Maria brushes Bermuda; 24-hour blitz by Climate Reality Project underway

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:27 PM GMT on September 15, 2011

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Tropical Storm Maria is roaring past Bermuda, bringing winds near tropical storm force. At 11 am local time, winds at the Bermuda airport were sustained at 36 mph, just below the 39 mph threshold of tropical storm strength. Outer spiral bands of Maria have brought a few brief heavy rain squalls to the island, as seen on Bermuda radar. The core of Maria is now at its closest point of approach to the island, about 150 miles (240 km) to the west, and the island may yet see an hour of two of sustained winds of 40 - 45 mph. Maria is headed north-northeast, and will brush Newfoundland, Canada on Friday afternoon. Since Newfoundland will be on the weak (left) side of a rapidly weakening Maria, I'm not expecting much in the way of wind damage from the storm in Canada, though heavy rains may cause isolated minor to moderate flooding. Top sustained winds in St. Johns will probably be in the 25 - 35 mph range Friday afternoon, though a few hours of tropical storm force winds of 40 - 45 mph are possible if Maria ends up tracking farther west than expected.


Figure 1. Radar image of Tropical Storm Maria taken at 10:13 am EDT September 15, 2011. Image credit: Bermuda Weather Service.

Elsewhere in the tropics
Even the busiest of hurricane seasons have lulls, and we're hitting one this week during what is traditionally the busiest week of hurricane season. A westward-moving tropical wave a few hundred miles south of the Cape Verde Islands, off the coast of Africa, has a modest amount of poorly organized heavy thunderstorm activity. This wave is under a moderate 10 - 20 knots of wind shear, is in a moist environment, and is over warm waters, so has the potential for some development, though NHC is currently not mentioning it in their Tropical Weather Outlook. The UKMET and NOGAPS models predict this wave could develop into a tropical depression 5 - 6 days from now. The NOGAPS model continues to predict the Western Caribbean off the coast of Nicaragua could see the development of a tropical depression 6 - 7 days from now, but the other models are showing little support for this scenario.


Figure 2. Heidi Cullen of Climate Central introduces Boulder, Colorado teacher John Zavalney, one of the presenters of the Climate Reality Project's 24-hour live streaming special.

The Climate Reality Project
The Climate Reality Project (climaterealityproject.org) is a little more than halfway through their live, 24-hour streaming video effort that features 24 different presenters for 24 hours, representing every time zone around the globe. The presentations began last night at 7 pm EDT, and will end tonight at 7 pm EDT. It's worth checking out; there have been some interesting presentations and some dull ones. Interspersed with the presentations are panel discussions with some slick Google Earth graphics; last night's discussions were led by Heidi Cullen of Climate Central, who is a rarity--a very personable and well-spoken scientist, and someone you'll be seeing on TV much more in coming years. The Climate Reality Project showed one excellent video tracking the history of industry-funded denial of science that began with the tobacco industry, something I've discussed as well in post called The Manufactured Doubt Industry and the hacked email controversy. Also shown were two cute 15 - 30 second comedy videos. But while the Climate Reality Project's 24-hour blitz has already gotten 3 million people to tune in, its documentary-style tone and Powerpoint lectures will not be engaging enough to keep most visitors around for more than a few minutes. Ph.D. oceanographer Randy Olson, who left a tenure-track professorship to become a Hollywood film maker, has written an excellent book called Don't be Such a Scientist, about the failure of scientists to communicate in way that will engage people (I thought so highly of the book that I bought 20 copies of the book to give away to students at the University of Michigan's Department of Atmospheric Science this year.) In the latest post in his blog, The Benshi, Olson outlines how the climate community has failed in the main way needed to engage an audience: create a likable voice through the effective telling of stories, which is a less literal means of communication and is less cerebral and thus reaches a mass audience. Future efforts at communication by the climate science community really need to work on using the telling of stories by likable voices in order to get their message across, and I highly recommend that all climate scientists who do public outreach read Olson's book "Don't be Such a Scientist."

Jeff Masters

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916. Skyepony (Mod)
Thailand got slammed with flood..82 died and more than 570,000 affected.

A pipeline from an orphaned platform was leaking crude oil into Bayou Dupont and north Barataria Bay in Jeffferson Parrish. Clean up is under way. Quite a bit of oil..

Oil industry had two explosions already today. Fireball in Australia & a rig blew in North Dakota killing two.

TX has some red tide in the Brownsville Ship Channel & a lot of dead fish..

Giant African Snails invade Miami..i know could be more weather related but giant snails..
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XX/AOI/XXL
MARK
12N/57W
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014L/H/M/C1

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Quoting Tazmanian:



CV season is winding down
No not yet, there's still names from Africa to form aleast 2 more maybe 3.
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Quoting TomTaylor:


Here's my best guess. The collision of ice crystals builds up charges in a thunderstorm. To balance this out, lightning is formed. Now, in a hurricane the reason why I would expect there to be less lightning activity than with an ordinary thunderstorm is because the air flow within the hurricane is different. Air flow in a hurricane has much more of a horizontal component due to the strong pressure gradient. Therefore, you don't get air moving more directly up and down and thus colliding more often, as we would see in the average thunderstorm cell. As a result, you get less of a build up of charge, and less lightning.

As far as more lightning with intensifying tropical cyclones, I would explain this as a result of stronger updrafts, relative to the horizontal wind/pressure gradient. When a storm is intensifying it usually has many overshooting cloud tops and the pressure fall always lags behind the latest convective blow up, which supports the idea of very strong updrafts relative to the pressure gradient/horizontal component of the air flow. These stronger updrafts and intensifying thunderstorms increase collision rates and lightning frequency.

That's my guess at it. No scientific papers or evidence used, just an educated guess.


That's pretty much the same way I would think too, makes since to me! That may be part of it.
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911. Skyepony (Mod)
ALBANY, NY (WTEN) - An $8 Million government rebate program has been set up for people in New York State who lost appliances in the flood.

The rebate is available for any Energy Star or high efficiency appliances that are purchased to replace an appliance damaged in either Hurricane Irene or Tropical Storm Lee.

The money is available through NYSERDA, the New York Energy Research and Development authority to help pay for appliances ranging from dehumidifiers to furnaces.

NYSERDA spokeswoman Dayle Zatlin says each family is allotted a maximum of $3,850 to replace their appliances.

"We don't know how many people will be served, we don't know how many people will apply for the program, it will be interesting to see what happens. And I know that we're going to do everything we can to get this money out to those in need," Zatlin said.

Zatlin says they will be spot auditing to make sure no one is taking advantage of the program. more here
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Being a Canadian, I'm worried that Maria will blow all of the poutine trucks in Newfoundland & Labrador away.

I hope they are safe, and at least Maria isn't going to be another Igor: the conditions aren't right where she is going.
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WOCN31 CWHX 160545
Tropical cyclone information statement updated by the Canadian
Hurricane Centre of Environment Canada at 2:42 AM NDT Thursday
16 September 2011.
------------------------------------------------- --------------------
Tropical cyclone information statement for:
Labrador
Newfoundland
Nova Scotia.

For hurricane Maria.

The next intermediate statement will be issued at 6:30 AM NDT.
Followed by the next full statement issued by 9:30 AM NDT.

Hurricane Maria expected to make landfall as a hurricane this
Afternoon in Southeast Newfoundland - merging with large
Non-tropical low over Labrador on Saturday.

------------------------------------------------- --------------------
==discussion==
1. Summary of basic information at 3:30 AM NDT.

Location: about 40.0 north 62.0 west.

About 470 kilometres south southwest of Sable Island.

Maximum sustained winds: 130 km/hour.

Present movement: northeast at 75 km/h.

Minimum central pressure: 982 MB.

2. Public weather impacts and warnings summary.

Hurricane Maria expected to merge/interact with a developing trough
to its north that will connect to a much larger non-tropical low over
Labrador.

Our latest track (on the WWW.HURRICANES.CA website) is adjusted
westward and shows Maria passing over the isthmus of the Avalon
Peninsula this afternoon with hurricane force gusts forecast over
land. Note that there will be far-reaching impacts of the combined
weather systems well away from the track.

A. Wind.

Windy conditions are to be expected throughout Atlantic Canada today
and Saturday as the non-tropical low and trough north of Maria unite.
The highest winds directly from Maria will pass over the Avalon
Peninsula this afternoon. A hurricane warning is in effect for the
southern half of the Avalon Peninsula and a tropical storm warning is
posted for the Northern Avalon, the Burin, and Bonavista peninsulas.

Wind gusts of 100 km/h are expected in the tropical storm warning
area. Hurricane force wind gusts (120 km/h or higher) are expected
in the hurricane warning area.

These wind gusts can topple trees and break large branches, resulting
in downed utility lines and power interuptions. Damage to signage
and building cladding/roofing material is also possible when winds
gust to 120 km/h or more.

The aforementioned combined low will deliver high winds over a broad
area covering Newfoundland and Labrador tonight and Saturday.
Coastal Labrador in particular will likely receive the strongest
winds on Saturday. Stay tuned for specific forecasts early this
morning related to that storm.

B. Rainfall.

Much of the Maritimes is receiving rainfall associated with the
non-tropical low and the trough developing north of Maria. Rain has
begun over Southern Newfoundland in advance of Maria and trough.
The potential for the heaviest rainfall exists over southern, Eastern
and Central Newfoundland where 60 to 90 millimetres is expected.
Heavy showers with lesser total amounts is occurring over the eastern
half of Nova Scotia.

Note that whenever moisture from a hurricane feeds into a
front/trough it is likely that rainfall rates of 15 to 25 millimetres
per hour would occur. Such rates could lead to flash-type flooding
in ditches and small rivers especially where terrain is steep.
Local flooding in prone areas is possible. Fortunately, river water
levels are at or below normal over Eastern Newfoundland. Keep in
mind however that smaller rivers/creeks will respond more quickly to
heavy rain than larger ones.

Rainfall warnings for Ramea Connaigre east to the Avalon Peninsula
then north to Bonavista and Terra Nova park. These will be expanded
westward early this morning.

C. Surge/waves.

Most coastal regions of Newfoundland can expect waves to build today
as the weather systems interact. Wave and surge effects directly
from Maria will occur over the Southern Avalon Peninsula coastlines
this afternoon.

Storm surge of 50 centimetres is likely along the Southern Avalon
coast with near a metre in south facing bays where surge and waves
get channeled. Fortunately the tidal range is currently low causing
the impact of surge to be less than it would be otherwise.
The highest waves will be south of Maria and will build to 4 to 7
metres over the Grand Banks and waters neighbouring the Avalon.

Large waves and storm surge are likely over Western Newfoundland
tonight and Saturday particularly in the Strait of Belle Isle.
A lesser risk exists for the Northeast Coast of Newfoundland.

This low will generate very high waves offshore of Labrador on
Saturday where wave heights could exceed 10 metres.

One factor that may help ease impacts somewhat is a run of lower than
average tides.

3. Marine weather impacts and warnings summary.

Storm to hurricane force wind warnings are in effect for the
southeastern marine areas for today as a result of Maria.

Gale to storm force winds are in effect elsewhere over most of
Atlantic Canadian waters for today and Saturday as a result of the
non-tropical low.

Visit weatheroffice.Gc.Ca/hurricane (all in lower case) for the
latest:

- forecast position, central pressure table.

- strength and predicted wind radii table.

- hurricane track information map.

- technical discussion.

Please also refer to the public and marine forecasts and warnings
issued by Environment Canada for your area.

End

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Quoting Seawall:
This USED to be a weather blog. Checked in twice today, and guess what? Presto, it's back to climate change, or whatever you call it. If I wanted to read about climate change, I'd go to a blog about it.. and yes, I know it's Dr. Master's blog, and I respect his weather opinions, but I don't want his other opinions shoved down my throat. Many have me on ignore, I don't care. Look at my join date; I've been on here a long time, paying each year.
The admins boot lots of good people from here; some temporarily, some perma banned. Some leave because of the lack of weather info. OK, so be it. This talk of climate is NOT what I come here to see.
The good people are gone, and the other people that have reasonable knowledge are on their way out as well.
I don't pay my money for a climate change main blog, I paid my money for a weather blog, and if you think they are the same, then you are wrong. JMHO.
I see Levi32 is a staff member on another blog, the one I've joined. But we can't mention that, can we?
This is totally crazy, what this blog has become in the past TEN YEARS!


Things are pretty quiet... the only thing I would suggest to improve this site and blog is more info and images earlier on in a storms development... and expanding the different ways data can be viewed from java to flash to whatever... so we all can enjoy it.

Out.
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Quoting Jedkins01:


It is because convective formation in tropical cyclones is quite different than normal convection contrary to what some may think that "rain clouds are always just rain clouds". The farther you travel towards the outer edges of tropical cyclones that process becomes more of what you see in a "normal" convective cell. However, the outer bands are normally still very tropical in nature, just less than the inner core of a hurricane, obviously.


I really don't have the patience to explain why, frankly because I don't have the credentials to completely know without giving inexact science. Lighting itself still has many unknowns, as well as tropical cyclones. It has something to do with a process called collision coalescence as well as the Bergeron process from what I know.


Here's my best guess. The collision of ice crystals builds up charges in a thunderstorm. To balance this out, lightning is formed. Now, in a hurricane the reason why I would expect there to be less lightning activity than with an ordinary thunderstorm is because the air flow within the hurricane is different. Air flow in a hurricane has much more of a horizontal component due to the strong pressure gradient. Therefore, you don't get air moving more directly up and down and thus colliding more often, as we would see in the average thunderstorm cell. As a result, you get less of a build up of charge, and less lightning.

As far as more lightning with intensifying tropical cyclones, I would explain this as a result of stronger updrafts, relative to the horizontal wind/pressure gradient. When a storm is intensifying it usually has many overshooting cloud tops and the pressure fall always lags behind the latest convective blow up, which supports the idea of very strong updrafts relative to the pressure gradient/horizontal component of the air flow. These stronger updrafts and intensifying thunderstorms increase collision rates and lightning frequency.

That's my guess at it. No scientific papers or evidence used, just an educated guess.
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Quoting redwagon:


He had two COCs at one time, one cold, one warm, if I recall.
yeah that's a cool loop
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
yep most will travel the ITCZ now and sink south with it

Please don't go...
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904. JLPR2
Quoting Jedkins01:


haha, well, I thought you were talking about flashes, not actual visible lightning, that's the only reason i mentioned lightning being confused with power issues. Also you may have had power out, but nearby lines in the area could be arching and have no relationship to your power. I'm not sure how power works over there, but 10 to 20 KV lines could be having power issues a half to a mile from here, meanwhile it only causes a "blip" or flash in the power here.

But as you start going higher up into the "bigger" lines, like say 120 KV range, a lot more people lose power if those go out. Or if you lose lines from a huge transmission tower like the giant metal link structure ones that come by my neighborhood which are probably 480 KV, you get thousands and thousands of outages.

Its scary how dangerous all these masses of power lines are that run all over in our modern world, we forget how dangerous they are when they work properly, but if something goes wrong, we are reminded of the shocking amount of energy traveling around the outside of them. Especially because they carry way more electrical energy, as in electron flow than you would think for their size.


Heard transformers exploding close by, but wasn't looking out the window at the moment. And yeah, I guess there could have been some lines arching somewhere, but I don't have a good view of any lines from where I was looking.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
Quoting Tazmanian:



CV season is winding down
yep most will travel the ITCZ now and sink south with it
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900. JLPR2
Seems like the ULL is trying hard to dig to the surface.

Surface converge making an appearance.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
Quoting pcola57:
Evening all,
Taking a look at African continent...Wave upon wave are lined up...
Link


And the Carribean looks ripe..

(Sorry wrong posted link..give me a sec...)

Here's the correct one...LOL

Link


This lull in activity won't last very long IMO...



CV season is winding down
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Quoting houston144:
so much for my theory "The fire broke out last week in Montgomery County", the power lines are in Warren County...which for the ones who are confused, the Riley Road fire is also known as the Tri-County fire effecting , Montgomery, Warren and Grimes county's in Texas.


Tri county fire, aka Riley Road fire, was in WALLER, Montgomery and Grimes Counties.
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Quoting houston144:
Link

I made a KMZ file of the Riley Road Fire in magnolia, Tx if any one is interested. used four different source of information to build it, my theory as for a cause is the high voltage power line that run down the west side of the woodlands and the high temps and low humidity caused an arc from the towers -lines- to the ground....


That is very possible. We had a transformer in a substation in Lumberton explode 2 weeks ago due to high heat and electrical overload. The fire was amazing, but stayed on the rock pad in the high yard.
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Evening all,
Taking a look at African continent...Wave upon wave are lined up...
Link


And the Carribean looks ripe..

(Sorry wrong posted link..give me a sec...)

Here's the correct one...LOL

Link


This lull in activity won't last very long IMO...
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Quoting JLPR2:


It was lightning, my area had no power at the moment and I doubt electric grids would send lighting bolts all the way up to the sky. XD


haha, well, I thought you were talking about flashes, not actual visible lightning, that's the only reason i mentioned lightning being confused with power issues. Also you may have had power out, but nearby lines in the area could be arching and have no relationship to your power. I'm not sure how power works over there, but 10 to 20 KV lines could be having power issues a half to a mile from here, meanwhile it only causes a "blip" or flash in the power here.

But as you start going higher up into the "bigger" lines, like say 120 KV range, a lot more people lose power if those go out. Or if you lose lines from a huge transmission tower like the giant metal link structure ones that come by my neighborhood which are probably 480 KV, you get thousands and thousands of outages.

Its scary how dangerous all these masses of power lines are that run all over in our modern world, we forget how dangerous they are when they work properly, but if something goes wrong, we are reminded of the shocking amount of energy traveling around the outside of them. Especially because they carry way more electrical energy, as in electron flow than you would think for their size.
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Quoting Gearsts:
Lee was warm core the upper low was to his west i think.


He had two COCs at one time, one cold, one warm, if I recall.
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Cooling down again in nw FL. I think we're in the clear for the 2011 hurricane season
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892. JLPR2
There goes Maria.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
891. JLPR2
Quoting Gearsts:
174hrs -_-


Yep. The long range trusty GFS. LOL!
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
Quoting redwagon:

Cold-core. You know, Lee did that, I still have a gif of him eating a huge dry mass of air like it was nothing, and look what he went on to do.

NOAA actually classified him as a hybrid, which I'd never seen them do.
Lee was warm core the upper low was to his west i think.
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Quoting JLPR2:
174hrs...

Looks like a TD east of the Windwards, but it's exit is sitting right at the East coast but will it be able to pull it north?
174hrs -_-
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Quoting JLPR2:


Time. But if the ULL becomes stacked with the surface circulation produced, the result will probably be a subtropical cyclone, like Andrea in 2007.

Cold-core. You know, Lee did that, I still have a gif of him eating a huge dry mass of air like it was nothing, and look what he went on to do.

NOAA actually classified him as a hybrid, which I'd never seen them do.
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887. JLPR2
174hrs...

Looks like a TD east of the Windwards, but it's exit is sitting right at the East coast, will it be able to pull it north?
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
886. JLPR2
Quoting ryang:


That looks so cool....


Yeah, I never get tired of looking at it. XD
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
885. ryang
Quoting JLPR2:


Time. But if the ULL becomes stacked with the surface circulation produced, the result will probably be a subtropical cyclone, like Andrea in 2007.


That looks so cool....
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884. JLPR2
Quoting redwagon:

Yeah but how do you get an ULL to stack down to a true surface cyclone in itself?


Time. But if the ULL becomes stacked with the surface circulation produced, the result will probably be a subtropical cyclone, like Andrea in 2007.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
Quoting redwagon:

Yeah but how do you get an ULL to stack down to a true surface cyclone in itself?



nope never seen that happen
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Quoting will40:


I have seen times where an ULL helped a cyclone with outflow

Yeah but how do you get an ULL to stack down to a true surface cyclone in itself?
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Quoting redwagon:

As we expect troughs to 'lift' surface-level cyclones, does there exist a mechanism to 'drop' ULLs down through mid and to surface level for a good stack of the storm?


I have seen times where an ULL helped a cyclone with outflow
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Quoting JLPR2:
Interesting... In 36hrs the GFS has the ULL north of PR with a nice surface reflection.


As we expect troughs to 'lift' surface-level cyclones, does there exist a mechanism to 'drop' ULLs down through mid and to surface level for a good stack of the storm?
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But if you were under a hot tower you probably would see some lightening, right?

I remember flashes of lightening in Betsy right before the eyewall hit. But that's a long time ago. Maybe it was transformers blowing.
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878. JLPR2
Interesting... In 36hrs the GFS has the ULL north of PR with a nice surface reflection.

Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
33.8n66.6w has been re-evaluated&altered for H.Maria's_12amGMT_ATCF
33.7n67.0w, 36.8n64.9w are now the most recent positions
Starting 15Sept_12amGMT and ending 16Sept_12amGMT

The 4 southern line-segments represent HurricaneMaria's path,
the northernmost line-segment is the straightline projection for 16Sept_12amGMT,
the coastline dumbbell at 45.992n59.6w-YPS is the endpoint of the straightline projection
connected to its nearest airport for the 15Sept_6pmGMT*mapping,
and the coastline dumbbell at 44.726n62.913w-YAW is the same for the 15Sept_12pmGMT*mapping.

Using straightline projection of the travel-speed&heading derived from the
ATCF coordinates spanning the 6hours between 6pmGMT then 12amGMT :
H.Maria's travel-speed was 40.7mph(65.4k/h) on a heading of 28.5degrees(NNE)
H.Maria was headed toward passage over Miquelon,France ~16hours from now... though its center was headed closer toward the airport(FSP) on St.Pierre,France than toward Miquelon's airport(MQC).

Copy&paste 44.726n62.913w-yaw, 45.992n59.6w-yps, 27.2n68.9w-28.8n68.5w, 28.8n68.5w-31.2n67.8w, 31.2n67.8w-33.7n67.0w, 33.7n67.0w-36.8n64.9w, mqc, 33.7n67.0w-46.804n56.361w, fsp into the GreatCircleMapper for more info

The previous mapping (for 15Sept_6pmGMT)

* The alteration of the endpoint of a TropicalCyclone's previous path also changes its previous travel-speed &heading, and the endpoint of its previous straightline projection...
...but I'm choosing to preserve the historicity of the mappings.
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Quoting redwagon:


I think the rotation of a cyclone storm, as opposed to a frontal storm, not only keeps good ground-to-storm lightning at a minimum, but muffles thunderclaps.

The earth doesn't know how to efficiently send up streamers which result in lightning in a vortex compared to a frontal/perpendicular elecromagnetic assault.

Of course that is not true of rainbands from cyclones, as they are frontal in their interaction with land.
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Quoting JLPR2:


Maria brought thunderstorms to PR, I believe that the little thunderstorms tropical storms and up have are at the outer bands, but not closer to the core, because the clouds move too fast to allow them to form?
Dang! My memory sucks!


It is because convective formation in tropical cyclones is quite different than normal convection contrary to what some may think that "rain clouds are always just rain clouds". The farther you travel towards the outer edges of tropical cyclones that process becomes more of what you see in a "normal" convective cell. However, the outer bands are normally still very tropical in nature, just less than the inner core of a hurricane, obviously.


I really don't have the patience to explain why, frankly because I don't have the credentials to completely know without giving inexact science. Lighting itself still has many unknowns, as well as tropical cyclones. It has something to do with a process called collision coalescence as well as the Bergeron process from what I know.
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874. JLPR2
Quoting redwagon:


I think the rotation of a cyclone storm, as opposed to a frontal storm, not only keeps good ground-to-storm lightning at a minimum, but muffles thunderclaps.

The earth doesn't know how to efficiently send up streamers which result in lightning in a vortex compared to a frontal/perpendicular elecromagnetic assault.


Now that you say that, most of the lighting I saw was cloud to cloud.
But it was pretty interesting to see so much lightning, don't remember seeing lightning when Georges or Jeanne passed through my area.

Lightning is usually associated with strengthening systems and Irene was doing exactly that as she crossed PR.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
Quoting JLPR2:


I don't remember "why" well, but I belive tropical systems aren't supposed to have that many thunderstorms.

During Irene I never heard thunder, but I did see frequent lightning.


I think the rotation of a cyclone storm, as opposed to a frontal storm, not only keeps good ground-to-storm lightning at a minimum, but muffles thunderclaps.

The earth doesn't know how to efficiently send up streamers which result in lightning in a vortex compared to a frontal/perpendicular elecromagnetic assault.
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3 weeks ago tonight: Irene turns northward and aims at the US East Coast
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871. JLPR2
Quoting Jedkins01:


Much of that frequent lighting was probably arching electric grids being damaged from the winds. Lightning in tropical cyclones is kinda like lighting in snow storms, if you're getting lighting, you're in a VERY strong convective band! lol

Really though, I only saw lighting a few times ever from tropical cyclones, and it was during a particularly violent and deep convective band. Rain rates were near 5 to 6 inches an hour briefly and wind gusts peaked over minimal hurricane force at my house. That was from hurricane Frances.


It was lightning, my area had no power at the moment and I doubt electric grids would send lighting bolts all the way up to the sky. XD
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8641
so much for my theory "The fire broke out last week in Montgomery County", the power lines are in Warren County...which for the ones who are confused, the Riley Road fire is also known as the Tri-County fire effecting , Montgomery, Warren and Grimes county's in Texas. As a personnel note it seems none of them seem to be doing the same thing and it appears their is no coordination between them and I am rather surprised at one of the county's where allot of the victims and their animals are staying at a county fair ground the Director of the fair grounds has asked them to leave...because they have to put on their county fair..../really!/
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Quoting Bielle:


I had no idea you created them yourself. I just assumed you were linking them from another weather site. Well done!


Oh. I always put a strip on the bottom indicating that I did them. Well, now you know.

Thank you for the complement!
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Quoting JLPR2:


I don't remember "why" well, but I belive tropical systems aren't supposed to have that many thunderstorms.

During Irene I never heard thunder, but I did see frequent lightning.


Much of that frequent lighting was probably arching electric grids being damaged from the winds. Lightning in tropical cyclones is kinda like lighting in snow storms, if you're getting lighting, you're in a VERY strong convective band! lol

Really though, I only saw lighting a few times ever from tropical cyclones, and it was during a particularly violent and deep convective band. Rain rates were near 5 to 6 inches an hour briefly and wind gusts peaked over minimal hurricane force at my house. That was from hurricane Frances.
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I remember the good old days, when you know? Scientists were scientists, not scientists acting as politicians, holding huge conventions, because they are gripped with fear from world problems. Ah humanity, it tries so hard to save itself from which it cannot.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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