U.S. had most extreme spring on record for precipitation

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:20 PM GMT on June 14, 2011

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Nature's fury reached new extremes in the U.S. during the spring of 2011, as a punishing series of billion-dollar disasters brought the greatest flood in recorded history to the Lower Mississippi River, an astonishingly deadly tornado season, the worst drought in Texas history, and the worst fire season in recorded history. There's never been a spring this extreme for combined wet and dry extremes in the U.S. since record keeping began over a century ago, statistics released last week by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) reveal. Their Climate Extremes Index (CEI) looks at the percentage area of the contiguous U.S. experiencing top 10% or bottom 10% monthly maximum and minimum temperatures, monthly drought, and daily precipitation. During the spring period of March, April, and May 2011, 46% of the nation had abnormally (top 10%) wet or dry conditions--the greatest such area during the 102-year period of record. On average, just 21% of the country has exceptionally wet conditions or exceptionally dry conditions during spring. In addition, heavy 1-day precipitation events--the kind that cause the worst flooding--were also at an all-time high in the spring of 2011. However, temperatures during spring 2011 were not as extreme as in several previous springs over the past 102 years, so spring 2011 ranked as the 5th most extreme spring in the past 102 years when factoring in both temperature and precipitation.


Figure 1. Nine states in the U.S. saw their heaviest precipitation in the 117-year record during spring 2011, with record-breaking precipitation concentrated in the Pacific Northwest and along the Ohio River. Seven other states had top-ten wettest springs. Texas had its driest spring on record, and New Mexico and Louisiana had top-ten driest springs. When compared with Figure 2, we see that this is a classic winter La Niña pattern, but at extreme amplitude. Image credit: NOAA/NCDC.


Figure 2. La Niña events since 1950 have brought wetter than average conditions to the Pacific Northwest and Ohio River Valley in winter, and drier than average conditions to the South in both winter and spring. Spring 2011 (Figure 1) had a pattern very similar to the classic winter La Niña pattern (left image in Figure 2.) Image credit: NOAA Climate Prediction Center.


Figure 3. The percent area of the Contiguous U.S. experiencing much above average heavy 1-day precipitation events in spring 2011 hit a record high, nearly 16%. The 102-year average is 9%. The previous record of 15.5% was set in 1964. Heavy springtime 1-day precipitation events in the U.S. have been increasing since 1960, in line with measured increases in water vapor over the U.S. due to a warming climate. See also Figure 4 below. Image credit: NOAA/NCDC.


Figure 4. Percent increase in the amount falling in heavy precipitation events (defined as the heaviest 1% of all daily events) from 1958 to 2007, for each region of the U.S. There are clear trends toward more very heavy precipitation events for the nation as a whole, and particularly in the Northeast and Midwest. Climate models predict that precipitation will increasingly fall in very heavy events, similar to the trend that has been observed over the past 50 years in the U.S. Image credit: United States Global Change Research Program. Figure updated from Groisman, P.Ya., R.W. Knight, T.R. Karl, D.R. Easterling, B. Sun, and J.H. Lawrimore, 2004: Contemporary changes of the hydro-logical cycle over the contiguous United States, trends derived from in situ observations. Journal of Hydrometeorology, 5(1), 64-85.

What caused this spring's extremes?
During a La Niña episode in the Eastern Pacific, when the equatorial waters cool to several degrees below average, abnormally dry winter weather usually occurs in the southern U.S., and abnormally wet weather in the Midwest. This occurs because La Niña alters the path of the jet stream, making the predominant storm track in winter traverse the Midwest and avoid the South. Cold, Canadian air stays north of the jet stream, and warm subtropical air lies to the south of the jet, bringing drought to the southern tier of states. La Niña's influence on the jet stream and U.S. weather typically fades in springtime, with precipitation patterns returning closer to normal. However, in 2011, the La Niña influence on U.S. weather stayed strong throughout spring. The jet stream remained farther south than usual over the Pacific Northwest and Midwest, and blew more strongly, with wind speeds more typical of winter than spring. The positioning of the jet stream brought a much colder than average spring to the Pacific Northwest, with Washington and Oregon recording top-five coldest springs. Spring was not as cold in the Midwest, because a series of strong storms moved along the jet stream and pulled up warm, moist Gulf of Mexico air, which mixed with the cold air spilling south from Canada. The air flowing north from the Gulf of Mexico was much warmer than usual, because weaker winds than average blew over the Gulf of Mexico during February and March. This reduced the amount of mixing of cold ocean waters from the depths, and allowed the surface waters to heat up. Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Gulf of Mexico warmed to 1°C (1.8°F) above average during April--the third warmest temperatures in over a century of record keeping (SST anomalies were a bit cooler in May, about 0.4°C above average, due to stronger winds over the Gulf.) These unusually warm surface waters allowed much more moisture than usual to evaporate into the air, resulting in unprecedented rains over the Midwest when the warm, moist air swirled into the unusually cold air spilling southwards from Canada. With the jet stream at exceptional winter-like strengths, the stage was also set for massive tornado outbreaks.


Figure 5. A La Niña-like positioning of the jet stream, more typical of winter than spring, brought much colder air than normal to the Pacific Northwest and Upper Midwest during the spring of 2011. Washington and Oregon had top-five coldest springs, and near-record snowfalls and snow packs were recorded in portions of the Northern Rockies and Northern Plains. South of the mean position of the jet stream, top-ten warmest springs were recorded in Texas, New Mexico, and Louisiana. Image credit: NOAA/NCDC.

Was climate change involved?
Whenever an unprecedented series of extreme weather events hit, it is natural to ask how climate change may be affecting the odds of these events, since our climate is undergoing unprecedented changes. This spring's unusual precipitation pattern--wet in the Northern U.S., and dry in the South--does fit what we'd expect from a natural but unusually long-lived winter La Niña pattern (Figure 2). However, it also fits the type of precipitation pattern climate models expect to occur over the U.S. by the end of the century due to human-caused warming of the climate (though shifted a few hundred miles to the south, Figure 6.) This drying of the Southern U.S. and increased precipitation in the Northern U.S. is expected to occur because of a fundamental shift in the large scale circulation of the atmosphere. The jet stream will retreat poleward, and rain-bearing storms that travel along the jet will have more moisture to precipitate out, since more water vapor can evaporate into a warmer atmosphere. The desert regions will expand towards the poles, and the Southern U.S. will experience a climate more like the desert regions of Mexico have now, with sinking air that discourages precipitation. A hotter climate will dry out the soil more, making record intensity droughts like this year's in Texas more probable. So, is it possible that the record extremes of drought and wetness this spring in the U.S. were due to a combination of La Niña and climate change. It is difficult to disentangle the two effects without doing detailed modelling studies, which typically take years complete and publish. One weakness in the climate change influence argument is that climate models predict the jet stream should retreat northwards and weaken due to climate change. Indeed, globally the jet stream retreated 270 miles poleward and weakened during the period 1970 - 2001, in line with climate model expectations. Thus, a stronger and more southerly jet stream over the U.S. during the spring is something we should expect to see less and less of during coming decades.


Figure 6. The future: simulated change in precipitation during winter and spring for the years 2089 - 2099 as predicted by fifteen climate models, assuming we continue high emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide. Confidence is highest in the hatched areas. Compare with Figure 7, the observed change in precipitation over the past 50 years. Image credit: United States Global Change Research Program.


Figure 7. U.S. annual average precipitation has increased by about 5% over the past 50 years, but there has been pronounced drying over the Southeast and Southwest U.S. Even in these dryer regions, though, heavy precipitation events have increased (see Figure 4.) Thus, rainfall tends to fall in a few very heavy events, and the light and moderate events decrease in number. Image credit: United States Global Change Research Program. Data plotted from http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/ushc n/.

Keep in mind, though, that climate models are best at describing the future global average conditions, and not at predicting how climate change might affect individual continents--or at predicting how rare extreme events might change. Major continent-scale changes in atmospheric circulation are likely to result over the coming few decades due to climate change, and I expect the jet stream will shift farther to the south in certain preferred regions during some combination of seasons and of the natural atmospheric patterns like La Niña, El Niño, and the Arctic Oscillation. For example, there has been research published linking recent record Arctic sea ice loss to atmospheric circulation changes in the Arctic Oscillation that encourage a southwards dip of the jet stream over Eastern North America and Western Europe during late fall and winter. Until we have many more years of data and more research results, we won't be able to say if climate change is likely to bring more springs with a circulation pattern like this year's.

One thing we can say is that since global ocean temperatures have warmed about 0.6°C (1°F) over the past 40 years, there is more moisture in the air to generate record flooding rains. The near-record warm Gulf of Mexico SSTs this April that led to record Ohio Valley rainfalls and the 100-year $5 billion+ flood on the Mississippi River would have been much harder to realize without global warming.

I'll have a new post by Thursday.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting Torgen:


One tidbit I've always remembered about Texas, is that it is further from Beaumont to El Paso than it is from El Paso to Los Angeles.


Yep Beaumont to El Paso 834

El Paso to LA 807

Gotta love mapquest lol
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 440
you would think the nuclear regulatory people would make an official statement to set the record straight? I found out about it on a blog yesterday and then today it has been removed from the blog? Theres something weird about all this. either its false or there is a coverup?
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Earth may be headed into a mini Ice Age within a decade

Physicists say sunspot cycle is 'going into hibernation'

By Lewis Page
Posted in Science, 14th June 2011 17:00 GMT

What may be the science story of the century is breaking this evening, as heavyweight US solar physicists announce that the Sun appears to be headed into a lengthy spell of low activity, which could mean that the Earth – far from facing a global warming problem – is actually headed into a mini Ice Age.

The announcement made on 14 June (18:00 UK time) comes from scientists at the US National Solar Observatory (NSO) and US Air Force Research Laboratory. Three different analyses of the Sun's recent behaviour all indicate that a period of unusually low solar activity may be about to begin.

The Sun normally follows an 11-year cycle of activity. The current cycle, Cycle 24, is now supposed to be ramping up towards maximum strength. Increased numbers of sunspots and other indications ought to be happening: but in fact results so far are most disappointing. Scientists at the NSO now suspect, based on data showing decades-long trends leading to this point, that Cycle 25 may not happen at all.





This could have major implications for the Earth's climate. According to a statement issued by the NSO, announcing the research:

An immediate question is whether this slowdown presages a second Maunder Minimum, a 70-year period with virtually no sunspots [which occurred] during 1645-1715.

As NASA notes:

Early records of sunspots indicate that the Sun went through a period of inactivity in the late 17th century. Very few sunspots were seen on the Sun from about 1645 to 1715. Although the observations were not as extensive as in later years, the Sun was in fact well observed during this time and this lack of sunspots is well documented. This period of solar inactivity also corresponds to a climatic period called the "Little Ice Age" when rivers that are normally ice-free froze and snow fields remained year-round at lower altitudes. There is evidence that the Sun has had similar periods of inactivity in the more distant past.

During the Maunder Minimum and for periods either side of it, many European rivers which are ice-free today – including the Thames – routinely froze over, allowing ice skating and even for armies to march across them in some cases.

"This is highly unusual and unexpected," says Dr Frank Hill of the NSO. "But the fact that three completely different views of the Sun point in the same direction is a powerful indicator that the sunspot cycle may be going into hibernation."

Next page: Good news for Mars astronauts – Less good for carbon traders
Link
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Quoting NRAamy:
Earth may be headed into a mini Ice Age within a decade

Physicists say sunspot cycle is 'going into hibernation'

By Lewis Page
Posted in Science, 14th June 2011 17:00 GMT

What may be the science story of the century is breaking this evening, as heavyweight US solar physicists announce that the Sun appears to be headed into a lengthy spell of low activity, which could mean that the Earth %u2013 far from facing a global warming problem %u2013 is actually headed into a mini Ice Age.

The announcement made on 14 June (18:00 UK time) comes from scientists at the US National Solar Observatory (NSO) and US Air Force Research Laboratory. Three different analyses of the Sun's recent behaviour all indicate that a period of unusually low solar activity may be about to begin.


Maybe we'll all get a decent snow in the south, and not have to face 100 degree summers.

Just lookin at the bright side...
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Quoting ScottLincoln:


Even if some educated best guesses need to be made to estimate the lag between the minor ups and downs of the ~11yr solar cycle, that does not refute his statement. Several independent estimates - backed up with actual infrared measurements - strongly indicate that the altered atmospheric chemistry is trapping more heat in the earth's climate system that can be overcome by a weak solar cycle.
Saying "I dont think I know, so you probably don't know either, so let's not even assume we know or try to know" is more a cop-out than a scientific answer.
Okay.

Do you have a link detailed currently accepted "educated best guesses" as to the lag time if one exists?

You also appear to be comfortable with a general assumption about there not being a lag time. The problem with that is, that if the lag time is longer than what was assumed, the statement you made, above, may have been come about incorrectly...and could be completely wrong.

What if it is 60 years and the assumption was made that it was zero? During a period of minimal TSI changes, measured changes in sensible heat at or near the surface could have wrongly been attributed to some other forcing if the TSI had been changing previously but had not yet manifested itself at thermometers.

Does anyone really want to say that they doubt that our oceans store incoming radiation as heat for decades before it shows up at the surface?
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
Quoting ShenValleyFlyFish:


from GoogleMaps:

Driving directions to Dalhart, TX
Suggested routes

1.
14 hours 41 mins
US-77 N
873 mi
2.
15 hours 2 mins
US-385 N
890 mi
3.
15 hours 1 min
US-83 N
878 mi


Brownsville, TX

Not a bad drive, That's about the same distance from the far south coast to the far north coast of NSW, my state. you arrive 2hrs earlier, Tweed Heads, NSW to Timbillica, NSW = 871miles(17hrs 2mins)
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Quoting Neapolitan:

The thing is, Fort Calhoun had a Level 2 incident last week, but I've seen or heard or read nothing about a Level 4 accident. Not saying it hasn't or won't happen, but I doubt the veracity of the Hawaii News Daily article.

FWIW, the NRC's event page doesn't describe anything like a Level 4 incident.


FWIW
Which turned out to be closer to correct in previous incident we followed here official statements or published rumors?

Powers That Be have pretty much the same interests wherever you find them.
Just Sayin'
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Quoting NRAamy:
Earth may be headed into a mini Ice Age within a decade

Physicists say sunspot cycle is 'going into hibernation'

By Lewis Page
Posted in Science, 14th June 2011 17:00 GMT

What may be the science story of the century is breaking this evening, as heavyweight US solar physicists announce that the Sun appears to be headed into a lengthy spell of low activity, which could mean that the Earth – far from facing a global warming problem – is actually headed into a mini Ice Age.

The announcement made on 14 June (18:00 UK time) comes from scientists at the US National Solar Observatory (NSO) and US Air Force Research Laboratory. Three different analyses of the Sun's recent behaviour all indicate that a period of unusually low solar activity may be about to begin.


It's unclear from this excerpt whether the scientists mentioned a mini-Ice Age in their announcement, or if that's what the reporter thinks the announcement means. Link to the article, please?
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956. srada
NWS in Wilmington, NC

.LONG TERM /SATURDAY NIGHT THROUGH TUESDAY/...
AS OF 3 AM WEDNESDAY...FAIRLY LOW-CONFIDENCE FORECAST AS THE
PATTERN IS RATHER SLOPPY AND SOME OF THE UPPER FEATURES ADVERTISED
BY GFS ARE A BIT SUSPICIOUS. WEEKEND PATTERN INVOLVES A MODEST
UPPER RIDGE BUILDING FROM THE WESTERN GULF COAST UP INTO THE OHIO
VALLEY...WITH WEAK TROFINESS OVER THE EAST COAST. AS WE HEAD INTO
THE EARLY PART OF NEXT WEEK...THE GFS IS VERY BULLISH ABOUT A
DISTURBANCE RIDING OVER THE TOP OF THAT RIDGE AND DEVELOPING A
SURFACE LOW OVER EASTERN NC.
HOWEVER...WILL NOT JUMP ON THAT
SOLUTION JUST YET AS THE DISTURBANCE MAY WELL BE CONVECTIVE
FEEDBACK.
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Quoting hydrus:
Someone said a drive from the southern tip of Texas to the the northern most tip would take approximately 22 hours..


One tidbit I've always remembered about Texas, is that it is further from Beaumont to El Paso than it is from El Paso to Los Angeles.
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954. Skyepony (Mod)
We just came off one of the longest & quietest solar min seen in near 100 years or so with a strong La Nina & it wasn't all that cool globally.


Blob tryin in the SW Caribbean. Click pic to loop

rgb
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Quoting Splashman:
Brownsville, TX to Dalhart, TX is 873 miles.


from GoogleMaps:

Driving directions to Dalhart, TX
Suggested routes

1.
14 hours 41 mins
US-77 N
873 mi
2.
15 hours 2 mins
US-385 N
890 mi
3.
15 hours 1 min
US-83 N
878 mi


Brownsville, TX
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Good morning.

Blog update:

Tropical Tidbit for Wednesday, June 15th, with Video
Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26775
951. Skyepony (Mod)
Every thing I'm seeing media almost goes out of it's way to not say which level. Check out the video. Water looks higher than the picture.

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945. NRAamy 11:01 AM EDT on June 15, 2011

All of these questions might be answered several decades after we (the current composition of this Blog) is dead and gone....Raises interesting possibilities for the future as to the Polar Ice Caps/Glaciers; while they have been shrinking in recent decades, perhaps due to climate warming, lower Sun activity might off-set that loss and cause them to regain lost territory.
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 11132
"so let's not even assume we know or try to know" is more a cop-out than a scientific answer."


'Assuming to know' or 'educated guesses' aren't scientific answers either. theory not fact.

just sayin'
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Bean!

:)
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Earth may be headed into a mini Ice Age within a decade

Physicists say sunspot cycle is 'going into hibernation'

By Lewis Page
Posted in Science, 14th June 2011 17:00 GMT

What may be the science story of the century is breaking this evening, as heavyweight US solar physicists announce that the Sun appears to be headed into a lengthy spell of low activity, which could mean that the Earth – far from facing a global warming problem – is actually headed into a mini Ice Age.

The announcement made on 14 June (18:00 UK time) comes from scientists at the US National Solar Observatory (NSO) and US Air Force Research Laboratory. Three different analyses of the Sun's recent behaviour all indicate that a period of unusually low solar activity may be about to begin.
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what happened to the volcano?

all the smoke and ash came over Jacksonville, FL.
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Quoting NRAamy:
sooooooooo......

what happened to the volcano?


;)

Which one,,, Eritrean or Chile?
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Quoting atmoaggie:
When would that negligible impediment start? Immediately upon the lower TSI beginning? 2 years later? 62 years later?

Do you have any idea what lag there might exist or are you comfortable assuming that changes in TSI imparted on the surface (3/4 fluid with a high specific heat) are instantly realized as sensible heat at the surface or in the near-surface atmosphere?

Big assumptions are dangerous, IMO. Moreso in a system of organized chaos (a.k.a. climate).


Even if some educated best guesses need to be made to estimate the lag between the minor ups and downs of the ~11yr solar cycle, that does not refute his statement. Several independent estimates - backed up with actual infrared measurements - strongly indicate that the altered atmospheric chemistry is trapping more heat in the earth's climate system that can be overcome by a weak solar cycle.
Saying "I dont think I know, so you probably don't know either, so let's not even assume we know or try to know" is more a cop-out than a scientific answer.
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Quoting help4u:
NOT WHAT I READ, MANY ARE SAYING MINI ICE AGE COMING.

Shouting doesn't get your point across any easier. If you keep shouting you'll go onto my "special" list
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sooooooooo......

what happened to the volcano?


;)
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Quoting Jax82:


Driving down JTB this morning was the worst i've ever seen it, we need a wind direction change.


absoloutely- this is really bad! got pics in my blog- but cannot see at ALL from 8th Floor Riverside. This is the worst I've ever seen in my life.
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Quoting Skyepony:
Something odd about the flooded nuclear power plant is googling comes up with..

Nebraska Nuclear Plant at Level 4 Accident

Hawaii News Daily - Tom Burnett - 10 hours ago
The Fort Calhoun, Nebraska, Nuclear power plant is going down fast due to massive flooding. It is pouring radiation into the Missouri river. ...


Clicking the link leads to an article that leaves out the part about radiation pouring into the river..


Recent articles from the local Omaha media say nothing about the rumors spreading around the net:
http://www.wowt.com/home/headlines/Ft_Calhoun_Flo od_Defenses_123878599.html

Until a media source beyond something somewhat unofficial out of Hawaii begins reporting it, I think it remains just that: rumor.
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Quoting help4u:
NOT WHAT I READ, MANY ARE SAYING MINI ICE AGE COMING.


Shouting never helps.
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NOT WHAT I READ, MANY ARE SAYING MINI ICE AGE COMING.
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Quoting Neapolitan:

Precisely what some--including most prominent climatologists--have been saying: greenhouse warming from rising CO2 levels is at least ten times stronger than any possible cooling from reduced solar irradiance. And given that the sun has been at a very low level of output for years and yet the temperature has continued to increase, the forecasted Maunder Minimum-like period of solar activity is likely to present a negligible impediment to rising temperatures.
When would that negligible impediment start? Immediately upon the lower TSI beginning? 2 years later? 62 years later?

Do you have any idea what lag there might exist or are you comfortable assuming that changes in TSI imparted on the surface (3/4 fluid with a high specific heat) are instantly realized as sensible heat at the surface or in the near-surface atmosphere?

Big assumptions are dangerous, IMO. Moreso in a system of organized chaos (a.k.a. climate).
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
Quoting Patrap:
Energy from the Sun Has Not Increased


Global surface temperature (top, blue) and the Sun's energy received at the top of Earth's atmosphere (red, bottom). Solar energy has been measured by satellites since 1978.

The amount of solar energy received at the top of our atmosphere has followed its natural 11-year cycle of small ups and downs, but with no net increase. Over the same period, global temperature has risen markedly. This indicates that it is extremely unlikely that solar influence has been a significant driver of global temperature change over several decades.

Precisely what some--including most prominent climatologists--have been saying: greenhouse warming from rising CO2 levels is at least ten times stronger than any possible cooling from reduced solar irradiance. And given that the sun has been at a very low level of output for years and yet the temperature has continued to increase, the forecasted Maunder Minimum-like period of solar activity is likely to present a negligible impediment to rising temperatures.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 14508


The entire state is under at least a high risk of fire. I'm personally at 4, or "very high". Can't find this map for other states though.
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Quoting Splashman:
Brownsville, TX to Dalhart, TX is 873 miles.


That would take you 14.55 hours going at an average speed of 60 mph, 17.46 hours going at an average speed of 50 mph, or 12.47 hours going at an average speed of 70 mph. Of course this isn't counting traffic, red lights, and a road that isn't an exact straight line from Brownsville to Dalhart. I could see it being somewhere around 20 hours total.
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Quoting Skyepony:

The Fort Calhoun nuclear power station in Fort Calhoun, Neb., currently shut down for refueling, is surrounded by flood waters from the Missouri River, Tuesday, June 14, 2011. On Tuesday, the releases at Gavins Point Dam in South Dakota hit the maximum planned amount of 150,000 cubic feet of water per second, which are expected to raise the Missouri River 5 to 7 feet above flood stage in most of Nebraska and Iowa. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
That looks like a water-filled barrier. We have a 6-foot one for our building.

A bigger version of this:
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
927. MahFL
Smoke is the worst yet in downtown JAX, the buildings on the opposite river bank are almost obscured.
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926. Skyepony (Mod)

The Fort Calhoun nuclear power station in Fort Calhoun, Neb., currently shut down for refueling, is surrounded by flood waters from the Missouri River, Tuesday, June 14, 2011. On Tuesday, the releases at Gavins Point Dam in South Dakota hit the maximum planned amount of 150,000 cubic feet of water per second, which are expected to raise the Missouri River 5 to 7 feet above flood stage in most of Nebraska and Iowa. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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Quoting Skyepony:
Something odd about the flooded nuclear power plant is googling comes up with..

Nebraska Nuclear Plant at Level 4 Accident

Hawaii News Daily - Tom Burnett - 10 hours ago
The Fort Calhoun, Nebraska, Nuclear power plant is going down fast due to massive flooding. It is pouring radiation into the Missouri river. ...


Clicking the link leads to an article that leaves out the part about radiation pouring into the river..
I sure hope that report is in error...
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 6 Comments: 12463
Spiked back up

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okay, nea. will have to see what develops.
thanks for the info.
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Well so much for the 23rd. On the bright side maybe someone will get rain.

High heat indices expected again today
By Anya Sehgal -

Forecast Discussion

Wednesday June 15, 2011

We could see a break in our heated, dry misery between June 27th to the 29th. Some of the computer models develop a tropical disturbance (maybe a depression or named storm) and have this feature approaching Texas and/or Louisiana from the Bay of Campeche. This disturbance has the potential to bring our region some badly needed rain. Link
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 440
Quoting Chicklit:


weird. if you look at the video the tv station said they were told not to film it. but they couldn't be stopped from filming from the river. google and you'll see the world press has not picked up on this as yet. will be interesting to see how long that takes to happen.

The thing is, Fort Calhoun had a Level 2 incident last week, but I've seen or heard or read nothing about a Level 4 accident. Not saying it hasn't or won't happen, but I doubt the veracity of the Hawaii News Daily article.

FWIW, the NRC's event page doesn't describe anything like a Level 4 incident.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 14508
ECMWF ensembles still forecast for a break in the ridge along the Gulf Coast, which would potentially give Texas some much needed precipitation, depending on how much liquid there is in the Gulf of Mexico/Western Caribbean.

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Quoting hydrus:
Someone said a drive from the southern tip of Texas to the the northern most tip would take approximately 22 hours...
The more accurate time is around 14 to 15 hours, I went from Hays County to Dalhart in 10 hours, stopping only once for gas.
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Evidently, the water is still rising.
Someone should find out if the message is true that the fuel rods are being stored underground.
Arne Gunderson, advisor for Fairewinds Assoc, says electrical fire may have incapacitated ability to cool down fuel rods.

LinkArnieGundersoncommentary

"Sand bags and nuclear power plants do not belong in the same sentence."
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First SAL outbreak of the season...

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916. Skyepony (Mod)
Something odd about the flooded nuclear power plant is googling comes up with..

Nebraska Nuclear Plant at Level 4 Accident

Hawaii News Daily - Tom Burnett - 10 hours ago
The Fort Calhoun, Nebraska, Nuclear power plant is going down fast due to massive flooding. It is pouring radiation into the Missouri river. ...


Clicking the link leads to an article that leaves out the part about radiation pouring into the river..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

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Dr. Masters co-founded wunderground in 1995. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990. Co-blogging with him: Bob Henson, @bhensonweather

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