Remnants of Emily could redevelop; Muifa batters Okinawa; Central U.S. roasts

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:54 PM GMT on August 05, 2011

Share this Blog
24
+

Tropical Storm Emily degraded into an open tropical wave yesterday afternoon, after Hurricane Hunters could no longer locate a center of circulation at the surface. Through the morning yesterday, the storm appeared to lose most of its strong thunderstorm activity on the north side, and mid-level circulation was broad (tropical cyclones need a tight, coherent circulation to maintain themselves). Soon after the Hurricane Hunters took a pass through the storm, the National Hurricane Center demoted Emily from a tropical storm to a remnant low, while continuing to stress the rainfall threat to Hispaniola and eastern Cuba. Today it appears the center of the remnants are located just north of eastern Cuba in the southern Bahamas, although thunderstorm activity continues across eastern Cuba. Hispaniola probably saw rain and thunderstorms again early this morning, the strongest of which were on the eastern side of the island. New thunderstorm activity is starting to develop in the southeast Bahamas. Given Wednesday's rain gauge analysis from CPC, Hispaniola probably saw at least an additional 5 inches of rain yesterday.

Environmental conditions remain pretty much the same as yesterday, but are expected to become more favorable for Emily's remnants, and redevelopment of the storm is possible. Circulation from the low to mid-levels is still broad and tilting to the east with height due to the lingering moderate westerly wind shear. However, this shear is expected to dissipate some over the next 24 hours, and signs of this are already present to the west of the remnants. The dry air that has been following the storm since its inception has dissipated, as well.


Figure 1. Satellite imagery of the remnants of Tropical Storm Emily as they move northwest away from Cuba and Hispaniola and into the Bahamas.

Forecast for Emily's Remnants
Interestingly, the models have come into better agreement on the forecast for former Emily now that it has lost its surface circulation and degenerated into a tropical wave. The ECMWF, which has come out ahead in this forecasting game so far, is optimistic today that Emily will redevelop. Other global models—GFS, CMC, and FIM—also redevelop the storm. Consensus on timing of redevelopment seems to be when the wave reaches the northern Bahamas in 24 to 48 hours. At 12Z (8am EDT), the high-resolution HWRF model run forecasted a track that was furthest to the west of all the models, scraping eastern Florida as it travels northwest. The most probable track and intensity forecast that I see at this point is north-northwest movement over the next 24 to 36 hours, at which point the system will take a fairly sharp turn to the northeast and out to sea. Without an already established, coherent circulation, it appears unlikely that if Emily is reborn it will intensify into anything more than a moderate tropical storm. However, there is some potential as the system moves out to see that it could gain some strength and develop hurricane-force winds before it transitions into an extra-tropical cyclone.

Typhoon Muifa passes to the south of Okinawa, heads into East China Sea

The center of Typhoon Muifa passed to the south of Okinawa earlier this morning (Eastern time) and it continues to batter the islands with high winds and torrential rain. Local radar estimate rainfall rates as high as 80 mm/hour (approx. 3 inches/hour) in the strongest rain bands. Kadena Air Force Base near the city of Okinawa has been reporting sustained winds of 47 mph with gusts up to 72 mph. Muifa is expected to turn northwest today as it enters the East China Sea as a category 1 on the Saffir-Simpson scale, and then intensify into a category 2 as it passes close to eastern China. This morning, the forecast is that Muifa will probably not make landfall anywhere as a typhoon.


Figure 2. Radar imagery from the Japan Meteorological Agency around 1am JST. Scale is in millimeters. Highest rainfall rates appear to be approximately 3 inches/hour.

South-Central U.S. continues to bake

The extreme heat continues again today after 269 high maximum and 250 high minimum temperature records were set yesterday, 19 and 29 of which were all-time records, respectively. 206 of yesterday's records were 110°F or higher. Yesterday, Reuters was reporting that Texas was one power plant shutdown away from rolling blackouts. The forecast today doesn't look any better. Heat index values up to 125° are forecast in eastern Texas and the Lower Mississippi Valley.

Particularly toasty heat index values from yesterday:

• Mobile, Alabama: 120°
• Arkadelphia, Arkansas: 121°
• Bay St. Louis, Mississippi: 121°
• Memphis, Tennessee: 122°


Figure 3. Heat index forecast from the ECMWF for today. Scale is in degrees Fahrenheit. You can plot model forecasts using Wundermap by choosing the "Model Data" layer.

Angela

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 2069 - 2019

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89Blog Index

tx saw no northern lights...but did see a nice few meteor showers
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting robj144:
Why does what seems like 90% of the bloggers here disagree with the NHC forecast so frequently? ......... I mean the NHC has Ph. D.'s who have been tracking storms for probably an average of twenty years or more. They're the authority.



It's this really neat concept called "Internet Experts". The VAST majority of people who comment on blogs are not representing any official position or group .... only themselves. As such, they don't have to worry about screwing up. In the REAL world (meaning not the virtual one), 90% of the people who engage in this type of "expertism" & have employment related to the subject they pretend to be an expert in, would have already been discredited, fired, laughed at, & humiliated into oblivion.

But on the net, you can anonymously pretend to know completely what's going on all you want to, & make claims that you're the world's leading expert in your pretend-field. And you can also discredit every single person, company, & entity which actually DOES hold a real-world position in the specific field .... such as the NHC.

Shoot, those idiots don't have even 10% of the knowledge & experience as most all "experts" on the internet have. I mean really, these internet guys all have 3 Bachelors, 2 Masters, 1 Doctorate, & an Honorary Degree from each of the 100 most respected universities in the world. We know this is true because they tell us so.

And then what happens when you run your mouth about the huge expertise you have about hurricanes ..... and then completely screw up in front of the world, when the hurricane that your personally-invented models show has a 100% chance of plowing into Brownsville .... changes it's mind & hits Iceland? Well, that's easy to fix. You simply quit posting on whatever forum you were using, disappear for a week or so, then come back with a completely new user-name & completely new profile.

And then you just start right back at the beginning, deciding which & how many degrees you are going to give yourself, and how many decades you're going to claim that you've been in the professional hurricane predicting field.

99% of the people on the internet don't have to answer for ANYTHING they say or claim, even if they are proven dead-wrong. And right there is what breeds these Internet-Experts who have 20X the experience of everyone at the NHC combined. :) :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2067. robj144
Well I'm pretty tired, so I'm out of here in a few minutes, but I honestly learned quite a bit. Thanks Levi. I'll probably be back with more questions eventually.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2066. Levi32
Quoting robj144:
Isn't there a Latex editor built into this blog. It would make these theoretical explanations much easier to write. :)


I wish....if I wasn't lazy I would just do it in LibreOffice Math and the post screenies here.

Anyway, I'm gonna hit the sack now. Great discussion Rob. Thanks for having it with me.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting robj144:


Yes, I know they don't get everything correct all the time. Honestly though, do you think most people on this blog have a better idea where the storm is going than people who have Ph. D.'s who have been studying storms for 30 years? I know it's just a blog and it's not designed to be a prediction center, but it kind of irks me when people discredit experts so readily.

Part of its ego.

Part of its based on logic and reasoning. One thing about the NHC is they strongly follow model consensus. They don't follow it exactly, but the forecast tracks and intensities are based primarily off model consensus. Why? Because they can't say the "I have a hunch" yada yada. There is no room for gut feelings when lives and property are at stake. Obviously, the NHC is forecast is not 100% model based, and I'm not calling them model worshipers, but it goes to show that there is some reasoning behind disagreeing with the NHC on occasion.

Another part of it is just general ignorance, and/or not knowing any better. For example, thinking a storm will become a major because of warm SSTs while completely ignoring the upper level conditions.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2064. robj144
Isn't there a Latex editor built into this blog. It would make these theoretical explanations much easier to write. :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
ahh makes sense thanks
Quoting Levi32:


Warmer ocean, bigger warmer ocean, almost no land in the way, and the fact that they are usually formed from the monsoon. Atlantic storms and some eastern Pacific storms are formed from tropical waves, which are usually fairly small entities, which helps keep them small.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting NJcat3cane:
is there any reason why almost every single west pacific storm is so much larger in size and stronger also? is it just they have more room or what?


If I were to take a guess, it would probably have to do with area to grow, but also they have higher SSTs in that area of the world, causing greater evaporation over a larger area condensing and causing the clouds.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2061. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


You mean L sin(x)....cos(90 degrees) = 0....and we don't want that, because a hurricane centered at the north pole yields the greatest angular momentum increase to the atmosphere.

*Edit nvm...you meant about the hurricane's axis, not the Earth's. Sorry, I'm tired lol.

About the Earth's axis, factored into the maps I posted, would be Lsin(x) though, or something similar. Torque is also a consideration, as the distance to the axis is changing on a sphere.


The torque's lever arm is like R sin x, where x is the co-latitude and R is the radius of the Earth.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2060. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


I said the co-latitude where the North Pole is zero degrees, so it is max at the north pole.


I thought you meant literal latitude. Perhaps I turned "co-" into "cos-" in my mind....again, tired lol.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2059. Levi32
Quoting NJcat3cane:
is there any reason why almost every single west pacific storm is so much larger in size and stronger also? is it just they have more room or what?


Warmer ocean, bigger warmer ocean, almost no land in the way, and the fact that they are usually formed from the monsoon. Atlantic storms and some eastern Pacific storms are formed from tropical waves, which are usually fairly small entities, which helps keep them small.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2058. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


You mean L sin(x)....cos(90 degrees) = 0....and we don't want that, because a hurricane centered at the north pole yields the greatest angular momentum increase to the atmosphere.


I said the co-latitude where the North Pole is zero degrees, so it is max at the north pole.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
is there any reason why almost every single west pacific storm is so much larger in size and stronger also? is it just they have more room or what?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2056. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


Understood, so the spin of the hurricane about its center is something like L cos x, where x is co-latitude and L is the angular momentum of the spin of the hurricane. This component is what is factored into the chart along with the the angular momentum about the surface.


You mean L sin(x)....cos(90 degrees) = 0....and we don't want that, because a hurricane centered at the north pole yields the greatest angular momentum increase to the atmosphere.

*Edit nvm...you meant about the hurricane's axis, not the Earth's. Sorry, I'm tired lol.

About the Earth's axis, factored into the maps I posted, would be Lsin(x) though, or something similar. Torque is also a consideration, as the distance to the axis is changing on a sphere.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JLPR2:
06/0545 UTC 23.4N 77.3W T1.0/1.0 EMILY

Hmm, doing better.


Ummm... yeah, sure enough. May not be upgraded back to TD status at 5am, but it is sure fighting back to life. But I am thinking that the center mark that it has is too far to the southeast. I am thinking, based on radar and satellite, it to be near 24N 78W moving slowly WWD
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2054. JLPR2
06/0545 UTC 23.4N 77.3W T1.0/1.0 EMILY

Hmm, doing better.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2053. robj144
Thanks for the clarification. How many more blog conversations until I get a degree? :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2052. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


I'm sure you know that you could pick any arbitrary axis in the universe for which to calculate the hurricane's angular momentum relative to that axis. As I mentioned earlier, since hurricanes do not form exactly on the equator, some of its angular momentum is always about the earth's axis, which is balanced by a loss in AM from the Earth itself. Here, we are just applying the law of conservation of angular momentum to the earth-atmosphere system about the Earth's axis of rotation. We could pick the hurricane's axis of rotation for the entire earth-atmosphere system instead, and still apply the law, and come out with exactly the same results.


Understood, so the spin of the hurricane about its center is something like L cos x, where x is co-latitude and L is the angular momentum of the spin of the hurricane. This component is what is factored into the chart along with the the angular momentum about the surface.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ecflweatherfan:
Link

Am I seeing the LLC and MLC finally beginning to become vertically stacked near/over Andros Island? Kinda appears that way, with the LLC slightly to the SW of the MLC... decent convection around it and looking on the IR2 channel, it seems to be bringing itself together a little more with good spiraling around the circulation. Anyone with a take on this like to explain or correct me if I am wrong.


Yes is is becoming very interesting to see how it is quite well organizing a this time, as you said, I see some convection trying to get going around that area and moving to the west, lets see what the visible image shows on the mroning.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Link

Am I seeing the LLC and MLC finally beginning to become vertically stacked near/over Andros Island? Kinda appears that way, with the LLC slightly to the SW of the MLC... decent convection around it and looking on the IR2 channel, it seems to be bringing itself together a little more with good spiraling around the circulation. Anyone with a take on this like to explain or correct me if I am wrong.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2049. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


Do you know how the other component of the angular momentum is conserved, due to the spin of the hurricane about its center? Since you're here, I figure I'd ask. :)


I'm sure you know that you could pick any arbitrary axis in the universe for which to calculate the hurricane's angular momentum relative to that axis. As I mentioned earlier, since hurricanes do not form exactly on the equator, some of their angular momentum is always about the earth's axis, which is balanced by a loss in AM from the Earth itself. Here, we are just applying the law of conservation of angular momentum to the earth-atmosphere system about the Earth's axis of rotation. We could pick the hurricane's axis of rotation for the entire earth-atmosphere system instead, and still apply the law, and come out with exactly the same results.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Now I have a question about the atmosphere and storms of Jupiter. WHAT THE HECK IS GOING ON THERE?

jk
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2047. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


Yes, and the friction/drag constants obviously change everywhere. The entire Earth and the fluid atmosphere around it are considered one system. The Earth's surface won't be uniform, but the entire glob is considered as one entity. And then, nothing is a fully isolated system as long as we are within the universe, of course. It's darn close for practical purposes, though, as they apply to meteorology.


Believe me... it's an excellent approximation.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2046. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


Yes, but that hurricane has a certain angular momentum relative to the Earth's axis, and that is what is factored into the maps I posted. It is the entire vertically-integrated AAM about the Earth's axis, for the entire atmosphere, hurricanes and all.


Do you know how the other component of the angular momentum is conserved, due to the spin of the hurricane about its center? Since you're here, I figure I'd ask. :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2045. Levi32
Quoting FrankZapper:
But it may be more complex than one uniform system. You have an interface between air and water and also land at times.


Yes, and the friction/drag constants obviously change everywhere. The entire Earth and the fluid atmosphere around it are considered one system. The Earth's surface won't be uniform, but the entire glob is considered as one entity. And then, nothing is a fully isolated system as long as we are within the universe, of course. It's darn close for practical purposes, though, as they apply to meteorology.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Interesting discussion, thanks guys

Wish I understood it all a little better though
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2043. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


Thanks again. You're like an encyclopedia. :)


I'm just citing the info that they have on their page for their product :P
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Levi32:


Correct. That is why the Earth and its atmosphere are considered as one system.
But it may be more complex than one uniform system. You have an interface between air and water and also land at times.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2041. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


Well for instance, the angular momentum of a hurricane would come from two axis. One about the center of the hurricane and one from it's movement around the surface of the Earth. The total angular momentum from the hurricane is not parallel or anti-parallel with the angular momentum axis for the Earth... it's skewed due to the component normal to the Earth from it's spin around it's center or eye.


Yes, but that hurricane has a certain angular momentum relative to the Earth's axis, and that is what is factored into the maps I posted. It is the entire vertically-integrated AAM about the Earth's axis, for the entire atmosphere, hurricanes and all.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2040. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


The anomaly is defined with respect to the 1968-1997 climatology. Given this, the integration of the graph will naturally be close to zero.


Thanks again. You're like an encyclopedia. :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2039. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


I don't see why they would use any other axis of rotation. The maps I posted were anomaly maps based on the average, which is always positive, which is consistent with the Earth's axis being the one in use here.


Well for instance, the angular momentum of a hurricane would come from two axis. One about the center of the hurricane and one from it's movement around the surface of the Earth. The total angular momentum from the hurricane is not parallel or anti-parallel with the angular momentum axis for the Earth... it's skewed due to the component normal to the Earth from it's spin around it's center or eye.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2038. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


Thanks... it looks like it integrates pretty close to zero though. Also, this looks a plot of the AAA anomaly. How is the anomaly defined? With respect to the some average angular momentum?


The anomaly is defined with respect to the 1968-1997 climatology. Given this, the integration of the graph will naturally be close to zero.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2037. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


Again we see a large period of fluctuation with embedded noise. This is likely due to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Notice the increased AAM from 1976-2005, consistent with a positive PDO and thus increased westerlies at the equator, yielding greater AAM.



Thanks... it looks like it integrates pretty close to zero though. Also, this looks a plot of the AAA anomaly. How is the anomaly defined? With respect to the some average angular momentum?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2036. Levi32
Quoting robj144:
Also, what angular momentum is that? Is that around the Earth's spin axis?


I don't see why they would use any other axis of rotation. The maps I posted were anomaly maps based on the average, which is always positive, which is consistent with the Earth's axis being the one in use here.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2035. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


Damn... it's not zero anymore. :) What about over a longer time period though... like five or ten years?


Again we see a large period of fluctuation with embedded noise. This is likely due to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Notice the increased AAM from 1976-2005, consistent with a positive PDO and thus increased westerlies at the equator, yielding greater AAM.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2034. robj144
Also, what angular momentum is that? Is that around the Earth's spin axis?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2033. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


Posted the wrong one by accident lol. That one wasn't total AAM.


Damn... it's not zero anymore. :) What about over a longer time period though... like five or ten years?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2032. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


Ok, but if you integrate the last graph it's about zero.


Posted the wrong one by accident lol. That one wasn't total AAM. This one integrates to a negative number (fixed in original post).
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2031. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


It changes. The atmosphere's total angular momentum is always fluctuating. A product from ESRL tracks it with NCEP reanalysis data. AAM is instrumental in observing changes in the ENSO, which occurs along the equator and has a large effect on the total AAM.



Ok, but if you integrate the last graph it's about zero.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2030. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


Also, on average, the Earth's rotation is not affected that much because in the southern hemisphere, cyclones rotate opposite so the integrated affect of all cyclones on the Earth is about zero, correct?


It changes. The atmosphere's total angular momentum is always fluctuating. A product from ESRL tracks it with NCEP reanalysis data. AAM is instrumental in observing changes in the ENSO, which occurs along the equator and has a large effect on the total AAM.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2029. robj144
Meant to modify my comment and quoted it by accident.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2028. robj144
Quoting robj144:


Also, on average, the Earth's rotation is not affected that much because in the southern hemisphere, cyclones rotate opposite so the integrated effect of all cyclones on the Earth is about zero, correct?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2027. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


Correct. That is why the Earth and its atmosphere is considered one system.


Also, on average, the Earth's rotation is not affected that much because in the southern hemisphere, cyclones rotate opposite so the integrated affect of all cyclones on the Earth is about zero, correct?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Went out to find Aurora. Found clouds. Found raindrops. No fancy dancing lights.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2025. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


That's what I thought, but what is the coupling force between them? Another words the angular momentum must be transferred by a force or a torque. Is it some sort of friction between the storm and the Earth.


Correct. That is why the Earth and its atmosphere are considered as one system.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2024. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


The hurricane gains angular momentum from the increase in average angular velocity generated by steeper air pressure gradients, due to the latent heat release. Since hurricanes do not form on the equator, some of its vorticity occurs about the Earth's axis, and thus the Earth must lose some angular momentum to satisfy the law of conservation of angular momentum.

You could also think about this: If the hurricane has a uniform wind field and the Earth's surface has a constant coefficient of friction beneath it, then the westerlies on the southern side of the storm exert a greater torque on the Earth than the easterlies do on the northern side, because the distance from the Earth's axis of rotation is greater on the south side of the storm. Thus, under the conditions above, the net effect is a gain in angular momentum of the atmosphere, which requires a decrease in the AM of the Earth.


Thanks! What you just added answered in my question.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Perhaps the reason the LLC is not as defined, per the NHC, as earlier is because it is trying to relocate under ther heavier convection near Andros Island... which STILL happens to be moving WEST.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2022. robj144
Quoting Levi32:


The hurricane gains angular momentum from the increase in average angular velocity generated by steeper air pressure gradients, due to the latent heat release. Since hurricanes do not form on the equator, some of that angular momentum occurs about the Earth's axis, and thus the Earth must lose some angular momentum to satisfy the law of conservation of angular momentum.


That's what I thought, but what is the coupling force between them? Another words the angular momentum must be transferred by a force or a torque. Is it some sort of friction between the storm and the Earth.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2021. Levi32
Quoting robj144:


Maybe you can answer a question someone brought up the other day that I tried to answer, but couldn't figure it out exactly. When a storm first forms, it gets its spin from the Coriolis force. This force creates a torque which imparts angular momentum to the storm and the Earth loses some angular momentum. As the storm gets stronger by acting as a heat engine and extracting energy from the latent heat of water vapor, it appears to gain angular momentum. What does it gain angular momentum from? Another words what other member of the system loses angular momentum? Is it the Earth still through friction?


The hurricane gains angular momentum from the increase in average angular velocity generated by steeper air pressure gradients, due to the latent heat release. Since hurricanes do not form on the equator, some of their vorticity occurs about the Earth's axis, and thus the Earth must lose some angular momentum to satisfy the law of conservation of angular momentum.

You could also think about this: If the hurricane has a uniform wind field and the Earth's surface beneath it has a constant coefficient of friction, then the westerlies on the southern side of the storm exert a greater torque on the Earth than the easterlies do on the northern side, because the distance from the Earth's axis of rotation is greater on the south side of the storm. Thus, under the conditions above, the net effect is a gain in angular momentum of the atmosphere, which requires a decrease in the AM of the Earth.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2020. robj144
Quoting FrankZapper:
Oh, he is one of those Wall Street Gordon Gecko types. And to think all I wanted to streamline the NHC, save the taxpayers some $ and get our rating back to AAA.


It was a great attempt though.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2019. robj144
Quoting HurricaneKing:


Was skimming the internets and this site looks the touch on the answer some. It seems to be saying that because a storms is at a lower pressure than the surroundings the surrounding air tries to rush into to fill it in. This is based on The ageostrophic wind theory. If the circulation is strong enough it turns this tangental air into angular velocity. Or geostrophic wind that is in balance. Again this is me speculating at now 1:51am after being up since 6am so my brain is beginning to shut down.
Link


Thanks, but that link is incredibly hard to follow. It also doesn't mention latent heat either. Appreciate the effort though.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 2069 - 2019

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Partly Cloudy
31 °F
Partly Cloudy