Historic hurricane-force blizzard pounds Alaska and Siberia

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:53 PM GMT on November 09, 2011

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The most powerful storm to affect the Bering Sea coast of Alaska in 37 years is pounding Alaska's west coast and Eastern Siberia with hurricane-force winds, a destructive storm surge up to 7 feet high, waves up to 35 feet high, and blinding snow. Tin City on the west coast of Alaska north of Nome recorded sustained winds of 70 mph, gusting to 81 mph, at 1:55 am local time this morning, and hurricane-force winds are likely affecting much of the open waters of the Bering Sea. A storm surge of 6 feet hit Nome, Alaska this morning, pushed inland by sustained winds that reached 45 mph, gusting to 61 mph. A even higher storm surge is predicted for this evening (Figure 3.) The last time Nome, Alaska saw a storm this strong was November 11 - 12 1974, when the city experienced sustained winds of 46 mph with gusts to 69 mph, a pressure that bottomed out at 969 mb, and a storm surge of 13 feet that pushed beach driftwood above the previous high storm tide mark set in 1913. The center of today's storm moved ashore over eastern Siberia near 12 UTC with a central pressure of 945 mb. The storm has likely peaked in strength, and will gradually weaken as it moves northeast into the Arctic.


Figure 1. Visible satellite image of the Bering Sea superstorm at 7 pm EST November 8, 2011. Image credit: National Weather Service.


Figure 2. Observed storm surge at Nome, Alaska (green line). MLLW = Mean Lower Low Water, the water level at the lowest tide of the month. Image credit: NOAA Tides and Currents.


Figure 3. Predicted storm surge (yellow-brown line) for Nome, Alaska for today's Bering Sea storm. The black line is the predicted storm tide--the water level reached as a result of the storm surge and the natural tidal cycle. Tidal range at Nome is normally less than 2 feet between low tide and high tide (green line.) MAT = Maximum Astronomical Tide, MLLW = Mean Lower Low Water. Image credit: National Weather Service.


Figure 4. Predicted storm surge for today's storm, as forecast by the Ocean Prediction Center's Extratropical Storm Surge Model. Image credit: NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab.

Climate change likely to worsen erosion along the Alaska coast
Arctic sea ice was at its 2nd lowest extent on record during October 2011, according to the National Snow and Ice data Center. Much of the missing ice this fall is along the Chukchi Sea coast of Northwest Alaska, where today's massive storm is hitting. When sea ice disappears, coastlines become more susceptible to battering waves. This is particularly common during the fall season, not only because sea ice extent is usually at its minimum, but fall is when storms tend to be stronger with higher storm surges. Recent coastal destruction has already forced residents of the Alaskan town of Shishmaref to vote to abandon their village. More than half the residents of the nearby village of Kivalina (population 400) were forced to evacuate in September 2007, when 25 - 40 mph winds drove a four foot storm surge into the town. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed a $16 million sea wall and shore fortifications in 2009 to protect the town, and Kivalina is trusting these protections during today's storm; no evacuations occurred. As of 11 am EST today, Kivalina has seen top sustained winds of 51 mph, gusting to 71 mph.


Figure 5. Kivalina, Alaska in 2005. Note how the homes on the right side of the image are perched precariously close to the ocean, due to erosion that has eaten away the shore. Image credit: Millie Hawley.

As sea ice continues to decrease in coming years, leaving more ocean surface exposed to air, more moisture and heat will be available to power storms. As I discussed in detail in my post, The future of intense winters storms, multiple studies have documented a significant increase in the number of intense extratropical cyclones with central pressures below 970 or 980 mb over the North Pacific and Arctic in recent decades. Computer climate models predict predict a future with fewer total winter storms, but a greater number of intense storms; up to twelve additional intense Northern Hemisphere cold-season extratropical storms per year are expected by the end of the century if we continue to follow our current path of emissions of greenhouse gases. These stronger storms will bringer higher winds and higher storm surges to coastal areas of Alaska and the Arctic over the remainder of the 21st century, resulting in increased erosion and flooding of low-lying areas. Contributing to the erosion will be sea level rise. Kivalina, which lies on a narrow barrier island in the Chukchi Sea, has been losing up to 8 feet of shore each year due to erosion, and the long-term survival of the island is in serious doubt. Plans have been drawn up by the Army Corps of Engineers to relocate the city to the mainland, but finding funding for the $100 - $400 million dollar move has been problematic. The city of Kivalina and a federally recognized tribe, the Alaska Native Village of Kivalina, sued Exxon Mobil Corporation, eight other oil companies, 14 power companies, and one coal company in a lawsuit filed in federal court on February 26, 2008, claiming that the large amounts of greenhouse gases these companies are responsible for contribute to global warming that threatens the community's existence. The lawsuit estimates the cost of relocation at $400 million.


Figure 6. The Kivalina sea wall as seen in 2007. Image credit: City of Kivalina.


Figure 7. The projected change in intense wintertime extratropical storms with central pressures < 970 mb for the Northern Hemisphere under various emission scenarios. Storms counted occur poleward of 30°N during the 120-day season beginning November 15. A future with relatively low emissions of greenhouse gases (B1 scenario, blue line) is expected to result in an additional four intense extratropical storms per year, while up to twelve additional intense storms per year can be expected in a future with high emissions (red and black lines). Humanity is currently on a high emissions track. Figure was adapted from Lambert and Fyfe (2006), and was taken from Weather and Climate Extremes in a Changing Climate, a 2009 report from the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP).

Tropical Storm Sean
Tropical Storm Sean became fully tropical yesterday as it stayed stationary 400 miles southwest of Bermuda. Infrared satellite loops reveal that Sean increased in organization this morning, with a cloud-free center now getting walled off from the dry air to Sean's west. The storm has a respectable amount of heavy thunderstorm activity near its center that is relatively shallow, and the tops of its thunderstorms extend up only to about the 300 mb level. Normally, a tropical storm extends up to about 200 mb. The shallow nature of Sean's thunderstorms mean that the storm is less vulnerable to wind shear than normal, since the storm is not feeling the strongest winds aloft. Bermuda radar shows one strong rain band from Sean has affected the island, with the bulk of Sean's heavy thunderstorms well to the island's southwest. Sustained winds at the Bermuda airport have been under 30 mph this morning, and Bermuda picked up just 0.08" of rain yesterday. Sustained winds at buoy 41048, about 300 miles west of Bermuda were 31 mph at 6:50 am EST. Strong upper-level winds out of the west are creating about 20 knots of wind shear over Sean, which is low enough to allow some slow development. Ocean temperatures are near 26.5°C (80°F), which is right at the boundary of being warm enough to support tropical storm formation.

Forecast for Sean
Sean will drift slowly west today, then turn north on Thursday. The latest SHIPS model forecast predicts wind shear will remain about where it is now through Friday morning, which should allow Sean to slowly intensify to a 60 mph storm. The computer models show little development of Sean, with none of our reliable models predicting it will become a hurricane. Bermuda is the only land area that need concern itself with Sean, as a trough of low pressure is expected to absorb the storm on Thursday night and lift it quickly to the north and then northeast. The center of Sean could pass close enough to Bermuda to bring the island heavy rain squalls and sustained winds of 40 - 45 mph on Thursday and Friday. NHC is giving a 31% chance that Bermuda will receive tropical storm-force winds of 39 mph. High wind shear should destroy Sean on Friday.


Figure 8. MODIS image of the hybrid low named "Rolf" in the Mediterranean Sea at 11:10 UTC November 9, 2011. Image credit: NASA.

Powerful "Medicane" hits France
A hybrid low pressure system pounded Southeast France yesterday, bringing heavy rains, hurricane-force winds gusts, and significant coastal flooding. The storm began over the weekend as an extratropical storm named "Rolf", but then stalled out over the relatively warm waters of the Mediterranean, acquiring tropical characteristics. Heavy thunderstorms similar in intensity to what one would get in a tropical storm built up, and Rolf developed sustained winds above tropical storm force. These sort of hybrid extratropical/tropical storms that form over waters colder than 22°C are sometimes called "Medicanes", and can cause substantial damage. Rolf brought heavy rains in excess of 400 mm (15.7") over the past 4 days to the department of Var, north of Toulon. A wind gust of 95 mph was recorded at 21 UTC November 8 at Porquerolles Island, south of the city of Toulon. French radar shows heavy rains from Rolf are continuing to affect Southeast France and the island of Corsica. Water temperatures off the south coast of France are near 17°C (63°F), far below the 26°C threshold usually needed to sustain a tropical storm.

Resources
Youtube video of high surf in Cannes along the south coast of France
Local news video showing coastal flooding and damage

Jeff Masters

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308. kellnerp
3:12 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Kivalina in perspective a sand bar, not really an island. The very nature of a sand bar is to shift and move. And looking at a zoomed out view, flow from the river delta is likely responsible for the erosion on the landward side of the island.

The key word from the Army video is that they used to be nomadic 100 years ago. It is hard to believe that the airstrip, oil tanks, water tanks and other features of mainland communities were paid for by fishing. Trying to sustain a lifestyle/housing similar to what might be built in Minnesota just doesn't make sense there. Consider what it costs to fill the water tanks and oil tanks yearly in order to survive being cutoff from resupply for 3-4 months for 80 houses. My guess is that the government is paying for all this too.

This isn't so much a climate change issue as a government policy issue. The 12 million cost of the revetments and seawall comes to about $150,000 per household to maintain a non-nomadic lifestyle for a nomadic tribe.
Member Since: September 1, 2003 Posts: 0 Comments: 172
307. Dragod66
3:06 PM GMT on November 10, 2011


Flanders Field Today
Member Since: August 24, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 604
306. Dragod66
3:04 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting BahaHurican:
Say, do you guys do the poppies too? For some reason it's just hitting me that they are a Commonwealth tradition, not just a Caribbean one....


Yes we do poppies... Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae from Ontario started the tradition when he wrote the poem In Flanders Fields. The poem states "In Flanders fields the poppies blow, Between the crosses, row on row." The reason why the Poppy became a such respected symbol for Remembrance day is because in Flanders Field(in France) the poppies grew naturally even though there was so much turmoil and death in the field.
Member Since: August 24, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 604
305. sar2401
2:52 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Good morning, everyone.

I may be the only person here who thinks Sean won't make it to hurricane status. The central pressure is rising, and it's making a turn north a little faster than forecast. If it does make it to hurricane status, it won't be one for long. Which brings me to a question: what was the shortest-lived hurricane on record? I'm sure someone here knows.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13464
304. sar2401
2:49 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
AussieStorm, sorry about the Paterno comments, but it's a bigger story here in the US than you probably realize. It's not like Sean is a storm which is a threat to any land areas, so I didn't feel like I was clogging up the blog. OTOH, it is off-topic, so I'll grant you that.

Very nice pics of the thunderstorm down there. I'm glad my boat wasn't anchored offshore when that one lightning bolt hit. :)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13464
303. Neapolitan
2:12 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Nome saw a 10-foot surge from yesterday's superstorm in Alaska. That likely caused some nasty erosion. Yikes...

Nome
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13473
302. RukusBoondocks
2:07 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Sorry but this is a weather blog and we do have a STS possible Hurricane in the ATL.


Its moving AWAY from the U.S. so WHO CARES!!!!!!!
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301. KoritheMan
1:23 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Gotta go to work now. See you guys later.
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300. seflagamma
1:19 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Morning Korith!
Member Since: August 29, 2005 Posts: 298 Comments: 40885
299. KoritheMan
1:18 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Morning, Gams.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 558 Comments: 20029
298. seflagamma
1:17 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Good morning everyone,

We went back to Standard time last Sunday morning at 2am...

I wish we would just stay on standard time all year round and stop this fliping back and forth twice a year.

I see Sean is still a TS this morning.

Enjoy your day.
Member Since: August 29, 2005 Posts: 298 Comments: 40885
297. KoritheMan
1:13 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting AussieStorm:

you guys gone back to normal time now? when did that happen, last weekend?


The other day. Don't remember when exactly.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 558 Comments: 20029
296. AussieStorm
1:13 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting KoritheMan:


Now it is. During DST though, it's not. Either way, it's quite a ways off from midnight as originally suggested.

you guys gone back to normal time now? when did that happen, last weekend?
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
295. KoritheMan
1:05 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting AussieStorm:

or is it 7am?


Now it is. During DST though, it's not. Either way, it's quite a ways off from midnight as originally suggested.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 558 Comments: 20029
294. AussieStorm
1:05 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting KoritheMan:


I thought 1200 UTC was 8 AM?

or is it 7am?
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
293. KoritheMan
1:03 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
ASCAT caught Sean at midnight, If I am reading the time correctly. It has a beautiful presentation in this pass, so well defined. Ignore the wind barbs, as ASCAT is bad for systems that are strong.



I thought 1200 UTC was 8 AM?
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 558 Comments: 20029
292. TropicalAnalystwx13
12:51 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31575
291. AussieStorm
12:45 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
ASCAT caught Sean at midnight, If I am reading the time correctly. It has a beautiful presentation in this pass, so well defined. Ignore the wind barbs, as ASCAT is bad for systems that are strong.


ASCAT finally got a bulls-eye. Very nice.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
290. TropicalAnalystwx13
12:39 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
ASCAT caught Sean at midnight, If I am reading the time correctly. It has a beautiful presentation in this pass, so well defined. Ignore the wind barbs, as ASCAT is bad for systems that are strong.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31575
289. AussieStorm
12:37 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting Neapolitan:

lightning

That's a pretty amazing shot. If I have the scale correct, that bolt's no more than a few hundred yards off shore. Very nice.


It sure is an Awesome shot. Pity it wasn't me that took it. It was an awesome storm to boot.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
288. AussieStorm
12:36 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting deadbeatdad:
Hey Aussie, get a life!!

Excuse me??????????
What does, what is being talked about here have to do with the weather. Nothing Zero Zip.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
287. Neapolitan
12:34 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting AussieStorm:
Some images from Tuesdays Thunderstorm as it past over Sydney and out to sea.

lightning

That's a pretty amazing shot. If I have the scale correct, that bolt's no more than a few hundred yards off shore. Very nice.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13473
285. TropicalAnalystwx13
12:29 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Deep Convection? Well...that's a first...at least, for Sean.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31575
284. Neapolitan
12:28 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
TS (Hurricane?) Sean:

Sean
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13473
283. AussieStorm
12:27 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
islander101010
MahFL
RukusBoondock
sar2401
AllyBama
tramp96
capeflorida

I have reported these comments as they do not belong on a weather blog. If you want to discuss this, take it to a private blog or WUmail. Sorry but this is a weather blog and we do have a STS possible Hurricane in the ATL.

Some images from Tuesdays Thunderstorm as it past over Sydney and out to sea.















Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
282. interstatelover7165
12:14 PM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting BahaHurican:


Starting to get some red in there....




And just barely visible....
Morning Sean.
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280. BahaHurican
11:36 AM GMT on November 10, 2011


Starting to get some red in there....




And just barely visible....
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 21643
277. BahaHurican
11:24 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting bluenosedave:


Yep, it's looking like a wet Friday, which is Remembrance Day. 20 hours of rain is what Peter Coad is predicting.
Say, do you guys do the poppies too? For some reason it's just hitting me that they are a Commonwealth tradition, not just a Caribbean one....
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 21643
276. islander101010
11:22 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
nice day
Member Since: September 11, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 4370
272. RTLSNK
10:26 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
Found this on Yahoo News this morning. The Associated Press in Anchorage was reporting on the Blizzard that hit Alaska.

"The highest wind gusts recorded, 89 mph, were at Wales at the western tip of the Seward Peninsula, which forms the US side of the Bering Strait, said Bob Fisher, lead forecaster for the Weather Service in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Meteorologist Jeff Osiensky with the National Weather Service said that this is a storm of Epic Proportions."

Hurricane force winds with Snow, not what this southerner would call a good time. :)

I think I will go have a nice cup of hot coffee and just be happy with the 58.8*F and 98% humidity here in Macon, Georgia this morning.

Check back in later, have a great day.
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271. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
7:03 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
India Meteorological Department
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #9
DEPRESSION ARB03-2011
8:30 AM IST November 10 2011
=================================

At 3:00 AM UTC, Depression ARB03-2011 over west central Arabian Sea moved northward and lays over west central Arabian Sea near 16.0N 58.5E, or about 1800 km west northwest of Mangalore (India), 600 km northeast of Socotra Island (Yemen), and 500 km east southeast of Salalah (Oman). The system is likely to move north northwest then southwestward and gradually weaken due to cooler sea surface temperatures and land interaction.

Satellite imagery indicates vortex over west central Arabian Sea near 16.1N 58.6E. Dvorak intensity is T1.5. Associated broken low/medium clouds with embedded intense to very intense convection seen over west Arabian Sea between 17.0N to 20.0N and 58.0E to 61.0E. Moderate to intense convection over rest north Arabian Sea north of 20.0 N and west of 63.0E and adjoining Oman. Minimum cloud top temperature is -78C. The convection is sheared to north northeastwards under the influence of the trough in westerlies in middle and upper tropospheric levels.

3 minute sustained winds near the center is 25 knots with gusts of 35 knots and a central pressure of 1002 hPa. The state of the sea is rough to very rough around the center. Salalah reported sea level pressure of 1010 hPa.
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268. SunriseSteeda
6:11 AM GMT on November 10, 2011

NHC thinks Sean will be a hurricane by 7pm tonight (Thursday).
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267. Tazmanian
6:05 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
AKZ210-101800-
NORTHERN AND INTERIOR SEWARD PENINSULA-
INCLUDING...BUCKLAND...DEERING...CANDLE...COUNCIL ...HAYCOCK...
PILGRIM SPRINGS...SERPENTINE HOT SPRINGS...TAYLOR
630 PM AKST WED NOV 9 2011

...DEERING AIRPORT ROAD IS FLOODED...

WATER FROM THE RIVER AT DEERING IS BEING PUSHED OVER THE ROAD TO
THE AIRPORT AT DEERING...DRIVEN BY STRONG SOUTHERLY WINDS DURING
THE DAY WEDNESDAY. WINDS HAVE DIMINISHED THIS EVENING AND THE WATER
OVER THE ROAD WILL SLOWLY SUBSIDE THROUGH THE NIGHT.
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 114783
266. Tazmanian
6:04 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
WWAK82 PAFG 100330
SPSWCZ

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FAIRBANKS AK
630 PM AKST WED NOV 9 2011

AKZ207>209-211>214-217-101800-
CHUKCHI SEA COAST-LOWER KOBUK AND NOATAK VALLEYS-
BALDWIN PENINSULA AND SELAWIK VALLEY-
SOUTHERN SEWARD PENINSULA COAST-
EASTERN NORTON SOUND AND NULATO HILLS-
ST LAWRENCE ISLAND AND BERING STRAIT COAST-YUKON DELTA-
UPPER KOBUK AND NOATAK VALLEYS-
INCLUDING...POINT HOPE...SHISHMAREF...KIVALINA...ESPENBERG...
NOATAK...KIANA...RED DOG MINE...KOTZEBUE...SELAWIK...NOORVIK...
NOME...WHITE MOUNTAIN...GOLOVIN...UNALAKLEET...STEBBINS...
ST MICHAEL...ELIM...KOYUK...SHAKTOOLIK...GAMBELL...SA VOONGA...
BREVIG MISSION...TELLER...WALES...DIOMEDE...MOUNTAIN VILLAGE...
EMMONAK...ALAKANUK...KOTLIK...PILOT STATION...ST MARYS...
SCAMMON BAY...MARSHALL...NUNAM IQUA...PITKAS POINT...AMBLER...
SHUNGNAK...KOBUK
630 PM AKST WED NOV 9 2011

...STRONG STORM CONTINUES TO BUFFET WESTERN ALASKA...

THE STRONG STORM WHICH HAS BEEN BATTERING WESTERN ALASKA MOVED
NORTH OF THE CHUKOTSK PENINSULA LATE WEDNESDAY AND IS ONLY SLOWLY
WEAKENING. THE STORM IS EXPECTED TO CURVE NORTHWEST REACHING
WRANGELL ISLAND LATER WEDNESDAY MORNING.

THE HARD HITTING WEATHER WITH THIS STORM IS FAR FROM OVER AS SEA
LEVELS RISE EARLY WEDNESDAY EVENING OVER NORTON SOUND...THE BERING
STRAIT...AND THE SOUTHERN CHUKCHI SEA COAST FROM POINT HOPE
SOUTH. WATER LEVELS WILL REMAIN HIGH THROUGH MUCH OF THURSDAY.

THE STRONG SOUTHEAST WINDS OF TUESDAY NIGHT AND WEDNESDAY HAVE
DIMINISHED TO SOUTHWEST WINDS WITH SPEEDS OF 30 TO 50 MPH...BUT
THIS DIRECTION FAVORS MUCH MORE MOVEMENT OF SEA WATER INTO THE
COASTAL COMMUNITIES RAISING THE WATER LEVEL SIGNIFICANTLY ABOVE
THE TIDES.

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE MAXIMUM WIND GUSTS SO FAR:

BUCKLAND........56 MPH AT 316AM WED
CAPE LISBURNE...81 MPH AT 700AM WED
CAPE ROMANZOF...60 MPH AT 300AM WED
DEERING.........61 MPH AT 319AM WED
EMMONAK.........62 MPH AT 1100PM TUE
GAMBELL.........74 MPH AT 600PM TUE
GOLOVIN.........64 MPH AT 1200AM WED
KIANA...........54 MPH AT 715AM WED
KIVALINA........71 MPH AT 323AM WED
KOTZEBUE........74 MPH AT 600AM WED
KOYUK...........41 MPH AT 800AM WED
MARSHALL........64 MPH AT 1100PM TUE
NOATAK..........62 MPH AT 1036AM WED
NOME............61 MPH AT 900PM TUE
NOORVIK.........67 MPH AT 423AM WED
POINT HOPE......78 MPH AT 500AM WED
RED DOG MINE....48 MPH AT 935AM WED
SAINT MARYS.....61 MPH AT 900PM TUE
ST MICHAEL......68 MPH AT 1200AM WED
SAVOONGA........76 MPH AT 700PM TUE
SCAMMON BAY.....72 MPH AT 800PM TUE
SHAKTOOLIK......64 MPH AT 115AM WED
SHISHMAREF......57 MPH AT 1216AM WED
SHUNGNAK........69 MPH AT 900AM WED
TELLER..........71 MPH AT 600AM WED
TIN CITY........85 MPH AT 1200AM WED
UNALAKLEET......66 MPH AT 1200AM WED
WALES...........89 MPH AT 142AM WED
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 114783
265. j2008
4:51 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
And the eye is covered up compleately........thinking this will be the start to a new eyewall and eye, 70MPH at next update likely. JMO Night eveyone, stay safe!
Member Since: December 19, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 224
264. j2008
4:42 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
Agreed j2008. I suspect the pressure is below 990 mb as well. I'll find out come morning.

We sure will, like every other storm this season, Sean probably will pull a few more surprises.
Member Since: December 19, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 224
263. BaltimoreBrian
4:40 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
Agreed j2008. I suspect the pressure is below 990 mb as well. I'll find out come morning.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8558
262. j2008
4:37 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
After an evening pause Sean's core is looking better. Hurricane by 4 a.m.?


Possibly, Personally I think Sean may have been a hurricane earlyer but eather way that is/was the most impressive eye I have ever seen on a TS.
Member Since: December 19, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 224
261. BaltimoreBrian
4:31 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
After an evening pause Sean's core is looking better. Hurricane by 4 a.m.?




Also, good night everyone!
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8558
259. Barefootontherocks
3:53 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
Quoting AllyBama:
This is not about weather but Joe Paterno has been fired..


Is he the guy who coached Penn State for, like, 50 years?

Meanwhile, in Nome, the barometric pressure continues to drop... just in case any of you are interested in life on the tundra.
Member Since: April 29, 2006 Posts: 151 Comments: 18415
258. GeoffreyWPB
3:43 AM GMT on November 10, 2011
Happy Birthday Carl Sagan...

Member Since: September 10, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 11012

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.