Climate change education in zoos

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 5:20 PM GMT on December 05, 2011

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I'm in San Francisco this week for the annual Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the world's largest gathering of Earth Scientists. Over ten thousand scientists from all over the world, including most of the world's top climate scientists, are in town this week to exchange ideas to advance the cause of Earth Science. This year, there is much attention being given to communication of science to the public, and the first talk I attended today on the subject was given by Dr. Michael Mann of Penn State University. Dr. Mann has been at the center of much recent controversy over climate science, and has an op-ed in today's Wall Street Journal titled, "Climate Contrarians Ignore Overwhelming Evidence". His "hockey stick" graphs showing the unprecedented increase in global temperatures over the past 1,000 years has been the subject of heated attack, much of it orchestrated by the public relations wings of powerful industries whose profits are threatened by by possibility of regulatory action to reduce global warming. He has a book coming out in January titled, The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches from the Front Lines. Dr. Mann reaffirmed his stance on human-caused climate change in his talk this morning, calling attention to a paper that appeared in Nature Geoscience last week, finding that most of the observed warming of Earth's climate in recent decades—at least 74 percent—is almost certainly due to human activity. Dr. Mann said that this study did not go far enough, and that more than 100% of the warming in the past 30 years was due to humans. Without humans, the climate would have cooled over the past 30 years.


Figure 1. An example of educational material on polar bears that has been developed by CliZEN for use at nine U.S. zoos.

Dr. Mann also introduced a new pilot program he is involved with to advance climate change education through U.S. zoos. The National Science Foundation-funded project is called CliZEN, The Climate Literacy Zoo Education Network. Zoos represent a unique way for people to connect to the natural world, and over 50 million people in the U.S. go to the zoo each year--double that, if one includes aquariums. Thus, zoos thus offer a unique opportunity to communicate how climate change threatens the natural world. People who go to zoos are approximately 50% more likely to be alarmed or concerned about climate change than the general population, Dr. Mann showed. The initial eduction effort has a polar theme, and is being brought to nine zoos: the Chicago Zoological Society of Brookfield, IL; Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, OH; Como Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul, MN; Indianapolis Zoo, IN; Louisville Zoological Garden, KY; Oregon Zoo, Portland, OR; Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, PA; Roger Williams Park Zoo, Providence, RI; and the Toledo Zoological Gardens, OH. The organization Polar Bears International is helping develop the educational material.

Jeff Masters

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Loop Current Eddy Formation and Recapturing in the Gulf

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Quoting hydrus:
This is true. But what if next week a 7 mile wide, 14,560 million tonne asteroid moving at 59,000 mph strikes the Pacific, which has an average depth of over 12,000 feet, slams through ocean and crust turning the impacted mantle into something like melted butter in just a split second, creating 100 mile high tidal waves, then all that stuff that was blasted into ballistic orbit will rain back to earth, incinerating the surface and crust of every land mass, massive earthquakes ,huge volcanic eruptions and most of all, causing me to miss a few of my favorite T.V. programs.....which aint right.


To create a 100 mile high tsunami, you're going to need a bigger bolide impact than that.

Chicxulub - which was around 6 miles wide - created tsunami around the 1 or 2 mile high variety. So, from simple, crude extrapolation, you're going to need a 400-600 mile wide spacerock to do that. There's only around 3 or 4 asteroids that big known, of which one includes Ceres, the minor planet. A planetoid crashing to earth? I think a megatsunami or iminami will be the least of your worries :)

Nice call on the verneshot, though. An interesting theoretical scenario.
Member Since: August 23, 2008 Posts: 7 Comments: 5300
I just churned out the final report for the night. I'll probably have the entire thing completed by tomorrow:

Hurricane Hilary

September 21 - September 30

Hilary was a small but powerful Category 4 hurricane that came very close to the southwest coast of Mexico before turning away.

a. Storm history

Hilary developed from a weak tropical wave that moved off Africa on September 9. A large burst of convection developed to the west of the wave axis the next day, but this appears to have been at least partially related to the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The wave soon lost the deep convection that was associated with it, and continued moving westward across the tropical Atlantic. The wave generated a large burst of convection across the Gulf of Panama late on September 16, moved across Central America, and entered the eastern Pacific on September 18. The wave began to show signs of organization late on September 19, and scatterometer data suggested that the low-level center was becoming better defined. The system developed a surface low around 0600 UTC the next day while centered about 200 miles south of Salina Cruz, Mexico. The low continued to become better organized as it moved slowly west-northwest. Satellite data suggested that the system became a tropical depression near 0600 UTC September 21 while centered about 180 miles southeast of Puerto Escondido, Mexico. The depression quickly became a tropical storm.

Hilary became a hurricane near 0900 UTC September 22 while centered about 250 miles southeast of Acapulco, Mexico. Amidst favorable environmental conditions characterized by low vertical shear, warm waters, and a moist environment, the hurricane rapidly intensified, and based on satellite data, became a major hurricane around 1800 UTC September 22. As it slowly moved away from the coast of Mexico, Hilary continued to strengthen, and reached Category 4 strength near 0000 UTC September 23. About six hours later, the hurricane reached its peak intensity of 130 kt while centered about 120 miles south of Zihuatanejo, Mexico. At that time, the cloud pattern of Hilary was quite the spectacle, with a small but well-defined eye embedded within a very symmetrical central dense overcast. However, scatterometer data showed that Hilary was a rather small hurricane, with tropical storm force winds extending outward up to no more than about 70 miles. The small size of the circulation could have been a contributor to the rapid intensification that was observed through the early stages of the cyclone's lifespan.

After assuming peak intensity, Hilary remained a powerful Category 4, although the eye briefly disappeared near 0900 UTC September 24. The hurricane continued westward and slowly weakened, becoming a Category 3 near 0600 UTC September 25 while located about 420 miles south-southeast of the southern tip of Baja California. Since the synoptic environment was seemingly favorable during this time, this weakening appears to have been related to changes within the inner core structure, namely an eyewall replacement cycle. As the cycle culminated, Hilary began to restrengthen a little again late on September 25, and is estimated to have briefly regained Category 4 status again near 1800 UTC September 26 while centered about 485 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Hilary weakened to a Category 3 again six hours later. The hurricane also gradually turned northwestward as a large trough amplified off the United States west coast.

The eye briefly reappeared late on September 27, disappearing for a final time just after 0000 UTC September 28. As the hurricane moved across cooler sea surface temperatures, it slowly weakened, losing hurricane strength near 0000 UTC September 29 while located around 600 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. The tropical cyclone continued to spin down, weakening to a tropical depression near 1200 UTC that day. Hilary weakened to a remnant low around 0600 UTC September 30 while centered about 750 miles west of the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula.

I should note that Hilary was a difficult storm to summarize, given its tenacity.
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172. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Mauritius Meteorological Services
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #5
TEMPETE TROPICALE MODEREE ALENGA (01-20112012)
10:30 AM RET December 6 2011
==============================================

At 6:00 AM UTC, Moderate Tropical Storm Alenga (990 hPa) located at 13.0S 87.4E has 10 minute sustained winds of 40 with gusts of 60 knots. The cyclone is reported as moving south at 3 knots.

Gale Force Winds
================
30 NM from the center extending up to 40 NM in the northern semi-circle

Near Gale Force Winds
====================
50 NM from the center extending up to 60 NM in the northern semi-circle

Dvorak Intensity: T3.0/3.0/W1.0/12 HRS

Forecast and Intensity
======================
12 HRS: 13.8S 87.5E - 40 knots (Tempête Tropicale Moderée)
24 HRS: 14.7S 89.3E - 35 knots (Tempête Tropicale Moderée)
48 HRS: 17.0S 93.8E - 30 knots (Depression Tropicale)
72 HRS: 21.0S 100.4E - 30 knots (Depression Extratropicale)

Additional Information
======================

According to the last available satellite data, Alenga's structure has rapidly changed during the last 6 hours and system is weakening and is currently a moderate tropical storm.

In relationship with a mid-level trough transiting in its south, Alenga is forecast to progressively accelerate towards the southeast.

On and after 1200z, system begins to undergo moderate west northwesterly vertical wind shear and intensity is expected to decrease faster. On this forecast, the system should pass east of 90E Wednesday morning. Thursday, an increase of vertical wind shear and cooler sea surface temperature should produce significant weakening on the system. Extratropical transition is now expected at this time.
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 50 Comments: 45234
171. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Mauritius Meteorological Services
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #1
DEPRESSION TROPICALE (02-20112012)
10:30 AM RET December 6 2011
==============================================

At 6:00 AM UTC, Depression 02 (998 hPa) located at 16.3S 69.2E has 10 minute sustained winds of 30 with gusts of 45 knots. The depression is reported as moving southwest at 3 knots.

Dvorak Intensity: T2.5/2.5/D1.0/18 HRS

Forecast and Intensity
======================
12 HRS: 16.3S 68.2E - 30 knots (Depression Tropicale)
24 HRS: 16.4S 67.1E - 40 knots (Tempête Tropicale Moderée)
48 HRS: 16.8S 64.9E - 40 knots (Tempête Tropicale Moderée)
72 HRS: 16.8S 62.8E - 35 knots (Tempête Tropicale Moderée)

Additional Information
======================

System 02R has reached the stage of tropical depression during the last 6 hours. ASCAT data at 4:11z depicts 30 knot winds in the southern semi-circle and under convection. According to the last available animated pictures convection is not well structured. The system is shifting west southwestward over the lower tropospheric subtropical ridge. Energetic potential is poor. Upper level wind shear is weak. System should reach the stage of moderate tropical storm. Beyond 72 hours it should undergo a strong vertical wind shear and fill up.
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Quoting chimera245:
And in other parts of the world, it's getting a bit wild out west:

Link



Looks exciting.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 573 Comments: 20409
Quoting allancalderini:
but it will be scary


So what? Fear is one of the things that makes us human -- fear of the unknown.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 573 Comments: 20409
Also done with TD8-E!

Tropical Depression Eight-E

August 31 - September 1

This depression was a short-lived one that briefly moved inland across southwestern Mexico and dissipated.

a. Storm history

The origins of this depression are quite unclear, but might be related to a tropical wave which crossed the coast of Africa on August 15. The northern portion of the tropical wave moved quickly westward and eventually spawned Hurricane Irene near the Leeward Islands. The southern portion lagged behind in the central Atlantic, possibly in response to outflow from Hurricane Irene combining with a longwave trough moving through the western Atlantic to amplify a weakness in the subtropical ridge. Extrapolation places the tropical wave in the jurisdiction of the eastern Pacific around August 28. As the wave continued westward, it interacted with a preexisting disturbance that was located several hundred miles south of the southwest coast of Mexico -- this disturbance was likely a perturbation within the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The interaction of these two features helped to initiate a more concentrated area of disturbed weather, although convection within this area was sporadic and not well-organized.

Possibly due to the large nature of the cyclonic envelope in which this system was embedded, development was slow, and the low did not become a tropical depression until around 0600 UTC August 31 while centered about 130 miles west of Zihuatanejo, Mexico. The depression quickly moved inland near La Mira near 1500 UTC that day. The circulation of the weak cyclone was quickly disrupted by the rugged terrain of the Sierra Madre del Sur, and the cyclone dissipated over southwest Mexico around 0000 UTC September 1. The depression moved back over water later that day, generating a large area of deep but disorganized convection. The system lost its identity the next day as it neared the southern tip of Baja California.
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And in other parts of the world, it's getting a bit wild out west:

Link

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@ skyepony
Another interesting link for keeping tabs on the sea ice is http://www.ec.gc.ca/glaces-ice/default.asp?lang=En &n=D32C361E-1
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165. Skyepony (Mod)
Quoting winter123:


Having deja vu. Remember last December? Snowstorm after snowstorm for the coast, but us inland who actually WANT the snow It's just brutally cold. Is there some reason for this. Global warming? La nina?


That neg NAO has got to be around the corner as lopsided as the sea ice has become over the last few weeks. Started with a nice spread, now it's about all on the Pacific side.


Hudson sea ice anomaly is free falling as it struggles to freeze. The peer review was out a few months ago, this tends to disrupt & sling the polar vortex down the east coast. They get the snow behind it gets the cold like you noted..


Another thing I noticed tonight.. ESPI is -.86... I expect La Niña to strengthen slightly over the next month or so.
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Quoting wxmod:
Link
Pacific weather looks a little weird today!


A 404 error?
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163. wxmod

Pacific weather under construction.
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Here's my report on Greg:

Hurricane Greg

August 16 - August 21

Greg was a minimal hurricane that remained offshore the coast of Mexico before dissipating.

a. Storm history

Greg appears to have developed from a tropical wave which moved off the coast of Africa on August 2. This wave was nearly impossible to track using satellite imagery as it moved westward across the tropical Atlantic. A small blowup of showers in the central Caribbean late on August 10 may have been related to this wave. The wave continued westward toward Central America, generating little convection. The wave is estimated to have moved into the eastern Pacific basin late on August 11, although its presence was masked by a merging with an active Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). A series of westward-moving tropical waves may have enhanced shower activity south of the Gulf of Tehuantepec over the following several days, but little organization of the large disturbance was noted. The system began to show signs of organization on August 15, though the associated convection wasn't particularly deep. Around 0000 UTC August 16, the disturbance began to consolidate, with more vigorous convection that wrapped cyclonically into a well-defined center. The disturbance is estimated to have become a tropical depression around 1800 UTC August 16 while centered roughly 250 miles south of Acapulco, Mexico. The depression became a tropical storm near 0600 UTC August 17.

Greg moved west-northwest under the influence of a strong mid-level ridge to its north. Initially, Greg's strengthening was rather fast, with the cyclone becoming a hurricane near 0000 UTC August 18 while centered about 270 miles west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. The hurricane continued to intensify, reaching its peak of 75 kt at 1200 UTC that day while centered approximately 400 miles south of the southern tip of Baja California. Greg began to weaken after that, possibly in response to increasing northeasterly vertical shear and cooler waters. Greg also appears to have ingested a dry lower- to middle-tropospheric airmass during this time. The conglomeration of these factors led to weakening of the tropical cyclone, with Greg falling below hurricane strength shortly before 1200 UTC August 19. Greg weakened to a tropical depression shortly after 0000 UTC August 20.

The weakening vortex turned westward in the lower-tropospheric flow on the south side of the Pacific subtropical high, becoming a non-convective remnant low by 1200 UTC August 21, centered around 900 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 573 Comments: 20409
Quoting Xyrus2000:


An asteroid like the one you described would probably knock your shows off the air. :D

But I wouldn't worry about it. It's very unlikely to happen, and even if it did there isn't anything we could do about it. There's no place on Earth, even in the deepest nuclear bunkers, where you'd be safe from an impact like that.

If the day ever comes though I've got a plan in place. I'll get a cooler full of beer, bring out my 10" Schmidt-Cassegrain scope, and watch it come in. It'll be one hell of a show.
but it will be scary
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Quoting SPLbeater:


The 1800Z run of the GFS is showing a good amount of snow for Pennsylvania, New York and north around 96-120 hours. so from that, it would be Dec. 9th or 10th if it does occur. (from GFS)


Having deja vu. Remember last December? Snowstorm after snowstorm for the coast, but us inland who actually WANT the snow It's just brutally cold. Is there some reason for this. Global warming? La nina?
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Quoting 1911maker:
Electric cars.....
I have not had time to digest this article, but I thought others might be interested.

Life Cycle Assessment of EVs Reveals Startling Results

Link

A number of articles published this week paint a negative picture of electric cars based on a British study published earlier this month. The study attempts a comparative life-cycle assessment (LCA) of conventional, hybrid and electric cars and prompted “downer” headlines such as, “Electric Cars May Not Be So Green After All” and “More Bad News For The Chevy Volt.”


The "Comments" section, of the article, was also interesting reading.
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158. Skyepony (Mod)
98S Showing signs of life..


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Quoting MTWX:

If it could snow at 70 degrees I would be a happy camper!! Skiing in shorts!!


Can I get a hell yeah?
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 573 Comments: 20409
156. MTWX
Quoting KoritheMan:


Yeah, cold weather sucks. But snow ftw.

If it could snow at 70 degrees I would be a happy camper!! Skiing in shorts!!
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155. Skyepony (Mod)
GOES-15 had it's final test the other day..a full disk scan every 30 mins. It captured the wind even in CA very well..


Quoting DDR:

Hi skyepony,sadly one person died when landslide came down on his home in a north eastern area called San Souci.
I had 4 inches in 24 hours,eastern areas got more than that.


Hope you get a chance to dry out. Looks like a bad scene. Saw it was being blamed on denuding the mountains..
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Yeah, cold weather sucks. But snow ftw.
Yeah I know, I really wished it snowed in San Diego lol. Really want to learn how to snowboard this winter too
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Electric cars.....
I have not had time to digest this article, but I thought others might be interested.

Life Cycle Assessment of EVs Reveals Startling Results

Link

A number of articles published this week paint a negative picture of electric cars based on a British study published earlier this month. The study attempts a comparative life-cycle assessment (LCA) of conventional, hybrid and electric cars and prompted “downer” headlines such as, “Electric Cars May Not Be So Green After All” and “More Bad News For The Chevy Volt.”
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Quoting Skyepony:
I see there was some landslides in Trinidad and Tobago today.. How ya'll doing there?
Yikes, hope everyone is ok, that's too bad about the one person who lost their life though. Rest in peace
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151. DDR
Quoting Skyepony:
I see there was some landslides in Trinidad and Tobago today.. How ya'll doing there?

Hi skyepony,sadly one person died when landslide came down on his home in a north eastern area called San Souci.
I had 4 inches in 24 hours,eastern areas got more than that.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I don't see the system's structure as THAT MUCH of a justification of not upgrading a system. Remember Nate? Without the ship/oil rig data, it wouldn't have been upgraded to a hurricane.

With that, I'm off for the night.

20 days and counting...


remember to write Santa Claus for a STS in the open central atlantic for Christmas lol. then he will have 2 letters and will consider it xD
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I don't see the system's structure as THAT MUCH of a justification of not upgrading a system. Remember Nate? Without the ship/oil rig data, it wouldn't have been upgraded to a hurricane.

With that, I'm off for the night.

20 days and counting...


Yeah, and that's not typical for most hurricanes. The exception to the rule, not the common one.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 573 Comments: 20409
Quoting TomTaylor:
Tell you what it has been giving us crummy weather down here in SD, California. It has been sunny and cloud free, but it's also been pretty cold...I can't stand cold weather


Yeah, cold weather sucks. But snow ftw.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 573 Comments: 20409
Quoting KoritheMan:


Here's my justification for not upgrading her to a hurricane. Make of it what you will:

Fernanda's peak intensity is based primarily on Dvorak estimates, which averaged close to 4.0 during the period of assessed peak intensity. Although one could make the argument that Fernanda was briefly a hurricane according to Dvorak estimates, the satellite signature was still somewhat sheared at that point, with upper-level outflow confined primarily to the western semicircle. Additionally, Fernanda began to slowly weaken after this time. The combination of the ragged satellite signature and the short-lived nature of the well-organized cloud pattern observed during the time of peak intensity, argues against Fernanda having been a hurricane.

I don't see the system's structure as THAT MUCH of a justification of not upgrading a system. Remember Nate? Without the ship/oil rig data, it wouldn't have been upgraded to a hurricane.

With that, I'm off for the night.

20 days and counting...
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31915
Closed LLC just east of Leeward Islands. its weak, but could be watched:)
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting KoritheMan:


The Alaskan death ridge™.
Tell you what it has been giving us crummy weather down here in SD, California. It has been sunny and cloud free, but it's also been pretty cold...I can't stand cold weather
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

It was probably around 60 knots, but may have briefly attained 65 knots in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific.


Here's my justification for not upgrading her to a hurricane. Make of it what you will:

Fernanda's peak intensity is based primarily on Dvorak estimates, which averaged close to 4.0 during the period of assessed peak intensity. Although one could make the argument that Fernanda was briefly a hurricane according to Dvorak estimates, the satellite signature was still somewhat sheared at that point, with upper-level outflow confined primarily to the western semicircle. Additionally, Fernanda began to slowly weaken after this time. The combination of the ragged satellite signature and the short-lived nature of the well-organized cloud pattern observed during the time of peak intensity, argues against Fernanda having been a hurricane.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 573 Comments: 20409
Quoting KoritheMan:


How strong do you think she was?
Quoting KoritheMan:
Also, I hope you're happy Cody: I increased Fernanda to 60 kt.

It was probably around 60 knots, but may have briefly attained 65 knots in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific.
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Quoting Skyepony:
I see there was some landslides in Trinidad and Tobago today.. How ya'll doing there?


I hope pottery chimes in and gives us an update!
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Quoting SPLbeater:


this is a prime example of why i was given the ignore button from wunderground. for people who want to talk about subjects with age limits(your not included in the handful). Not considering some mid-aged kids could be here to grow and learn im meteorology.


Also, says the guy who randomly brings up religion.

WHOOSH!
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 573 Comments: 20409
Quoting SPLbeater:


this is a prime example of why i was given the ignore button from wunderground. for people who want to talk about subjects with age limits(your not included in the handful). Not considering some mid-aged kids could be here to grow and learn im meteorology.


Killjoy. :(
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139. Skyepony (Mod)
I see there was some landslides in Trinidad and Tobago today.. How ya'll doing there?
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Quoting TomTaylor:
Yep big longwave pattern shift.

500mb anomaly for the two weeks between Nov 13 to Nov 27





500mb anomaly for Dec 1 to Dec 2 (December 2nd is as far back as daily PSD analysis goes back)







In the first image there is a large high south of the Aleutian islands and a strong low over Alaska and Western Canada. The pressure gradient between the ridge and low produced winds out of the N to NW advecting cold polar air out of the Arctic and into Alaska. In the second image there's a large high off the Pacific Northwest and Gulf of Alaska producing southwesterly winds which advect warmer air out of the southern latitudes and into Alaska.


The Alaskan death ridge™.
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Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:



Encroachment! 10 yard penalty and loss of down!


this is a prime example of why i was given the ignore button from wunderground. for people who want to talk about subjects with age limits(your not included in the handful). Not considering some mid-aged kids could be here to grow and learn im meteorology.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting Neapolitan:
Quite an amazing turnaround in parts of Alaska. Just a few weeks ago, there were record low temperatures of deeper than -40; yesterday some of the same stations that dipped that low obliterated record high readings. For instance, North Pole, AK, which set a record low for the date of -49.F on 11/17, reached a record high yesterday of 49.F, completely smashing the previous record of 27.F. That's a swing of 98 degrees over a two-week period. Meanwhile, Fairbanks International, which cooled to -41.F on 11/17, warmed to 47.F yesterday, breaking the old record by 15.F for a two-week swing of 88.F.

More here: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/extremes/records/
Yep big longwave pattern shift.

500mb anomaly for the two weeks between Nov 13 to Nov 27





500mb anomaly for Dec 1 to Dec 2 (December 2nd is as far back as daily PSD analysis goes back)







In the first image there is a large high south of the Aleutian islands and a strong low over Alaska and Western Canada. The pressure gradient between the ridge and low produced winds out of the N to NW advecting cold polar air out of the Arctic and into Alaska. In the second image there's a large high off the Pacific Northwest and Gulf of Alaska producing southwesterly flow into Alaska which advect warmer air out of the southern latitudes and into the region.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


20 years from now? Considering how well I take care of myself now, hopefully I won't be dealing with erectile dysfunction.


Personal foul! 15 yard penalty and loss of down!
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Quoting SPLbeater:
WTXS21 PGTW 060300
MSGID/GENADMIN/NAVMARFCSTCEN PEARL HARBOR HI/JTWC//
RMKS/
1. FORMATION OF A SIGNIFICANT TROPICAL CYCLONE IS POSSIBLE WITHIN 120 NM EITHER SIDE OF A LINE 16.9S 69.9E TO 17.5S 65.5E WITHIN THE NEXT 12 TO 24 HOURS. AVAILABLE DATA DOES NOT JUSTIFY ISSUANCE OF NUMBERED TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNINGS AT THIS TIME. WINDS IN THE AREA ARE ESTIMATED TO BE 28 TO 32 KNOTS. METSAT IMAGERY AT 060000Z INDICATES THAT A CIRCULATION CENTER IS LOCATED NEAR 17.0S 69.6E. THE SYSTEM IS MOVING WEST-SOUTHWESTWARD AT 06 KNOTS.

#2 time 98S has done this, if it develops the prediction from me and the JTWC would be wrong. lol


Welcome to weather, bud. :D
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Re #123: Posted lies from obvious sockpuppet reported. I expect the trash will be taken out soon.
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WTXS21 PGTW 060300
MSGID/GENADMIN/NAVMARFCSTCEN PEARL HARBOR HI/JTWC//
RMKS/
1. FORMATION OF A SIGNIFICANT TROPICAL CYCLONE IS POSSIBLE WITHIN 120 NM EITHER SIDE OF A LINE 16.9S 69.9E TO 17.5S 65.5E WITHIN THE NEXT 12 TO 24 HOURS. AVAILABLE DATA DOES NOT JUSTIFY ISSUANCE OF NUMBERED TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNINGS AT THIS TIME. WINDS IN THE AREA ARE ESTIMATED TO BE 28 TO 32 KNOTS. METSAT IMAGERY AT 060000Z INDICATES THAT A CIRCULATION CENTER IS LOCATED NEAR 17.0S 69.6E. THE SYSTEM IS MOVING WEST-SOUTHWESTWARD AT 06 KNOTS.

#2 time 98S has done this, if it develops the prediction from me and the JTWC would be wrong. lol
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting KoritheMan:


You can rightfully consider me the resident pervert of Weather Underground.
Startin already huh?..Scary to think where you will be 20 years from now..:)
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Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:



Encroachment! 10 yard penalty and loss of down!


lmao
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Quoting KoritheMan:


You can rightfully consider me the resident pervert of Weather Underground.



Encroachment! 10 yard penalty and loss of down!
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Quoting SPLbeater:
im going to swrite santa claus for a unexpected STS in the central atlantic for Christmas lol


No way. After I complete this blog I've been working on since October, I'm done with the tropics until May.
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im going to swrite santa claus for a unexpected STS in the central atlantic for Christmas lol
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4481
Quoting Speeky:
What do you guys think of the possibility of a winter storm in the Northeast on Wednesday, December 8th?



It would be Thursday, and it would be an event mostly for VA/MD/DE/PA/WV if it does occur. The areas north could pick up some light snow, but I believe the heaviest amounts will be in northern/northwestern VA and MD west of DC and Baltimore. There, the potential does exist for 4-8 inches with some spots up to 10 inches.

IMO.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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