Irene hits North Carolina

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:37 PM GMT on August 27, 2011

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Hurricane Irene roared ashore over Cape Lookout, North Carolina at 7:30 am this morning. The Cedar Island Ferry Terminal measured sustained winds of 90 mph, gusting to 110 mph at 7:19am, and a trained spotter on Atlantic Beach measured sustained winds of 85 mph, gusting to 101 mph at 10:35 am. The Hurricane Hunters measured 80 mph winds over water at the time of landfall. Winds at the Cape Lookout, North Carolina buoy, which the eye passed directly over, peaked at 67 mph as Irene made landfall. At 10am EDT, top winds observed at Cape Hatteras on the Outer Banks of North Carolina were 53 mph, gusting to 73 mph. Winds are rising now along the coast of Virginia, with sustained winds of 56 mph, gusting to 62 mph observed at 10 am EDT at Chesapeake Bay Light. Satellite loops show a large but deteriorating storm with dry air intruding to the southwest. The radar presentation of Irene visible on the Norfolk, VA radar is very impressive--Irene is dropping torrential rains over a huge area.


Figure 1. Radar-estimated precipitation from Irene as of 12:18 pm EDT August 27, 2011. An expanding region of rains in excess of ten inches (pick colors) was observed north of where the center made landfall.

Storm surge damage from Irene
The storm surge and wave action from Irene is likely to cause the greatest damage, and this will be a historic coastal flooding event for many regions of the mid-Atlantic and Northeast. A storm surge of 8.5 feet was reported this morning in North Harlow, NC, and three feet in New Bern, NC. Significant wave heights (the average height of the largest 1/3 of the waves) reached 27 feet at Onslow Bay, NC this morning, and wave heights along the New Jersey shore Sunday morning during the time of high tide are expected to be 15 - 20 feet, according to the NOAA Wavewatch III model (Figure 2.) A storm surge of 3 - 6 feet is expected near Atlantic City, NJ Sunday morning, during the time of high tide. With 15 - 20 foot waves expected on top of this storm surge, there will be tremendous damage to the coast and low-lying structures. Storm surge is also a major concern for New York City. The latest NWS forecast is calling for a 5 - 8 foot storm surge in New York Harbor, which would easily top the flood walls protecting the south end of Manhattan if the storm surge occurs at high tide. High tide is near 8 am Sunday morning. A research storm surge model run by SUNY Stonybrook predicts that water levels at The Battery at the south end of Manhattan will peak at 2.2 meters above Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW) at high tide Sunday morning, which would be about six inches below the top of the flood wall (which is 5 feet above mean sea level.) Waves on top of the surge would likely spill over the top of the floodwall in this scenario, and cause some flooding in southern Manhattan. Andy Revkin's Dot Earth blog has links to a storm surge animation for New York City done by the SUNY Stonybrook group. Climate Central has a nice satellite image showing which parts of New York Harbor are below five feet in elevation. Storm surge heights of up to eight feet are predicted in Western Long Island Sound, and 3 - 6 feet along much of the New England coast from New York to Massachusetts. This is going to be a damaging coastal flooding event for this stretch of coast, though perhaps not as damaging as the one New Jersey will experience.


Figure 2. Predicted wave heights along the U.S. coast from NOAA's Wavewatch III model for 8am EDT Sunday, August 28, 2011. This is the time of high tide, and this model is suggesting that the coast of New Jersey will be subject to battering waves 15 - 20 feet high at the time of high tide.

Inland flooding damage from Irene
Inland flash flooding and river flooding from torrential rains are a major concern. Latest radar-estimated rainfall amounts in North Carolina already exceed ten inches in some locations. Cedar Island, NC has reported 7.21" as of 11am EDT, and a 100 mile-wide swath of 8+ inches of rain will likely fall from Eastern North Carolina northwards along the coast, through New York City, and into Vermont and New Hampshire during the next two days. Destructive river flooding will be a significant danger from New Jersey northwards to Southeast New York, where soils are saturated and run-off will be the greatest.


Figure 3. Distribution of Irene's wind field at 9:30 am EDT Saturday August 27, 2011, as observed by the Hurricane Hunters, land stations, and buoys. The right front quadrant of the hurricane had all of the storm's hurricane-force winds (yellow and warmer colors, bounded by the heavy black line between the "50" and "60" knot thin black lines.) Tropical storm-force winds (heavy black like bounding the light blue area) extended out 260 miles from the center of Irene. Irene's storm surge damage potential has dropped to 4.3 on a scale of 0 to 6, down from a high of 5.1 yesterday. Image credit: NOAA/AOML/HRD.

Wind damage
Irene is slowly deteriorating, but the storm is too large to weaken quickly. The latest wind distribution map from NOAA's Hurricane Research Division (Figure 3) shows that all of Irene's hurricane-force winds are on the storm's east side, so only North Carolina's Outer Banks will get winds of 75 - 80 mph. The coast from Virginia northwards through New Jersey will see tropical storm-force winds of 50 - 70 mph from Irene. These strong winds, when combined with the torrential rains that are falling, will cause widespread tree damage and power failures that will affect millions of people. When Irene makes its 2nd landfall on Long Island, NY on Sunday, coastal locations to the right of the eye will likely experience top sustained winds of 60 -70 mph.

Lady Liberty not in danger from Irene
The Statue of Liberty is not vulnerable to a storm surge, since the good lady stands atop a 65-foot high foundation and 89-foot high granite pedestal. However, the 305' height of the lady's torch above the foundation means the statue will experience winds a full Saffir-Simpson category higher than winds at the surface. The statue is rated to survive a wind load of 58 psf, which is roughly equivalent to 120 mph winds (Category 3 hurricane). However, a mid-strength Category 2 hurricane with 105 mph winds will be able to generate 120 mph winds at a height of 300 feet, and would theoretically be capable of toppling the Statue of Liberty. Winds from Irene should stay below 80 mph at 300 feet, and not pose a threat to the Statue of Liberty.

Tornadoes
Two tornadoes were reported in coastal North Carolina last night. One tornado destroyed 2 homes and damaged 6 others in Columbia, with several minor injuries, and the other hit Belhaven, damaging multiple trailers. NOAA's Storm Prediction Center is calling for a slight risk of severe weather along coast Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware today. We might see five or ten tornadoes from Irene over the next two days, but the atmosphere is not unstable enough for Irene to generate as many tornadoes as we're used to seeing from a landfalling hurricane. A tornado watch is posted for coastal areas from Eastern North Carolina northwards to Southern New Jersey.

Insurance company AIR-Worldwide is estimating that insured damages from Irene in the U.S. will be $1.5 - $6 billion. They estimate losses in the Caribbean at $0.5 - $1.1 billion from Irene, 60% in the Bahamas.

Typhoon Nanmadol
Over in the Western Pacific, Typhoon Nanmadol has weakened to a Category 3 storm after battering the Philippines as a Category 4 super typhoon with 155 mph winds. At least two people have been killed in the heavy flooding there. Nanmadol is a threat to Taiwan, and Wunderground meteorologist Elaine Yang (who hails from Taiwan), has the details in her blog.

Links
Our Weather Historian, Christopher C. Burt, has an excellent post on Historic Hurricanes from New Jersey to New England.

Joe Romm at climateprogress.org has a thoughtful piece called, How Does Global Warming Make Hurricanes Like Irene More Destructive?

For those of you wanting to know your odds of receiving hurricane force or tropical storm force winds, I recommend the NHC wind probability product.

Wunderground has detailed storm surge maps for the U.S. coast.

The National Hurricane Center's Interactive Storm Surge RIsk Map, which allows one to pick a particular Category hurricane and zoom in, is a good source of storm surge risk information.

Jeff Masters

Aftremath of Hurricane Irene in Nassau, Bahamas (ktbahamas)
Downed street light broken by strong gusts of Irene.
Aftremath of Hurricane Irene in Nassau, Bahamas
Battery Park, the night before Irene... (line)
Battery Park, the night before Irene...

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Quoting IMA:

Keith, I meant he's dealt with plenty, not that he is one! Man, I need to tie-up my fingers lol



you mighta been right either way
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Quoting NOVArules:


I think I'm going to sleep on the floor of my family room tonight.


Basements really should be required for all houses that aren't in an extremely high-water table environment.
Member Since: August 5, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 290
630. IMA
Quoting tkeith:
LMAO!

*sorry press* :)

Keith, I meant he's dealt with plenty, not that he is one! Man, I need to tie-up my fingers lol
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09L/TS/I
MARK
37.38N/75.98W forecast point





ALWAYS FOLLOW NHC/TPC FORECASTS FOR ALL WARNINGS REGARDING THIS STORM
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 170 Comments: 53611
Quoting LoveObama:
Does anybody know when the storm surge should subside in Aurora, NC? I have family calling me trapped on their roof. They can see people swimming in the water.


Winds in that area are now out of the WNW and NW. That should begin to push the water back toward the outer banks islands. If water is not trapped onshore from levees or unique topographical features, it should begin to subside soon.
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Roanoke Bay
MWatkins


Current live stream. Not sure where they are now.
Link
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Quoting IMA:

Well, Press knows a lot about hurricanes & a lot about sailing (and a lot about idiots LOL).
LMAO!

*sorry press* :)
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Quoting FLdewey:


I agree. I know it takes time, according to MTA officials about 6 hours, to "shut er down."

I agree with the call to shut everything down, I just think they did it a little early. To be fair early is obviously better than too late.
Most parts of the Northeast, Elevation rises rather rapidly from the coast, for example College hill in Providence RI is 300ft and its summit is 1 mile from the Providence harbor/ Narragansett Bay.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 694
Quoting NOVArules:


This is why I am scared to sleep at night, when Irene will be at her worst in my area as my bedroom is right next to a mature oak tree.
Camp out in the living room?
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Quoting BrockBerlin:


That speaks volumes about how great the Cayman Islands handle hurricanes, I mean Ivan was a high end Cat.4 and only caused 2 deaths.
I agree. There was a lot of damage but thank God that was it for deaths. Paloma also hit Cayman Brac and Little Cayman I think as a Cat 4 and no deaths at all. Lots of damage though. Our building code is up to Florida standards and then some.
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622. IMA
Quoting nymore:
I am pretty sure the guy in New York knows a little more about his situation than anyone on this blog. There are a lot of people on here that think they know more than they actually do. It is up to him what he wants to do good or bad.

Well, Press knows a lot about hurricanes & a lot about sailing (and a lot about idiots LOL).
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Personally, I think they called the right time. Thousands of people work for public transportation. They have to be able to get home, and many use public transportation. It takes hours to get everything off rail, put up and then shut down the electricals and be able to do what they can to try and protect them from the water. Especially the subways. Everyone then working on that has to get home before the worst conditions. And they can't use their normal way to do it. Most don't own cars. It's a logistical problem then to get all home safe. These men and women want to be home with their families, not stuck somewhere away from them. Plus, as long as public transportation is available, people will be using it. Just look at N and S Carolina and the people.
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HEY LEVI32 ! thanks for all the info in your blog these past 2 weeks. You really hit the nail on the head hit this one. SPOT ON! You called a crawl up the east coast, smacking into either SC or NC, and insisted is wouldn't be a fish storm and needed to be taken seriously. GREAT JOB!
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618. IMA
102 at the San Antonio airport, 104.7 at my house. I hate it, it literally makes me sick, but at least I don't have a hurricane sittin' over me or coming at me.
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Quoting nymore:
I am pretty sure the guy in New York knows a little more about his situation than anyone on this blog. There are a lot of people on here that think they know more than they actually do. It is up to him what he wants to do good or bad.


of course it's up to him....So what?
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Quoting ConnecticutWXGuy:
I'm tired of all the morons claiming they're over-hyping this storm. Even if it is over-hyped, that's a heck of a lot better than under-hype. There's no such thing as a perfect forecast, so every major event is going to be over-hyped or under-hyped. Which would you prefer?


Absolutely!!! I'd rather say..."Wow, that wasn't so bad" instead of "That was much worse than I thought".
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Quoting NOVArules:


This is why I am scared to sleep at night, when Irene will be at her worst in my area as my bedroom is right next to a mature oak tree.


Sleep in the bathroom -- its not worth worrying about it!
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Quoting BobinTampa:


may want to consider sleeping in another room in your house.


I think I'm going to sleep on the floor of my family room tonight.
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Satellite continues to look worse and worse in terms of warming cloud tops - but radar shows she is holding her own. At this latitude, cloud tops won't look as cold as in the tropics... but going over water may give her a small boost in convection, although strengthening is unlikely.

Pressure has also fallen to 947mb, which is amazing, and shows she's not weakening.
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I am pretty sure the guy in New York knows a little more about his situation than anyone on this blog. There are a lot of people on here that think they know more than they actually do. It is up to him what he wants to do good or bad.
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Quoting Methurricanes:
They will probably close the green line near the Muddy River, due to eventual flooding, like last year during March


Yeah I'll be shocked if Kenmore and Fenway don't have some flooding.
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Quoting tampahurricane:
Can anyone post a storm surge map for New Jersey? My grandfather lives in Keansburg. thanks guys

Link
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 85
Quoting NOVArules:


This is why I am scared to sleep at night, when Irene will be at her worst in my area as my bedroom is right next to a mature oak tree.


may want to consider sleeping in another room in your house.
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Quoting Pirate999:
Commadore + Cards on boat + Hurricane = Darwin Awards.

There was a guy who decided to ride out Alica on a boat in 1983. They found his body in his boat, 2 miles away, on a highway.

As a fellow sailor, I'm very disapointed. This guy is making a terribel mistake and example.

BTW, send some ICE and RAIN our way.. 109 a new record for Houston.
Two deaths in Grand Cayman from Ivan. One from someone riding it out on his boat and another from coming outside of a shelter so he could see what is going on. People just don't think.
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Quoting SPLbeater:
Irene looking good...what are the chances she intensifies to atleast a high-end Cat 1 once more?


She is looking better. NHC and Dr. Masters say gradual weakening, but perhaps very gradual due to its size. Waters between NC and NYC probably a bit cooler than normally required for intensification, but Irene has been such an oddball, you wouldn't want to rule anything out.

If upper atmospheric conditions are colder than normal, intensification can occur even if SSTs are below the threshold.
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Quoting SamWells:


When Irene was Cat-3 over the Bahamas, there was no media hype, and the locals just accepted the reality of it and hunkered down. Winds to 120 MPH gusting higher were common.

Now we have a Cat-1 storm and The Weather Channel and a bunch of weather dudes are saying it is Armageddon, the end of the world, and ultimate destruction. Myself, I have actually survived many Cat-1 storms without evacuating, so I don't pull any punches about that.


From what I've seen, most of the media is ACCURATELY making a big deal about the flooding from the rain (most of us are already at near record total August rainfall amounts) and the power outages. Actually here in Connecticut where I live, our forest levels are at a record high level... there are significantly more trees than there were during the last widespread hurricane event. So while a Category 1 would be just another thunderstorm to most areas accustomed to Hurricanes, it will have the damage effects of a high end Category 2 for southern New England and parts of the Mid Atlantic.... even disregarding the possible storm surge. Earlier this summer CT alone had 100,000 power outages from one supercell thunderstorm, which didn't even move over the most populated area. One can imagine a large tropical cyclone will produce many more power outages.
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Quoting Pirate999:
Commadore + Cards on boat + Hurricane = Darwin Awards.

There was a guy who decided to ride out Alica on a boat in 1983. They found his body in his boat, 2 miles away, on a highway.

As a fellow sailor, I'm very disapointed. This guy is making a terribel mistake and example.

BTW, send some ICE and RAIN our way.. 109 a new record for Houston.

We set a new one for Pensacola with 100 yesterday.
Member Since: August 18, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 188
Quoting Methurricanes:
The NWS Taunton may be dumb, the flash flood warning in effect for the 128 belt, Inner core of Boston, has Southern Middlesex County (North of Boston) as SE Mass, while Norfolk county (south of boston) as Eastern Massachusetts, lol
Here in Lowell little wind 10-15mph winds.


Lol ya they messed that up a little bit. Middlesex county is definitely not in SE MA.


FLASH FLOOD WARNING
MAC017-021-025-027-272215-
/O.NEW.KBOX.FF.W.0009.110827T1915Z-110827T2215Z/
/00000.0.ER.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.000000T0000 Z.OO/

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
FLASH FLOOD WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TAUNTON MA
315 PM EDT SAT AUG 27 2011

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN TAUNTON HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WARNING FOR...
SOUTHEASTERN WORCESTER COUNTY IN CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS...
THIS INCLUDES THE CITY OF MILFORD...
WESTERN NORFOLK COUNTY IN EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS...
THIS INCLUDES THE CITIES OF...FRANKLIN...BROOKLINE...
SUFFOLK COUNTY IN EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS...
THIS INCLUDES THE CITY OF BOSTON...
SOUTHERN MIDDLESEX COUNTY IN SOUTHEAST MASSACHUSETTS...
THIS INCLUDES THE CITIES OF...WALTHAM...SOMERVILLE...NEWTON...
FRAMINGHAM...CAMBRIDGE...

* UNTIL 615 PM EDT

* AT 307 PM EDT...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED
FLASH FLOODING FROM RAINS ASSOCIATED WITH HURRICANE IRENE OVER THE
WARNED AREA. RAINFALL RATES OVER 2 INCHES AN HOUR HAVE BEEN
REPORTED BY AUTOMATED RAIN GAGES AND RADAR ESTIMATES WITH HEAVIER
BANDS OF RAIN.

FLASH FLOODING OF SMALL STREAMS AND URBAN AREAS IS OCCURRING OR
IMMINENT. THOSE NEAR STREAMS AND CREEKS...OR IN AREAS PRONE TO
FLOODING SHOULD MOVE TO HIGHER GROUND IMMEDIATELY. AVOID FLOODED
ROADS. THE WATER MAY BE TOO DEEP TO ALLOW VEHICLES TO CROSS SAFELY...
OR THE ROADWAY MAY BE UNDERMINED. TURN AROUND...DONT DROWN!

&&

LAT...LON 4252 7104 4247 7105 4243 7101 4244 7096
4241 7098 4236 7096 4232 7101 4232 7103
4231 7103 4202 7138 4202 7183 4223 7173
4259 7136

$$

SIPPRELL
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Quoting zoomiami:
The young boy who died in Newport News was in an apartment that a tree came down on.

Such a shame, the mom tried to keep them safe, but had no control over this.


This is why I am scared to sleep at night, when Irene will be at her worst in my area as my bedroom is right next to a mature oak tree.
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New Jersey is not currently listed in the warning area for Hurricane Local Statement.
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Quoting nrtiwlnvragn:


It may have been partly to force them to make a decision. The longer they left it open, the longer people may delay leaving.
Could be . I just thought it strange since although I have never been there I am aware that many do not drive. I fear for the people stuck there with so many high rises and glass windows.
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Quoting BostonWench:


Plus, all the people RUNNING the subway and moving the cars need a chance to get somewhere safe, as well. Not a great decision, but I don't know that any decision would be perfect.

Meanwhile, up in Boston, where parts of the T (subway) have been known to flood with bad enough thunderstorms, the MBTA is planning on keeping everything open as of right now. Here's a link to the official MBTA site. The MBTA also runs the commuter rail and buses in the area; no plans for shutdown, but they are saying delays on Sunday.
They will probably close the green line near the Muddy River, due to eventual flooding, like last year during March
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 694
Quoting FLdewey:
The call to end transit at noon MAY have been a tad premature.

Ahh well... hindsight is 20/20 right?


It takes them 8 hours to get everything put away, off tracks, etc. Seems like a good time to me.
Member Since: August 22, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 1455
596. amd
Looking at both recon reports and radar, it seems that Irene will enter the Atlantic again somewhere around Elizabeth City, NC.
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Commadore + Cards on boat + Hurricane = Darwin Awards.

There was a guy who decided to ride out Alica on a boat in 1983. They found his body in his boat, 2 miles away, on a highway.

As a fellow sailor, I'm very disapointed. This guy is making a terribel mistake and example.

BTW, send some ICE and RAIN our way.. 109 a new record for Houston.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting atmoaggie:
A "cold front" kicking off a heat wave...

That's what I've been telling folks about the next few days.


Yeah. We also cooled down to 100 today.

Orange County Airport
Lat: 30.07 Lon: -93.8 Elev: 13
Last Update on Aug 27, 2:55 pm CDT

Partly Cloudy

100 °F
(38 °C)
Humidity: 37 %
Wind Speed: N 7 MPH
Barometer: 29.83"
Dewpoint: 70 °F (21 °C)
Heat Index: 107 °F (42 °C)
Visibility: 10.00 mi.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 67
Quoting BrockBerlin:


I think you are a little too cynical in this regard, I think it is mainly because people see its SS category and discount it, I imagine they would do the same if it was headed for NOLA


I know there's been some discussion criticizing the continued use of the Saffir-Simpson scale for exactly this reason. We've had enough anomalous storms in recent years that I see their point. Cat 1 winds with "storm surge typical of a Cat 4" doesn't translate well to ordinary people. And the pressure gradient for Irene doesn't match the scale at all. It would be nice to see something like an A-B-C scale, where wind, rain, and surge each have a threat value.
Member Since: August 30, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 85
Quoting nrtiwlnvragn:


It may have been partly to force them to make a decision. The longer they left it open, the longer people may delay leaving.


Plus, all the people RUNNING the subway and moving the cars need a chance to get somewhere safe, as well. Not a great decision, but I don't know that any decision would be perfect.

Meanwhile, up in Boston, where parts of the T (subway) have been known to flood with bad enough thunderstorms, the MBTA is planning on keeping everything open as of right now. Here's a link to the official MBTA site. The MBTA also runs the commuter rail and buses in the area; no plans for shutdown, but they are saying delays on Sunday.
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Quoting SPLbeater:
Irene looking good...what are the chances she intensifies to atleast a high-end Cat 1 once more?


It doesn't look like any intensification is going to occur, but she will be maintaining herself pretty well until she hits New England.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26611
Quoting Grothar:


I'll just let that line go and not finish.


lol :)
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Quoting CrazyDuke:
I am in NoVA as well, currently. It looks like about 15 sustained, gusting to 25 occasionally here. But, I'm just eyeballing it.


It's on the way. I've been getting some pretty serious gusts in Northwest Richmond.
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Quoting P451:


They want it to hit South Florida, NOLA, Haiti, Grand Cayman, or the Lesser Antilles.

As soon as all these places were out of harms way this blog went from hyping the storm to claiming it was a fart in the breeze.

That's just the way this place is. If this same exact storm was in the Gulf heading for NOLA at the same intensity and presentation this place would be a flood of OMG DOOM EVERYONE STAY SAFE posts.

Those joking would have their posts deleted and they would be banned.

But since it's coming up here it's considered a huge joke to be made fun of and is a nothing storm.

Even reports of deaths in NC and VA aren't swaying their opinions that it's a joke of a storm and we're overreacting.

Pathetic, misinformed, and immature.



No-one WANTS a hurricane to hit them except maybe JFV and as for over-hyping it maybe some think that since it was supposed to make landfall as a CAT3-4 and it obviously didn't. I for one do not consider it a nothing storm since many have and will be affected by it but your holier than thou personality does not help. You seem to know quite a bit about hurricanes and weather in general but as they say in the islands "Self praise is no recommendation."
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Quoting ConnecticutWXGuy:
I'm tired of all the morons claiming they're over-hyping this storm. Even if it is over-hyped, that's a heck of a lot better than under-hype. There's no such thing as a perfect forecast, so every major event is going to be over-hyped or under-hyped. Which would you prefer?


When Irene was Cat-3 over the Bahamas, there was no media hype, and the locals just accepted the reality of it and hunkered down. Winds to 120 MPH gusting higher were common.

Now we have a Cat-1 storm and The Weather Channel and a bunch of weather dudes are saying it is Armageddon, the end of the world, and ultimate destruction. Myself, I have actually survived many Cat-1 storms without evacuating, so I don't pull any punches about that.
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Quoting presslord:
the Commodore of the NY Yacht Club is gonna ride out the storm aboard his sailboat playing poker with his buddies...


Possible Darwin award contenders...
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Quoting LoveObama:
Aurora, NC has people swimming to the fire department. PCS Phosphate is underwater and is the major employer in the area. My uncle was working there and we have not heard from him yet.


Hope he's alright.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 67

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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