Fourteen U.S. billion-dollar weather disasters in 2011: a new record

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 12:12 PM GMT on November 04, 2011

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It's time to add another billion-dollar weather disaster to the growing 2011 total of these costly disasters: the extraordinary early-season Northeast U.S. snowstorm of October 29, which dumped up to 32 inches of snow, brought winds gusts of 70 mph to the coast, and killed at least 22 people. Not since the infamous snow hurricane of 1804 have such prodigious amounts of October snow been recorded in New England and, to a lesser extent, in the mid-Atlantic states. Trees that had not yet lost their leaves suffered tremendous damage from the wet, heavy snow. Snapped branches and falling trees brought down numerous power lines, leaving at least 3 million people without electricity. The damage estimate in Connecticut alone is $3 billion, far more than the damage Hurricane Irene did to the state. Hundreds of thousands still remain without power a week after the storm, with full electricity not expected to be restored until Monday.


Figure 1. Wet, heavy snow from the October 29, 2011 snowstorm weighing down trees still sporting their fall leaves in Winchester, VA. Image credit: wunderphotographer MaddScientist98.

The October 29 snow storm brings the 2011 tally of U.S. billion-dollar weather disasters to fourteen, thoroughly smashing the previous record of nine such disasters, set in 2008. Between 1980 - 2010, the U.S. averaged 3.5 of these weather disasters per year. Through August, the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) estimated that ten weather disasters costing at least $1 billion had hit the U.S., at total cost of up to $45 billion. However, the October 29 snow storm brings us up to eleven billion-dollar disasters, and a new disaster analysis done by global reinsurance company AON Benfield adds three more. Flood damage from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee in the Northeast on September 8 is now estimated at more than $1 billion, and two outbreaks of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes--one in April and one in June--now have damage estimates exceeding $1 billion. A remarkable seven severe thunderstorm/tornado outbreaks did more than $1 billion each in damage in 2011, and an eighth outbreak July 10 - 14 came close, with damages of $900 million. In total, the fourteen billion-dollar disasters killed 675 people. Tornadoes, hurricanes, and floods in these fourteen disasters killed over 600 people, putting 2011 into fourth place since 1940 for most deaths by severe storms. Only 2005, with over 1,000 deaths caused by Katrina, 1969, with over 700 hurricane and flood-related deaths, and 1972, with 676 hurricane and flood-related deaths, were deadlier years for storms, according to NOAA. The fourteen billion-dollar weather disasters of 2011 caused $53 billion in damage, putting 2011 in fifth place for most damages from billion-dollar weather disasters. The top damage years, according to NCDC in adjusted 2011 dollars, were 2005 (the year of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma), 2008 (Hurricane Ike), 1988 (Midwest drought), and 1980 (Midwest drought). With nearly two months remaining in 2011, the potential exists for more billion-dollar weather disasters this year. Our first opportunity comes Tuesday, when the NOAA Storm Prediction Center is forecasting the possibility of a severe weather outbreak centered over Arkansas and Missouri.


Video 1. Remarkable video of the tornado that hit Tuscaloosa, Alabama during the April 25 - 30, 2011 Super Outbreak. This tornado outbreak was the most expensive U.S. weather-related disaster of 2011, with damages estimated at $9 billion. Fast forward to minute four to see the worst of the storm.

Here are AON Benfield's estimates of the damages and NCDC's estimates of the death tolls from 2011's fourteen billion-dollar weather disasters (a clickable version of this table with information on each disaster is available on our severe weather resource page):



Have a great weekend, everyone, and I'll be back with a new post on Monday.

Angela Fritz is subbing for Ricky Rood this week, and has written an interesting post on the latest climate change controversy, the release of the new Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature (BEST) study by skeptic Dr. Richard Muller.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Good afternoon all from a windy SE North Carolina.


It was windy early this morning here. But we are close to the center of the high now. Winds only about 6-8 mph from the east. Pressure 30.44"

Cool and sunny, low 50s.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Good afternoon all from a windy SE North Carolina.
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Quoting Skyepony:
I see windfarm NW of Billings. It's showing up on radar tonight with the wind. The other ground clutter looks like mountains in wind? Maybe that's causing the constant plume, friction of mountains in high winds. No real smoke plumes on radar.


Fox seems to be eavesdropping.

Link
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Well lastly before I become immersed completely in grilling and football, the BP's in the sw Caribbean seem to support a low forming off Belize. IMO with satellite backup.
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Quoting bappit:
Anita is an intense looking storm.

Just saw this news story about air conditioning technology. Salt-driven air conditioner. They use a dessicant to remove water from the air.


And, they only need $1.3 million to build a commercial prototype.

Sounds like a good candidate for a government-backed loan...
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Almost wintry today. Barely 50 despite the sun. Breath shows up well outside.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Nice little swirl east of Belize. Was going to mention yesterday but didn't, seems to be holding together.My bet for this weeks surprise. Only thing I know for sure,is we should see some good football tonight. Wish I had a dog in the fight.Have a nice weekend all.
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Quoting WoodyFL:


Not this year. My mother-in-law told us she was staying home.

*grin*
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
A Thanksgiving Terror?



Not this year. My mother-in-law told us she was staying home.
Member Since: April 24, 2011 Posts: 1 Comments: 601
We've got a swirl.

Member Since: April 24, 2011 Posts: 1 Comments: 601
Cybrteddy I don't think much of what the GFS puts out there at 384 hours is likely. But it's fun to look.

If that storm north of the Bahamas gets a name, which I doubt, then that system in the eastern Caribbean would be the T storm.

Well, around 288/312 hours there is a system near Nicaragua but it doesn't look impressive.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
A Thanksgiving Terror?



Unlikely, but formation is VERY similar to Tomas. Will probably be dropped or significantly weaker at the 18z.
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A Thanksgiving Terror?

Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
After 96 hours the low stops through 114 hours and then 'jumps' to New Jersey by 120 hours. The setup brings heavy rain to NYC. If it verifies it will push NYC up to its second wettest year on record.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting RukusBoondocks:
All we can do now is just reminisce about past hurricane seasons..
Yea,I love this time of year. Depression sets in in the weather crowd and they turn to Climatology full time. And they are SO SERIOUS.
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Lurking low off in the Atlantic 24 hours from now.

Images are from the GFS Nov 5 12Z run. Images are clickable and expandable.




And it came closer (48 hours)



And closer (72 hours)



And closer! (96 hours)

Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting yqt1001:
Here's a dry slot in Irene.



Anyone who's been tracking long enough should be easily able to see which one is her real eye. And yet, despite the very well defined eye, she was only a 90mph category 1 hurricane at the time of that picture.


Satellite imagery isn't really useful when looking for the inner core of a cyclone. Use of microwave can do wonders for you.
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Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
Earthquakes increase in energy by 30 fold for each full point of magnitude.

So an increase of 0.8 in magnitude from 4.7 to 5.5 is 15.2 times.


Personally I don't doubt that fracking could cause earthquakes in the 2s or 3s. Even swarms of them. Triggering a major earthquake? I would say no. Although I think fracking in or near major fault zones should be restricted or banned.


If it ever did, the insurance payout would be astronomical. Particularly if it caused widespread damage.

anyway, joyous 5th November to you all...
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Quoting DallasGumby:


I have no earthly idea whether the fracing has any correlation with the quakes but, C'mon - "could have possibly been" does not equate to likely.

And, FYI, there is a huge difference in magnitude between a 4.7 and a 5.5. I may be way off on the math here, but I think a 5.5 is something like 80 times greater magnitude than a 4.7.


Exact thought I had when I read Neo's post.

252. Neapolitan

A few more "snippets" from Holland's report, the one you cited from
http://thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Fracking-quake.pdf

(Add: Quoting comment 252: First, I think it's important to note that the report I referenced wasn't authored by some wild-eyed environmentalist, but by a geologist working with Cimarex Energy Co., the operator of the wells in question.
Unless I'm missing something, seems clear from the first page this report was prepared for the Oklahoma Geological Survey. Austin Holland is also cited as contact for the prelim OGS report linked below.)

It begins...
Oklahoma Geological Survey
Open file report disclaimer

This open-file report is intended to make the results of research available at the earliest possible date and not intended to represent the final or formal publication. The report is an unedited copy prepared by the author.


other quotes...
The earthquakes range in magnitude from 1.0 to 2.8... the uncertainties in the data make it impossible to say with a high degree of certainty whether or not these earthquakes were triggered by natural means or by the nearby hydraulic fracturing operation.

Whether or not the earthquakes in the Eola field were triggered by hydraulic fracturing these were small earthquakes with only one local resident having reported feeling them.

Is there a clear correlation between injection and seismicity? Yes.
There is a clear correlation between the time of hydraulic fracturing and the observed seismicity in the Eola field. However, subsequent hydraulic fracturing stages at Picket Unit B well 4-18 did not appear to have any earthquakes associated with them. Subsequent frac stages were all shallower than the first, and otherwise there were no major differences in the fracking operations.


Neo, I have no agenda regarding whether or not fracking operations cause earthquakes. It makes sense that they could cause small ones. Meanwhile, just some observations on the current Oklahoma event - the 4.7 at 2:12 am CDT.

Seven aftershocks so far ranging 2.8 to 3.6. The 3.6 being the latest reported at 9:36 am CDT.

Many faults run through Oklahoma.

BIG difference between 1.0-2.8, the magnitudes cited in Holland's report, and the 4.7 in the wee hours today.

Where this quake was felt
The "Responses" tab on that page shows multiple reports that this quake was felt all the way from St Louis, MO to N TX. And even in KS, Toto. (I discounted the reports out of SC and WI.)

One hundred forty-nine km from the epicenter, I was awake watching a movie at 2:12 am CDT. The initial quake rocked my chair. Not a rocking chair, btw. I have felt many quakes of varying magnitude in AK and CA, and there was not doubt in my mind I'd felt an earthquake.

I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say I think this was a real earthquake, as opposed to man-made. Hopefully someone will study this event and give us a real conclusion.

Add:
Preliminary report, Oklahoma Geological Survey
This earthquake occurred very close to where a magnitude 4.3 earthquake occurred on February 27, 2010. From the location of the earthquake and the focal mechanism it is most likely that this earthquake occurred on the Wilzetta fault also known as the Seminole uplift.
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Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
Earthquakes increase in energy by 30 fold for each full point of magnitude.

So an increase of 0.8 in magnitude from 4.7 to 5.5 is 15.2 times.


Personally I don't doubt that fracking could cause earthquakes in the 2s or 3s. Even swarms of them. Triggering a major earthquake? I would say no. Although I think fracking in or near major fault zones should be restricted or banned.

It doesn't seem likely that such a large tremor could be triggered by fracking. (But then again, it wasn't all that long ago that we were assured that fracking couldn't cause even small ones.) It'll be interesting to see whether pent up natural and anthropogenic stresses could be unleashed by fracking.
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Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
The 935 mb pressure was taken in the eye of the 1926 hurricane so it seems reasonable to me. The hurricane was moving pretty quickly at around 18 mph. Part of why it was so deadly was that it struck at dawn and was not expected to reach the FL coast until afternoon.

On the right side of the eyewall I bet there were sustained winds in the 140-150 mph range.

One of the most amazing facts I read on the storm was that they had an average wind speed of over 76 mph for 24 consecutive hours...Must have been horrible.
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I suspect that even with inflation adjustments, and accounting for population growth and increased wealth a hurricane like the 1926 Miami Hurricane or the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane could inflict even more damage than 157 billion. All of the SE Florida coast is so packed with people!
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting HuracanTaino:
Since "this outspace rocks" are the biggest threat to "humankind besides "selfaniquilation" , or a Nuclear war or nuclear accident, is a "most" that all the scientific community of the world join hands in an effort to find ways to "safe the planet" from a near future collition with one of this object. It should be our common goal to safe the planet. Any time, any day one of this "asteroids" are going to aim "Earth" and if the technology, resourses, and strategies aren't there, our very existense is at stake. This common goal, should unite the planet and perhaps, helps to bring peace among the nations.
history channel had a great series on cosmic hits on earth and went into detail of what could happen IF one hits us today..was amazed at the amount of destruction one could cause, maybe even life changing here on earth..geez
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The 935 mb pressure was taken in the eye of the 1926 hurricane so it seems reasonable to me. The hurricane was moving pretty quickly at around 18 mph. Part of why it was so deadly was that it struck at dawn and was not expected to reach the FL coast until afternoon.

On the right side of the eyewall I bet there were sustained winds in the 140-150 mph range.

Quoting hydrus:
In Florida, winds on the ground were reported around 125 mph (201 km/h) and the pressure measured at 935 mbar (27.61 inHg) — though all such data is suspect. Most of the coastal inhabitants had not evacuated, partly because of short warning (a hurricane warning was issued just a few hours before landfall) and partly because the "young" city's population knew little about the danger a major hurricane posed. A 15-foot (4.6 m) storm surge inundated the area, causing massive property damage and some fatalities. As the eye of the hurricane crossed over Miami Beach and downtown Miami, many people believed the storm had passed. Some tried to leave the barrier islands, only to be swept off the bridges by the rear eyewall. "The lull lasted 35 minutes, and during that time the streets of the city became crowded with people," wrote Richard Gray, the local weather chief. "As a result, many lives were lost during the second phase of the storm."[2]

Inland, Lake Okeechobee experienced a high storm surge that broke a portion of the dikes, flooding the town of Moore Haven and killing many. This was just a prelude to the deadly 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane, which would cause a massive number of fatalities estimated at 2,500 around the lake.

Coastal regions between Mobile and Pensacola, Florida also suffered heavy damage from wind, rain, and storm surge, but this paled beside the news of the destruction in Miami. According to the Red Cross there were 373 fatalities. Other estimates vary, since there were a large number of people listed as "missing". Between 25,000 and 50,000 people were left homeless, mostly in the Miami area.

Costliest U.S. Atlantic hurricanes
Total estimated property damage, adjusted for wealth normalization[3] Rank Hurricane Season Cost (2005 USD)
1 "Miami" 1926 $157 billion
2 "Galveston" 1900 $99.4 billion
3 Katrina 2005 $81.0 billion
4 "Galveston" 1915 $68.0 billion
5 Andrew 1992 $55.8 billion
6 "New England" 1938 $39.2 billion
7 "Cuba–Florida" 1944 $38.7 billion
8 "Okeechobee" 1928 $33.6 billion
9 Donna 1960 $26.8 billion
10 Camille 1969 $21.2 billion
Main article: List of costliest Atlantic hurricanes

The damage from the storm was immense; few buildings in Miami or Miami Beach were left intact. The toll for the storm was $100 million ($1.24 billion 2011 USD). The Great Miami Hurricane of 1926 was a hurricane of epic proportions..We all know it will happen again someday..I truly wish agaist it occurring tho.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Earthquakes increase in energy by 30 fold for each full point of magnitude.

So an increase of 0.8 in magnitude from 4.7 to 5.5 is 15.2 times.


Personally I don't doubt that fracking could cause earthquakes in the 2s or 3s. Even swarms of them. Triggering a major earthquake? I would say no. Although I think fracking in or near major fault zones should be restricted or banned.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting RukusBoondocks:
All we can do now is just reminisce about past hurricane seasons..
YEAH, I had heard of a past storm entering Tampa bay and moving up the bay, pushing all the water in front of it, causing massive flooding. dont know the year but its one of our present day nightmares that we now wish would never happen again
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Quoting Stormchaser2007:
.

Best comment so far all day.
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Quoting RukusBoondocks:
All we can do now is just reminisce about past hurricane seasons..
In Florida, winds on the ground were reported around 125 mph (201 km/h) and the pressure measured at 935 mbar (27.61 inHg) — though all such data is suspect. Most of the coastal inhabitants had not evacuated, partly because of short warning (a hurricane warning was issued just a few hours before landfall) and partly because the "young" city's population knew little about the danger a major hurricane posed. A 15-foot (4.6 m) storm surge inundated the area, causing massive property damage and some fatalities. As the eye of the hurricane crossed over Miami Beach and downtown Miami, many people believed the storm had passed. Some tried to leave the barrier islands, only to be swept off the bridges by the rear eyewall. "The lull lasted 35 minutes, and during that time the streets of the city became crowded with people," wrote Richard Gray, the local weather chief. "As a result, many lives were lost during the second phase of the storm."[2]

Inland, Lake Okeechobee experienced a high storm surge that broke a portion of the dikes, flooding the town of Moore Haven and killing many. This was just a prelude to the deadly 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane, which would cause a massive number of fatalities estimated at 2,500 around the lake.

Coastal regions between Mobile and Pensacola, Florida also suffered heavy damage from wind, rain, and storm surge, but this paled beside the news of the destruction in Miami. According to the Red Cross there were 373 fatalities. Other estimates vary, since there were a large number of people listed as "missing". Between 25,000 and 50,000 people were left homeless, mostly in the Miami area.

Costliest U.S. Atlantic hurricanes
Total estimated property damage, adjusted for wealth normalization[3] Rank Hurricane Season Cost (2005 USD)
1 "Miami" 1926 $157 billion
2 "Galveston" 1900 $99.4 billion
3 Katrina 2005 $81.0 billion
4 "Galveston" 1915 $68.0 billion
5 Andrew 1992 $55.8 billion
6 "New England" 1938 $39.2 billion
7 "Cuba–Florida" 1944 $38.7 billion
8 "Okeechobee" 1928 $33.6 billion
9 Donna 1960 $26.8 billion
10 Camille 1969 $21.2 billion
Main article: List of costliest Atlantic hurricanes

The damage from the storm was immense; few buildings in Miami or Miami Beach were left intact. The toll for the storm was $100 million ($1.24 billion 2011 USD). The Great Miami Hurricane of 1926 was a hurricane of epic proportions..We all know it will happen again someday..I truly wish agaist it occurring tho.
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All we can do now is just reminisce about past hurricane seasons..
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Quoting bappit:
Anita is an intense looking storm.

Just saw this news story about air conditioning technology. Salt-driven air conditioner. They use a dessicant to remove water from the air.
Lol..I thought they had that already.
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Quoting DallasGumby:


I have no earthly idea whether the fracing has any correlation with the quakes but, C'mon - "could have possibly been" does not equate to likely.

First, I think it's important to note that the report I referenced wasn't authored by some wild-eyed environmentalist, but by a geologist working with Cimarex Energy Co., the operator of the wells in question. Now, when an oil company says that there's a "possibility" their activities are causing earthquakes, that's as monumental a statement as a tobacco company admitting that there's a "possibility" cigarettes cause cancer.

Anyway, a few more snippets for your perusal:

"Cases of clear anthropogenically-triggered seismicity from fluid injection are well documented with correlations between the number of earthquakes in an area and injection, specifically injection pressures, with earthqaukes occurring very close to the well."

"Clearly since the case considered here involves hydraulic-fracturing where pressure is being used to fracture rock, by design the pressure are sufficient to enourage seismicity."

"Our analysis showed that shortly after hydraulic fracturing began small earthquakes started occurring, and more than 50 were identified."

Quoting DallasGumby:
And, FYI, there is a huge difference in magnitude between a 4.7 and a 5.5. I may be way off on the math here, but I think a 5.5 is something like 80 times greater magnitude than a 4.7.

Of course a 5.5 quake is more powerful than a 4.7. But my statement that a 4.7 tremor (the third most powerful quake in Oklahoma's recorded history, and the most powerful in that state in nearly 60 years) isn't all that far off from one of 5.5 isn't an untrue statement. And the difference is nowhere near the "80 times" you stated; a 5.5 magnitude quake is actually just 6.3 times bigger (and releases 15.9 times more energy) than one of 4.7. (By way of comparison, last March's Japanese quake was 19,952 times bigger than last night's OK quake--and 2.81 million times stronger. Now that's a "huge difference".)
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.
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Anita is an intense looking storm.

Just saw this news story about air conditioning technology. Salt-driven air conditioner. They use a dessicant to remove water from the air.
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Anita with double eye wall structure at landfall..
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Quoting DallasGumby:
I have no earthly idea whether the fracing has any correlation with the quakes but, C'mon - "could have possibly been" does not equate to likely.

I'll go with that. Interesting algebra you are developing there.
Quoting DallasGumby:
"And, FYI, there is a huge difference in magnitude between a 4.7 and a 5.5. I may be way off on the math here, but I think a 5.5 is something like 80 times greater magnitude than a 4.7.

This reminds me of how difficult it is to grasp how large a big number is--or how big a large number is. Once I get past two they all seem many to me. Wikipedia to the rescue.

"The expression Richter magnitude scale refers to a number of ways to assign a single number to quantify the energy contained in an earthquake.

"In all cases, the magnitude is a base-10 logarithmic scale obtained by calculating the logarithm of the amplitude of waves measured by a seismograph. An earthquake that measures 5.0 on the Richter scale has a shaking amplitude 10 times larger and corresponds to an energy release of √1000 ≈ 31.6 times greater than one that measures 4.0."

Then there is also this interesting passage.

"The Richter scale proper was defined in 1935 for particular circumstances and instruments; the instrument used saturated for strong earthquakes. The scale was replaced by the moment magnitude scale (MMS); for earthquakes adequately measured by the Richter scale, numerical values are approximately the same. Although values measured for earthquakes now are actually Mw (MMS), they are frequently reported as Richter values, even for earthquakes of magnitude over 8, where the Richter scale becomes meaningless.

"The Richter and MMS scales measure the energy released by an earthquake; another scale, the Mercalli intensity scale, classifies earthquakes by their effects, from detectable by instruments but not noticeable to catastrophic. The energy and effects are not necessarily strongly correlated; a shallow earthquake in a populated area with soil of certain types can be far more intense than a much more energetic deep earthquake in an isolated area."

Reminds me of the options available for measuring the intensity of tropical storms. The effects are not necessarily commensurate with the barometric pressure or wind speed. Then again, as Irene showed, the wind speed is not necessarily commensurate with barometric pressure. Complicated world.
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Quoting Articuno:


This may have not had a landfall, but it was sure pretty,

Hurricane Isaac (Cat 4) at peak
(and its not the strongest either, but it was a beauty)
Cool sat pic..Anita looked rather vicious in 1977..
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This may have not had a landfall, but it was sure pretty,

Hurricane Isaac (Cat 4) at peak
(and its not the strongest either, but it was a beauty)
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Billion Dollar, Babies
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Quoting Patrap:
Asteroid 2005 YU55 To Narrowly Miss Earth (PHOTOS, VIDEO)





An asteroid a quarter-mile-wide will, astronomically speaking, narrowly miss Earth next week.

And while it is the closest an asteroid this size has come to the home planet since 1976, there's no need to call Bruce Willis ... yet.

"There is no chance that this object will collide with the Earth or moon," Don Yeomans, the manager of NASA's Near Earth Object Program office, told Reuters.

But that doesn't mean the asteroid -- named 2005 YU55 -- won't be a threat to earth in the future.

Lance Benner, a research scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in a video from NASA (available below) that scientists haven't been able to reliably compute the asteroid's path beyond a couple of hundred years from now.

At its closest point, the space rock will be about 201,700 miles (324,600 kilometers) away, which is 0.85 the distance between the moon and the Earth. NASA says that the asteroid will reach this point at 6:28 p.m. EST on Tuesday.

"In effect, it'll be moving straight at us from one direction, and then go whizzing by straight away from us in the other direction," Benner said.

An asteroid this size -- which, according to Scientific American is larger than an aircraft carrier -- would cause widespread damage if it were to hit Earth, however. The Associated Press spoke to Jay Melosh, a professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Purdue University, who said that the asteroid would create a four-mile wide crater 1,700 feet deep. It could cause 70-foot tsunami waves and shake the ground like a magnitude-7 earthquake.

Even though the asteroid will be inside the orbit of the moon, NASA said that the space rock's gravitational pull shouldn't have any "detectable effect" on Earth's tectonic plates or tides.

Yeomans told HuffPost that the flyby will give astronomers a great view of 2005 YU55 and is an opportunity to do research into the asteroid's composition. He said that it's a C-Type asteroid, which means it contains carbon-based minerals which could potentially be used in future space exploration.

"These objects are important for science ... they're potential resources for raw materials in space that we may wish to take advantage of some day," he said.

The New York Times reported last month on proposed fuel stations in space that one study says could put astronauts on an asteroid by 2024.
Since "this outspace rocks" are the biggest threat to "humankind besides "selfaniquilation" , or a Nuclear war or nuclear accident, is a "most" that all the scientific community of the world join hands in an effort to find ways to "safe the planet" from a near future collition with one of this object. It should be our common goal to safe the planet. Any time, any day one of this "asteroids" are going to aim "Earth" and if the technology, resourses, and strategies aren't there, our very existense is at stake. This common goal, should unite the planet and perhaps, helps to bring peace among the nations.
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Here's a dry slot in Irene.



Anyone who's been tracking long enough should be easily able to see which one is her real eye. And yet, despite the very well defined eye, she was only a 90mph category 1 hurricane at the time of that picture.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Of course, one can't help but wonder whether last night's Oklahoma tremors are related to fracking operations like those earlier in the year likely were*, and as last month's quake in Texas may have been, and as last year's quakes in the UK almost definitely were, etc. I reckon we'll find out...

* - From the report's conclusion: "The strong spatial and temporal correlations to the hydraulic-fracturing in Picket Unit B Well 4-18 certainly suggests that the earthquakes observed in the Eola Field could have possibly been triggered by this activity."


I have no earthly idea whether the fracing has any correlation with the quakes but, C'mon - "could have possibly been" does not equate to likely.

And, FYI, there is a huge difference in magnitude between a 4.7 and a 5.5. I may be way off on the math here, but I think a 5.5 is something like 80 times greater magnitude than a 4.7.
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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
Good morning. Bright blue skies here this morning. It was a cool 71F earlier but has warmed up to upper 70's now.
I am just south of Richmond, Virginia this morning. 36 degrees at sunrise, forecast to reach 53 by this afternoon...Been up in this neck of the woods over a month now..Getting a little home sick.
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Quoting hydrus:
Very very true..He must have knew. He retired a few weeks ago . Good morning C.I.
Good morning. Bright blue skies here this morning. It was a cool 71F earlier but has warmed up to upper 70's now.
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Dry slot

A zone of dry (and relatively cloud-free) air which wraps west- or south-westwards into the southern and eastern parts of a synoptic scale or mesoscale low pressure system. A dry slot is seen best on satellite photographs. A dry slot should not be confused with clear slot, which is a storm-scale phenomenon.
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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
Sad to hear but he lived a long, productive life.
Very very true..He must have knew. He retired a few weeks ago . Good morning C.I.
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Quoting AussieStorm:
Remember this.....


$


I hope we don't see one of these this Cyclone season.


Impressive images. If you want to post these and more hurricane and typhoon images,I made a blog to post them.

Link
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Quoting winter123:

Perhaps not perfect in a tradional sense, but the structure of wilma at peak still amazes me.
Another impressive sat pic. Cyclone Monica just before landfall in Northern Australia...
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Remember this.....


$


I hope we don't see one of these this Cyclone season.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15940
weather underground is advertising now parasite control for dogs. might think about picking some up for some friends in latin america one friend there was complaining no number twos but terrible gas for wks we told him to go to the doctor they found 11 different types of parasites in his system. thats what happens to gringos when they eat rotten food low pressure off n.carol coast
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This has been happening here for over a year, what exactly is Dry Slotting? Yesterday my humidity was 10 percent, my low was 35 some areas in South Central Texas got down to 20 degrees officially, humidity at 3 am was 33 percent? I know I am not getting any rain because it is too dry but dry slotting?

DRY SLOTTING ALOFT STILL LOOKS LIKELY...SO WILL
CONTINUE TO UNDERCUT STORM POTENTIAL OVER SOUTH CENTRAL TX...WITH
THE BEST POTENTIAL OVER THE HILL COUNTRY AND EASTERN COUNTIES
MONDAY NIGHT AND EARLY TUESDAY. THUS A MOSTLY DRY FRONT IS
EXPECTED OVER SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS AS THE SECOND UPPER LOW EJECTS
NORTH OF SOUTH CENTRAL TX
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.