Dangerous Tropical Storm Irene headed for the Dominican Republic

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:38 PM GMT on August 21, 2011

Share this Blog
48
+

Tropical Storm Irene roared into life last night, transitioning from a tropical wave to a 50 mph tropical storm in just a few short hours. Irene is getting organized quickly, and has the potential to become a hurricane by Monday morning. All interests in the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba, the Bahamas, and South Florida should prepare for the arrival of this dangerous storm. An Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft in the storm found the strongest winds near 18°N latitude to the north of Irene's center at 8am this morning. After passing through the center, the plane returned to the area of strongest winds two hours later, and found that flight level winds at 5,000 feet had increased by about 5 - 8 mph. However, the pressure in the latest center fix taken at 10am EDT remained the same as two hours previously, 1007 mb, and the plane noted that Irene's center was not circular, signs that the storm still has some work to do before serious intensification can begin. Visible satellite loops and radar out of Martinique show the storm has rapidly organized this morning, with well-developed spiral bands forming and a large area of intense thunderstorms to the north of the center. Irene has shrugged off the dry air that was bothering it yesterday, and wind shear has fallen to the low range, 5 - 10 knots, as analyzed by the University of Wisconsin CIMSS group. Torrential rains and strong gusty winds are affecting the northern Lesser Antilles this morning. A wind gust of 41 mph was recorded at St. Eustatius at 8am local time.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Irene.

Track forecast for Irene
The computer models are in agreement that Irene will pass just south of Puerto Rico tonight, then hit the south coast of Hispaniola in the Dominican Republic or Haiti on Monday afternoon. Irene should then emerge into the channel between Haiti and Cuba on Tuesday afternoon, when the storm will have 12 or so hours over water before having to contend with Cuba. A trough of low pressure is expected to move across the Eastern U.S. on Wednesday and Thursday, turning Irene to the northwest and north by Thursday. The timing and strength of this trough varies considerably from model to model, and will be critical in determining where and when Irene will turn to the north. Irene's strength will also matter--a stronger Irene is more likely to turn northward earlier. The most likely path for Irene is a track just east of the Florida Peninsula and into Georgia, South Carolina, or North Carolina by next weekend, but a landfall near Miami then directly up the Florida Peninsula is also a reasonable solution--like Tropical Storm Fay of 2008 did. Fay formed just off the coast of Puerto Rico, and was never quite able to get organized enough to become a hurricane, due to passage over Hispaniola and Cuba. Fay topped out as a strong tropical storm with 70 mph winds, and did over $500 million in damage in the U.S., mostly due to flooding rains in Florida that accumulated to over 25 inches in a few areas. Fay also dumped heavy rains on Hispaniola, triggering flooding that claimed eight lives.


Figure 2. Track of Tropical Storm Fay of 2008.

Intensity forecast for Irene
Irene is embedded in a large envelope of moisture now, and wind shear will remain low, 5 - 10 knots, for the next five days. With water temperatures very warm, 28 - 30°C, these conditions should allow for intensification except when land is interfering. Irene's current appearance on satellite loops gives me the impression of a storm that is not fooling around, and I expect Irene will be a hurricane before hitting Hispaniola on Monday. Passage over Hispaniola will not destroy Irene, since it is a fairly large storm. Once the storm finishes with Hispaniola, it will have to deal with Cuba, which will keep Irene from intensifying significantly. Once Irene pops off the coast of Cuba Wednesday or Thursday into the Florida Straits, Irene will likely be a tropical storm. If the storm then has at least a day over water before hitting land, it will likely become a hurricane again, and could become a major hurricane if it ends up missing South Florida and moving over the warm waters on either side of the Florida Peninsula.

Harvey hits Belize
Tropical Storm Harvey made landfall at 2pm EDT on Saturday near Dangriga Town, Belize, as a tropical storm with 60 mph winds. Harvey continues to dump very heavy rains on southern Mexico, but dissipation is expected tonight as the storm pushes inland. Harvey was a small storm, and the strongest winds were confined to a short stretch of coast near where the center came ashore. Winds at Belize City, Belize on Saturday topped out at 15 mph.


Figure 3. Radar image of Harvey taken at 11:30am EDT on Saturday, August 20, 2011, a few hours before landfall in Belize. A small closed eye is visible just south of the offshore islands of Belize. Image credit: Belize National Meteorological Service.

Invest 98L northwest of the Cape Verde Islands
A tropical wave few hundred miles northwest of the Cape Verde Islands off the coast of Africa, Invest 98L, has become disorganized and lost most of its heavy thunderstorms. The disturbance is moving over colder waters and encountering drier air, and NHC is giving 98L only a 10% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Tuesday. The latest set of model runs keep 98L well out to sea away from any land areas over the next five days.

Links
Long-range radar out of Puerto Rico

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 7623 - 7573

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 | 142 | 143 | 144 | 145 | 146 | 147 | 148 | 149 | 150 | 151 | 152 | 153 | 154 | 155 | 156 | 157 | 158 | 159 | 160Blog Index

Quoting NJ2S:
What about points north of North Carolina ..... the shift in the models is not looking good for VA MD DE NJ NY ..... Anythoughts about that... Irene maybe impacting the most unprepared population on the east coast


I believe that Irene will make landfall in SC/NC coast, based off of the models. However, if it should miss the coast, and head farther east than expected, I don't see this as being a threat to the upper east coast/New England area.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Until the UKMET and GFDL models move with the rest of the model consensus you will not see the NHC shift too far East with its track, thus we cannot take Florida out of the cone. The last two NHC track still had them to the West of the consensus models out of respect for those two models.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MahFL:
The IR blob seems to be moving due west though.....


Radar and microwave scans of the system are two of the few ways tell you more or less where it is going.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
7620. scott39
Quoting BobinTampa:


computer models and the NHC must also really annoy you then.
Know just the comments!
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 6730
Quoting scott39:
Anyone making comments that Irene WILL NOT hit Fl. just shows hom much they know about tracking a TC? Those flipid comments are annoying.


computer models and the NHC must also really annoy you then.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Just because Irene is moving more north doesn't mean she can't turn west again due to the strengthening ridge to the north. It's not time to call Florida off the hook. We will know more info by tomorrow. I am checking my generator out today and buying packs of water.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Don't discount the impact of high surf on Florida...have you seen all the jellyfish in the water lately...won't be able to walk on the beach for weeks.

Just my hunch but I think the track is just gonna keep moving further and further east, until about 24-48 hours from now when Florida is completely out of the cone. Still keeping an eye on it though.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I had no avocado's in my tree since Jean... I just went to the backyard and I've got 32 wind blown avocado's...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting scott39:
Anyone making comments that Irene WILL NOT hit Fl. just shows hom much they know about tracking a TC? Those flipid comments are annoying.
I concur...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nrtiwlnvragn:
HPC Preliminary Extended Forecast Discussion

Excerpt:


ALTHOUGH INTERACTIONS WITH A COUPLE SHORTWAVES MOVING THROUGH THE NORTHERN TIER OF THE COUNTRY
COMPLICATE THE FORECAST LATER IN THE MEDIUM RANGE PERIOD...IRENE
SHOULD ROUND THE WESTERN PERIPHERY OF THE SUBTROPICAL RIDGE ACROSS
THE WESTERN SUBTROPICAL ATLANTIC ALONG A PARABOLIC TRACK. THE
GUIDANCE /IN THIS CASE THE 06Z GFS AND 00Z ECMWF/ HAS BEEN PRONE
TO SENDING SYSTEMS TRACKING NEAR THE EAST COAST INLAND INTO THE
NORTHEAST THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS DUE TO PREMATURE PHASING OF
TROPICAL CYCLONES WITH SYSTEMS IN THE WESTERLIES...WHICH HAS NOT
VERIFIED SINCE HURRICANE ISABEL IN 2003...SO LITTLE WEIGHT WAS
PLACED UPON THEIR SOLUTIONS. PER THE NHC TRACK
FORECAST...MODERATE TO HEAVY RAINS SHOULD INITIALLY FORM ALONG A
DEVELOPING COASTAL FRONT NEAR THE SOUTHEAST COAST WHICH BECOMES
REINFORCED BY A FRONT DROPPING IN FROM THE WESTERLIES. THE
CYCLONE IS THEN EXPECTED TO MOVE ALONG THE COAST OF THE CAROLINAS
OFFSHORE THE NORTHEAST JUST INSIDE THE 40N/70W BENCHMARK NEXT
MONDAY.


When I saw the models this morning I decided to take a look at this, seems they are taking the eastern solution models with little confidence at least in the shorter term.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
7611. MahFL
The IR blob seems to be moving due west though.....
Member Since: June 9, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 3264
7610. Jax82
Just a little FYI, SSTs in the bahamas are the warmest in the entire basin.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting cat5hurricane:

In my opinion, she's not going to Florida. She'll stay at least a hundred miles off the East Coast of FL. Not saying that Florida should not be prepared and are out of the woods, but I think this will be a Savanah GA, to Myrtle Beach, SC impact, very likely major hurricane strength. However, the effects of Irene will be felt through the entire state of FL up through at least the Mid-Atlantic states.

I think the GFS and other models will begin to shift back south and west as the high builds in, suggesting that lowland coastal GA/SC impact. Storm surge will be the greatest threat in these regions, especially with her massive size.
Thanks, I guess I need to tune up the old chainsaw!LOL
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
7608. scott39
Anyone making comments that Irene WILL NOT hit Fl. just shows hom much they know about tracking a TC? Those flipid comments are annoying.
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 6730
Guys people in Florida should still closely watch Irene, but more and more data supports that Irene will not be a Florida storm at all. Heck, you can even see how Irene is already turning more north already ahead of forecast.

This is why I told people yesterday that it was ridiculously too early to say Irene was an extremely dangerous threat to Florida. lol
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting cat5hurricane:

I agree with you Jed.


I agree with your agreement. I don't think Florida ends up with a hell of a lot other than some high surf. I have a feeling it might only graze the SC coast.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
7605. NJ2S
What about points north of North Carolina ..... the shift in the models is not looking good for VA MD DE NJ NY ..... Anythoughts about that... Irene maybe impacting the most unprepared population on the east coast
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting sunlinepr:
Waiting for Levi's analysis... Troff in Conus into the Gom will pick her up?

Where is the weakness where she will move to?


Me too. He is the EF Hutton of Wunderground.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting scott39:
Good video Bob Thanks, What are your thoughts on Irene somewhat creating her own enviroment as a major hurricane in relation to making the ridge stronger?


Good point. "Pumping the Ridge!"..Just had to say it!..LOL Yes, these stronger Hurricanes can do that, we would just have to see how strong she gets. She would have to be a Major for something like that to happen. I don't believe it affects them as much as some may think, but when you have a storm moving parallel to the coast like Irene will be doing 50 or 100 miles could make a big difference. We will have to watch for that.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Complete Update

TS BUSTED FORECAST ALIBI





Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I still believe Irene will go up the Coast of Florida and hit Georgia or South Carolina. I agree with the NHC track.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Recon headed back towards the center.

http://tropicalatlantic.com/recon/scripts/path.cg i?lat=18.067c18.083c18.100c18.133c18.150c18.167c18 .200c18.217c18.233c18.250c18.283c18.300c18.317c18. 333c18.367c18.383c18.400c18.433c18.450c18.467&lon= -68.250c-68.233c-68.217c-68.200c-68.167c-68.150c-6 8.133c-68.117c-68.100c-68.083c-68.050c-68.033c-68. 017c-68.000c-67.983c-67.967c-67.933c-67.917c-67.90 0c-67.883
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting FLWeatherFreak91:
Everyone currently within the NHC cone needs to keep their guard up with this system. I want to remind everyone of just how quickly a five day track can change under similar synoptic scenarios as we have with Irene.

Hurricane Jeanne of 2004 track while in the same position that Irene finds herself this morning-

By a day later, the NHC is showing a South Carolina landfall-

Models begin to indicate that the first trof will pull northward too quickly and leave Jeanne being pushed west again by a building high.

By later that same day, the NHC comes to this conclusion. I think we all know what the track ends up doing...

I am in no way forecasting this to happen with Irene, but I am just reminding everyone that these tracks are nowhere near being set in stone. In fact, in Jeanne's case, the NHC was basically following the model consensus the entire time; the models remained in fairly good agreement throughout the duration of the storm while wildly flopping back and forth.


But there's pretty much no way Irene will be like Jeanne, in fact, the hurricane is already taking a more northerly direction than forecast. I wouldn't be surprised if Irene doesn't even come anywhere close to making landfall in Florida.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
It is important to realize that a stronger system will feel weaknesses more. In this case with Irene a more northerly track would be likely. Irene being mainly north of the islands is why there has been a shift to the east with models. I can definitely see Irene becoming a major.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
HPC Preliminary Extended Forecast Discussion

Excerpt:


ALTHOUGH INTERACTIONS WITH A COUPLE SHORTWAVES MOVING THROUGH THE NORTHERN TIER OF THE COUNTRY
COMPLICATE THE FORECAST LATER IN THE MEDIUM RANGE PERIOD...IRENE
SHOULD ROUND THE WESTERN PERIPHERY OF THE SUBTROPICAL RIDGE ACROSS
THE WESTERN SUBTROPICAL ATLANTIC ALONG A PARABOLIC TRACK. THE
GUIDANCE /IN THIS CASE THE 06Z GFS AND 00Z ECMWF/ HAS BEEN PRONE
TO SENDING SYSTEMS TRACKING NEAR THE EAST COAST INLAND INTO THE
NORTHEAST THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS DUE TO PREMATURE PHASING OF
TROPICAL CYCLONES WITH SYSTEMS IN THE WESTERLIES...WHICH HAS NOT
VERIFIED SINCE HURRICANE ISABEL IN 2003...SO LITTLE WEIGHT WAS
PLACED UPON THEIR SOLUTIONS. PER THE NHC TRACK
FORECAST...MODERATE TO HEAVY RAINS SHOULD INITIALLY FORM ALONG A
DEVELOPING COASTAL FRONT NEAR THE SOUTHEAST COAST WHICH BECOMES
REINFORCED BY A FRONT DROPPING IN FROM THE WESTERLIES. THE
CYCLONE IS THEN EXPECTED TO MOVE ALONG THE COAST OF THE CAROLINAS
OFFSHORE THE NORTHEAST JUST INSIDE THE 40N/70W BENCHMARK NEXT
MONDAY.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
7594. scott39
Quoting weatherguy03:
Hurricane Irene Morning Update Aug. 22nd., 2011
Good video Bob Thanks, What are your thoughts on Irene somewhat creating her own enviroment as a major hurricane in relation to making the ridge stronger?
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 6730
I'm still liking a David '79 track. Right up the coast of Florida. Only a stronger storm than David was at land fall. Strong Cat 2 low Cat 3. Just a gut feeling looking at everything.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting cloudburst2011:


You quoted the wrong guy :-)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
7591. hydrus
Quoting presslord:
timing is everything with every storm
Yes indeed. One small detail in thr steering pattern or a quick change in the sheer upstairs can make a big difference in lives and property loss..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Waiting for Levi's analysis... Trof in Conus into the Gom will pick her up?

Where is the weakness where she will move to?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MississippiWx:


And it will cause drying winds over Florida for months, which you will never be able to recover from, right? :-)


LMAO... I remember that one too.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting FLWeatherFreak91:
Everyone currently within the NHC cone needs to keep their guard up with this system. I want to remind everyone of just how quickly a five day track can change under similar synoptic scenarios as we have with Irene.

Hurricane Jeanne of 2004 track while in the same position that Irene finds herself this morning-

By a day later, the NHC is showing a South Carolina landfall-

Models begin to indicate that the first trof will pull northward too quickly and leave Jeanne being pushed west again by a building high.

By later that same day, the NHC comes to this conclusion. I think we all know what the track ends up doing...

I am in no way forecasting this to happen with Irene, but I am just reminding everyone that these tracks are nowhere near being set in stone. In fact, in Jeanne's case, the NHC was basically following the model consensus the entire time; the models remained in fairly good agreement throughout the duration of the storm while wildly flopping back and forth.
i remember this storm well... My apartment complex did not even have our electric back on from frances nd we had one v in the neighborhood that we had hooked up with a long heavy duty extension cord to a house on the next block and they were talking bout jeanne and then lo and behold the electric goes on a few days later...... then jeanne made aa loop and came back around and we were earmarked one more time... lost electric 13 days with frances had it back on for less than a week and lost it for another 11 with jeanne!!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MississippiWx:


And it will cause drying winds over Florida for months, which you will never be able to recover from, right? :-)


Ahh drying winds again. Where's my parasail?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
timing is everything with every storm
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Jedkins01:
Its starting to look more and moor like Irene won't even scratch Florida. The models that shifted slightly west overnight have come back even farther east than they ever were.


And it will cause drying winds over Florida for months, which you will never be able to recover from, right? :-)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting cat5hurricane:
She could be contracting her TS wind field a bit, explaining the slight rise in pressure. Radar also suggests she's trying to reconsolidate the eye wall.
Hi Cat5,where is Irene going? Your thoughts please!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I believe that with this storm timimg is everything. Since Irene did not suffer during land interaction, she did not loose any steam. Notice that her forward speed is relatively fast and has not slowed down much while crossing Puerto Rico. Her forward speed and lack of interaction with land may cause her to make that northerly turn further to the west than expected. I am not wishcasting but it would be foolish for us to think that South Florida is in the clear. There is a local guy on nbc channel 6 his name is John Morales who hinted this scenario last night and For right now I believe that this is a possibility. Again, it is too early to tell but all we can do is prepare for the worst and hope for the best.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting FLWeatherFreak91:
Everyone currently within the NHC cone needs to keep their guard up with this system. I want to remind everyone of just how quickly a five day track can change under similar synoptic scenarios as we have with Irene.

Hurricane Jeanne of 2004 track while in the same position that Irene finds herself this morning-

By a day later, the NHC is showing a South Carolina landfall-

Models begin to indicate that the first trof will pull northward too quickly and leave Jeanne being pushed west again by a building high.

By later that same day, the NHC comes to this conclusion. I think we all know what the track ends up doing...

I am in no way forecasting this to happen with Irene, but I am just reminding everyone that these tracks are nowhere near being set in stone. In fact, in Jeanne's case, the NHC was basically following the model consensus the entire time; the models remained in fairly good agreement throughout the duration of the storm while wildly flopping back and forth.


Thanks. This is the best post of the last 3 days. You can't ignore the GFDL. It smells something and won't let go of it.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
7580. lennit
after going back 100 yrs closes analog track both occured in 1928 , both hitting Florida .. i cannot find any other near Irene's location and movement
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting presslord:
all tenants should have insurance

press .,,,,you know that out there are living hundreds of thousands of people in mobil homes,and insurances co.s dont wnt to deal with
Member Since: August 3, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 134
Quoting Jedkins01:
Its starting to look more and moor like Irene won't even scratch Florida. The models that shifted slightly west overnight have come back even farther east than they ever were.

Cheers my good man...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
7577. hydrus
Quoting BoroDad17:
I have to say the last few satellite frames the motion looks much further to the W again, as opposed to the more NW movement overnight.
Irene will wobble, jog and make odd movments when it is near land and in its formative stages. When she fine tunes the CDO, her track should smooth out..jmo
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
7575. RickWPB
Quoting naplesdreamer28:


What does this mean in terms of track, if anything?

If the trough digs far enough south... and Irene is strong enough, should help turn it to the NW... then NNW and hopefully NNE or NE.

As been said before, it's a timing issue / strength of storm issue.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Its starting to look more and moor like Irene won't even scratch Florida. The models that shifted slightly west overnight have come back even farther east than they ever were.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting overwash12:
I made it up after seeing all the newscasters on the outerbanks reporting on overwash on hwy 12. Thanks!


Hahahaha very interesting! I love it!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 7623 - 7573

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 | 142 | 143 | 144 | 145 | 146 | 147 | 148 | 149 | 150 | 151 | 152 | 153 | 154 | 155 | 156 | 157 | 158 | 159 | 160Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
70 °F
Overcast