Watch out for the bugs

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 12:56 AM GMT on December 10, 2011

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I'm wrapping up my stay in San Francisco for the annual Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the world's largest gathering of Earth Scientists. Over eighteen thousand scientists from all over the world, including most of the world's top climate scientists, were in town this week to exchange ideas to advance the cause of Earth Science. It's been a great opportunity to learn about climate change topics I don't know much about, and I attended a fascinating (and somewhat unnerving) lecture on how global warming is expected to affect insects, titled "The Impact of Global Warming on global crop yields due to changes in pest pressure". Global warming is expected to bring a variety of impacts to agriculture, both positive and negative. Extra CO2 in the atmosphere will tend to increase crop yields, but crop losses due to insect pests are expected to double by 2100, according to a insect pest/crop model designed by David Battisti of the University of Washington. These losses will occur in addition to the expected 35 - 40% decrease in crop yields due to higher temperatures by the end of the century.



When temperature increases, the metabolic rate of insects goes up, requiring that they eat more to survive. In the mid-latitudes, the predicted 2 - 4°C temperature increase by 2100 will require insects to eat double what they do now, in order to survive. The increase in temperature is also expected to enable insect populations to rise by 20%. However, insect populations will fall by 20% in the tropics, where insects have evolved to tolerate a much narrower range of temperatures. Let's look at the world's three most important crops: rice, wheat, and corn. In the four largest rice producing countries--China, India, Bangladesh, and Thailand--Insects currently cause a loss of 10- 20% of the crop, and this is expected to double to 20 - 30% by 2100. These nations have 40% of the world's population, and make 60% of the world's rice. For corn, the world's four largest producers--the U.S., China, France, and Argentina--are expected to see insect pest losses double from 6% to 12%. The story is similar for wheat; pest losses are expected to double from 10% to 20% by 2100. The total increased damage to global agriculture is predicted to be $30 - $50 billion per year by 2100. This will likely contribute greatly to food costs and potential food shortages. The model made a number of simplifications that could greatly change this outcome, though. The model assumed that there would be no change to the number of insects that survive winter, and this number is likely to increase in a warmer climate. Precipitation was not changed to reflect what is expected to happen in a changed climate, and this will cause increases in crop yields in some areas, and decreases in others. Farmers are likely to change growing practices and utilize new pesticides to combat the expected increase in pests, and this was not considered, either. It is interesting to note that during the great natural global warming event of 55 million years ago--the Palecene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)--fossil records of plant leaves show greatly increased levels of damage from insects, supporting the idea that a warmer climate will drive an explosion in the insect population.

Jeff Masters

Locust Clouds over Paamul (cleo85)
A several miles wide swarm of Locus is moving from Cancun south-west ward over Yucatans Jungle.Paamul, Quintana Roo, Mexico
Locust Clouds over Paamul

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171. TropicalAnalystwx13
2:56 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
Quoting WxGeekVA:
And now for... Find the WPac Tropical Depression!!!!! Pick your blob....


The area of low pressure that is extremely disorganized and virtually convectionless.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31915
170. WxGeekVA
2:48 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
And now for... Find the WPac Tropical Depression!!!!! Pick your blob....

Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3470
169. Ameister12
2:34 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
Strong Earthquake Strikes Mexico
by Sean Breslin, weather.com


Updated: Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011 at 9:30 p.m. E/T

On Saturday night, a 6.7-magnitude earthquake hit Guerrero, Mexico at a depth of about 40 miles. The earthquake was reported at 7:47 p.m. local time (8:47 p.m. Eastern), and the epicenter is 82 miles from Acapulco, Mexico, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Per the Associated Press, USGS Geophysist Shengzao Chen said this is a very active region. The quake is within "normal activity" for this region -- it was very deep but strong -- and there are no initial reports of damage or casualties.

The quake shook buildings in Mexico City, and residents of the town were seen in photos taking to the streets when the buildings began shaking.

We will keep you posted as more details come in.
Member Since: August 9, 2009 Posts: 10 Comments: 4952
168. SPLbeater
2:30 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
976mb low heading for europe, wont be AS bad. hopefully. winds arent >50kts on south side 110100Z-
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
167. Articuno
2:30 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
MEXICO CITY (AP) — A 6.7-magnitude earthquake struck Mexico's western Guerrero state Saturday night, shaking buildings and causing some panic just over 100 miles away in the nation's capital. There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.

The U.S. Geological Service estimated the quake's magnitude at 6.7, after an initial reading of 6.8. It said the quake was centered about 26 miles (42 kilometers) southwest of Iguala in Guerrero. That is 103 miles (166 kilometers) south-southwest of Mexico City.

High-rises swayed in the center of Mexico City, and shoppers were temporarily herded out of some shopping centers.

People in one part of the capital's upscale Condesa neighborhood ran out of their houses and gathered in the streets, hugging each other while some shook and began to cry.

On one street, a group of women joined hands in a circle, closed their eyes and began to pray.

"Please God, help us and let everything be OK," said one. "It's OK. It's OK. Everything is OK."
Member Since: October 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2383
166. Patrap
2:30 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
....not gonna let them catch me no,..
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165. sunlinepr
2:26 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9803
164. Ameister12
2:23 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
Member Since: August 9, 2009 Posts: 10 Comments: 4952
163. sunlinepr
2:20 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
Models develop some Tropical? system Mid Atl. that turns N, then another Low develops in the same area...

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162. Patrap
2:19 AM GMT on December 11, 2011

Earthquake Shaking Alert Level: YELLOW


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127874
161. SPLbeater
2:15 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
WTPN21 PGTW 100900
MSGID/NAVMARFCSTCEN PEARL HARBOR HI /JTWC//
SUBJ/TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION ALERT//
RMKS/
1. FORMATION OF A SIGNIFICANT TROPICAL CYCLONE IS POSSIBLE WITHIN 150 NM EITHER SIDE OF A LINE FROM 12.4N 116.6E TO 8.8N 112.1E WITHIN THE NEXT 12 TO 24 HOURS. AVAILABLE DATA DOES NOT JUSTIFY ISSUANCE OF NUMBERED TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNINGS AT THIS TIME. WINDS IN THE AREA ARE ESTIMATED TO BE 15 TO 20 KNOTS. METSAT IMAGERY AND SYNOPTIC DATA AT 100830Z INDICATE THAT A CIRCULATION CENTER IS LOCATED NEAR 11.8N 116.1E. THE SYSTEM IS MOVING NORTHWESTWARD AT 04 KNOTS.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
160. Patrap
2:14 AM GMT on December 11, 2011

Magnitude 6.7 - GUERRERO, MEXICO
2011 December 11 01:47:26 UTC


Version en Espanol
Details
Summary
Maps
Scientific & Technical
Tsunami
Earthquake Details

This event has been reviewed by a seismologist.
Magnitude
6.7
Date-Time
Sunday, December 11, 2011 at 01:47:26 UTC
Saturday, December 10, 2011 at 07:47:26 PM at epicenter
Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones
Location
18.038N, 99.796W
Depth
64.9 km (40.3 miles)
Region
GUERRERO, MEXICO
Distances
42 km (26 miles) SW of Iguala, Guerrero, Mexico
56 km (34 miles) ESE of Arcelia, Guerrero, Mexico
62 km (38 miles) NNW of Chilpancingo, Guerrero, Mexico
166 km (103 miles) SSW of MEXICO CITY, D.F., Mexico
Location Uncertainty
horizontal /- 14.5 km (9.0 miles); depth /- 9.8 km (6.1 miles)
Parameters
NST=488, Nph=488, Dmin=140.3 km, Rmss=0.78 sec, Gp= 47,
M-type=regional moment magnitude (Mw), Version=8
Source
Magnitude: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
Location: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
Event ID
usc000753u

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127874
159. Articuno
2:05 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
BREAKING NEWS:
A 6.7 earthquake has occured in Mexico.
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsw w/Quakes/usc000753u.php#maps

NOTE: This earthquake has just occurred, so expect more info later.
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158. sunlinepr
1:47 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
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157. AtHomeInTX
1:46 AM GMT on December 11, 2011

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156. SPLbeater
1:44 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
hey guys. aint been on today, workin from 8-12 splitting firewood
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
155. PlazaRed
1:12 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
I got this extract from the BBC posted by them at 00.33 GMT today 11 Dec:-

"Other important countries including the US are prepared to negotiate an emission-curbing "legal instrument" by 2015, taking effect by 2020."

India is holding out to start after 2020, and the weaker "legal outcome".

If anybody is interested in reading the full article, here's the link to copy and paste:-
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-161 24670

This line below might be the slogan for the anti industrialists for the foreseeable future, {also taken from the same article.}:-

"While they develop, we die; and why should we accept this?"



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154. Skyepony (Mod)
1:07 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
sar~ I see your point, overall it wasn't costliest. The number of Billion dollar events is telling too though. 2005 was weighted overall by Katrina taking down levees & wiping some towns. Regardless, having this many billion dollar disasters means more people over all were affected. The shear coverage of the country in terms of extreme weather this year was noteworthy & maybe more remembered as a whole since more people's lives were directly affected by some sort of weather disaster this year.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 162 Comments: 37822
153. AlwaysThinkin
12:31 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
Quoting mistymountainhop:
Chilly morning in Chicago and Northern Illinois. Local lakes froze over for the first time.



Back in the 40s next week with lows in the upper 20s (at least here in Southern Wisconsin). And actually these last three days have been the first time this winter that the nightly low has dipped below 20 which is really late. Unfortunately that has meant that I've had to refrain from asking people if it's 'cold enough for them yet' :(
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 394
152. bohonkweatherman
12:28 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
Quoting hydrus:
Models have been quite accurate lately, and Texas is looking different on satellite these days..Almost the only game in town,,,
No rain today as of 630 pm but have received quite a bit last 2 months, lake levels have not gone up any yet but if these rains continue Lakes should start going up, they are 70 percent empty right now.
Member Since: July 5, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 1348
151. Patrap
12:11 AM GMT on December 11, 2011
Datz wun ard langwedge to Master Grothar.

What da ell iz a "airman hem" anyway? : )

O, bout 2-3 Ib's I reckon..

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127874
Quoting taistelutipu:
God Jul, Grothar. Hur mår du? Jag ser att det är varmt i Florida. Jag hoppas att vi har inte snö innan jag flyger hem på fredag.


Beautiful weather in Florida. I see your little part of the world has been getting hammered. (We have to be careful now. Patrap and others are using "Google Translator" and writing to me in Norwegian. LOL Hope you have a good Holiday and your weather gets better.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26037


How do we know the Earth's climate is warming?

Thousands of land and ocean temperature measurements are recorded each day around the globe. This includes measurements from climate reference stations, weather stations, ships, buoys and autonomous gliders in the oceans.

These surface measurements are also supplemented with satellite measurements. These measurements are processed, examined for random and systematic errors, and then finally combined to produce a time series of global average temperature change.

A number of agencies around the world have produced datasets of global-scale changes in surface temperature using different techniques to process the data and remove measurement errors that could lead to false interpretations of temperature trends.

The warming trend that is apparent in all of the independent methods of calculating global temperature change is also confirmed by other independent observations, such as the melting of mountain glaciers on every continent, reductions in the extent of snow cover, earlier blooming of plants in spring, a shorter ice season on lakes and rivers, ocean heat content, reduced arctic sea ice, and rising sea levels."


More Here:
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127874
God Jul, Grothar. Hur mår du? Jag ser att det är varmt i Florida. Jag hoppas att vi har inte snö innan jag flyger hem på fredag.
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Global Warming and bugs. I have to laugh.....
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Quoting taistelutipu:


It was actually named Friedhelm by the met office in Berlin.

PS: The next one named G�nter also looks quite ominous, already down to 960 mb coming off the East coast, yikes!


God jul, tai!
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26037
142. sar2401

I understand and concur.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127874
Quoting HuracanTaino:
This type of systems should be name since they have a similar wind destruction as hurricanes....it will be more easy to classify and remember by the general public.


It was actually named Friedhelm by the met office in Berlin.

PS: The next one named Gnter also looks quite ominous, already down to 960 mb coming off the East coast, yikes!
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143. flsky
Quoting pottery:


Thanks, Pott. This was wonderful, yet bittersweet to watch. Forwarded it to my multitudes (such as they are, haha).
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Quoting Patrap:
Conference in overtime on future of climate talks
Published: Saturday, December 10, 2011, 3:00 PM


A package of documents was submitted to a marathon U.N. climate conference Saturday that would set a new course for the global fight against climate change for more than a decade to come. South Africa's foreign minister and chairman of the 194-party conference, Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, told delegates that failure to agree after 16 days of work would be an unsustainable setback for international efforts to control greenhouse gases.

"This multilateral system remains fragile and will not survive another shock," she told a full meeting of the conference, which had been delayed more than 24 hours while ministers and senior negotiators labored over words and nuances.

Nkoana-Mashabane said the package of four documents, which were being printed as she spoke, were an imperfect compromise, but they reflected years of negotiations on issues that had plagued the U.N. climate efforts.

The 100-plus pages would give new life to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, whose carbon emissions targets expire next year and apply only to industrial countries. A separate document calls on major emitting nations like China and India, excluded under Kyoto, to accept legally binding emissions targets in the future.
After her brief address, Nkoana-Mashabane adjourned the session. The documents were to be discussed and put up for approval later Saturday. The convention operates by consensus, and the package will not be put up for a vote.

Arthur Max of The Associated Press wrote this report.


Patrap,
Rather reminds me of our Congressional "Supercommittee" that took almost three months to produce absolutely nothing. I'm convinced that all these types of treaties will always fail if there is not a giant train wreck already happening. The emerging countries will do everything they can to evade any climatic restrictions that raise their costs of production. The developed world will do a little better, but always point to the fact that the treaties, or whatever they will be called, are not equally enforced, therefore they can fudge a little too. Only two things make treaties work - a looming disaster or enforcement by an army big enough to make you do what you promised to do. Neither one are on the horizon, so this is merely an exercise in futility. We won't do anything much unless and until it's clear global climate change isn't really happening, at which point some people will get lynched, or it's so bad we all agree we need to do something before it's too late - assuming it's not already too late. :(
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I wish...

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31915
Quoting HurrikanEB:


I see nothing false about the statement "2011 will be known as the year of the greatest collective weather disasters in U.S. history." On its own, all the statement literally means is that 2011 will be know as the year of the most collective weather disasters in US history... a valid statement. I believe that you may be evaluating it based on the death tolls, in which case yes, other years have seen worse. But OracleDeAtlantis did point that without "advanced warning systems now in place, just imagine what the death toll would likely have been, without this technology."

I personally don't know enough about the total price tags off hand, but even if the worst events of this year were only ranked in the teens/20s when it comes to the most costly, if you have enough events they will start to add up... whether or not they come close to years like 2004/2005 i cant say, but 3billion here, 4 billion there does add up.

But, again, i believe the original statement is a reference to the sheer quantity($billion events), more so than death or destruction. And in the long run, i believe that this greater frequency that, geographically speaking, doesn't discriminate via location/region, is far more significant than a single anomaly, ie the $100billion from katrina.


Part of my response has already been posted to Skye, but ranking weather disasters by simply the total number of supposed one billion dollar occurences is open to a lot of interpretation, depending one how one defines a weather disaster and calculates cost. For example, many more people now have insurance to cover losses from weather-related disasters, some because they are required to by mortgage holders or FEMA. This inflates the cost of each incident. Actually, before the inception of FEMA, only insured costs were calculated with any accuracy. Other damage was estimated by various public agencies, and many of the damage estimates are suspect at best. FEMA estimates all damages for Federal declared disasters (which a billion dollar disaster will always be a Federally declared disaster), and their estimates are just as suspect, since they are under a lot of political pressure to estimate on the high side of actual damage. During my career in law enforcement and emergency management, I had the misfortune of having to haul around a lot of these FEMA damage assessment teams, and their methods were haphazard at best. They also had certain "goals" to meet if they didn't want a bunch of grief from local officials or the Congressperson that represented the district. As you can see, I have a certain amount of skepticism about damage asessments and how we arrive at damage totals.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14507
Conference in overtime on future of climate talks
Published: Saturday, December 10, 2011, 3:00 PM


A package of documents was submitted to a marathon U.N. climate conference Saturday that would set a new course for the global fight against climate change for more than a decade to come. South Africa's foreign minister and chairman of the 194-party conference, Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, told delegates that failure to agree after 16 days of work would be an unsustainable setback for international efforts to control greenhouse gases.

"This multilateral system remains fragile and will not survive another shock," she told a full meeting of the conference, which had been delayed more than 24 hours while ministers and senior negotiators labored over words and nuances.

Nkoana-Mashabane said the package of four documents, which were being printed as she spoke, were an imperfect compromise, but they reflected years of negotiations on issues that had plagued the U.N. climate efforts.

The 100-plus pages would give new life to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, whose carbon emissions targets expire next year and apply only to industrial countries. A separate document calls on major emitting nations like China and India, excluded under Kyoto, to accept legally binding emissions targets in the future.
After her brief address, Nkoana-Mashabane adjourned the session. The documents were to be discussed and put up for approval later Saturday. The convention operates by consensus, and the package will not be put up for a vote.

Arthur Max of The Associated Press wrote this report.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127874
Quoting Jedkins01:


We must wait for a pattern change, that is the reverse of the current pattern, we will need general troughing in the east and general ridging in the west.

We have been in the reverse pattern for a while, so maybe a colder pattern will arrive for Florida just in time for Christmas, it could happen!

We shall see, I know though at some point its gotta give. It would be nice if it gives around Christmas, for us Southeastern folks :)

Does it? We've had Negative NAO for the past several years, which usually promotes cold air and snow across the Eastern USA. However, this year, we're in a moderate to strong Positive NAO, so us in the East/Southeast may not get the cold air and snow we're hoping for.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31915
Models have been quite accurate lately, and Texas is looking different on satellite these days..Almost the only game in town,,,
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Quoting CybrTeddy:
So when are temperatures really going to get cold in Florida? Any sub-45 degree temperatures in the forthcoming that anyone can see? Honestly, it has been way to hot this winter even for Florida. I was sweating outside, sweating in December!


We must wait for a pattern change, that is the reverse of the current pattern, we will need general troughing in the east and general ridging in the west.

We have been in the reverse pattern for a while, so maybe a colder pattern will arrive for Florida just in time for Christmas, it could happen!

We shall see, I know though at some point its gotta give. It would be nice if it gives around Christmas, for us Southeastern folks :)
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Quoting Skyepony:
sar2401~ Guessing you missed the blog the other day about this being the costliest year for US weather disasters? I think that's what being referred to, not the death toll. What a list there you posted..


Skye, no, I did not miss that blog. As stated in the blog, 2011 may be the FOURTH costliest year for weather disasters in US history, not the worst. As Dr. Masters stated, ranking weather disasters by cost is fraught with uncertainty, since how we measure dollar loss, and what year we use for reference, can cause huge changes in totals. Weather disasters by deaths, while not perfect, is more precise than by cost, since deaths are deaths, no matter what year they occurred. Even more confusingly, the chart highlights the number of "billion dollar" disasters, while the important part, total cost of the cumulative diasters, is overlaid with a line graph. If you look at the chart again, you'll see that 2005 is still, by far, the largest cumulative cost for weather disasters in modern history, with 2011 coming in at about 25% of the cumulative costs of 2005. Thus, I stand by my statements, unless one simply wants to use numbers of events, without considering costs or deaths, as a maximum data point.
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Here is a scary list of disasters based on death toll...Horrific is an absolute understatement..Link
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Quoting sar2401:
Very well done video about the Bison (there is no such thing as an American Buffalo), but the claim that "2011 will be known as the year of the greatest collective weather disasters in U.S. history" is utterly false by any measure I can think of. The worst weather disaster of 2011 was the April tornado outbreak, which places it as #17 on the list of worst natural disasters in US history. Even if you add the Joplin tornado and the Mississippi flood deaths, that still only brings the death toll to about 530, far less than the death toll from single tornado outbreak of 1925. Nothing in recent history even comes close to the death and damage from the 2005 hurricanes. I realize you are concerned for the future of the earth, as we all are, but you do yourself and others no favors by over dramatizing easily obtainable facts. For your reference, the following is a list of the top 17 natural diasters in US history. Amounts, when given, are estimates of damage, with the year of referrence in parenthesis.




I see nothing false about the statement "2011 will be known as the year of the greatest collective weather disasters in U.S. history." On its own, all the statement literally means is that 2011 will be know as the year of the most collective weather disasters in US history... a valid statement. I believe that you may be evaluating it based on the death tolls, in which case yes, other years have seen worse. But OracleDeAtlantis did point that without "advanced warning systems now in place, just imagine what the death toll would likely have been, without this technology."

I personally don't know enough about the total price tags off hand, but even if the worst events of this year were only ranked in the teens/20s when it comes to the most costly, if you have enough events they will start to add up... whether or not they come close to years like 2004/2005 i cant say, but 3billion here, 4 billion there does add up.

But, again, i believe the original statement is a reference to the sheer quantity($billion events), more so than death or destruction. And in the long run, i believe that this greater frequency that, geographically speaking, doesn't discriminate via location/region, is far more significant than a single anomaly, ie the $100billion from katrina.
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132. Skyepony (Mod)
sar2401~ Guessing you missed the blog the other day about this being the costliest year for US weather disasters? I think that's what being referred to, not the death toll. What a list there you posted..
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 162 Comments: 37822
Quoting presslord:


that dude in the back of the truck would make a fine lookin' woman


LOL!
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Very well done video about the Bison (there is no such thing as an American Buffalo), but the claim that "2011 will be known as the year of the greatest collective weather disasters in U.S. history" is utterly false by any measure I can think of. The worst weather disaster of 2011 was the April tornado outbreak, which places it as #17 on the list of worst natural disasters in US history. Even if you add the Joplin tornado and the Mississippi flood deaths, that still only brings the death toll to about 530, far less than the death toll from single tornado outbreak of 1925. Nothing in recent history even comes close to the death and damage from the 2005 hurricanes. I realize you are concerned for the future of the earth, as we all are, but you do yourself and others no favors by over dramatizing easily obtainable facts. For your reference, the following is a list of the top 17 natural diasters in US history. Amounts, when given, are estimates of damage, with the year of referrence in parenthesis.

1. 1900 Cyclone 6,000-12,000 Galveston Hurricane of 1900 Texas Fatalities estimated - remains deadliest natural disaster in North American history.

2. 1928 Cyclone 3,000 $800,000,000 (2005) 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane Leeward Islands, Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, and Florida 4,078+ believed dead total. About 2,500 died in Florida and 500 in the U.S. possession of Puerto Rico.

3. 1893 Cyclone 2,000 1893 Cheniere Caminada Hurricane Louisiana - Fatalities estimated

4. 2005 Cyclone 1,836 $84,000,000,000 (2006) Hurricane Katrina Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama

5. 1980 Heat wave 1,700 1980 United States heat wave Central and southern states. Official death toll, may have been higher

6. 1893 Cyclone 1,000-2,000 1893 Sea Islands Hurricane Georgia, South Carolina Fatalities estimated

7.1995 Heat wave 739 Chicago Heat Wave of 1995 Chicago, Illinois

8. 1925 Tornado 695-727 $1,650,000,000 (2005) Tri-State Tornado Missouri, Illinois and Indiana (Kentucky, Tennessee) Lower number for single 3-state tornado; higher for 5-state outbreak

9. 1919 Cyclone 600 1919 Florida Keys Hurricane Florida, Texas

10. 1938 Cyclone 600 Great New England Hurricane

11. 1913 Flood 428 1913 (Ohio) Statewide Flood Southwest, Central, and Eastern Ohio

12. 1935 Cyclone 423 Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 Florida

13. 1888 Blizzard 400 Great Blizzard of 1888 Northeast Fatalities estimated

14. 1937 Flood 385 $5,000,000,000 Ohio River flood of 1937 Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois

15. 1913 Flood 361 Great Dayton Flood Dayton, Ohio Flood was created by a series of three winter storms that hit the region in March, 1913

16. 1950 Blizzard 353 $66,700,000 (1950) Great Appalachian Storm of November 1950 Eastern US States

17. 2011 Tornado 346 ~$10,000,000,000 (2011) April 25–28, 2011 tornado outbreak Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia, Arkansas and Virginia 336 tornadoes
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Now that Christmas is approaching, it's looking likely that we may have a green Christmas this year. The last one was before I was born, although on Dec 25th 2006 we had 1cm of snow on the ground. Last year, amazingly we had accumulated 2 feet of snow on Christmas day.
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Quoting pottery:
Nice lesson of the potential grave danger we all are in.

As Dr. Masters has so accurately pointed out several times here, 2011 will be known as the year of the greatest collective weather disasters in U.S. history.

This will be known as the year of the killer tornadoes and the floods, in rare combination. If you consider the advanced warning systems now in place, just imagine what the death toll would likely have been, without this technology.

On [February 3, 2011] I published a curious forecast of the coming year's weather in the U.S.

The "children" in the forecast below, represent the decedents of those who lived when the buffalo numbered in the millions. The buffalo that used to thunder across the Great Plains, tearing up the ground were an accurate mental model of hail and tornadoes. The floods which came along with this, completed the forecast.

If you pay close attention to the end of this visual forecast, it combines all the elements of what the "hooves" will come to represent.

To believe that earth is without voice, is a fool's gamble. The American Indians knew the earth had a name, and that she had a spirit too, but more importantly that she could fight back, and easily win.

[February 3, 2011] - "Watch, in the sky, the buffalo who once crossed the Great Plains have returned in spirit, to find refuge in the clouds and make their amends. So great in number, we ask, is this all those that ever lived?

They come to make mud, held tightly by the roots of grasses and trees for thousands of years. From before the time of the ice, until after, and in all four hooves, they kick it out so that the earth slides downhill.

Look, a herd full of leaders, with long flowing white hair, moving down into the clouds. They will remember their native friends, and spare them, but have no mercy upon the children of their foes."




Member Since: August 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 521
Quoting SPLbeater:
there was a halo around the moon when i got home a few mins ago. Central NC here, anything special?


Saw it last night too, it was huge, but I'm in SE TX
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Christmas Day:

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31915
Quoting presslord:


that dude in the back of the truck would make a fine lookin' woman
even in the Carolina,s....:o
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Quoting presslord:


that dude in the back of the truck would make a fine lookin' woman



I AM REPULSED!


Yet oddly, excited!
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 562
Western Pacific tropical depression:

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31915
About these Bugs!!
I spent a long time watching bugs and seeing how they adapt to their environment changing and one thing among many is that they are very industrious critters.
If they don't like where they are they move and they seem to like their version of comforts.
As climate change if it occurs will be quite fast from slow moving and constructing human point of view, it will not be a problem I think from a bugs point of view. They will either go uphill to maintain the same temperatures or move away from heat sources to more temperate areas and latitudes. Billions will die but billions will adapt and they will being relatively short lived evolve to resist drought and higher temperatures.
A lot of humans resist or despise change but bugs will just move on, in fact if the tropics become hostile to them even at a few miles a day they fly or march to safety.
After all they don't have to construct complex dwellings to live in and infrastructure like people do.
Member Since: January 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2072
LIVE Cam of all the people skiing on Sugar Mountain, North Carolina today. A lot of people up there today.

Link
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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