1-in-100 year rains cause extreme flooding in NY, PA; Nate, Maria, and Katia

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:37 PM GMT on September 08, 2011

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An extreme rainfall event unprecedented in recorded history has hit the Binghamton, New York area, where 7.49" fell yesterday. This is the second year in a row Binghamton has recorded a 1-in-100 year rain event; their previous all-time record was set last September, when 4.68" fell on Sep 30 - Oct. 1, 2010. Records go back to 1890 in the city. The skies have now cleared in Binghamton, with this morning's rain bringing the city's total rainfall for the 40-hour event to 9.02". However, another large region of rain lies just to the south in Pennsylvania, and all of the rivers in the surrounding region are in major or record flood. The Susquehanna River at Binghamton is at 25.18', its highest level since records began in 1847, and is expected to overtop the flood walls protecting the city this afternoon. In Hershey, Pennsylvania, Swatara Creek is 18' over flood stage, and more than 8' above its record flood crest. Widespread flash flooding is occurring across the entire area, and over 125,000 people have been evacuated from their homes.


Figure 1. Radar-observed rainfall from the Binghamton, NY radar.


Figure 2. The Susquehanna River at Binghamton is at its highest flood height on record this morning (25 feet.) Records at this gauge go back to 1847. Image credit: NOAA/AHPS.


Figure 3. In Hershey, Pennsylvania, Swatara Creek is 18' over flood stage, and more than 8' above its record flood crest. Records at this gage go back to 1930. Image credit: NOAA/AHPS.

The extreme rains are due the the remains of Tropical Storm Lee interacting with a stationary front draped along the Eastern U.S. Adding to the potent moisture mix last night was a stream of tropical moisture associated with Hurricane Katia that collided with the stationary front. You don't often see a major city break its all-time 24-hour precipitation record by a 60% margin, according to wunderground's weather historian, Christopher C. Burt, and he can't recall ever seeing it happen before. It's worth noting that the Susquehanna River Binghamton stream gage, which has been in operation since 1847, is due to be shut off in 3 weeks due to budget cuts. Here's the note at the USGS web site:

NOTICE (03/23/2011)--Data collection at this streamgage may be discontinued after October 1, 2011 due to funding reductions from partner agencies. Although historic data will remain accessible, no new data will be collected unless one or more new funding partners are found. Users who are willing to contribute funding to continue operation of this streamgage should contact Rob Breault or Ward Freeman of the USGS New York Water Science Center at 518-285-5658 or dc_ny@usgs.gov.

Tropical Storm Nate
Tropical Storm Nate formed in the southern Gulf of Mexico yesterday afternoon after the Hurricane Hunters found a well-defined surface circulation and 45 mph surface winds. Nate is the 14th named storm this year, and comes three days before the climatological half-way point of the Atlantic hurricane season, September 10. A typical hurricane season has just 10 - 11 named storms, so we've already had 35% more than a whole season's worth of storms before reaching the season's half-way point. At this rate, 2011 will see 28 named storms, equaling the all-time record set in 2005. Nate's formation date of September 7 puts 2011 in 2nd place for earliest date of arrival of the season's 14th storm. Only 2005 had an earlier formation date of the season's 14th named storm (September 6, when Hurricane Nate got named.) Third place is now held jointly by 1936 and 1933, which got their 14th storm of the season on September 10.

Latest visible satellite loops show that Nate's low-level center is exposed to view, due to northeasterly upper-level winds that are creating a moderate 10 knots of wind shear. This shear is keeping all of Nate's heavy thunderstorms pushed to the south side of the center. Sustained winds at Buoy 42055, about 100 miles to the northwest of the suspected center of Nate, were north at 31 mph at 6:50 am CDT this morning. We haven't had a hurricane hunter aircraft in the storm since yesterday afternoon, and the next plane is due to arrive near 2 pm this afternoon. Water vapor satellite loops show that here is a large area of very dry air from Texas to the north of Nate, and this dry air is probably interfering with the storm's development.

Up until last night's 8 pm EDT runs of the computer models, the models were in general agreement that Nate would meander in the Bay of Campeche for several days, until a ridge of high pressure built in to the north of the storm, forcing it westwards to a landfall in Mexico. However, the latest 2 am EDT run by the GFS model predicts that Nate may gain enough latitude to escape being forced westwards by the ridge, and instead move northwards to make a landfall along the U.S. Gulf Coast. The GFDL, which uses the GFS for its initial conditions, is also on board with this idea, as is the HWRF model, to a lesser degree. The 2 am EDT run of the NOGAPS model did not go along with this idea, though. We will have to wait until the NOAA jet makes its first mission to sample the steering currents in the Gulf of Mexico to get a better idea on how probable this northern path might be; their first flight will be tonight, and the data will make it into the 8 pm models runs that will be available first thing Friday morning. As far as intensity goes, the very dry air to Nate's north should begin being less of a problem for it by Friday, when the upper level winds shift more to blow from the southeast, and the shear drops to the low range, 5 - 10 knots. Since the storm is moving very slowly, it will upwell cooler waters from the depths that will slow intensification, though. The earliest Nate would become a hurricane is probably on Saturday.


Figure 2. GOES-13 image of Hurricane Katia, Tropical Storm Maria, and Tropical Storm Nate taken at 8 am EDT September 8, 2011. Image credit: NASA/GSFC.

Tropical Storm Maria
Tropical Storm Maria is midway between the Northern Lesser Antilles Islands the coast of Africa, and due to arrive in the Northern Lesser Antilles late Friday night or Saturday morning. Satellite loops show that Maria has been ripped up pretty badly by the 10 - 20 knots of wind shear affecting it, with the low-level center exposed to view, and a few disorganized clumps of heavy thunderstorms lying to the west and northeast of the center. Water vapor satellite images show that Maria is embedded in a very moist environment. Ocean temperatures are near 28.5°C, which is 2°C above the 26.5°C threshold usually needed to sustain a tropical storm. Maria passed just south of Buoy 41041 this morning, and top sustained winds during passage were 42 mph, gusting to 56 mph. Maria will pass close to buoy 41040 near 8pm EDT tonight.

With wind shear predicted to continue in the moderate range for the next five days, and the storm struggling to maintain its circulation, strengthening of Maria to a hurricane before it reaches the Lesser Antilles seems unlikely at this time. None of the intensity models are calling for Maria to reach hurricane strength until well after the storm passes Puerto Rico. However, Mike Ventrice, a meteorology Ph.D. student at the University of Albany, pointed out to me yesterday that a atmospheric disturbance known as a Convectively-Coupled Kelvin Wave (CCKW) is passing through the Lesser Antilles Islands today, and is headed eastwards towards Maria at 25 mph. Maria will encounter this CCKW Thursday night or Friday morning. There is a great deal of upward-moving air in the vicinity of a CCKW, and will help strengthen the updrafts in Maria's thunderstorms, potentially intensifying the storm. None of our models are detailed enough to "see" CCKWs", so we may see more intensification of the storm than the models are calling for. Given the disorganized state Maria is currently in, though, the extra boost in upward motion provided by the CCKW may not make of a difference to the storm.

The track forecasts for Maria from the various models agree that the storm will affect the Northern Lesser Antilles Islands, Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. After it passes the Lesser Antilles, Maria has the usual amount of high uncertainty in its 5 - 7 day track forecast. The models are split on how strong the steering influence a trough of low pressure along the U.S. East Coast will have. The UKMET model prefers a more southerly track for Maria through the Turk and Caicos Islands and the Bahamas towards the U.S. East Coast, while the other models predict a more northwesterly track, with a potential threat to Bermuda. Climatology favors a track that would miss the U.S., with Dr. Bob Hart's track history pages suggesting that Maria has a 14% chance of hitting Canada, 5% chance of hitting Bermuda, and an 18% chance of hitting North Carolina.

Hurricane Katia
Hurricane Katia has brought a few rain showers and some gusty winds of 20 - 30 mph to Bermuda last night and this morning, but is not going to bring hazardous weather to the island as the storm makes it swing around Bermuda today and tomorrow. Latest satellite loops show that Katia is a shadow of its former Category 4 self, as dry air has eaten into the southwest side of the storm into the eye. Katia's outer rainbands should remain just offshore from North Carolina, New England, and the Canadian Maritime provinces at the point of closest approach. The main impact of Katia will be a multi-day period of high surf leading to beach erosion and dangerous rip currents.

I'll have an update this afternoon.

Jeff Masters

Bryn Athyn, PA (HighRdGeo)
Fetters Mill 9-8-11 morning
Bryn Athyn, PA

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Quoting twincomanche:
Considering the quality of internet blogging I would say that anyone who just jumps on a blog and believes the first thing they read is pretty foolish. If I can find some people like that I have a certain famous bridge to sell them.


Hold off , twin. I already have a buyer for that bridge.
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wonder what kind of winds are on the beach on south side of Nate

Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 9645




Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129088
933. Jax82
I smell DOOM.
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Tropical Storm Maria is probably no more...for the time being. I believe recon is going out into the system a little later on, and I doubt they will find a closed circulation, due to the speed shear that has disrupted Maria. However, as I mentioned yesterday, conditions will be favorable for regeneration later down the road, and Florida and the Southeast will have to watch Maria VERY closely. For the Antilles, for now, it is appearing that impacts, mainly wind, will not be as strong as previously thought.

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Maria has probably at this time degenerated into a strong tropical wave, with a good likelihood of regeneration. Doesn't seem closed to me. The ECMWF, GFS, CMC, and NOGAPS all indicate that this will at least strengthen further however. The ECMWF is the weakest, but brings it close to Florida. The GFS, CMC, and NOGAPS all make Maria a hurricane. If Maria degenerates into a wave it will probably regenerate, and be much more south than we would like.
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Quoting mobiledave:


The visitors that ask the questions are not on here long enough to decipher what information is good or bad. They simply "show up" when a cyclone is close enough to be mentioned by there local news.

What if you would ave been wrong by telling your family to evacuate only to find that the new model consensus had the storm pegged to there evacuation spot?
Quoting kipperedherring:
It looks like only Mobiledave can save us now...
This is what I'm talkin' about ...
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Quoting mobiledave:


The visitors that ask the questions are not on here long enough to decipher what information is good or bad. They simply "show up" when a cyclone is close enough to be mentioned by there local news.

What if you would ave been wrong by telling your family to evacuate only to find that the new model consensus had the storm pegged to there evacuation spot?
Considering the quality of internet blogging I would say that anyone who just jumps on a blog and believes the first thing they read is pretty foolish. If I can find some people like that I have a certain famous bridge to sell them.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Good afternoon guys.

70 mph huh? I went to school with a 45 mph storm this morning. That's fast intensification, and shows you exactly what the Bay of Campeche can do to storms. With it expected to be over water for AT LEAST 5 days or more (probably more like 7-9), the chances of seeing a major hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico are increasing...

I'm still in the Gulf Coast bandwagon, not so sold on Mexico ATTM.


yeah, I'm not wishing anything major, but TX really needs some rain. Hopefully Nate can bring that to us.
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Quoting Drakoen:
GFDL run for Maria is scary
Horrific for se fla
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Quoting Drakoen:
NHC should change the track much at 5pm. The models are clearly having a hard time depicting how strong (or not) the trough will be.
What's going on with Maria any new news
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Quoting basti11:



WELL I CAN SAY ONE THING YOU ARE BATTING 1000 I DISAGREE WITH EVERYTHING YOU JUST SAID...


I CAN'T HEAR YOU!!!

First off lay off the caps.

Second, he is exactly right, shear is affecting Nate at the moment as well as dry air, you need to get your facts straight.
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GFDL run for Maria is scary
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Good afternoon guys.

70 mph huh? I went to school with a 45 mph storm this morning. That's fast intensification, and shows you exactly what the Bay of Campeche can do to storms. With it expected to be over water for AT LEAST 5 days or more (probably more like 7-9), the chances of seeing a major hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico are increasing...

I'm still in the Gulf Coast bandwagon, not so sold on Mexico ATTM.
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Quoting Drakoen:
NHC should change the track much at 5pm. The models are clearly having a hard time depicting how strong (or not) the trough will be.


Yep. We are going to have huge fluctuations until the upper level pattern is nailed down. The G-IV flight should straighten things out in the 00z runs (hopefully).
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Quoting aprinz1979:


Now I'm sure you're hiding behind that sweet old lady picture. First the JFV comment couple days back and now this. Is that you Jason?
and grandpa?
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Quoting IceCoast:


Nope, there's certainly some shear effecting the system. The shear analysis maps aren't always 100% accurate. It's also likely some dry air is having a negative effect on Nate. Although this isn't detrimental enough to prevent Nate from gradually intensifying, it certainly can't be classified as "Perfect" conditions, that's just foolish.



WELL I CAN SAY ONE THING YOU ARE BATTING 1000 I DISAGREE WITH EVERYTHING YOU JUST SAID...
Member Since: September 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 213
918. Caner
Quoting TexasHurricane:
Does anyone think Nate has a good chance at actually coming to TX?



Short answer, yes, particularly southern Brownsville area.

Long answer, with a new high building in over N TX, it is going to be one of two scenarios.

Either it builds enough to get into mid level steering along the ridge, northward, towards gulf coast or it meanders enough westwards and gets into mid level steering southward, under the ridge, towards TX/Mex.

Eventually its going to move, and it's either going to go around the ridge to the north or south. All depends on the circumstances to determine which.

Models keep flip-flopping trying to figure it out. So at this point, even money.

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NHC shouldnt change the track much at 5pm. The models are clearly having a hard time depicting how strong (or not) the trough will be.
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Quoting miguel617:
Those of you that board up your windows, how exactly do you do that without messing up the outside of your homes with the nails and/or screws? Do you go back and caulk up the holes later. My home is stucco so I am not sure how to do it.


We installed several small permanent hooks painted like the house and keep the same boards with corresponding eyes in the garage. It is a good project for the spring! I don't have other ideas. Sorry.

- from Galveston
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Quoting WetBankGuy:


There's a lot of noise in the signal, but if you hang around long enough Mr. Breck you'll find out who knows what they're talking about and who doesn't. Reading her thoughtfully and carefully lead me to start calling family Friday Aug. 26, 2005 and telling them to get the hell out of NOLA while the NHC, FEMA and all the other's were waiting for more model run concensus to call for an evacuation.



The visitors that ask the questions are not on here long enough to decipher what information is good or bad. They simply "show up" when a cyclone is close enough to be mentioned by there local news.

What if you would ave been wrong by telling your family to evacuate only to find that the new model consensus had the storm pegged to there evacuation spot?
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914. P451
Nate has a very well developed surface...and one thing you can see as a result is how he is sucking in the dry air from the north and north west of him at the surface. It is one of the reasons the convection cannot maintain itself on the northern and eastern portions of the storm. Shear from the NE being the other reason but the shear is not more than moderate. So dry air must be getting pulled in.






Nate has also clearly begun a NE movement.

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Quoting Drakoen:
I see the 12z models have flopped back to Mexico/Texas solutions, that just goes to show how uncertain the forecast track for Nate is.


Landfall prediction: 27.54'N, 97.00'W as a Category 2 Hurricane. Hmmmm....

Just wishcasting...please don't take me serious :) But seriously, please come this way Nate!
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Pretty fast intensification there, thanks to the BOC's shape. COC is half exposed, and is not a hurricane at this time though.
AL, 15, 2011090818, , BEST, 0, 197N, 923W, 60, 997, TS,
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Quoting Patrap:


18z Early Cycle NHC model tracks
Nate
Statistical/Simple Models (CLIPER,BAMs,LBAR,other Statistical Models)




Dynamic Models (More sophisticated models)





lol models are all over the place
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Quoting RitaEvac:


That's hardyplank


Our builder used a different brand.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 16 Comments: 4766
Quoting TexasHurricane:
Does anyone think Nate has a good chance at actually coming to TX?



No. The NHC track is deceiving as it is only a compromise of the models which are two extremes. One camp is in the Northern Gulf, the other in Mexico.
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18z Early Cycle NHC model tracks
Nate
Statistical/Simple Models (CLIPER,BAMs,LBAR,other Statistical Models)




Dynamic Models (More sophisticated models)




Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129088
Quoting twincomanche:
That's a interesting perspective. First you posit that if you don't have a advanced degree you can't possibly know anything credible about the weather. Second you claim that that you can't learn anything from here. There are for your information many very knowledgeable people on here who may or may not have advanced degrees. Some of them I know do not since they are still in high school or college, however I consider them way up there in forecasting accuracy. I suggest you look at the content and not the credentials when evaluating information.


Agreed. And if that person does not like the information on this blog, they can go elsewhere... instead of being a hinderance to those trying to learn and use this blog for educational purposes. I find that a lot of the information on this blog is VERY useful. Even the scientists with Ph.Ds at the NHC can not tell you EXACTLY where a hurricane or tropical storm is going to make landfall at this point. All they can do is create forecasts to give the general public an idea of where it is going, and fine tune it as the days draw nearer. I haven't seen that poster provide ANY useful information on where he/she thinks the storm will go (with any scientific evidence, anyways). Kudos for standing up for the good content on this blog! :-)
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Quoting RitaEvac:
Seeing a NE or NNE drift on Nate?


Looks that way for now...recon is about to have another center fix, so we will see.
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Quoting hurricanehanna:
Nate Vortex (9/8 18:05:50Z): MSLP: 997mb (extrap); Inbound Flt. Lvl. Wind (Item F.): 41kts (~47.1mph); Max Flt. Wind (from Remarks): 81kts (~93.1mph) (View Data
It looks like only Mobiledave can save us now...
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Quoting basti11:




3 things very good outlflow expanding to the north ssts near 90 degrees and no SHEAR...the only thing that would be ideal is NATE PROXIMITY TO LAND...this would already be a strong hurricane if it was further from the yucatan...


Nope, there's certainly some shear effecting the system. The shear analysis maps aren't always 100% accurate. It's also likely some dry air is having a negative effect on Nate. Although this isn't detrimental enough to prevent Nate from gradually intensifying, it certainly can't be classified as "Perfect" conditions, that's just foolish.
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Seeing a NE or NNE drift on Nate?
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 9645
Does anyone think Nate has a good chance at actually coming to TX?

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Breaches now taking place...

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Glad the GFDL finally got it figured out. :p Now on to important matters, like the weather at Laumbeau Field. I'll worry about Nate tomorrow.
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Quoting atmoaggie:
Umm, not true. A number of relevant B.S. degrees in here, regularly.

At least a few with a M.S. in meteorology in here from time to time.

And, a couple of PhDs show up every once in a while.

But, most of them very rarely talk about their qualifications.
Nor do they need to.
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Quoting angiest:


Pretty much caulk. The wood trim on our house is cement fiber.


That's hardyplank
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 9645
Quoting MississippiWx:


You do realize that the dry air isn't going to just sit there the whole time, right? In fact, it's already being displaced with moisture and the dry air will only be less and less of an issue. However, if it gains enough latitude and heads towards the Northern Gulf, the upper trough will be able to pump in the dry air from Texas.


i still say with nate being influenced by the 2 highs its best shot is into mexico or driven south into the yucatan not gaining much latitude at all..nate could easily be a cat 2 hurricane if it stays below 22N
Member Since: September 5, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 213
Quoting angiest:


I was referring specifically to the most recent GFS run.

oh then ya its on track with that path.
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Quoting mobiledave:


I think the answer, from what I've gathered from the posts, is zero.

If you are looking at the comments on this blog in hopes of finding out where a potential storm will make landfall I would highly suggest you only follow the NHC main web site. The absolute BEST answers you will find on here come form people like you and I. You will not even find an EDUCATED guess on this blog; only guesses.
Umm, not true. A number of relevant B.S. degrees in here, regularly.

At least a few with a M.S. in meteorology in here from time to time.

And, a couple of PhDs show up every once in a while.

But, most of them very rarely talk about their qualifications.
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From Plymouth State:
NATE HAS NOT MOVED MUCH OVERNIGHT OR THIS MORNING...ALTHOUGH THE
LATEST SATELLITE AND MICROWAVE IMAGERY SUGGESTS THAT THE CENTER IS
A LITTLE SOUTH OF THE EARLIER ESTIMATES. THE CYCLONE IS FORECAST TO
REMAIN IN A WEAK STEERING PATTERN BETWEEN MID-LEVEL RIDGES OVER
MEXICO AND THE NORTHERN CARIBBEAN DURING THE NEXT 12-24 HOURS. IN A
DAY OR SO...NATE IS EXPECTED TO MOVE SLOWLY NORTHWARD AROUND THE
WESTERN PERIPHERY OF THE CARIBBEAN RIDGE. AFTER 36-48 HOURS...THE
MODEL SPREAD BECOMES INCREASINGLY LARGE...AS SUBTLE DIFFERENCES IN
THE STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION OF A MID/UPPER-LEVEL LOW AND TROUGH
EXTENDING FROM THE OHIO VALLEY SOUTHWESTWARD HAVE SIGNIFICANT
IMPLICATIONS ON THE FUTURE TRACK OF THE CYCLONE. THE LATEST GFS AND
GFDL MODELS...WHICH SHOW A SLIGHTLY DEEPER TROUGH...MOVE NATE
NORTHWARD TOWARD THE NORTHERN GULF COAST. THE ECMWF AND NOGAPS
MODELS DEPICT A WEAKER TROUGH THAT DOES NOT CAPTURE NATE AND ALLOWS
IT TURN TURN WESTWARD TOWARD MEXICO TO THE SOUTH OF A BUILDING
RIDGE...ALTHOUGH IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT THERE IS CONSIDERABLE
SPREAD AMONG THE ECMWF ENSEMBLE MEMBERS. THE OFFICIAL FORECAST HAS
BEEN SHIFTED TO THE RIGHT AND LIES BETWEEN THESE TWO VIABLE
SCENARIOS BUT HAS NOT BEEN SHIFTED AS FAR AS THE TVCA CONSENSUS.
THE NOAA G-IV AIRCRAFT IS SCHEDULED TO PERFORM A SYNOPTIC
SURVEILLANCE MISSION LATER TODAY...WHICH WILL HOPEFULLY HELP REDUCE
THE SPREAD IN THE TRACK GUIDANCE TONIGHT.
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Quoting Grothar:


Ah, almost neighbors. In Bradford Country. Sayre/Athens, just North of Towanda. You know (pooh talk?) LOL
Hi, Grothar, hope you are feeling much better, glad to see you back on the blog.
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
HH going back in for another center fix.
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It's bad up there.




College of DuPage Meteorology
Severe Weather and Flash Flood Warnings
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Click on the station ID to bring up list of recent severe weather statements.


FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 326 PM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 323 PM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 259 PM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 231 PM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 120 PM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 100 PM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING MOUNT HOLLY NJ - KPHI 1236 PM EDT THU SEP 8 2011

Severe Warnings Issued More Than Three Hours Ago

FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 1223 PM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING ALBANY NY - KALY 1123 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 1100 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 1049 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 1028 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING ALBANY NY - KALY 1026 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 940 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 912 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 858 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 827 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING ALBANY NY - KALY 820 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 759 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING ALBANY NY - KALY 747 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 726 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 554 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING MOUNT HOLLY NJ - KPHI 508 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 459 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING MOUNT HOLLY NJ - KPHI 458 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 448 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING ALBANY NY - KALY 439 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 417 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 333 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING MOUNT HOLLY NJ - KPHI 326 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING MOUNT HOLLY NJ - KPHI 315 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING MOUNT HOLLY NJ - KPHI 226 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BINGHAMTON NY - KBGM 213 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING MOUNT HOLLY NJ - KPHI 125 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 117 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
FLASH FLOOD WARNING BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC - KLWX 1245 AM EDT THU SEP 8 2011
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129088
Quoting miguel617:
Those of you that board up your windows, how exactly do you do that without messing up the outside of your homes with the nails and/or screws? Do you go back and caulk up the holes later. My home is stucco so I am not sure how to do it.


Concrete anchors and then you can just put the screws in to cover the anchors. Paint the screws to match the color of the house... No really "great" way to do it...

-OR- in a pinch and in a hurry - just use tapcons and caulk over the holes when done.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10567
Quoting miguel617:
Those of you that board up your windows, how exactly do you do that without messing up the outside of your homes with the nails and/or screws? Do you go back and caulk up the holes later. My home is stucco so I am not sure how to do it.


plylox
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 9645
Quoting Bretts9112:

or opal


I was referring specifically to the most recent GFS run.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 16 Comments: 4766

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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