Climate change education in zoos

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 5:20 PM GMT on December 05, 2011

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I'm in San Francisco this week for the annual Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the world's largest gathering of Earth Scientists. Over ten thousand scientists from all over the world, including most of the world's top climate scientists, are in town this week to exchange ideas to advance the cause of Earth Science. This year, there is much attention being given to communication of science to the public, and the first talk I attended today on the subject was given by Dr. Michael Mann of Penn State University. Dr. Mann has been at the center of much recent controversy over climate science, and has an op-ed in today's Wall Street Journal titled, "Climate Contrarians Ignore Overwhelming Evidence". His "hockey stick" graphs showing the unprecedented increase in global temperatures over the past 1,000 years has been the subject of heated attack, much of it orchestrated by the public relations wings of powerful industries whose profits are threatened by by possibility of regulatory action to reduce global warming. He has a book coming out in January titled, The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches from the Front Lines. Dr. Mann reaffirmed his stance on human-caused climate change in his talk this morning, calling attention to a paper that appeared in Nature Geoscience last week, finding that most of the observed warming of Earth's climate in recent decades—at least 74 percent—is almost certainly due to human activity. Dr. Mann said that this study did not go far enough, and that more than 100% of the warming in the past 30 years was due to humans. Without humans, the climate would have cooled over the past 30 years.


Figure 1. An example of educational material on polar bears that has been developed by CliZEN for use at nine U.S. zoos.

Dr. Mann also introduced a new pilot program he is involved with to advance climate change education through U.S. zoos. The National Science Foundation-funded project is called CliZEN, The Climate Literacy Zoo Education Network. Zoos represent a unique way for people to connect to the natural world, and over 50 million people in the U.S. go to the zoo each year--double that, if one includes aquariums. Thus, zoos thus offer a unique opportunity to communicate how climate change threatens the natural world. People who go to zoos are approximately 50% more likely to be alarmed or concerned about climate change than the general population, Dr. Mann showed. The initial eduction effort has a polar theme, and is being brought to nine zoos: the Chicago Zoological Society of Brookfield, IL; Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, OH; Como Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul, MN; Indianapolis Zoo, IN; Louisville Zoological Garden, KY; Oregon Zoo, Portland, OR; Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, PA; Roger Williams Park Zoo, Providence, RI; and the Toledo Zoological Gardens, OH. The organization Polar Bears International is helping develop the educational material.

Jeff Masters

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Hello!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SPLbeater:


you can remain in rebellion as long as you want, but i have indications that it would have been and you dont contain any to prove it wouldnt have been. end of discussion.


Says the guy citing anecdotal evidence, rather than scientific observation. In the confines of a scientific discussion, no less.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 602 Comments: 21302
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I guarantee it wouldn't have.


you can remain in rebellion as long as you want, but i have indications that it would have been and you dont contain any to prove it wouldnt have been. end of discussion.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Upper 30s and Low 40s ALLLLLLL day long here in SE TX, cloudy, gray, blustery day in the Lone Star State.

Another inch of rain yesterday, Trees, plants catching a break from the relentless heat and drought, but FAR from over
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 9686
Quoting SPLbeater:
Really?

Look towards the top left corner, 10-15knot winds. it did not last, but if this was in september i garuntee it would have gotten atleast <10%.

I guarantee it wouldn't have.
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Quoting Cotillion:


I know, just couldn't resist saying. It probably depends, more water would certainly be displaced in a deep ocean impact, but there would be less of a funnelling (the bigger tsunamis tend to be when they're funnelled, like the one in Alaska in '58) effect. Partly why landslides can be so dangerous.

By the way, while I'm not sure if the Discovery Channel retracted their decision or it was found out to be false, the last episode of the BBC's Frozen Planet series airs tomorrow (the episode pertaining to climate change and such).

So, if one was so inclined, you may be able to scout to see if it's available.


From want of anything much else to do on this cold night in the northern UK.3/c here with gales tomorrow.
I would like to postulate that the maths connected with meteor impact must depend on 4 things:-
1,Physical Size rather than Mass of object at impact.
2,Speed of object at impact.
3,Angle of trajectory at point of impact.
4,Depth of water at point of impact.
Given the high level of mathematical ability of some of the bloggers on this site, I am sure that the size of any waves resulting form an hypothetical impact can relatively easily be calculated and no doubt relevant graphs drawn up.
PS.Its behond me but I'd love to see them!
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Deep South TX under freeze warnings. Florida missing out on the cold and winter over there.

Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 9686
Really?

Look towards the top left corner, 10-15knot winds. it did not last, but if this was in september i garuntee it would have gotten atleast <10%.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
#196

No, sorry, Hydrus. Should've put in a break between the two paragraphs, they weren't connected. Just a comment to whoever was interested.

Refers to Frozen Planet

It does appear whenever the DVD is released, it'll contain all seven episodes as intended (including for US viewers).

Quoting biff4ugo:
Those post pangea maps don't ever seem to handle crust expansion properly.


Crust expansion...?
Member Since: August 23, 2008 Posts: 7 Comments: 5300
Quoting SPLbeater:


gotta disagree there. ASCAT picked up a small, weak circulation center yesterday evening, and convection was deep in some areas overtop it(area near Lesser Antilles) today the supposed circulation isnt that great and convection going down recently.

What you saw what was not a closed circulation. It was a messy, disorganized, and weak area of low pressure that did not warrant any mention in a special Tropical Weather Outlook.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

They have no bias in what time of year it is when it comes to tropical cyclones. They choose the percentages they think are warranted, regardless of whether its August or December.


gotta disagree there. ASCAT picked up a small, weak circulation center yesterday evening, and convection was deep in some areas overtop it(area near Lesser Antilles) today the supposed circulation isnt that great and convection going down recently.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
CMC has the tropical system in the Bahamas moving southwestward towards Cuba.

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

That's not true...Looks like that this system will follow a completely different path. The CMC brings it into the Bahamas by 144 hours.


True, but it's origins are the same, just this one will have much longer time over warm water and less shear (although it will still be heavy shear regardless). Maybe it has a chance...
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Quoting SPLbeater:


i am not using observations from 2011. i have followed the tropics since 08 tracked every atlantic movement since 09. in 09 and 2010, i have seen some systems that would have gotten 10% in august/september, and in late november they had nothing. the NHC tends to require more agressiveness in a Tropical Wave, or Low pressure system in late/post season Hurricane season then they do in early/mid hurricane season.

They have no bias in what time of year it is when it comes to tropical cyclones. They choose the percentages they think are warranted, regardless of whether its August or December.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Not really...


i am not using observations from 2011. i have followed the tropics since 08 tracked every atlantic movement since 09. in 09 and 2010, i have seen some systems that would have gotten 10% in august/september, and in late november they had nothing. the NHC tends to require more agressiveness in a Tropical Wave, or Low pressure system in late/post season Hurricane season then they do in early/mid hurricane season.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting yqt1001:


No model support? A lot of models have it developing in 24 hours. It's unlikely that that would happen, and the origins of this is the same as our last two bust invests..90L and 99L, so it will probably follow the same path as those two.

That's not true...Looks like that this system will follow a completely different path. The CMC brings it into the Bahamas by 144 hours.
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Quoting HuracanTaino:
It certainly looks interesting but its December, so a system needs more than that to gain attention and of course, models support...


No model support? A lot of models have it developing in 24 hours. It's unlikely that that would happen, and the origins of this is the same as our last two bust invests..90L and 99L, so it will probably follow the same path as those two.
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Quoting SPLbeater:


its been observed

Not really...
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

How would you know they're conservative? We've not any real tropical system to test it out on.


its been observed
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Those post pangea maps don't ever seem to handle crust expansion properly.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting PolishHurrMaster:
Why the system which center I estimate at 19N 53W isn't noticed anywhere? I'm asking someone now to have a professional look on this
It certainly looks interesting but its December, so a system needs more than that to gain attention and of course, models support...
Member Since: May 31, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1008
Quoting SPLbeater:


when hurricane season is over, the NHC is conservative on things. With this system, the probably case is that wind shear is high 25-40 knots, convection isnt sustaining itself for a long period, and dry air is to its south. I dont think it has any model support either...(assumption)

:D

How would you know they're conservative? We've not any real tropical system to test it out on.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
02S, 17:00Z
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
202. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Mauritius Meteorological Services
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #7
TEMPETE TROPICALE MODEREE ALENGA (01-20112012)
22:30 PM RET December 6 2011
==============================================

At 18:00 PM UTC, Moderate Tropical Storm Alenga (995 hPa) located at 13.9S 88.7E has 10 minute sustained winds of 40 with gusts of 60 knots. The cyclone is reported as moving east southeast at 8 knots.

Gale Force Winds
================
30 NM from the center extending up to 40 NM in the northern semi-circle

Near Gale Force Winds
====================
50 NM from the center extending up to 60 NM in the northern semi-circle

Dvorak Intensity: T3.0/3.0/W0.5/24 HRS

Forecast and Intensity
======================
12 HRS: 14.7S 90.4E - 40 knots (Tempête Tropicale Moderée)
24 HRS: 15.9S 92.9E - 40 knots (Tempête Tropicale Moderée)
48 HRS: 18.8S 98.5E - 30 knots (Depression Tropicale)
72 HRS: 20.8S 101.1E - 30 knots (Depression Extratropicale)

Additional Information
======================

It is a little bit tricky to find Alenga's center tonight with the most recent fix, and uncertain METOP IR3 fix of 1513z. Vigorous convection has started near the center since 1200z but come mainly from the southwestern quadrant according to latest SSMIS overpass of 1149z. Current cloud pattern is closed to an irregular central dense overcast pattern of a little more than 90 NM diameter.

Alenga seems now to speed up towards the east southeast as it is catching within the west northwesterly steering flow that exists ahead of a mid-level trough transiting in its south.

Only a minor change has been made on the intensity forecast. On an after Thursday, system should undergo a moderate west northwesterly vertical wind shear. Intensity is expected to decrease faster, and system should begin its extratropical transition.

On this forecast, the system should pass east of 90E Wednesday morning. Current forecast is a little bit faster than the previous one about this point.
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 52 Comments: 46909
201. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
7:29 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Mauritius Meteorological Services
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #3
DEPRESSION TROPICALE (02-20112012)
22:30 PM RET December 6 2011
==============================================

At 18:00 PM UTC, Tropical Depression 02 (999 hPa) located at 16.5S 67.9E has 10 minute sustained winds of 30 with gusts of 45 knots. The depression is reported as moving west at 6 knots.

Near Gale Force Winds
=====================
80 NM from the center in the southern semi-circle

Dvorak Intensity: T1.5/2.5/W0.5/6 HRS

Forecast and Intensity
======================
12 HRS: 16.7S 66.5E - 35 knots (Tempête Tropicale Moderée)
24 HRS: 16.9S 65.5E - 35 knots (Tempête Tropicale Moderée)
48 HRS: 16.9S 63.9E - 30 knots (Depression Tropicale)
72 HRS: 16.7S 62.1E - 25 knots (Low Pressure)

Additional Information
======================

The center has been relocated to the northwest according to latest microwave imagery. Deep convection has disappeared close to the center and exist only within a peripheral band located to more than 120 NM in near gale force winds in the southern semi-circle. System is now tracking westward. Rebuilding subtropical anticyclone within the next 24 hours should improve the polar inflow in the lower levels. Energetic potential is poor (26/26.5 degrees). Upper level wind shear is weak. System should deepen a bit within the next 24 hours and could reach moderate tropical storm status. Due to the current trend, this is a low confident forecast. Beyond 48 hours, it should weaken due to a strong vertical wind shear and fill up beyond 96 hours.
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 52 Comments: 46909
200. SPLbeater
7:23 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
oh man im bored....im going outside guys be back soon =P
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
199. SPLbeater
6:17 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Quoting PolishHurrMaster:
Why the system which center I estimate at 19N 53W isn't noticed anywhere? I'm asking someone now to have a professional look on this


when hurricane season is over, the NHC is conservative on things. With this system, the probably case is that wind shear is high 25-40 knots, convection isnt sustaining itself for a long period, and dry air is to its south. I dont think it has any model support either...(assumption)

:D
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
198. Tazmanian
6:00 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Quoting hydrus:
This next system may have a little more punch than forecast....




you are showing us a black boxs of nothing
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 115454
197. hydrus
5:38 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Quoting pottery:
Typical street flooding, Maraval, Trinidad 2011.

Good morning Pott. Hope you are well..bbl
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22615
196. hydrus
5:37 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Quoting Cotillion:


I know, just couldn't resist saying. It probably depends, more water would certainly be displaced in a deep ocean impact, but there would be less of a funnelling (the bigger tsunamis tend to be when they're funnelled, like the one in Alaska in '58) effect. Partly why landslides can be so dangerous.

By the way, while I'm not sure if the Discovery Channel retracted their decision or it was found out to be false, the last episode of the BBC's Frozen Planet series airs tomorrow (the episode pertaining to climate change and such).

So, if one was so inclined, you may be able to scout to see if it's available.

Is that the one about the hypothesized" Snowball Earth "? This is a 2.1 billion year old rock with black-band ironstone that may have formed during these snowball periods...Kinda neat lookin..Excerpt and link to Wiki...The Snowball Earth hypothesis posits that the Earth's surface became entirely or nearly entirely frozen at least once, some time earlier than 650 Ma (million years ago). Proponents of the hypothesis argue that it best explains sedimentary deposits generally regarded as of glacial origin at tropical paleolatitudes, and other otherwise enigmatic features in the geological record. Opponents of the hypothesis contest the implications of the geological evidence for global glaciation, the geophysical feasibility of an ice- or slush-covered ocean,[2][3] and the difficulty of escaping an all-frozen condition. There are a number of unanswered questions, including whether the Earth was a full snowball, or a "slushball" with a thin equatorial band of open (or seasonally open) water.

The geological time frames under consideration come before the sudden multiplication of life forms on Earth known as the Cambrian explosion, and the most recent snowball episode may have triggered the evolution of multi-cellular life on Earth. Another, much earlier and longer, snowball episode, the Huronian glaciation, which occurred 2400 to 2100 Ma may have been triggered by the oxygen catastrophe.Link
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22615
195. pottery
5:34 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Typical street flooding, Maraval, Trinidad 2011.

Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 24880
194. PolishHurrMaster
5:30 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Why the system which center I estimate at 19N 53W isn't noticed anywhere? I'm asking someone now to have a professional look on this
Member Since: May 19, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 358
193. hydrus
5:27 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
This next system may have a little more punch than forecast....
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22615
192. pottery
5:23 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Quoting KoritheMan:


I hope pottery chimes in and gives us an update!

And see post 151.
Plenty rain recently, with some showers in the 4" to 6" zone.
There have been landslides and some pretty severe flooding, and so far one fatality from a landslide that destroyed a house.

According to reports, the man was sight-impaired and aged.
He woke in the very early morning and "heard" something that caused him to wake the rest of the family and he told them to run from the house.
They did that, but they were unable to get him out fast enough. He was trapped when the hillside came down, burying him.
The survivors say that he saved their lives.

The village is called San Souci.
Which means, "Without Cares".

Looks like the Wet Season is tapering off now.
Bright and sunny today and most of yesterday.
We still expect showers through December and into Jan., then the dryseason from Jan. to May.

Last dryseason was relatively wet, and this rainy season has been particularly so. Most of the Island is saturated, and more slides and slips are probable.
Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 24880
191. Cotillion
5:20 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Quoting hydrus:
The sea was very shallow where the Chicxulub impact occurred. I exaggerated my wave for effect. I do believe if this impact had happened in deeper water, the wave would have been at least as high as the asteroid is wide. You can see what the sea was like during the Cretacious period at the left central part of this image..Some cool lookin little birds and pterosaurs were around in this era of Earth,s history...


I know, just couldn't resist saying. It probably depends, more water would certainly be displaced in a deep ocean impact, but there would be less of a funnelling (the bigger tsunamis tend to be when they're funnelled, like the one in Alaska in '58) effect. Partly why landslides can be so dangerous.

By the way, while I'm not sure if the Discovery Channel retracted their decision or it was found out to be false, the last episode of the BBC's Frozen Planet series airs tomorrow (the episode pertaining to climate change and such).

So, if one was so inclined, you may be able to scout to see if it's available.

Member Since: August 23, 2008 Posts: 7 Comments: 5300
190. RitaEvac
4:53 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
TEXAS

Today's State Extremes Hide
State Highs:
South Padre Island 53°F
North Padre Island 53°F
McAllen 51°F
Port Isabel 51°F
Brownsville 51°F

State Lows:
Pampa / Mesa Vista 1°F
Pampa 1°F
Hereford 3°F
Dumas 3°F
Amarillo 3°F
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 9686
188. SPLbeater
4:27 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
TC Alenga(01S)

CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
3.6 / 990.4mb/ 57.0kt

Raw T# 3.5
Adj T# 3.5
Final T# 3.4

Scene Type: UNIFORM CDO CLOUD REGION

---------------------------
TC TWO(02S)

CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
2.6 /1000.6mb/ 37.0kt

Raw T# 2.6
Adj T# 2.6
Final T# 2.4

Scene Type: SHEAR
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
187. hydrus
4:17 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
You can see a huge linear swath of snow from the S.W.U.S all the way up into Central Canada..
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22615
185. HuracanTaino
4:09 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Quoting allancalderini:
but it will be scary
yes. your last show....
Member Since: May 31, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1008
184. SPLbeater
3:56 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
*SNORE*
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
183. RitaEvac
3:47 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Nice visible shots of TX panhandle, NM, KS, CO, NB of snow on the ground
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 9686
182. hydrus
3:40 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Snow coming for some folks..
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22615
181. hydrus
3:24 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Quoting Cotillion:


To create a 100 mile high tsunami, you're going to need a bigger bolide impact than that.

Chicxulub - which was around 6 miles wide - created tsunami around the 1 or 2 mile high variety. So, from simple, crude extrapolation, you're going to need a 400-600 mile wide spacerock to do that. There's only around 3 or 4 asteroids that big known, of which one includes Ceres, the minor planet. A planetoid crashing to earth? I think a megatsunami or iminami will be the least of your worries :)

Nice call on the verneshot, though. An interesting theoretical scenario.
The sea was very shallow where the Chicxulub impact occurred. I exaggerated my wave for effect. I do believe if this impact had happened in deeper water, the wave would have been at least as high as the asteroid is wide. You can see what the sea was like during the Cretacious period at the left central part of this image..Some cool lookin little birds and pterosaurs were around in this era of Earth,s history...
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22615
180. RitaEvac
3:00 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Dalhart, Texas (Airport)
Clear
2 F
Clear
Windchill: -13 F
Humidity: 80%
Dew Point: -3 F
Wind: 9 mph from the WNW
Pressure: 30.45 in (Falling)
Visibility: 10.0 miles


Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 9686
179. SPLbeater
2:27 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
02S from this morning
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
178. RitaEvac
2:19 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Herman Cain.....POOF, talked the talked....but just couldnt walk the walk
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 9686
177. RitaEvac
2:15 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Rise and shine Pat
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 9686
176. Patrap
1:58 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
Climate change talks not like soccer: Zuma
Sapa | 06 December, 2011 12:21


The climate talks in Durban should not be like the Soccer World Cup, where only a few teams qualified and there was only one winner, President Jacob Zuma said on Tuesday.

Countries should rise above national interests when negotiating about what needed to be done to deal with climate change, he said.

"This event is not like the 2010 Fifa Soccer World Cup tournament that we proudly hosted, where only a few soccer teams qualified, with one ultimate winner," Zuma said.

Speaking during the high-level dialogue and round table on global sustainability in a changing climate, Zuma said all countries had qualified to participate in the COP 17 talks and all should emerge as winners.

"According to your programme, you will continue with extensive deliberations on possible solutions for what we need to do now and what we agree to do in the future."

It was important for countries to think beyond their national interests during negotiations, no matter how difficult that may be.

Developing countries feared their economic development could be hampered by countries that had contributed immensely to the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

The global emissions of greenhouse gases from developing countries were growing rapidly, Zuma said.

"The developed world must continue to take the lead. On the other hand, the developing countries must show a willingness to take their fair share of responsibilities."

South Africa believed that without a multilateral rules-based system there would be no guarantee that countries would honour their commitments to reducing emissions that caused climate change.

The discussion was attended by scientists, heads of states and Jean Ping, the chairman of the Commission of the African Union.

Zuma said it was important that the level of ambition on dealing with climate change should correspond to the demands of science.

"Any agreement on a future response should also take into account what science prescribes, as well as the outcome of the 5th report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change."

Before Zuma's address, Professor Johan Rockstrom, chairman of the 3rd Nobel Laureate symposium on global sustainability, painted a gloomy picture of the effects of climate change.

He said there would be huge chaos if climate change was not addressed, and poor countries would be the hardest hit.

Rockstrom said it was unfair that the developed countries, which were regarded as major contributors to emissions, would be the least vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

Climate change would increase drought in Africa, which would lead to poverty, and the monsoon rains would be disrupted, making people unable to predict the weather.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129841
175. Patrap
1:30 PM GMT on December 06, 2011
ESL by LSU


Loop Current Eddy Formation and Recapturing in the Gulf

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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