit around the photo. I was waiting for the plane to Madison, WI and while in the terminal at LaGuardia for an hour just staring shell shocked at the tv just absolutely dazed from seeing the utter destruction on tv. I can't imagine going through it as it was haunting enough just to see on tv. If I get some time off I'm hoping to go with a group for Habitat for Humanity or something those people deserve our compassion and time.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hackleburg/Phil Campbell EF5



Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Most call the April 25th-28th 2011 outbreak The Perfect Storm, Superstorm, or Storm of the Century. With record winds, rains, tornadoes, and low baronomic pressures! Everything perfectly came together and bombed out! NOAA was right in calling this a 1-10,000 year event before it happened!

The cyclone twirled like a hurricane! Like the 2005 hurricane season, it doesn't look like we'll see anything like this in our lifetimes!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SteveDa1:
Looking at that aerial shot of the destruction in Joplin, Missouri sure makes me appreciate the fact that I live in such a safe area where this sort of thing is impossible...


Was thinking the same thing. That is truly devastating to see. I can't even imagine how horrible that was in person.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:
This is the tornado going through that field that Doc mentioned in Figure #3.


O_O
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
This is the tornado going through that field that Doc mentioned in Figure #3.

Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
Smithville, Miss EF5 tornado.





Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
Fortunately totals weren't made any higher by StL tornado as it struck Lambert terminal, couple of churches holding Good Friday services. Lots of damage, but only a few injuries. Joplin pictures are plain scary - being in basements didn't even help.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:


Yeah, specifically in the Rome area. I have family near there and it's still bad as some areas have yet to rebuild from the devastation.


Link
Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
Quoting presslord:


North Georgia was hit hard, as well...


Yeah, specifically in the Rome area. I have family near there and it's still bad as some areas have yet to rebuild from the devastation.
Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
pretty scary
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SPLbeater:
has every1 forgoten april 16th 2011? when 27 tornadoes roared thru NC? i figured the Joplin and Tuscaloosa tornadoes would git all the media attention, but there WAS another outbreak that 27 people lost their lives...


North Georgia was hit hard, as well...
Member Since: August 13, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10479
AREA FORECAST DISCUSSION
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE RALEIGH NC
243 PM EST TUE DEC 27 2011
&&

.LONG TERM /FRIDAY NIGHT THROUGH TUESDAY/...
-- Changed Discussion --AS OF 240 PM TUESDAY...

FORECAST UNCERTAINTY GROWS IN THIS TIME PERIOD. THE AFOREMENTIONED
SHORTWAVE TROUGH AND ASSOCIATED SURFACE FRONT PASS THROUGH THE AREA
FRIDAY NIGHT INTO SATURDAY MORNING. WITH PRECEDING LOW LEVEL FLOW
VEERING AROUND TO MAINLY WESTERLY... MOISTURE RETURN IS ABSENT...
THUS EXPECT THE SURFACE FRONT TO PASS THROUGH LARGELY DRY WITH JUST
PARTLY CLOUDY SKIES. THICKNESSES REMAIN ABOVE NORMAL AS SHORTWAVE
RIDGING MOVES IN ALOFT AND WITH AN INCOMING MODIFIED SURFACE AIR
MASS... SO TEMPS SATURDAY/SUNDAY SHOULD REMAIN MILD WITH HIGHS IN
THE MID 50S TO LOWER 60S.

THEN STARTING LATE IN THE WEEKEND... THE GENERAL TREND OF THE MODELS
IS TO A PATTERN FEATURING FULL-LATITUDE LONGWAVE RIDGING IN THE
WESTERN US AND TROUGHING IN THE EAST. BUT MAJOR MODEL DIFFERENCES
BETWEEN THE DETERMINISTIC GFS AND ECMWF REGARDING PLACEMENT OF THESE
LONGWAVE FEATURES INCREASE SIGNIFICANTLY... CULMINATING IN SOLUTIONS
THAT ARE 180 DEGREES OUT OF PHASE WITH EACH OTHER BY MONDAY/TUESDAY.
THE GFS HAS TRENDED A BIT FARTHER WEST AND DEEPER WITH ITS EASTERN
NOAM TROUGH... CLOSER TO THE ECMWF ENSEMBLE MEAN... WHILE THE
DETERMINISTIC ECMWF IS MUCH SLOWER AND STRONGER THAN ITS ENSEMBLE
MEAN... CLOSING OFF A POTENT VORTEX JUST TO OUR WEST BY TUESDAY.
THIS ECMWF SOLUTION INITIALLY APPEARS EXTREME... HOWEVER THIS IS THE
SECOND ECMWF RUN SHOWING SUCH AN INTENSE CLOSED LOW. IF THIS COMES
TO PASS... WE COULD BE LOOKING AT A SIGNIFICANT STORM FOR NC FOR
MONDAY NIGHT THROUGH TUESDAY AND POSSIBLY BEYOND. FOR NOW... AND TO
ACCOUNT FOR THE WIDE VARIETY OF MODEL SOLUTIONS... WILL LEAN TOWARD
THE MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD ECMWF ENSEMBLE MEAN... WHICH SWEEPS A LARGELY
DRY COLD FRONT THROUGH THE AREA EARLY MONDAY AND BRINGS IN COOLER
AND MORE SEASONABLE AIR FOR LATE MONDAY THROUGH TUESDAY.
BUT
AGAIN... THE CONFIDENCE IN THE MEDIUM RANGE IS QUITE LOW... SO STAY
TUNED. -GIH-- End Changed Discussion --

Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
has every1 forgoten april 16th 2011? when 27 tornadoes roared thru NC? i figured the Joplin and Tuscaloosa tornadoes would git all the media attention, but there WAS another outbreak that 27 people lost their lives...
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Looking at that aerial shot of the destruction in Joplin, Missouri sure makes me appreciate the fact that I live in such a safe area where this sort of thing is impossible...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 62 - 12

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Mostly Cloudy
70 °F
Mostly Cloudy