Four invests in the Atlantic; fair weather in Arctic to drive rapid sea ice loss

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:38 PM GMT on August 12, 2011

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It's a busy day in the tropical Atlantic, with the National Hurricane Center tracking four areas of interest (Invests.) None of these systems is a danger to any land areas over the next three days. The disturbance of most concern is the one farthest from land, a tropical wave that emerged from the coast of Africa two days ago. This wave, (Invest 93L), is located about 500 miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands, and is moving westward at 15 - 20 mph. Recent visible satellite loops show that 93L has lost some of its heavy thunderstorms since yesterday, and the system is poorly organized, though there is a good deal of spin to the system. There is dry air to its north that is interfering with development. The SHIPS model and University of Wisconsin CIMSS wind shear analysis are showing high wind shear in excess 20 knots affecting 93L, which has undoubtedly contributed to the storm's loss of organization. Sea surface temperatures are 27.5°C, which is one degree above the 26.5°C threshold usually needed to support a tropical storm.


Figure 1. Morning satellite photo of the four Invests in the Atlantic today.

Forecast for 93L
High wind shear above 20 knots is predicted along 93L's path through Saturday afternoon, followed by a drop to the moderate range, 10 - 20 knots, for the succeeding four days. This should allow the storm to organize over the weekend. The latest 00Z and 06Z model runs of the four best models for predicting tropical storm formation (GFS, ECMWF, NOGAPS, and UKMET), have only one model, the GFS, that is indicating significant development of 93L. This model brings 93L near the northern Lesser Antilles Islands by Wednesday. NHC gave 93L a 40% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Sunday morning in their 8am outlook. Given 93L's recent struggles, I'd put these odds at 30%.

92L
An African wave midway between the northern Lesser Antilles Islands and the coast of Africa, near 18°N 45°W, is moving west-northwest at 20 mph. This system, (Invest 92L), is being given a 40% chance of development by NHC. Recent visible satellite loops show a modest amount of heavy thunderstorm activity, but no signs of a surface circulation. A Windsat pass from 8:04 am EDT this morning also showed no surface circulation, and noted top winds of around 35 mph. Water vapor satellite loops show that a large area of dry air surrounds 92L, and this dry air is causing problems for the storm. The SHIPS model and University of Wisconsin CIMSS wind shear analysis are showing moderate wind shear of 10 - 20 knots affecting 92L. Sea surface temperatures are 27 - 27.5°C, which is a degree above the 26.5°C threshold usually needed to support a tropical storm.

Forecast for 92L
Moderate wind shear of 10 - 20 knots is predicted along 92L's path over the coming five days, which should allow the storm to organize if it can handle the dry air surrounding it. The latest 00Z and 06Z model runs of the four best models for predicting tropical storm formation (GFS, ECMWF, NOGAPS, and UKMET) show weak development or no development of 92L, and NHC gave 92L a 40% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Sunday morning in their 8am outlook. A steady west-northwest motion for 92L is predicted by all of the models, which should make the storm miss the Lesser Antilles by a comfortable margin. However, Bermuda may be at risk from 92L next week.

94L
A broad low pressure system about 700 miles northeast of the northern Lesser Antilles Islands has developed a small amount of heavy thunderstorm activity, and may be a threat to become a tropical depression early next week. This system, (Invest 94L), is currently headed west-southwest at 10 mph, but is expected to turn northwest later today. Recent visible satellite loops show some spin to the cloud pattern at middle levels of the atmosphere, but no signs of a surface circulation. This system is also battling dry air, which is keeping the its heavy thunderstorms relatively meager. The SHIPS model is showing moderate wind shear of 10 - 20 knots affecting 94L. Sea surface temperatures are 28°C.

Forecast for 94L
Moderate wind shear of 10 - 20 knots is predicted along 94L's path over the coming five days, which should allow slow development, if it can handle the dry air surrounding it. None of our reliable models for predicting tropical storm formation (GFS, ECMWF, NOGAPS, and UKMET) show no development of 94L, and NHC gave 94L just a 20% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Sunday morning in their 8am outlook. Bermuda is the only land area that needs to be concerned with 94L.

95L
The final invest out there is an area of disturbed weather along on old frontal boundary several hundred miles off the coast of North Carolina. This sytem, Invest 95L, is headed northeastwards out to sea, and is not a threat to any land areas.



Figure 2. Arctic sea ice extent on August 11, 2011, was the 2nd lowest on record for the date. The Northeast Passage and Northwest Passage (southern route) were both ice-free. Image credit: UIUC Cryosphere Today.

Arctic sea ice poised to undergo record decline in mid-August
A strong high pressure system with a central pressure of 1035 mb has developed over the Arctic north of Alaska, and will bring clear skies and warm southerly winds to northeast Siberia and the Arctic during the coming week, accelerating Arctic sea ice loss. Widespread areas of northeastern Siberia are expected to see air temperatures 4 - 12°C (7 - 22°F) above average during the coming week, and the clockwise flow of air around the high pressure system centered north of Alaska will pump this warm air into the Arctic. Arctic sea ice extent, currently slightly higher than the record low values set in 2007, should fall to to its lowest extent for the date by the third week of August as the clear skies and warm southerly winds melt ice and push it away from the coast of Siberia. This weather pattern, known as the Arctic Dipole, was also responsible for the record sea ice loss in 2007, but was stronger that year. The weather conditions that led to the 2007 record were quite extreme--one 2008 study led by Jennifer Kay of the National Center for Atmospheric Research showed that 2007's combination of high pressure and sunny skies in the Arctic occur, on average, only once every 10 - 20 years. The 2011 summer weather pattern in the Arctic has not been nearly as extreme as in 2007, but the total sea ice volume has declined significantly since 2007, leading to much loss of old, thick, multi-year ice, making it easier to set a new low extent record with less extreme weather conditions. The GFS model is predicting that the Arctic Dipole will weaken by 8 - 15 days from now, with cloudier weather and weaker high pressure over the Arctic. This should slow down the rate of Arctic sea ice loss to very near the record low values observed in 2007. It remains to be seen if 2011 Arctic sea ice extent will surpass the all-time low set in September 2007; it will be close, and will depend on the weather conditions of late August and early September, which are not predictable at this time. It is already possible to sail completely around the North Pole in ice-free waters through the Northeast Passage and Northwest Passage, according to sea ice maps maintained by the UIUC Cryosphere Today website. This marks the fourth consecutive year--and the fourth time in recorded history--both of these Arctic shipping routes have melted free. Mariners have been attempting to sail these passages since 1497. This year, the Northeast Passage along the north coast of Russia melted free several weeks earlier than its previous record early opening.

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Jeff Masters

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1811. Tazmanian
7:40 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
13/1745 UTC 39.5N 56.8W EXTRATROPICAL FRANKLIN -- Atlantic
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 114649
1810. islander101010
5:55 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting stormpetrol:


I think 93L is a sleeper, still gotta watch it closely imo
hope you dont have an X on your back good luck
Member Since: September 11, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 4258
1809. stormpetrol
5:27 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting GTcooliebai:
There is almost nothing left of 93L:


I think 93L is a sleeper, still gotta watch it closely imo
Member Since: April 29, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7631
1808. CybrTeddy
5:08 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Dang! I Just realized, today's August 13th isn't it? I remember what I was doing 8 years ago today, I lived north of John Young Parkway in Orlando, Charley hit Punta Gorda.. weakened to a Category 1 by the time it reached me. Remember it was really gusty that day, had to struggle to move chairs to the garage with my family, lost about 15 shingles or so. Wasn't terrible, not all that different from Isabel the prior year for me.. I can't say I can relate to the people in Punta Gorda however.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23485
1807. BahaHurican
5:07 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
New blog?
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 21147
1806. aislinnpaps
5:06 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
New Blog
Member Since: August 22, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 3115
1805. CybrTeddy
5:05 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Getting tired of saying this but we're ahead of schedule, first hurricane isn't normally until August 10th so we're only a few days behind the climo norm. F name isn't until September 8th or so, 2002 didn't see a hurricane until September and that was Gustav, 2010 after Alex didn't see another hurricane until late-August, 2010 had a bunch of weak storms just not as many, Alex was a one off rarity for June, do I need to go on lol?
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23485
1804. zparkie
4:58 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Good to see Texas is getting some rain, everything is brown out there, the whole state has been suffering for months.
Member Since: August 25, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 54
1803. zparkie
4:55 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Yeah, I dont want any hurricanes, but they always every year say we will, I was just thinking that the pattern we are in might stay that way and we have no hurricanes, that would be good. August if flying by and its looking good so far.
Member Since: August 25, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 54
1802. aislinnpaps
4:47 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting zparkie:
There seems to be something in the atmosphere wrecking these storms. The storms cant maintain convection for a period of time and then just disappear. No named hurricanes yet? Something drastic has to change soon or we may not have a hurricane this year. It just looks odd on satelite, storm then no storm, comes off Africa and scatters and wimps out, this may be good, the atmospheric conditions are tearing them up.


You have obviously never had to attempt to repair your roof when there are no shingles to be had, cut down trees that have fallen on your house, lived for days or weeks in a hundred degree heat with no a/c, or saw friends, neighbors or family lose loved ones/thier homes/their way of life.
Member Since: August 22, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 3115
1801. nigel20
4:46 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting CarolinaHurricanes87:



Maybe a dumb question here, but.... can a "system" currently as weak as 93L undergo rapid intensification? It seems to me much more likely for rapid intensification to happen to a storm that is already structurally well defined. I didnt know if rapid intensification can take something from an open tropical wave quickly to a tropical storm or hurricane in a days time

I agree with you, a well defined storm is more likely to undergo rapid intensification than weaker systems, but it can happen with weaker systems also.
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 7748
1800. SouthDadeFish
4:45 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
NEW BLOG
Member Since: August 12, 2007 Posts: 11 Comments: 2448
1799. InTheCone
4:45 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
GFS 12z out a looong time - trying to be VERY scary....

Member Since: September 1, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 1979
1798. AtHomeInTX
4:44 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
back to Texas this run.



Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 671
1797. GTcooliebai
4:43 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
New Blog
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
1796. SLU
4:43 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
1776. stoormfury 4:30 PM GMT on August 13, 2011

Yep!
Member Since: July 13, 2006 Posts: 12 Comments: 4784
1795. ncstorm
4:43 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
GFS and Texas..

12Z
Link
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 14234
1794. CarolinaHurricanes87
4:42 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting nigel20:

If a storm enters the Caribbean along with favorable conditions, then rapid intensification could take place.



Maybe a dumb question here, but.... can a "system" currently as weak as 93L undergo rapid intensification? It seems to me much more likely for rapid intensification to happen to a storm that is already structurally well defined. I didnt know if rapid intensification can take something from an open tropical wave quickly to a tropical storm or hurricane in a days time
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 631
1793. aquak9
4:40 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting E46Pilot:
Hi everyone. I want to get one of those weather stations to put outside, to measure wind etc. What is good one? What are you using?


Hi E46. Yes we own RainmanWeather, a WeatherUnderground approved vendor. Best station on the market right now? Probably any of the Davis products, unless you have the money to go with a Rainwise.

TyconPower is much less expensive than the Davis, but it's made overseas (and re-branded by another weather-product company as it's own) and unfortunately we are seeing more and more DOA's. Davis products are made in the USA and we are proud to carry them.

Full on-line and telephone technical support is available to our customers, to help you get up and running, and downloading data to WU, if desired.

Contact the company via the website, say you're from WU, and get an even better price.

BTW, we have an assortment of 4 different stations running at home, as well as thirteen other products with alarms, bells, lights, etc. This place is like NORAD when a storm approaches! :)
Member Since: August 13, 2005 Posts: 163 Comments: 25697
1792. JrWeathermanFL
4:39 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Opinion time:
93L will be gone tommorow. YES or NO
Franklin will exceed 45mph. YES or NO
94L will form. YES or NO
92L will form. YES or NO
Which of them will become hurricanes? 92L 93L 94L Franklin
Member Since: July 19, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 2034
1791. ProgressivePulse
4:37 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:



I bet the cell phone reception is EXCELLENT on that ship.



Morning All. 94L split in two, 96L & 97L soon?
Member Since: August 19, 2005 Posts: 5 Comments: 5019
1790. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
4:36 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
<
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 168 Comments: 53285
1789. ncstorm
4:35 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting nofailsafe:


Interesting, so the center of the azores high is on the move west.


yes and with that move, it will push 92L more west as well..eithier blocking it or recurving it further west..
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 14234
1788. nigel20
4:34 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting hydrus:
That is alot of warm water in the Western Caribbean.....

If a storm enters the Caribbean along with favorable conditions, then rapid intensification could take place.
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 7748
1787. nofailsafe
4:34 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting ncstorm:


Interesting, so the center of the azores high is on the move west.
Member Since: June 18, 2010 Posts: 3 Comments: 941
1786. zparkie
4:34 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Thats a good thing, I am just wondering about these weather specialists who predict how many hurricanes we are going to have. I am not too reliant on these predictions, they must be throwing darts at a dart board and whatever number it hits, thats what they predict
Member Since: August 25, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 54
1785. nofailsafe
4:32 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting SLU:


It's dead now. There is a weak rotation in the low level cloud field but it lacks deep convection. Yet still, all of the reliable models show increasing organisation once it gets to 50 west.


There's not much to the broad low there, ships in the area from 1600 UTC report pressures from 1012mbar at the center to 1014mbar 5 degrees of longitude from the invest's center.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Member Since: June 18, 2010 Posts: 3 Comments: 941
1784. debbie31
4:32 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Yes, 93L is looking a little sick this morning, but in SWLA on the GOM coast, still being wary.
Member Since: August 11, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 4
1783. gulfbreeze
4:32 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting severstorm:

charlottefl...I have mine at 20ft and sometimes the wind is stronger at ground level than up at 20ft.
30 ft is the recomended
Member Since: June 13, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 855
1782. GTcooliebai
4:32 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting Jedkins01:


Ehhh not really. Mathematically speaking, the probability of Tampa being hit has not changed. Its just that Tampa has a low chance of a direct hurricane strike.

Remember, when we are talking accuracy, there is no such thing as luck. There is also no such thing as "overdue". Probability is probability. If you say, flip a coin, even if you flip on tails say, 6 times in a row. The chance is always 50%, that it will land on tales or heads. It would be inaccurate to say its overdue to land on heads because it landed on tails 6 times in a row.

Therefore, the same goes for hurricanes. The probability of hurricane hitting Tampa directly is low. I'm not sure what the percentage chance is, but it is very low, so Tampa is not "overdue".


Now, math does not have a bias, or superstition like people can have, it just tells the honest truth. The fact is, Tampa has a low probability of a hurricane strike. But because the chance does exist, Tampa could be hit again as it has before. One day it will be hit again, be we cannot say how long it will take. It could happen this year, or Tampa may go another 40 or 50 years without a direct strike.


Ultimately, we should always be prepared for a potential strike living in Tampa Bay, we should never blow off a threatening hurricane. But we should not fear that Tampa must get hit soon because it hasn't in a while, there is not overdue. The probability is the same.
But statistics says we should get hit once every 13 years and a brush every other year. So I don't think the percentage is actually that low. It is interesting to note though, that we kept getting brushed year after year it seems from the late 1800s to early 1900s Link It may have had a lot to do with the weather patterns back then & might one day revert back to it. And I found this also interesting to go along with our "Great Tampa Bay Hurricane"...Latest hurricane to strike the U. S.: late on November 30, 1925 near Tampa, Florida. You also have the Great Gale of 1848 which caused a water rise of 15ft! in Tampa Bay and for a category 1 storm it had a pressure reading and storm surge of a Category 4 Hurricane! As far as a major Hurricane goes, we haven't been brushed by one since Alma in 1960, but as me and you both know it doesn't take a major Hurricane and a direct hit to due damage to across this region. Take Gabrielle, Frances, and Jeanne for instance while they weren't direct hits, all three storms brought Hurricane force wind gusts to the area, & my neighbors tree got uprooted during Jeanne & Bay Shore Blvd. was flooded from the storm surge.
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
1781. ncstorm
4:31 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 14234
1780. emcf30
4:31 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting stoormfury:
morning SLU

what is your take on 93L? I JUST DON'T TRUST THESE SLEEPING MONSTERS.


Even though 93L looks terrible, it looked a lot worst last night and early this morning. Convection is starting to fire back up. Staying weak was not the best case scenario which is going to keep it tracking more towards the West. If it would have developed early on it would have had a lot better chance of not impacting any land. JMO. As you said, DON'T TRUST THESE SLEEPING MONSTERS.
Member Since: August 7, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1933
1779. nigel20
4:31 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting Vincent4989:

Franklin's going to be torn apart.......... really really bad by 90 knots of shear.

Franklin will likely be gone by tonight/tomorrow.
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 7748
1778. hydrus
4:30 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting nigel20:

That is alot of warm water in the Western Caribbean.....
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20321
1777. OracleDeAtlantis
4:30 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting sunlinepr:


Its no crazy crap....By no way I eat the HAARP crap theory. But many nations in their interests of maintaining their world class positions do try to play God... There have been many secret projects by these nations, since the cold war, that now we have some knowledge of.. And there a many secret projects going on, where the is no consideration of human rights, or the effect it will have in natural balance...
ODA, I think I'm in your side and not against you...
Cloud seeding has been an established practice, and is not considered to be a threat. HAARP would be considered a threat to nations for a variety of reasons.

The main reason people believe in HAARP now, is because they've seen things that intrigue them. Like NASA's facilities being hit with perfect aim, three times between 2005 and 2008, each by an unusual and historic storm. Stennis, Canaveral, Mission Control, but it has nothing to do with HAARP. HAARP isn't capable of doing that.

That kind of aim has to do with something else, because it wasn't by pure chance, I can assure you. Try explaining the statistics available to any actuary to the science buffs here. Those three direct hits were forecast by someone too, making it even rarer.
Member Since: August 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 501
1776. stoormfury
4:30 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
thanks man
Member Since: August 22, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 2571
1775. LargoFl
4:29 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting SLU:


It's dead now. There is a weak rotation in the low level cloud field but it lacks deep convection. Yet still, all of the reliable models show increasing organisation once it get to 50 west.
interesting how that one model has it headed for the gulf at the end of the run, gulf temp is rather high now, fuel for a storm.
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 36620
1774. aquak9
4:29 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Something drastic has to change soon or we may not have a hurricane this year.

And that's a bad thing?
Member Since: August 13, 2005 Posts: 163 Comments: 25697
1773. redwagon
4:29 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
i see the ultra zonic atomspheric wave generating device has worked on 93L great now lets see whats next to be zapped

The monster high over TX? How much money do they need? I'll send all I have.
Member Since: August 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3083
1772. zparkie
4:28 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
There seems to be something in the atmosphere wrecking these storms. The storms cant maintain convection for a period of time and then just disappear. No named hurricanes yet? Something drastic has to change soon or we may not have a hurricane this year. It just looks odd on satelite, storm then no storm, comes off Africa and scatters and wimps out, this may be good, the atmospheric conditions are tearing them up.
Member Since: August 25, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 54
1771. Vincent4989
4:28 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting jasoniswildman20x1:
LOOK AT THIS LOW OFF THE EAST COAST!!

I was already watching that
Member Since: November 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 728
1770. Vincent4989
4:27 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting nigel20:

Good morning guys.

Franklin's going to be torn apart.......... really really bad by 90 knots of shear.
Member Since: November 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 728
1768. SLU
4:25 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting stoormfury:
morning SLU

what is your take on 93L? I JUST DON'T TRUST THESE SLEEPING MONSTERS.


It's dead now. There is a weak rotation in the low level cloud field but it lacks deep convection. Yet still, all of the reliable models show increasing organisation once it gets to 50 west.
Member Since: July 13, 2006 Posts: 12 Comments: 4784
1767. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
4:23 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
i see the ultra zonic atomspheric wave generating device has worked on 93L great now lets see whats next to be zapped
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 168 Comments: 53285
1766. Progster
4:23 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
CMC regional run generates what is probably a hybrid system off the east coast in 48 hrs. The core of the system draws off a 576 dm 500 thickness which is plenty tropical and the low drops 5 mb btn 36h and 48h on the run. I've seen a few of these warm valued and yet mainly baroclinic systems develop in the gulf stream before, and if they indeed rapidly intensify they can make a quick left hook back into the upper trof and actually landfall.

Link
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 490
1765. sunlinepr
4:23 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting DFWjc:


What's causing the invest train to curve back out into the Atlantic?


The Azores High... Stronger or weaker... curves waves.
And many other variables.

Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9690
1763. sunlinepr
4:20 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
Quoting OracleDeAtlantis:
So let's see now, they're upsetting the balance of fever in the Atlantic basin for how long? Destroying the conveyor belt for what purpose? Adjusting weather patterns in Europe and the rest of the world, without any notice by other advanced nations?

Get real, there are dozens of scientists monitoring this activity as noise in their ionosphere research. Do you think they would all keep their mouths tightly shut? Not a chance.

Do your homework before you go babbling this crazy crap here. It's nonsense, and would be considered an act of war by any nation suffering drought or other weather related disaster as even a suspected indirect result.


Its no crazy crap....By no way I eat the HAARP crap theory. But many nations in their interests of maintaining their world class positions do try to play God... There have been many secret projects by these nations, since the cold war, that now we have some knowledge of.. And there a many secret projects going on, where the is no consideration of human rights, or the effect it will have in natural balance...
ODA, I think I'm in your side and not against you...
These considerations, create concience of what is hidden...
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9690
1762. nigel20
4:17 PM GMT on August 13, 2011

Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 7748
1761. stoormfury
4:13 PM GMT on August 13, 2011
morning SLU

what is your take on 93L? I JUST DON'T TRUST THESE SLEEPING MONSTERS.
Member Since: August 22, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 2571

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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