Powerful Category 3 Irene enters the Bahamas

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:49 PM GMT on August 24, 2011

Share this Blog
20
+

Powerful Category 3 Hurricane Irene stormed through the Turks and Caicos Islands overnight, bringing hurricane-force winds, torrential rains, and storm surge flooding. On Providenciales in the Turks and Caicos Islands, where half of the population of these islands live, winds reached a sustained 65 mph at a personal weather station at Pine Cay, and the pressure bottomed out at 989 mb. The eyewall of Irene missed the island, with the center of the storm passing about 60 miles to the southwest. The center of Irene passed about 60 miles to the northwest of Grand Inagua Island, and Category 1 hurricane conditions were probably experienced on that island. Damage in the Turks and Caicos is likely to be much less than the $50 - $200 million wrought by Category 4 Hurricane Ike of 2008, since Irene's eyewall missed populated islands.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Irene.

Monday, Irene hit Puerto Rico as a tropical storm with 70 mph winds, but reached hurricane strength as it emerged into the Atlantic northwest of the capital of San Juan. One drowning death is being reported from the island, and the storm dumped up to 20 inches of rain in some areas. About 11% of the island was still without power this morning, and numerous roads were closed due to flooding and landslides. Irene did an estimated $17 million in damage to agriculture and $2 million to ports in Puerto Rico. Satellite estimates suggest that Irene has brought only 1 - 2 inches of rain to Haiti. With Irene now pulling away from Hispaniola, Haiti can expect only another 1 - 2 inches from the hurricane, and appears to have dodged a major bullet. Heavy rains of 3 - 6 inches were common across the Dominican Republic, where moderate flooding but no deaths occurred.


Track forecast for Irene
Continuing dropsonde missions by the NOAA jet have helped to significantly narrow the uncertainty in the 1 - 3 day forecasts from the computer models. Irene will track through the central Bahamas today, the northwestern Bahamas on Thursday, and approach the Outer Banks of North Carolina on Friday. However, the models still diverge considerably on their 4 - 5 days forecasts, and we don't know if Irene will plow up the mid-Atlantic coast into New Jersey, as the GFDL model is predicting, hit New England between Long Island, NY and Massachusetts, as the ECMWF, GFS, and HWRF models are predicting, or miss the U.S. and hit Canada, as the NOGAPS model is predicting.

Intensity forecast for Irene
Latest data from the Hurricane Hunters shows that Irene has paused in its intensification cycle. A gap has opened in the eyewall, and the central pressure has remained constant at 956 - 957 mb over the past few hours. However, the hurricane is embedded in a large envelope of moisture, and wind shear is expected to remain low to moderate, 5 - 20 knots, for the next three days. With water temperatures very warm, 28 - 30°C, these conditions should allow for intensification to a Category 4 storm sometime in the next two days. Satellite loops show that Irene is well-organized, with excellent upper-level outflow, and impressive spiral banding.

Irene's impact on the Bahama Islands
Irene is making a direct hit on Crooked Island (population 350) in the Bahamas, and will continue west-northwest and hit Rum Cay (population 80) and Cat Island (population 1700) late tonight. These unfortunate islands will bear the full brunt of Irene's 115+ mph winds and 8 - 13 foot storm surge, and suffer major damage that will take months to recover from. Major damage is also likely on Long Island (population 3000) and San Salvador Island (population 1000.) Shortly after midnight tonight, winds at the capital of Nassau, home to 70% of the population of the Bahamas, will rise above tropical storm force, and increase through the night. By late morning on Thursday, sustained winds will peak on Nassau at just below hurricane force, 60 - 70 mph. Nassau will miss the brunt of the storm, and I expect the airport should be able to re-open on Friday. Winds on Grand Bahama Island in Freeport will rise above tropical storm force late Thursday morning, and increase to a peak of 45 - 60 mph late Thursday afternoon. Grand Bahama will also miss the brunt of the storm, but Abaco Island to its east will likely experience Category 2 hurricane conditions Thursday afternoon. However, Abaco will probably miss the right front eyewall of Irene with the strongest winds and highest storm surge.


Figure 2. Wind distibution around Irene as of 1330 UTC (9:30am EDT) August 24, 2011. Irene was a Category 3 hurricane with 115 mph winds at the time. Hurricane force winds (yellow colors) extended over Crooked Island to the storm's northwest, and over Mayaguana Island to the east. Image credit: NOAA/AOML. Irene is a large storm, and its potential storm surge damage rated 3.9 on a scale of 0 to 6, with its wind damage potential rated at 2.5 on a scale of 0 to 6.

Irene's impact on the Southeast U.S.
Long-period ocean swells from Irene will reach the coast from Florida to North Carolina tonight, and continue to build as the storm approaches. The outermost rainbands of the hurricane will reach South Florida by Thursday morning, and spread over much of the eastern coastal portion of Florida during the day Thursday. If Irene follows the official NHC forecast through the Bahama Islands, the storm's expected radius of tropical storm-force winds of 130 - 170 miles will keep tropical storm conditions just off the east coast of Florida. Sustained winds of 20 - 30 mph can be expected along the coast of Florida during Irene's point of closest approach, and rainfall amounts of 1 - 2" will be common along the coast. Georgia, which could use the rain, will get very little. It is unlikely any airport in Florida or Georgia will need to close for Irene.

Late Friday night or early Saturday morning, Irene's outer spiral bands will move over the southern coast of North Carolina and the northeastern portion of South Carolina, and tropical storm-force winds of 39+ mph will arrive. Winds will steadily increase to hurricane force on the Outer Banks by Saturday night. The main damage from Irene in North Carolina will come from the storm's flooding rains of 4 - 12" that will fall in coastal areas. Fortunately, this region is under moderate to severe drought, so the damage will not be as severe as that experienced during Hurricane Floyd of 1999. Significant wind damage can be expected in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, and considerable storm surge damage may occur along the shores of Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds. If Irene's eye misses making landfall in North Carolina, total damage from the storm should be less than $200 million, and could be considerably less than that.


Figure 3. Sea surface temperatures for August 24, 2011. Temperatures of 26°C (79°F) are typically needed for a hurricane to maintain its strength (black line). This boundary lies just off the southern coast of New Jersey this year, which is much farther north than usual.


Figure 4. Predicted 5-day rainfall for the period ending Monday morning, August 29, at 8am EDT. Image credit: NOAA/HPC.

Irene's impact on the mid-Atlantic and New England
The impact of Irene on the mid-Atlantic and New England is highly uncertain at this point, because we don't know if the core of the storm will miss the coast or not. In general, the heaviest rains will fall along a 100-mile swath just to the west of where the center tracks, and the worst wind and storm surge damage will occur to the east. If the core of Irene stays offshore, the mid-Atlantic and New England may escape with a few hundred million dollars in damage from flooding due to heavy rains and storm surge. If Irene hits Long Island or Southeast Massachusetts, the storm has the potential to be a $10 billion disaster. Irene is one of those rare storms that has the potential to make landfall in New England as a Category 2 or stronger hurricane. It is difficult for a major Category 3 or stronger hurricane crossing north of North Carolina to maintain that intensity, because wind shear rapidly increases and ocean temperatures plunge below the 26°C (79°F) level that can support a hurricane. We do expect wind shear to rapidly increase to a high 30 - 50 knots once Irene pushes north of Delaware, which should knock the storm down by at least 15 - 30 mph before it reaches New England. However, this year sea surface temperatures 1 - 3°F warmer than average extend along the East Coast from North Carolina to New York. Waters of at least 26°C extend all the way to Southern New Jersey, which will make it easier for Irene to maintain its strength much farther to the north than a hurricane usually can. During the month of July, ocean temperature off the mid-Atlantic coast (35°N - 40°N, 75°W - 70°W) averaged 2.6°F (1.45°C) above average, the second highest July ocean temperatures since record keeping began over a century ago (the record was 3.8°F above average, set in 2010.) These warm ocean temperatures will also make Irene a much wetter hurricane than is typical, since much more water vapor can evaporate into the air from record-warm ocean surfaces. The latest precipitation forecast from NOAA's Hydrological prediction center shows that Irene could dump over 8 inches of rain over coastal New England.


Figure 5. Soil moisture profiles from yesterday show that a region of very moist soils ranking in the top 1% in recorded history (dark green colors) lie over northern New Jersey, Southeast New York, and Northeast Pennsylvania. Image credit: NOAA/CPC.

Tropical storm-force winds and heavy rains will move into Eastern Virginia Saturday afternoon, and push northwards to Delaware and coastal Maryland by late Saturday night. Tropical moisture through a deep layer of the atmosphere will also stream well ahead of Irene into New England on Saturday afternoon and evening, bringing what is called a "Predecessor Rain Event" (PRE). The Washington D.C., Baltimore, and Philadelphia airports will be right at the edge of the heavy rain and high wind area, and it currently appears they will not have to close for an extended period. The Philadelphia and New York City airports may not be as lucky, and it is possible they will suffer extended closures Sunday morning and afternoon. By late Sunday night, Irene's rains will move north of New York City, allowing the airports to re-open. The highest potential for damaging fresh-water flooding is in northern New Jersey, Southeast New York, and Northeast Pennsylvania, where soil moisture is near record high levels, and there is nowhere for the rain to go (Figure 5.) Heavy rains of 4 - 12" are likely across all of coastal New England if Irene passes within 100 miles of shore.

Links
For those of you wanting to know your odds of receiving hurricane force or tropical storm force winds, I recommend the NHC wind probability product.

Wunderground has detailed storm surge maps for the U.S. coast.

Elsewhere in the tropics
A tropical wave far out in the eastern Atlantic about 200 miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands, Invest 90L, is showing signs of organization. NHC is giving this disturbance a 50% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Friday. Several of our models do develop 90L into a tropical storm by early next week, but long-range models are showing that this system will not be a threat to any land areas over the next seven days, and will probably move too far north to ever be a threat to land.

Internet radio show on Irene at 4:30pm EDT today
I'll be discussing Hurricane Irene on a special edition of our Internet radio show, the Daily Downpour, today (Wednesday) at 4:30pm EDT. Fellow wunderground meteorologists Shaun Tanner, Tim Roche, and Angela Fritz will also be there. Listeners can email in or call in questions. The email address to ask questions is broadcast@wunderground.com.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 940 - 890

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30Blog Index

Quoting ncstorm:


TWC last time I looked was blowing up the NYC storm and I just went on Allan's page and the links wont work? which model has trended back west?
most of them went west by 10-30 miles. Enough for NHC path to be east of most models. I'm expecting SLIGHT shift to west or no shift at 5 pm.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
August 24, 2011...





...what a year so far.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ncstorm:


TWC last time I looked was blowing up the NYC storm and I just went on Allan's page and the links wont work? which model has trended back west?


They will be in doomsday mode tonight guaranteed-NYC will be destroyed!
Member Since: August 14, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 535
uh , havent paid attention most of the day but am i seeing this right? models are moving west? Looks horrible right now for us in south eastern ct.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Invest 90 is looking pretty angry now. How confident are we in the computer models for it?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
12z ECMWF actually has the eye of Irene passing directly on top of me here in North Caldwell, NJ in about 108 hours. Not exactly the likeliest of possibilities at the moment and hopefully only part of a temporary westward trend, but very unsettling nevertheless...

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting wayfaringstranger:
its still a possibility...please keep an eye on TWC and local weather stations. Its way to dangerous a situation.


TWC last time I looked was blowing up the NYC storm and I just went on Allan's page and the links wont work? which model has trended back west?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Well, it's a beautiful day here in NC... I'll be back later after I'm done with AP US History homework.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting tiggeriffic:


didn't say we were taking a hit...conversations were around hugo...just commented on how things were done then compared to now Press... :P


yea...I know...wasn't addressing that...just makin' a random comment...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TX2FL:


Anyone have any idea when Jersey may start evacuation plans? Trying to convince some friends that it's pointless going there on Friday even though planned to leave on Sunday.


NJ...evacuate?? Yeah, right. If they're going to Atlantic City...NJ won't want them to leave their slot machine or gaming table... If they made people leave it would be amazing.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting xtremeweathertracker:
Later Guys!!!


Take it easy Jeremy keep the updates coming.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
This is Sad

It looks like only the main Bahamas Island will be spared Irene's Wrath since the storm will be passing east of it; however, every other island in the chain as either been hit directly or been on the right side of the storm's wrath. (When was the last time a hurricane hit every island but one in the Bahamas?)

a href="Photobucket" target="_blank">
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting LavosPhoenix:
The blog is moving quickly as expected given the situation, so hopefully I can get an answer. IIRC, Irene has only dropped about 15 mb since last night/early this morning, but does anyone have a list of winds and pressures since she became a hurricane or for the past 24 hours?



Link
Member Since: September 23, 2005 Posts: 14 Comments: 11222
Quoting presslord:
with all due respect to my neighbors on here...Charleston ain't gonna see much 'cept some coastal flooding....


didn't say we were taking a hit...conversations were around hugo...just commented on how things were done then compared to now Press... :P
Member Since: September 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3650
This is how it looks at the moment

1st landfall North Carolina outer banks Cat 3 or 4

2nd landfall NE Long Island, Rhode Island to Cape Cod Cat 2

3rd landfall Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia Cat 1


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting chsstormgirl:


Somehow I remember there being adequate warning for Hugo... we knew it was coming our way, or so I thought... was I wrong?

I wasn't there - but looking at some of the historical information, the 24-hour average forecast error was a mere 65 nautical miles, and there was sufficient time to get a 90% complete evacuation of the S. Carolina coast before landfall.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ncstorm:
okay..am I hearing correctly..models are trending west? Wilmington might get hit dead on?
its still a possibility...please keep an eye on TWC and local weather stations. Its way to dangerous a situation.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I have been around this forum sence 97 98 time frame . i ussually dont post much . I having and out of mode momment
When I do post something ussually it is in contradiiction to the current thinking .simply to steer thought to possability rather then forecast. these thing change with change in dynamics .no one knows if a high will drift off in opposite direction . untill it begins actually doing it .forecast models are tools and thaty is all they are . nothing is concrete .I would pay more attention to trends then forecast and them you can see for yourself .however my skill improves as time goes on . each year watching some of the simpler things in forecasting is improving me .
think of the Atmosphere as liquid and you will also improve .
You all have a good day and i have enjoyed watching you and listening to your skill.
Watch for mertle beach to kitty hawk as i said in my earlier post . see ya
Dew
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Currently the some of Bahamas and also perhaps the outer banks could experience winds like this 130 mph gust to 160... (at time index 4:25)

(nearing cat 4)

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Removed by author - no sense feeding the troll frenzy.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting PrivateIdaho:


DAM, you're good.


:-)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Give it a break with the grandpa posts for crying out loud. He's a big boy. Don't feed the trolls Grandpa, plenty of em here.. That's why I usually lurk and keep my mouth shut. I'm on your side.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Later Guys!!!
Member Since: May 31, 2011 Posts: 57 Comments: 572
okay..am I hearing correctly..models are trending west? Wilmington might get hit dead on?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting snotly:
Check out this video... (around the 4 minute mark +)

So this is what New England can expect at 100-110 mph winds?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjo_yBTIPmo&fe atur e=relmfu




I lived on Cape Cod when Gloria came along. It went into CT of course but we got 110 mph sustained and a tree came down in Hyannis. We were fine. Bob was worse for the Cape though...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 7544:
here comes the turn ?


Not to the north...right now its still WNW. I wouldnt anticipate any turn till maybe at the earliest tomorrow morning IF there is a pronounced turn N - but thats just my guess based on what I am seeing, hearing, and watching from the tv.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting DoubleBranchGuy:


Are you thinking of FLOYD and not HUGO? That is what happened during Floyd. I was in Myrtle then. Floyd was a monster heading straight at Florida, turned hard north (as expected) and then teased all the way up while weakening and went into NC as a Cat 1 but caused major, major, major flooding in all of eastern NC.


nope...campbell was gov during HUGO...BEASLEY was gov during FLOYD, beasly would NOT open the east bound lanes of I26, said we never did it before...Harve Jacobs from Channel 5 news got the footage from hugo and took it to Beasly in Columbia before Floyd got here and played it for him to PROVE Campbell had done it...besides...i SAYED for hugo and had to EVAC for Floyd...i did not take I26 for Floyd...i went out hwy 61 toward summerville...i can give you a link to where savannah was evaced for HUGO

Link
Member Since: September 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3650
Quoting JeffM:
I get the feeling that Bastardi's favorite model is the one that agrees with his track forecast. Doesn't matter which one it is, as long as it does the most damage to the East Coast.


Bastardi does forecasts for corporations and private businesses, so what incentive does he have to be wrong? Just because people may not like his style doesn't mean he's doing stuff to simply self-indulge. His clients have vested interests in how the weather will influence their business. Just like with anyone else that works, if he's wrong continually, he gets fired. So why wouldn't he strive to do his best?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
910. 7544
here comes the turn ?
Member Since: May 6, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6862
The 18z TVCN has shifted back west in the 72-90 hour time frame - the NHC forecast path is now off to the east of the TVCN so that will have to be adjusted at 5pm. Brings the threat back to the NC OBX coastline for landfall (not that the threat ever left)...

But clearly, with the new data, some of the models have shifted back westward slightly and a lot of the models are now moving Irene northward along the coast, and not NE.

After the 90 hour mark, the TVCN and NHC forecast matches up pretty closely for now.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Fotograffa:


But isn't it true that if the storm passes off the coast we'll be on the safer side? NJ has those barrier islands which can go underwater in a lesser storm than this though. The roads leading into/out of Atlantic City go under water in a nor'easter and the only way in our out is the AC Expressay. They could never evacuate Atlantic City in a reasonable time before a big hurricane...and they probably wouldn't even try. They wouldn't want anyone to leave a slot machine!! Consider too that we're having astronomical hich tide so that could just add to the flooding situation for my area...

Yes if the storm passes well offshore north winds would probably keep the tides fairly low working the opposite of a storm surge!!
Member Since: May 31, 2011 Posts: 57 Comments: 572
907. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Japan Meteorological Agency
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #15
SEVERE TROPICAL STORM NANMADOL (T1111)
3:00 AM JST August 25 2011
============================

SUBJECT: Category Two Typhoon In Sea East Of Philippines

At 18:00 PM UTC, Severe Tropical Storm Nanmadol (985 hPa) located near 16.0N 126.4E has 10 minute sustained winds of 55 knots with gusts of 80 knots. The cyclone is reported as almost stationary

Dvorak Intensity: T3.5

Storm Force Winds
=================
40 NM from the center

Gale Force Winds
=================
150 NM from the center in south quadrant
100 NM from the center in north quadrant

Forecast and Intensity
=======================

24 HRS: 17.1N 125.7E - 60 knots (CAT 2/Severe Tropical Storm)
48 HRS: 18.8N 125.0E - 70 knots (CAT 3/Strong Typhoon)
72 HRS: 20.5N 124.2E - 75 knots (CAT 3/Strong Typhoon)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Is hte second trof in place already? Is it going to deep deeper? I noticed that the first trof was further south. Just an uneducated question can someone please bring some light to this?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Minnemike:
you'll need a lot more patience around here to stick with it... a few random posts removed for no good reason is a minor irritation compared to other antics in this blog.

if you seek information, why be concerned about your own posts...? just lurk around and you'll get All the quality (and poor) information you can possibly digest!! it's pretty clear who the good contributors are. if you follow Too closely, you might also loose bearing on reality. there is always WUmail to ask questions directly to another blogger, without worrying about the question disappearing.


Well put Minnemike! So how's the weather up there! Grew up there and landed in Florida after the Air Force sent me to Spain and Florida. Still a diehard Vikings fan as you can probably tell! Interesting to see someone living in MN on a Tropical Storm blog but then again Levi is from Alaska!
Member Since: August 25, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 3060
Quoting Grandpato4:
I know that is what they are doing one of them mailed me on here earlier today and said they were going to team up to remove all my posts. Then they had the nerve to tell me that I should go sit on the beach because my days were numbered anyway with or without a storm.


I am sorry to hear that some idiots are behaving in such a way. I hope you reported them immediately. Hang in there, most people on here , including the kids, are reasonable people. Unfortunately, it only takes a few idiots to spoil everything for the rest of us.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting angiest:


If you still have the wumail then send it to admin (WunderBlogAdmin I think is the name) or at least to angelafritz.


yes if you still have the original email forward it to admin. they know what to do with it..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting kshipre1:
reed,

do you mean Irene will shift from NW to WNW again?


NO just that its current NW course will cause IRENE to be more suseptable to west jogs. Like we have been seeing today. As of right now it looks as if the ULL is SLOWLY and i do mean slowly retreating to the north via the Water Vapor Loop.

Link

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting DontAnnoyMe:


Enable Tools/Compatibility View, then restart.


DAM, you're good.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
with all due respect to my neighbors on here...Charleston ain't gonna see much 'cept some coastal flooding....
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Grandpato4, I appreciate your posts. I am from newport..only 20min from you. It's great seeing someone else on here from our local area :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting tiggeriffic:


Actually, Savannah was evacuated first...Hugo didn't start making the turn till somewhere around FLA... by the time they evacuated Savannah all those people were on the roads, we were inundated with extra people here...all the roads going south were closed off...Gov Campbell opened the east bound lanes of I26 to get people out because if he had not, there would not have been enough time...


Are you thinking of FLOYD and not HUGO? That is what happened during Floyd. I was in Myrtle then. Floyd was a monster heading straight at Florida, turned hard north (as expected) and then teased all the way up while weakening and went into NC as a Cat 1 but caused major, major, major flooding in all of eastern NC.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Grandpato4:


I know that is what they are doing one of them mailed me on here earlier today and said they were going to team up to remove all my posts. Then they had the nerve to tell me that I should go sit on the beach because my days were numbered anyway with or without a storm.


If you still have the wumail then send it to admin (WunderBlogAdmin I think is the name) or at least to angelafritz.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 174 Comments: 54630
Quoting Grandpato4:


I know that is what they are doing one of them mailed me on here earlier today and said they were going to team up to remove all my posts. Then they had the nerve to tell me that I should go sit on the beach because my days were numbered anyway with or without a storm.
No accounting for idiots. I'm sorry. Most everyone on here is very knowledgeable and nice. Stupid trolls.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting tiggeriffic:


forward that email to Admin...they will handle it... threats like that are cause for a ban...


Exactly
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Minnemike:
for a brief moment, i thought most of South America had flooded :P
j/k


These are available in the WU gift shop.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Grandpato4:


I know that is what they are doing one of them mailed me on here earlier today and said they were going to team up to remove all my posts. Then they had the nerve to tell me that I should go sit on the beach because my days were numbered anyway with or without a storm.


Don't let them get to you. Remember this, old age and treachery will beat youth and exuberance any day.

Grothar, tell him, would you please? ;-)

Grandpa, meet treachery.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Grandpato4:


I know that is what they are doing one of them mailed me on here earlier today and said they were going to team up to remove all my posts. Then they had the nerve to tell me that I should go sit on the beach because my days were numbered anyway with or without a storm.


forward that email to Admin...they will handle it... threats like that are cause for a ban...
Member Since: September 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3650

Viewing: 940 - 890

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
52 °F
Overcast