Irene's eyewall collapses; further intensification unlikely

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:14 PM GMT on August 26, 2011

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Satellite data and measurements from the Hurricane Hunters show that Irene is weakening. A 9:21 am EDT center fix by an Air Force Reserve aircraft found that Irene's eyewall had collapsed, and the central pressure had risen to 946 mb from a low of 942 mb this morning. The highest winds measured at their flight level of 10,000 feet were 125 mph, which would normally support classifying Irene as a Category 3 hurricane with 115 mph winds. However, these winds were not mixing down to the surface in the way we typically see with hurricanes, and the strongest surface winds seen by the aircraft with their SFMR instrument were just 90 mph in the storm's northeast eyewall. Assuming the aircraft missed sampling the strongest winds of the hurricane, it's a good guess that Irene is a mid-strength Category 2 hurricane with 100 mph winds. Satellite imagery shows a distinctly lopsided appearance to Irene's cloud pattern, with not much heavy thunderstorm activity on the southwest side. This is due to moderate wind shear of 10 - 20 knots due to upper-level winds out of the southwest. This shear is disrupting Irene's circulation and has cut off upper-level outflow along the south side of the hurricane. No eye is visible in satellite loops, but the storm's size is certainly impressive. Long range radar out of Wlimington, North Carolina, shows that the outermost spiral bands from Irene are now beginning to come ashore along the South Carolina/North Carolina border. Winds at buoy 41004 100 miles offshore from Charleston, SC increased to 36 mph as of 10 am, with significant wave heights of 18 feet.


Figure 1. Distribution of Irene's wind field at 9:30 am EDT Friday August 26, 2011, as observed by the Hurricane Hunters and buoys. The right front quadrant of the hurricane had about 90% of the storm's hurricane-force winds (yellow and warmer colors, bounded by the heavy black line between the "50" and "60" knot thin black lines.) Tropical storm-force winds (heavy black like bounding the light blue area) extended out 290 miles from the center of Irene. Image credit: NOAA/AOML/HRD.

Forecast and storm surge potential for Irene
With its eyewall collapsed and just 24 more hours over water before landfall, it is unlikely Irene will have time to build a new eyewall and intensify. The storm is too large to weaken quickly, and the best forecast is that Irene will be a Category 2 hurricane at landfall in North Carolina on Saturday, and a rapidly weakening Category 1 hurricane at its second landfall in New England on Sunday. However, since Irene is such a huge storm--tropical storm force winds extend out up to 290 miles from the center--it has set a massive amount of the ocean's surface in motion, which will cause a much larger storm surge than the winds would suggest. At 9:30am EDT this morning, a wind analysis from NOAA/HRD (Figure 1) indicated that the potential storm surge damage from Irene rated a 5.1 on a scale of 0 to 6. This is equivalent to the storm surge a typical Category 4 hurricane would have. While this damage potential should gradually decline as Irene moves northwards and weakens, we can still expect a storm surge one full Saffir-Simpson Category higher than Irene's winds. Since tides are at their highest levels of the month this weekend due to the new moon, storm surge flooding will be at a maximum during the high tidal cycles that will occur at 8 pm Saturday night and 8 am Sunday morning. Wherever Irene happens to be at those times the storm surge damage potential will be maximized. A surge rivaling that experienced during Hurricane Isabel in 2003 is likely in northern NC, southern Maryland, and up Chesapeake Bay on Saturday night. Coastal New England from New York City to Massachusetts may also see storm surges characteristic of a Category 1 hurricane during Sunday morning's high tide, even if Irene has weakened to a tropical storm. I continue to give a 20% chance that a storm surge high enough to over-top the Manhattan flood walls and swamp the New York City subway system will occur on Sunday.

Wind damage
I don't think Irene is going to do a lot of wind damage to the mid-Atlantic states, since the eye of the storm will be just offshore, and the I-95 corridor from Virginia to New Jersey will be on the weak (left) side of the hurricane. The current wind distribution of Irene (Figure 1) shows almost all of the hurricane's winds are on the right side of the storm, and by the time the storm reaches Virginia, there will be likely be no hurricane-force winds on the left side of Irene. Sustained winds should stay below 74 mph (hurricane force), and wind damage will be similar to that wrought be some of the strongest Nor'easters of the past 20 years, from Virginia northwards to New York City. Since Irene will be steadily weakening as it approaches its second landfall on Long Island, I give a 50% chance that no mainland U.S. surface station in New England will record sustained hurricane-force winds. I do think it likely that one or more of the offshore islands--Block Island, Nantucket, and Marthas Vinyard--will get Category 1 hurricane winds. Though the wind damage to buildings will be similar to what the Northeast has seen during some of the more severe nor'easters of the past 20 years, tree damage will be much worse. The trees are in full leaf during hurricane season, and catch the wind much more readily than during the winter. Tree damage will very heavy, and we can expect trees in regions with saturated soils will fall over in high winds onto power lines. Irene is likely to cause one of the top-five most widespread power outages in American history from a storm. The record power outage from a Northeast storm was probably the ten million people that lost power during the great Blizzard of 1993. I don't think Irene's power outages will be quite that extensive, but several million people will likely lose power.

Irene likely to bring destructive fresh water flooding
In addition to storm surge, flash flooding and river flooding from Irene's torrential rains are the main threats. The hurricane is expected to bring rains in excess of 8" to a 100-mile-wide swath from Eastern North Carolina northwards along the coast, through New York City. The danger of fresh water flooding is greatest in northern New Jersey, Southeast Pennsylvania, and Southeast New York, where the soils are saturated from heavy August rains that were among the heaviest on record. New Jersey has had its 6th wettest August on record, with most of that rain falling in the past two weeks. Expect major river flooding throughout New Jersey the Delmarva Peninsula, and regions near New York City, as Irene's rains run off the saturated soils directly into the rivers. In general, the heaviest rains will fall along the west side of the hurricane's track, and the greatest wind damage will occur on the east side. I don't think flooding from heavy rains will be a huge concern in North Carolina, which is under moderate to severe drought. Irene's rains are likely to do some good in Southeast Virginia, where a fire triggered by lightning from a thunderstorm on August 4 sparked a fire in the Dismal Swamp that is burning out of control. Right now, it does not appear that tornadoes will be a major concern, but there will probably be a few weak tornadoes. Hurricane Bob of 1991, the last hurricane to affect New England, spawned six tornadoes, most of them weak F-0 and F-1 twisters.


Figure 2. Predicted rainfall for the 5-day period ending at 8 am EDT Wednesday August 31, as issued by NOAA/HPC.

Links
For those of you wanting to know your odds of receiving hurricane force or tropical storm force winds, I recommend the NHC wind probability product.

Wunderground has detailed storm surge maps for the U.S. coast.

The National Hurricane Center's Interactive Storm Surge RIsk Map, which allows one to pick a particular Category hurricane and zoom in, is a good source of storm surge risk information.

Wunderblogger Mike Theiss is in Nassau, documenting the storm's impact on the Bahamas.

Internet radio show on Irene at 4:30pm EDT
Wunderground meteorologists will be discussing Hurricane Irene on a special edition of our Internet radio show, the Daily Downpour, today (Friday) at 4:30pm EDT. Shaun Tanner , Tim Roche, Angela Fritz, and Rob Carver will there, and I will be available if my schedule permits. Listeners can email in or call in questions. The email address to ask questions is broadcast@wunderground.com.

Portlight mobilizes for Irene
The Bahamas have been hit hard by Irene, and unfortunately, it appears that the Northeast U.S. may have its share of hurricane victims before Irene finally dissipates. My favorite disaster relief charity, Portlight.org, is mobilizing to help, and has sent out their relief trailer and crew to North Carolina. Check out this blog to see what they're up to; donations are always needed.

Jeff Masters

Hurricane Irene's Wrath ! (MikeTheiss)
A shot of the Palm Trees at Nassau, Bahamas being thrashed by high winds during Irene's closest approach !
Hurricane Irene's Wrath !
Aftremath of Hurricane Irene in Nassau, Bahamas (ktbahamas)
Utility pole with street light snapped in half by Irene's winds on a busy street in New Providence.
Aftremath of Hurricane Irene in Nassau, Bahamas
Irene Response (presslord)
Portlight deploying to North Carolina
Irene Response

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1379. thelmores
12:48 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
Time: 00:34:00Z
Coordinates: 32.2667N 77.0W
Acft. Static Air Press: 696.1 mb (~ 20.56 inHg)
Acft. Geopotential Hgt: 2,715 meters (~ 8,907 feet)
Extrap. Sfc. Press: 949.6 mb (~ 28.04 inHg)
D-value: -
Flt. Lvl. Wind (30s): From 2° at 5 knots (From the N at ~ 5.8 mph)
Air Temp: 14.9°C (~ 58.8°F)
Dew Pt: 11.0°C (~ 51.8°F)
Peak (10s) Flt. Lvl. Wind: 6 knots (~ 6.9 mph)
SFMR Peak (10s) Sfc. Wind: 11 knots* (~ 12.6 mph*)
SFMR Rain Rate: 0 mm/hr* (~ 0 in/hr*)
(*) Denotes suspect data
Member Since: September 8, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3805
1377. thelmores
12:47 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
From looking at the recon plots, seems clear to me that Irene does not like landfalls, and want to even avoid the outer banks......

And should this occur, and Irene then head due north, could be worse for the NE!
Member Since: September 8, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 3805
1376. Hurricanes12
12:00 AM GMT on August 27, 2011
NEW BLOG!
Member Since: June 21, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 528
1375. Trouper415
11:47 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
What is the forecast windshear for Irene until out banks landfall?

patrick
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 5 Comments: 637
1374. Speeky
10:11 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
All the birds in New York are gone. Its dead silent out here in Westchester county. Also why hasn't anyone boarded up their windows?
Member Since: April 10, 2009 Posts: 1 Comments: 306
1373. PureScience
9:57 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
I am just a high school drop out but I can't help but wonder why we even spend a dime sending Hurricane Hunters into storms to get precise measurements when the guys and gals with the degrees resort to assumptions and guesses of the storms intensity when they don't get readings to support their hype.


"Assuming the aircraft missed sampling the strongest winds of the hurricane, it's a good guess that Irene is a mid-strength Category 2 hurricane with 100 mph winds."
Dr. Jeff Masters weather blog 3:14 pm GMT 08/26/2011

A couple of quotes from others:

"Although not shown in the official
forecast...Irene could weaken just below hurricane strength before
reaching southern New England."
forecaster Brown/cangialosi


Hurricane Irene Discussion Number 23
Statement as of 11:00 PM EDT on August 25, 2011

" two hurricane hunter aircraft...one Air Force and one NOAA...are
again tonight supplying very valuable meteorological data to the
National Hurricane Center. Both planes indicate that the central
pressure is gradually falling and is now near 942 mb...but the
winds have not increased yet. The initial intensity is kept at 100
knots at this time."
forecaster Avila

The two hurricane Hunter reports preceding this forcast found maximum surface winds of 70MPH and 90MPH...Heck why not round it up to a nice even 100kts. After all 115mph Cat 3 storm is much scarier than a strong TS or a CAT 1 hurricane. I guess it is fine to ignore the data and fan the flames of fear in the public to keep the herd moving.




Member Since: March 13, 2003 Posts: 0 Comments: 10
1372. oracle28
9:51 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
IRENE COULD WEAKEN JUST BELOW HURRICANE STRENGTH BEFORE
REACHING SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND.

That's great news.
Member Since: July 25, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 596
1371. carcar1967
9:46 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting SWLACajun:


Another question, with the sewers filled to the brim, how long will the toilets on the top floors of those apartment bldgs be able to send down their contents without it spilling out into the city streets?


Does not sound good. Yuck!!!!
Member Since: June 9, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 100
1370. SWLACajun
9:43 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting uptxcoast:
If much of New York City loses power, How long will the water pressure be able to get water up to the top floors of those apartment buildings?


Another question, with the sewers filled to the brim, how long will the toilets on the top floors of those apartment bldgs be able to send down their contents without it spilling out into the city streets?
Member Since: September 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 81
1369. Patrap
9:40 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128282
1368. Patrap
9:39 PM GMT on August 26, 2011

AMSU Microwave 89GHz Imagery (4 km Mercator)

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128282
1367. TexasHurricane
9:38 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Member Since: July 2, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 2811
1366. Patrap
9:36 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128282
1365. TexasHurricane
9:35 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Member Since: July 2, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 2811
1364. uptxcoast
9:35 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
If much of New York City loses power, How long will the water pressure be able to get water up to the top floors of those apartment buildings?
Member Since: September 23, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 235
1363. SWLACajun
9:34 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting stormtopz1:


you should stop so much doom gloom when dr master title is "Irene's eyewall collapses; further intensification unlikely"

geesh


no doom gloom. Just practical and been through two cat 2 & cat 3 storms. Also can read past Dr. Master's title and actually read the article. Try it and you may get informed, as well info of others on this blog that pretty much concur. When the surge happens and all the damage that comes with it, where will you be with your "no doom gloom geez" flippant comments while others are suffering the effects of Irene?
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1362. Patrap
9:34 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128282
1361. MrNatural
9:32 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting ConnecticutWXGuy:


the highest winds I have ever experienced from a Nor'Easter was actually December 26th, 2010 which had hurricane force gusts, but Nor'Easters usually always keep their sustained high winds on the coast unlike tropical systems which tend to bring the sustained winds much further inland.


Very true. I bring this up because many bloggers are trying to predict damage without any points of comparison. A very powerful Nor'easter can cause Hurricane like damage along the coast.
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1360. K8eCane
9:30 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Weather Underground Community I for one am very grateful and thankful that we have Portlight...They will be there when we need them and that is comforting to know.
Member Since: April 26, 2006 Posts: 5 Comments: 3138
1359. VampyreGTX
9:28 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting MrNatural:
Anybody have the ability to pull up the weather maps for March 13-14, 2010? That weekend a very powerful Nor'easter roared up the east coast. JFK Airport clocked sustained winds of 60 mph and gusts to 73 mph. Rain totals were in the area of 6 inches. There was localized flooding, but the big story was the wind damage. This storm may be useful in trying to predict the damage patterns along the east coast.


What was the time frame for that event though? Irene is much larger and NY will be under it for a much longer time than most nor'easters.
Member Since: August 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 19
1357. ConnecticutWXGuy
9:27 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting MrNatural:
Anybody have the ability to pull up the weather maps for March 13-14, 2010? That weekend a very powerful Nor'easter roared up the east coast. JFK Airport clocked sustained winds of 60 mph and gusts to 73 mph. Rain totals were in the area of 6 inches. There was localized flooding, but the big story was the wind damage. This storm may be useful in trying to predict the damage patterns along the east coast.


the highest winds I have ever experienced from a Nor'Easter was actually December 26th, 2010 which had hurricane force gusts, but Nor'Easters usually always keep their sustained high winds on the coast unlike tropical systems which tend to bring the sustained winds much further inland.
Member Since: November 17, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 527
1356. AllStar17
9:26 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
The Latest
*Click on images in WU Blog to magnify them (images can be further magnified in the new window by clicking on them)






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1355. JamesSA
9:24 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting redwagon:


6. What kind of poisonous snakes live in your habitat? Run down to Goodwill and get some bite-proof boots.


Most of the poisonous snakes in Manhattan are wearing 3 piece suits.
Member Since: August 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 579
1354. MrNatural
9:24 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Anybody have the ability to pull up the weather maps for March 13-14, 2010? That weekend a very powerful Nor'easter roared up the east coast. JFK Airport clocked sustained winds of 60 mph and gusts to 73 mph. Rain totals were in the area of 6 inches. There was localized flooding, but the big story was the wind damage. This storm may be useful in trying to predict the damage patterns along the east coast.
Member Since: July 28, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 264
1353. ConnecticutWXGuy
9:24 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting stormtopz1:


a cat 1 is not intense and that is predicted for landfall


but it is still a hurricane, and sustained 74MPH winds ( a minimal category 1) is still pretty intense.
Member Since: November 17, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 527
1352. aspectre
9:23 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
30.0n77.3w has been re-evaluated&altered for H.Irene's_6pmGMT_ATCF
30.0n77.4w, 31.2n77.5w are now the most recent positions
Starting 25August_6pmGMT and ending 26August_6pmGMT

The 4 shorter line-segments represent HurricaneIrene's path
and the westernmost line-segment is the straightline projection.

Using straightline projection of the travel-speed&heading derived from the ATCF coordinates spanning the 6hours between 12pmGMT then 6pmGMT :
H.Irene's travel-speed was 13.8mph(23k/h) on a heading of 355.9degrees(N)
H.Irene was headed toward passage over Ogden,NorthCarolina ~12hours from now
(ILM is WilmingtonInternationalAirport)

Copy&paste 26.5n77.2w-27.7n77.3w, 27.7n77.3w-28.8n77.3w, 28.8n77.3w-30.0n77.4w, 30.0n77.4w-31.2n77.5w, ilm, 30.0n77.4w-34.246n77.768w into the GreatCircleMapper for more info

The previous mapping (for 26August_12pmGMT)
Member Since: August 21, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 4860
1351. redwagon
9:22 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting TexasGulf:
If you live in Long Island or lower Manhattan, here are a few things to keep in mind;

1)


6. What kind of poisonous snakes live in your habitat? Run down to Goodwill and get some bite-proof boots.
Member Since: August 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3248
1348. stormtopz1
9:19 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting carcar1967:



How do you define intense? What is your determining factor that causes a hurricane to be intense? Cat 3, 4, or 5? You can have intense thunder storms with 60 mph winds be called intense. So why can't a cat 2 hurricane with 100 mph winds be called intense?


a cat 1 is not intense and that is predicted for landfall
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1347. aspectre
9:18 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
testing
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1346. GTcooliebai
9:18 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting P451:
Scope of winds is incredible Jersey Shore expecting 65-85 sustained gusting 100. SE Mass expecting 50-60 sustained gusting 70.

That is gigantic.

How long of a duration are they expecting those winds, and how much rainfall in those areas?
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1345. ConnecticutWXGuy
9:14 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting stormtopz1:
an intense hurricane = eye

intense hurricane = katrina



either way, you were claiming that no eye = no hurricane

"please don't call hurricane without an eye, all hurricane have eye"

but you are still incorrect, as intense hurricanes have and do occur without having a distinct eye
Member Since: November 17, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 527
1343. carcar1967
9:12 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting stormtopz1:


you have to be kidding. LOL

all intense hurricanes have eyes!



How do you define intense? What is your determining factor that causes a hurricane to be intense? Cat 3, 4, or 5? You can have intense thunder storms with 60 mph winds be called intense. So why can't a cat 2 hurricane with 100 mph winds be called intense?
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1342. stormtopz1
9:12 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
an intense hurricane = eye

intense hurricane = katrina

Member Since: July 27, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 72
1341. ConnecticutWXGuy
9:12 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting stormtopz1:


you have to be kidding. LOL

all intense hurricanes have eyes!


It's true. There have been Category 3 hurricanes with no eyes... in fact Irene was one of those at times. A hurricane doesn't need an eye to be a hurricane. 74MPH sustained winds is still a hurricane, eye or no eye.
Member Since: November 17, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 527
1340. MississippiWx
9:12 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
I think some are giving way too much credit to the Gulf Stream. It's not the only factor we are dealing with. If Irene strengthens any, it will be a minimal gain of 5-10mph. She has already assembled her main weapon and that is the storm surge.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10247
1339. ConnecticutWXGuy
9:11 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Hurricane Warning now in effect for CT shore, still a Hurricane Watch for the rest of southern CT and a Tropical Storm watch for the rest
Member Since: November 17, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 527
1338. stormtopz1
9:09 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting ConnecticutWXGuy:


there have been very intense hurricanes in the past with no eye... that doesn't make them NOT a hurricane


you have to be kidding. LOL

all intense hurricanes have eyes!
Member Since: July 27, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 72
1337. HellaGoose
9:09 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Recon has found a couple findings of 950...at very least seems to not be weakening anymore at the moment.
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1336. weathermancer
9:08 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting weatherjr:
Hurricane Irene NOT as bad as predicted. NY subway smart rats will remain in their protected habitat and will not invade the streets. They have a very good adaptability potential, much better than us. They live from us and with us in a paceful way. Danger (from the storm) will diminish as time passes...


LOL. Will you be watching the storm tonight?, because you might have a surprise in the morning...
Member Since: August 29, 2009 Posts: 12 Comments: 482
1334. stormtopz1
9:06 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting 996tt:
Still looking kind of weak. Any new news. Is TWC still calling this the storm of the century and a worst case scenario? Looks like good news to me.


they do that to scare people to much and media needs sponsor.
Member Since: July 27, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 72
1333. zawxdsk
9:05 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Does anyone else really hate the Mercator Projection that the NHC still uses for its Hurricane Tracking maps. (It's the reason why Greenland is often the size of the United states)

I know it gets complicated to hand-plot maps, but this is the 21st century - map it on a computer and find an appropriate display. Mercator is fine for equatorial areas but at the very least, use Robinson or something once we get about 30 degrees!
Member Since: August 2, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 195
1332. ConnecticutWXGuy
9:05 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Quoting stormtopz1:


quote "Irene's eyewall collapses; further intensification unlikely"

no eye = no intense

education not needed for that


there have been very intense hurricanes in the past with no eye... that doesn't make them NOT a hurricane
Member Since: November 17, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 527
1331. TexasGulf
9:04 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
If you live in Long Island or lower Manhattan, here are a few things to keep in mind;

1) From being in a few hurricanes and tropical storms, when the electricity goes out and the wind is blowing tropical rains... you will NOT be able to see outside except between lightning flashes. If you even think that you might have to go out in the storm (to check on animals, etc...) have a really GOOD flashlight and try to memorize where everything is. Know where the ditches are. Know how to get back to the house. If you can't find your way back blindfolded NOW... don't think about going out.

2) If you live in a possible flooding area and your family will be staying home... make everyone wear GLOW BRACELETS that night. (the kind that comes 3 per package for $1.00). Glow bracelets are water resistant and you can see them easily during a dark night. You at least will be able to see each other if everything goes dark. If you have to evac... you can see where everyone is.

3) If you live in an area with large trees... DONT go out around them. Limbs falling probably cause the 2nd most deaths in hurricanes other than storm surge flooding.

4) If an electrical line is down (they will be all over the place) assume every one of them is live. After tropical storm Allison, several people were electrocuted by either contact with live wires or stepping into a puddle or touching a metal shed on which wires had fallen. If you don't know... then it's "live" until proven otherwise.

5) Animals will be nervous during a storm. Make them comfortable, but don't BOTHER them. Nervous animals can react unexpectedly. Even if the dogs down the street are running loose... maybe call them in out of the storm, but don't assume that they will be calm like normal. Nervous animals can be dangerous.
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1330. drg0dOwnCountry
9:04 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
1329. 996tt
9:03 PM GMT on August 26, 2011
Still looking kind of weak. Any new news. Is TWC still calling this the storm of the century and a worst case scenario? Looks like good news to me.
Member Since: September 5, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 308

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.