Irene continues to weaken

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 8:46 PM GMT on August 26, 2011

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Satellite data and measurements from the Hurricane Hunters show that Irene continues to weaken. A 1:32 pm EDT center fix by an Air Force Reserve aircraft found that Irene's eyewall is still gone, and the central pressure had risen to 951 mb from a low of 942 mb this morning. The winds measured in Irene near the surface support classifying it as a strong Category 1 hurricane or weak Category 2. Satellite imagery shows a distinctly lopsided appearance to Irene's cloud pattern, with not much heavy thunderstorm activity on the southwest side. This is due to moderate southwesterly wind shear of 10 - 20 knots. This shear is disrupting Irene's circulation and has cut off upper-level outflow along the south side of the hurricane. No eye is visible in satellite loops, but the storm's size is certainly impressive. Long range radar out of Wilmington, North Carolina, shows that the outermost spiral bands from Irene have moved ashore over North Carolina. Winds at buoy 41004 100 miles offshore from Charleston, SC increased to 47 mph, gusting to 60 mph at 3 pm EDT, with significant wave heights of 25 feet.


Figure 1. MODIS satellite image of Hurricane Irene taken at 11:50 am EDT Friday August 26, when Irene was a Category 2 hurricane with 105 mph winds. The eyewall collapsed several hours before this image was taken, and no eye is apparent. Image credit: a href=http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/ NASA.


Figure 2. Distribution of Irene's wind field at 3:30 pm EDT Friday August 26, 2011, as observed by the Hurricane Hunters and buoys. The right front quadrant of the hurricane had about 90% of the storm's hurricane-force winds (yellow and warmer colors, bounded by the heavy black line between the "50" and "60" knot thin black lines.) Tropical storm-force winds (heavy black like bounding the light blue area) extended out 290 miles from the center of Irene. Image credit: NOAA/AOML/HRD.

Forecast for Irene
With its eyewall collapsed and just 18 more hours over water before landfall, Irene does not have time to build a new eyewall and intensify. The storm is too large to weaken quickly, and the best forecast is that Irene will be a strong Category 1 hurricane at landfall in North Carolina on Saturday. Based on the latest wind analysis from NOAA's Hurricane Research Division (Figure 2) and Irene's continued weakening trend, I predict that the 80-mile section of North Carolina coast to the right of where Irene makes landfall will receive sustained hurricane-force winds of 75 - 85 mph on Saturday at landfall; the 80-mile section of coast to the left will receive 55 - 75 mph winds. High wind shear of 30 knots will begin ripping into Irene Sunday morning when it is near Southern New Jersey, and more rapid weakening will occur. By the time Irene arrives on Long Island Sunday afternoon, it will probably have top sustained winds in the 65 - 75 mph range. However, since Irene is such a huge storm--tropical storm force winds extend out up to 290 miles from the center--it has set a massive amount of the ocean's surface in motion, which will cause a much larger storm surge than the winds would suggest. At 3:30 pm EDT this afternoon, a wind analysis from NOAA/HRD (Figure 2) indicated that the potential storm surge damage from Irene still rated a 5.0 on a scale of 0 to 6. This is equivalent to the storm surge a typical Category 4 hurricane would have. While this damage potential should steadily decline as Irene moves northwards and weakens, we can still expect a storm surge one full Saffir-Simpson Category higher than Irene's winds when it impacts the coast. Since tides are at their highest levels of the month this weekend due to the new moon, storm surge flooding will be at a maximum during the high tidal cycles that will occur at 8 pm Saturday night and 8 am Sunday morning. Wherever Irene happens to be at those times, the storm surge damage potential will be maximized. I continue to give a 20% chance that a 3 - 4 foot storm surge high enough to over-top the Manhattan flood walls and swamp the New York City subway system will occur on Sunday. The latest 11 am probabilistic storm surge map from NHC shows a 20 - 30% chance of a storm surge in excess of 3 feet in New York Harbor (Figure 4.) Keep in mind that these maps are calculated for normal tide level, and this weekend's high tides will be nearly 1 foot above normal.

Insurance company AIR-Worldwide is estimating that insured damages from Irene in the U.S. will be $1.5 - $6 billion. They estimate losses in the Caribbean at $0.5 - $1.1 billion from Irene.


Figure 3. Storm surge heights, in feet above normal tide level, which have a 20 percent chance of being exceeded during the next 3 days.  The graphic is based upon an ensemble of Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model runs using the current National Hurricane Center (NHC) official hurricane advisory. The exceedance heights depend on the historical accuracy of NHCs forecasts of hurricane track, and wind speed, and an estimate of storm size. Image credit: NOAA.


Figure 4. Overall chance that storm surges will be greater than 3 feet above normal tide levels during the next 3 days.  The graphic is based upon an ensemble of Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model runs using the current National Hurricane Center (NHC) official hurricane advisory.  Storm surge probabilities depend on the historical accuracy of NHCs forecasts of hurricane track, and wind speed, and an estimate of storm size. Image credit: NOAA.

Links
For those of you wanting to know your odds of receiving hurricane force or tropical storm force winds, I recommend the NHC wind probability product.

Wunderground has detailed storm surge maps for the U.S. coast.

The National Hurricane Center's Interactive Storm Surge RIsk Map, which allows one to pick a particular Category hurricane and zoom in, is a good source of storm surge risk information.

Wunderblogger Mike Theiss is in Nassau, documenting the storm's impact on the Bahamas.

Internet radio show on Irene at 4:30pm EDT
Wunderground meteorologists will be discussing Hurricane Irene on a special edition of our Internet radio show, the Daily Downpour, today (Friday) at 4:30pm EDT. Shaun Tanner , Tim Roche, Angela Fritz, and Rob Carver will take your questions. The email address to ask questions is broadcast@wunderground.com.

Jeff Masters

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I was surfing in the same area as the young man who drowned earlier. It is a very tragic situation that could have been easily avoided. He appeared to be a novice surfer. It is devastating. People seem to always underestimate the power of the ocean. I am located less than 5 miles from the oceanfront and will provide updates as long as I can.
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NYC evacuation shelters will be pet-friendly. Please don't leave them behind. And this is a major step forward! Kudos to NYC! See our site for more info.

http://www.aspca.org/Blog/08-26-11-1-aspca-pet-pa rents-prepare-for-hurricane-irene.aspx
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Quoting yoboi:
from a first responders point of view if you decided to stay in an EVAC zone please write your name and ss number not only on your arm but in 3 places because during katrina seemed like crabs ate alot of flesh away when we were in recovery mode it helps us out a bunch please use an sharpie or some sort of perm marker... thanks.......


that's hard core...but sometimes the truth is.
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Quoting yoboi:
from a first responders point of view if you decided to stay in an EVAC zone please write your name and ss number not only on your arm but in 3 places because during katrina seemed like crabs ate alot of flesh away when we were in recovery mode it helps us out a bunch please use an sharpie or some sort of perm marker... thanks.......


Sobering.
... And a needed reminder.
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Question, if Irene only skirts the Outer Banks and is not overly impacted by land, how far north would surface temperatures allow strengthening (if it ever gets its eye together), or maintenance of its current strength?
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Quoting chicagowatcher:

webcam from topsail island is really impressive.

cam


WOW. How long do you suppose that pier is going to hold?
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If i were in Lower Manhattan (near the WTC site) i would leave, due to equitment,and the window panes, which are unevenly rising, to leave because of the immense danger of flying debris.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 701
Quoting ConnecticutWXGuy:
I think the people who are downplaying this system because they are angry at the inconvenience the warnings are causing in NYC are the most ignorant of all. Glad they aren't the ones in charge.


I think the idea is that after Irene hits the Hatteras area and heads to the NYC/New England area, it could start degrading - you might say extra-tropical, baroclinic, cold-core, sub-tropical storm, blown to bits, and one heckuva windy rain storm, whatever. But you're right, best to err on the side of precaution.

What many think is that while Weather Underground has been pretty honest, Jeff and Angela and the gang, The Weather Channel is selling outright fear and disaster and Armageddon. I agree that it's not cool to do that. You watch as people drive right into a freaking inland flood.
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994. yoboi
from a first responders point of view if you decided to stay in an EVAC zone please write your name and ss number not only on your arm but in 3 places because during katrina seemed like crabs ate alot of flesh away when we were in recovery mode it helps us out a bunch please use an sharpie or some sort of perm marker... thanks.......
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Quoting scott39:
Levi, is Irene turning NNE at the forcasted point?


She made the turn yesterday a little earlier than the NHC forecasted, and she is more or less following today's projected track, but she's slightly east of it right now, and the short-term track may be slightly too far inland over NC right now.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26695
Have the east casters,it's going to miss land altogether returned yet?
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Old Yellow pines are really good for slicing homes in half like a knife. A lot of hardwoods fell during Isabel. But, those pine trees really did a number to homes and everything else that was unlucky enough to be under one. I guess it's easier to situate a house under a pine canopy than a bunch of bushed out hardwoods.
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Tornado watches and warnings in eastern N. Carolina, according to TWC.
Member Since: August 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 884
Wilmington-gusting to 53mph now

9:12 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.45 in 2.5 mi NNE 27.6 mph 52.9 mph 0.13 in Rain Rain
Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 446
Quoting scott39:
Levi, is Irene turning NNE at the forcasted point?


Not Levi, but Irene looks like it will go slightly east of the next forecast point.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Our yard has major problems...


??
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Quoting ConnecticutWXGuy:


Well I'll agree there, Cantori is somewhat exaggerating the risk... but I think the call to evacuate high rises is a smart move... no matter how much Cantori is exaggerating is predictions.
Wasn't it Ike that blew out so many windows in Houston? And by the time Ike hit Houston, was it cat 1 or 2?
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West Beach, Bald Head Island, North Carolina (PWS)
Updated: 9:22 PM EDT on August 26, 2011

74.9 °F / 23.8 °C
Rain
Humidity: 100%
Dew Point: 75 °F / 24 °C
Wind: 51.0 mph / 82.1 km/h / 22.8 m/s from the NE

Wind Gust: 60.0 mph / 96.6 km/h / 23.7 m/s

Pressure: 29.29 in / 991.8 hPa (Steady)
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26695
Levi, is Irene turning NNE at the forcasted point?
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According to wavewatch, the Northern OBX are going to eat alot of ocean, so I wouldn't be too sure about NC escaping the worst of that.

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Precipitation 2.42 in Wilmington rainfall today so far
Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 446
Dr. Forbes sporting the pink shirt...nice, Doc...also..tornado warnings already...not so nice
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Quoting 996tt:


Nope the dude talking right now said unsafe, flying stuff, debris and etc. He was diagraming venturi effect, but he did not call it as such. Justified. Seriously, if you are going to say something like this a day before, you need to have a solution. Where does he expect 5 million people to go to. If stretch it to make a problem of this magnitude, need to offer a solution.


Well considering you referenced him as "dude" I couldn't pinpoint who you were actually referring to. However, at 7:50 EST this evening, Mayor Boomberg was televised on TWC stating exactly what I referenced above.

In response to a question from a reporter saying a lot of people in high rises in Battery Park have a false sense of security saying their safe on the upper levels, what would you say to them?

Michael Bloomberg - "The trouble is that the basements get flooded and a lot of the mechanical equipment and power equipment is in the basement. And if you had to get in or out or if we had to get emergency service people there, an ambulance, a doctor, a firefighter or policeman, we probably couldn't do it. So yes, I'm sure you would be fine if you stayed in the upper floors of the building, but it's just not safe to be in a building where in an emergency you can't get help."

Gotta love DVR's sometimes. :-)

In all seriousness, if you're in zone A and live in a high rise, regardless what floor you live on, please heed the evacuation order. As for where the 5 million people should go? Well I'm sure we would all agree that 5 million people evacuating to safe locations (shelters, friends, family, co-workers) is much better then hundreds or thousands of deaths from emergency situations in high rises that first responders simply couldn't reach due to flooding.
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This is more of a general question – since Irene doesn’t have an eye right now…

Would a northbound hurricane hitting the outer banks, say around Ocracoke, even notice that it’s made landfall? Or would it continue to act like it’s over the ocean when it’s over the sound (sound water warmer than the sourrounding ocean)?

I hope this isn't a dumb question
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977. 996tt
Quoting tiggeriffic:


That the one here in the Charleston area?


Said Virginia Beach I think.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Our yard has major problems...


Are you okay?
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The eye is just coming onto the Wilmington radar !!!
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Irene appears to be filling in the dry air wedge we saw earlier. Also note the increase in red pixels from earlier, showing even colder cloud tops. Still no complete eyewall yet but it's getting there. Running out of time to intensify any before landfall, which is good for the Carolinas.
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972. 996tt
Quoting ConnecticutWXGuy:


Well I'll agree there, Cantori is somewhat exaggerating the risk... but I think the call to evacuate high rises is a smart move... no matter how much Cantori is exaggerating is predictions.


I guess I am just wondering where he expects them to go. Good call if alternative, but with no alternative, better to safe in strong structure then be stuck on the road somewhere.
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971. txjac
Quoting P451:
12hr wv imagery loop



That's a big girl.


And angry looking ...
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BREAKING: Port Authority now says ALL airports in NYC region closed to arrivals as of Sat noon.

Yikes.
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Those of you in NC things will get worse so stay safe.
Member Since: August 12, 2007 Posts: 2 Comments: 2838
Quoting Levi32:


Alright Dennis. I must have had the wrong weather station then lol.


Happens
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Quoting Levi32:


No, because NC is not in the way of the water getting pushed. Irene's eye is going to pass over the very outer banks of North Carolina, and the storm surge is focused directly ahead of the eye and east of it. All of this water is rushing northward right up the coast.

Man..East coast can't win for losing with Irene..
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Wilmington Since 4:45 pm--wx getting worse by the minute/hour
4:45 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.66 in 0.8 mi NE 20.7 mph 29.9 mph N/A Rain Heavy Rain
4:48 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.66 in 1.5 mi NE 27.6 mph 41.4 mph 0.72 in Rain Rain
4:50 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.65 in 3.0 mi NE 28.8 mph 41.4 mph 0.72 in Rain Light Rain
4:53 PM 77.0 °F - 73.9 °F 90% 29.66 in 6.0 mi NE 25.3 mph 41.4 mph 0.73 in Rain Light Rain
5:00 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.66 in 10.0 mi NE 20.7 mph 34.5 mph 0.00 in Rain Light Rain
5:34 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.64 in 3.0 mi ENE 27.6 mph 42.6 mph 0.09 in Rain Heavy Rain
5:53 PM 75.0 °F - 73.0 °F 94% 29.63 in 4.0 mi NE 23.0 mph 32.2 mph 0.16 in Rain Rain
6:37 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.58 in 1.8 mi NNE 28.8 mph 40.3 mph 0.10 in Rain Heavy Rain
6:51 PM 75.2 °F - 71.6 °F 89% 29.56 in 3.0 mi NNE 32.2 mph 43.7 mph 0.16 in Rain Rain
6:52 PM 75.0 °F - 72.0 °F 90% 29.56 in 3.0 mi NNE 31.1 mph 43.7 mph 0.16 in Rain Rain
7:50 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.52 in 2.5 mi NNE 27.6 mph 44.9 mph 0.26 in Rain Heavy Rain
7:53 PM 73.9 °F - 72.0 °F 93% 29.52 in 2.5 mi NNE 27.6 mph 44.9 mph 0.26 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:00 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.50 in 3.0 mi NNE 25.3 mph 38.0 mph 0.05 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:23 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.50 in 2.0 mi NNE 29.9 mph 44.9 mph 0.16 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:30 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.49 in 1.5 mi NNE 32.2 mph 43.7 mph 0.26 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:37 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.48 in 1.8 mi NNE 33.4 mph 42.6 mph 0.33 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:53 PM 73.9 °F - 73.0 °F 97% 29.47 in 1.0 mi NNE 29.9 mph 47.2 mph 0.57 in Rain Heavy Rain
9:02 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.46 in 2.0 mi NNE 35.7 mph 47.2 mph 0.07 in Rain Heavy Rain
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Quoting MissNadia:

Station 41013 - Frying Pan Shoals, NC Buoy
August 26, 2011 8:50 pm EDT
Location: 33.436N 77.743W
Wind Direction: NNE (30°)
Wind Speed: 33.0 knots
Wind Gust: 44.7 knots
Significant Wave Height: 27.6 ft
Dominant Wave Period: 15 sec
Average Period: 9.6 sec
Mean Wave Direction: SSE (147°)
Atmospheric Pressure: 29.13 in (986.3 mb)
Pressure Tendency: -0.14 in (-4.8 mb)
Air Temperature: 80.6°F (27.0°C)
Dew Point: 78.4°F (25.8°C)
Water Temperature: 82.8°F (28.2°C)


Evening Miss, good to see ya. Stay safe!
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Quoting Dennis8:


4:45 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.66 in 0.8 mi NE 20.7 mph 29.9 mph N/A Rain Heavy Rain
4:48 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.66 in 1.5 mi NE 27.6 mph 41.4 mph 0.72 in Rain Rain
4:50 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.65 in 3.0 mi NE 28.8 mph 41.4 mph 0.72 in Rain Light Rain
4:53 PM 77.0 °F - 73.9 °F 90% 29.66 in 6.0 mi NE 25.3 mph 41.4 mph 0.73 in Rain Light Rain
5:00 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.66 in 10.0 mi NE 20.7 mph 34.5 mph 0.00 in Rain Light Rain
5:34 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.64 in 3.0 mi ENE 27.6 mph 42.6 mph 0.09 in Rain Heavy Rain
5:53 PM 75.0 °F - 73.0 °F 94% 29.63 in 4.0 mi NE 23.0 mph 32.2 mph 0.16 in Rain Rain
6:37 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.58 in 1.8 mi NNE 28.8 mph 40.3 mph 0.10 in Rain Heavy Rain
6:51 PM 75.2 °F - 71.6 °F 89% 29.56 in 3.0 mi NNE 32.2 mph 43.7 mph 0.16 in Rain Rain
6:52 PM 75.0 °F - 72.0 °F 90% 29.56 in 3.0 mi NNE 31.1 mph 43.7 mph 0.16 in Rain Rain
7:50 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.52 in 2.5 mi NNE 27.6 mph 44.9 mph 0.26 in Rain Heavy Rain
7:53 PM 73.9 °F - 72.0 °F 93% 29.52 in 2.5 mi NNE 27.6 mph 44.9 mph 0.26 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:00 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.50 in 3.0 mi NNE 25.3 mph 38.0 mph 0.05 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:23 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.50 in 2.0 mi NNE 29.9 mph 44.9 mph 0.16 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:30 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.49 in 1.5 mi NNE 32.2 mph 43.7 mph 0.26 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:37 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.48 in 1.8 mi NNE 33.4 mph 42.6 mph 0.33 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:53 PM 73.9 °F - 73.0 °F 97% 29.47 in 1.0 mi NNE 29.9 mph 47.2 mph 0.57 in Rain Heavy Rain
9:02 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.46 in 2.0 mi NNE 35.7 mph 47.2 mph 0.07 in Rain Heavy Rain


Alright Dennis. I must have had the wrong weather station then lol.
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26695
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Our yard has major problems...


Stay safe!!!
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Quoting 996tt:


May be, but F1 can be as high as intense focused 110 mph winds and then multiplied by venturi. Is he saying there will be intense focused 110 mph winds in NYC??? Older building obviously have more serious issues, but he was talking high rises. Westin in Atlanta lost some windows also from a stronger tornado.

The point is, report the facts. the facts are, high rises are built to withstand higher winds then perhaps homes. High rises have taken direct hit from tornados and been okay. Sustained winds with this storm are not likely to be be an intense as tornadoes.

Cantori talking about right now about windows in high rises and now dude talking about venturi. Telling people to get to lower floors which is contrary to what someone else just responded. Usually hear them tell people to just stay away from windows and get toward center of building if tornado. Again, where do they expect people to go and do they really think high rises are going to see more damage than weaker built low rise structures???


Well I'll agree there, Cantori is somewhat exaggerating the risk... but I think the call to evacuate high rises is a smart move... no matter how much Cantori is exaggerating is predictions.
Member Since: November 17, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 527
961. P451
12hr wv imagery loop



That's a big girl.
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Quoting 996tt:
22 year old surfer pulled from water. God speed. Usually results from getting smacked on head by board and drowning or leash coming unattached in bad fall. Dude said rip, but we paddle in rips all the time.


That the one here in the Charleston area?
Member Since: September 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3666
Quoting Levi32:


That's a newer time than I saw, only 10 minutes old. It's getting close to TS force there then.


4:45 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.66 in 0.8 mi NE 20.7 mph 29.9 mph N/A Rain Heavy Rain
4:48 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.66 in 1.5 mi NE 27.6 mph 41.4 mph 0.72 in Rain Rain
4:50 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.65 in 3.0 mi NE 28.8 mph 41.4 mph 0.72 in Rain Light Rain
4:53 PM 77.0 °F - 73.9 °F 90% 29.66 in 6.0 mi NE 25.3 mph 41.4 mph 0.73 in Rain Light Rain
5:00 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.66 in 10.0 mi NE 20.7 mph 34.5 mph 0.00 in Rain Light Rain
5:34 PM 75.2 °F - 73.4 °F 94% 29.64 in 3.0 mi ENE 27.6 mph 42.6 mph 0.09 in Rain Heavy Rain
5:53 PM 75.0 °F - 73.0 °F 94% 29.63 in 4.0 mi NE 23.0 mph 32.2 mph 0.16 in Rain Rain
6:37 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.58 in 1.8 mi NNE 28.8 mph 40.3 mph 0.10 in Rain Heavy Rain
6:51 PM 75.2 °F - 71.6 °F 89% 29.56 in 3.0 mi NNE 32.2 mph 43.7 mph 0.16 in Rain Rain
6:52 PM 75.0 °F - 72.0 °F 90% 29.56 in 3.0 mi NNE 31.1 mph 43.7 mph 0.16 in Rain Rain
7:50 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.52 in 2.5 mi NNE 27.6 mph 44.9 mph 0.26 in Rain Heavy Rain
7:53 PM 73.9 °F - 72.0 °F 93% 29.52 in 2.5 mi NNE 27.6 mph 44.9 mph 0.26 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:00 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.50 in 3.0 mi NNE 25.3 mph 38.0 mph 0.05 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:23 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.50 in 2.0 mi NNE 29.9 mph 44.9 mph 0.16 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:30 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.49 in 1.5 mi NNE 32.2 mph 43.7 mph 0.26 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:37 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.48 in 1.8 mi NNE 33.4 mph 42.6 mph 0.33 in Rain Heavy Rain
8:53 PM 73.9 °F - 73.0 °F 97% 29.47 in 1.0 mi NNE 29.9 mph 47.2 mph 0.57 in Rain Heavy Rain
9:02 PM 73.4 °F - 71.6 °F 94% 29.46 in 2.0 mi NNE 35.7 mph 47.2 mph 0.07 in Rain Heavy Rain
Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 446
958. hamla
rule of thumb about pine trees

here in se louisiana/mississippi the height of the pine tree is also the length of the tap root
in tropical systems in this area the young trees bend from the wind direction,the older ones will snap off aprox.20-40 ft from top and get blown into the powerlines which go down.so unless u remove them and grind stumps they will be back
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Just a Reminder ALL Piblic Transit is closed Between Bridgeport Ct, and down to the Philidelphia Area, so if you didnt leave now leave before noon tommorrow when they close the Public Transit,
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 701
Our yard has major problems...
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Everyone in the path of the Irene stay safe. It will be over before you know it, and you will be fine.
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Quoting ncstorm:
its getting bad here..
Stay safe...
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Quoting muddertracker:
Levi, others...will NC knock down the amount of water Irene is pushing?


No, because NC is not in the way of the water getting pushed. Irene's eye is going to pass over the very outer banks of North Carolina, and the storm surge is focused directly ahead of the eye and east of it. All of this water is rushing northward right up the coast.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.