America's Achilles' heel: the Mississippi River's Old River Control Structure

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 5:20 PM GMT on May 13, 2011

Share this Blog
20
+

America has an Achilles' heel. It lies on a quiet, unpopulated stretch of the Mississippi River in Louisiana, a few miles east of the tiny town of Simmesport. Rising up from the flat, wooded west flood plain of the Mississippi River tower four massive concrete and steel structures that would make a Pharaoh envious--the Army Corps' of Engineers greatest work, the billion-dollar Old River Control Structure. This marvel of modern civil engineering has, for fifty years, done what many thought impossible--impose man's will on the Mississippi River. Mark Twain, who captained a Mississippi river boat for many years, wrote in his book Life on the Mississippi, "ten thousand river commissions, with the mines of the world at their back, cannot tame that lawless stream, cannot curb it or define it, cannot say to it "Go here," or Go there, and make it obey; cannot save a shore which it has sentenced; cannot bar its path with an obstruction which it will not tear down, dance over, and laugh at." The great river wants to carve a new path to the Gulf of Mexico; only the Old River Control Structure keeps it at bay. Failure of the Old River Control Structure would be a severe blow to America's economy, interrupting a huge portion of our imports and exports that ship along the Mississippi River. Closure of the Mississippi to shipping would cost $295 million per day, said Gary LaGrange, executive director of the Port of New Orleans, during a news conference Thursday. The structure will receive its most severe test in its history in the coming two weeks, as the Mississippi River's greatest flood on record crests at a level never before seen.


Figure 1. Two views of the Mississippi River. Left: the meander paths of the Mississippi over time, as published in "Geological Investigation of the Alluvial Valley of the Lower Mississippi River" (Fisk, 1944). Right: The Army Corps of Engineers' view of Mississippi River peak flow rates during a maximum 1-in-500 year "Project Flood" (U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, 1958.) The places outlined in red are where the Corps has built flood control structures capable of diverting a portion of the Mississippi's flow.

A better path to the Gulf
The mighty Mississippi River keeps on rollin' along its final 300 miles to the Gulf of Mexico south of New Orleans--but unwillingly. There is a better way to the Gulf--150 miles shorter, and more than twice as steep. This path lies down the Atchafalaya River, which connects to the Mississippi at a point 45 miles north-northwest of Baton Rouge, 300 river miles from the Gulf of Mexico Delta. Each year, the path down the Atchafalaya grows more inviting. As the massive amounts of sediments the Mississippi carries--scoured from fully 41% of the U.S. land area--reach the Gulf of Mexico, the river's path grows longer. This forces it to dump large amounts of sediment hundreds of miles upstream, in order to build its bed higher and maintain the flow rates needed to flush such huge amounts of sediment to the sea. Thus the difference in elevation between the bed of the Mississippi and the Atchafalaya--currently 17 - 19 feet at typical flow rates of the rivers--grows ever steeper, and the path to the Gulf down the Atchafalaya more inviting. Floods like this year's great flood further increase the slope, as flood waters scour out the bed of the Atchafalaya. Without the Old River Control Structure, the Mississippi River would have carved a new path to the Gulf in the 1970s, leaving Baton Rouge and New Orleans stranded on a salt water estuary, with no fresh water to supply their people and industry.

History of the Old River Control Structure
The Mississippi River has been carving a path to the ocean since the time of the dinosaurs, always seeking the shortest and steepest route possible. Approximately once every 1000 years, the river jumps out of its banks and carves a new path. In John McPhee's fantastic essay, The Control of Nature, we learn:

The Mississippi's main channel of three thousand years ago is now the quiet water of Bayou Teche, which mimics the shape of the Mississippi. Along Bayou Teche, on the high ground of ancient natural levees, are Jeanerette, Breaux Bridge, Broussard, Olivier--arcuate strings of Cajun towns. Eight hundred years before the birth of Christ, the channel was captured from the east. It shifted abruptly and flowed in that direction for about a thousand years. In the second century a.d., it was captured again, and taken south, by the now unprepossessing Bayou Lafourche, which, by the year 1000, was losing its hegemony to the river's present course, through the region that would be known as Plaquemines. By the nineteen-fifties, the Mississippi River had advanced so far past New Orleans and out into the Gulf that it was about to shift again, and its offspring Atchafalaya was ready to receive it.

For the Mississippi to make such a change was completely natural, but in the interval since the last shift Europeans had settled beside the river, a nation had developed, and the nation could not afford nature. The consequences of the Atchafalaya's conquest of the Mississippi would include but not be limited to the demise of Baton Rouge and the virtual destruction of New Orleans. With its fresh water gone, its harbor a silt bar, its economy disconnected from inland commerce, New Orleans would turn into New Gomorrah. Moreover, there were so many big industries between the two cities that at night they made the river glow like a worm. As a result of settlement patterns, this reach of the Mississippi had long been known as "the German coast," and now, with B. F. Goodrich, E. I. du Pont, Union Carbide, Reynolds Metals, Shell, Mobil, Texaco, Exxon, Monsanto, Uniroyal, Georgia-Pacific, Hydrocarbon Industries, Vulcan Materials, Nalco Chemical, Freeport Chemical, Dow Chemical, Allied Chemical, Stauffer Chemical, Hooker Chemicals, Rubicon Chemicals, American Petrofina--with an infrastructural concentration equaled in few other places--it was often called "the American Ruhr." The industries were there because of the river. They had come for its navigational convenience and its fresh water. They would not, and could not, linger beside a tidal creek. For nature to take its course was simply unthinkable. The Sixth World War would do less damage to southern Louisiana. Nature, in this place, had become an enemy of the state.


The Atchafalaya steadily took more and more of the Mississippi's water to the Gulf of Mexico during the 20th Century, until by 1950, it had captured 30% of the great river's flow, becoming the 4th largest river in the U.S. by volume discharge. The Army Corps of Engineers stepped in, and in the late 1950s began construction of a massive structure that resembled a dam with gates to control the amount of water escaping from the Mississippi to the Atchafalaya. This "Low Sill Structure", completed in 1963, consisted of a dam with 11 gates, each 44 feet wide, that could be raised or lowered. The entire structure was 566 feet long. A companion "Overbank Structure" was built on dry land next to the Low Sill Structure, in order to control extreme water flows during major floods. The Overbank Structure had 73 bays, each 44 feet wide, and was 3,356 feet long. The total cost of the two structures: about $300 million.


Figure 2. Aerial view of the Mississippi River's Old River Control Structure, looking downstream (south.) Image credit: U.S. Army Corp of Engineers.

The flood of 1973: Old River Control Structure almost fails
For the first ten years after completion of the Old River Control Structure, no major floods tested it, leading the Army Corps to declare, "We harnessed it, straightened it, regularized it, shackled it." But in 1973, a series of heavy snowstorms in the Upper Midwest was followed by exceptionally heavy spring rains in the South. The Mighty Mississippi rose inexorably until the flow rate at the Old River Control Structure reached 2 million cubic feet per second--twenty times the flow of Niagara Falls--and stayed there for more almost three months. Turbulence from the unprecedented flows through the Low Sill Structure scoured the foundation and destroyed a 67-foot-high wing wall that guided water into the structure. Scour holes as big as a football field developed upstream, downstream, and underneath the structure, exposing 50 feet of the 90-foot long steel pilings supporting the structure. The structure began vibrating dangerously, so much so that it would slam open car doors of vehicles parking on top of Highway 15 that crosses over the top. Emergency repairs saved the structure, but it came every close to complete failure.

The flood of 1973 permanently damaged the Low Sill Structure, forcing the Corps to build additional structures to control future great floods. The first of these structures was the Auxilliary Control Structure. This 442-foot long structure, completed in 1986, consisted of six gates, each 62 feet wide, and cost $206 million to build. Joining the mix in the late 1980s was a 192-megawatt hydroelectric power plant, build at a cost of $520 million.


Figure 3. The flow of water in the Mississippi River as of Friday, May 13 (red line) has exceeded 2 million cubic feet per second, and was approaching the all-time record (dashed blue line.) Image credit: USACE.

The Old River Control Structure's greatest test: the flood of 2011
Flow rates of the Mississippi at the latitude of the Old River Control Structure are expected to exceed the all-time record on Saturday, giving the Old River Control Structure its greatest test since the flood of 1973. Since there are now four structures to control the flooding instead of just the two that existed in 1973, the Old River Control Structure should be able to handle a much greater flow of water. The flood of 2011 is not as large as the maximum 1-in-500 year "Project Flood" that the Old River Control Structure was designed to handle, and the Army Corps of Engineers has expressed confidence that the structure can handle the current flood. However, the system has never been tested in these conditions before. This is a dangerous flood, and very high water levels are expected for many weeks. Unexpected flaws in the design of the Old River Control Structure may give it a few percent chance of failure under these sorts of unprecedented conditions. While I expect that the Old River Control Structure will indeed hold back the great flood of 2011, we also need to be concerned about the levees on either side of the structure. The levees near Old River Control Structure range from 71 - 74 feet high, and the flood is expected to crest at 65.5 feet on May 22. This is, in theory, plenty of levee to handle such a flood, but levees subjected to long periods of pressure can and do fail sometimes, and the Corps has to be super-careful to keep all the levees under constant surveillance and quickly move to repair sand boils or piping problems that might develop. Any failure of a levee on the west bank of the Mississippi could allow the river to jump its banks permanently and carve a new path to the Gulf of Mexico. I'll say more about the potential costs of such an event in a future post.

According to the latest information from the Army Corps the Old River Control Structure is currently passing 624,000 cubic feet per second of water, which is 1% beyond what is intended in a maximum "Project Flood." The flow rate of the Mississippi at New Orleans is at 100% of the maximum Project Flood. These are dangerous flow rates, and makes it likely that the Army Corps will open the Morganza Spillway in the next few days to take pressure off of the Old River Control Structure and New Orleans levees. Neither can be allowed to fail. In theory, the Old River Control Structure can be operated at 140% of a Project Flood, since there are now four control structures instead of just the two that existed in 1973 (flows rates of 300,000 cfs, 350,000 cfs, 320,000 cfs, and 170,000 cfs can go through the Low Sill, Auxiliary, Overbank, and Hydroelectric structures, respectively.) Apparently, the Corps is considering this, as evidenced by their Scenario #3 images they posted yesterday. This is a risky proposition, as the Old River Control Structure would be pushed to its absolute limit in this scenario. It would seem a lower risk proposition to open the Morganza spillway to divert up to 600,000 cfs, unless there are concerns the Corps has they aren't telling us about.


Figure 4. Kayaking, anyone? The stilling basin downstream of the Low Sill Structure of the Old River Control Structure, as seen during major flood stage of the Mississippi River on May 10, 2011. The flow rate is 2 - 3 times that of Niagara Falls here. Video by Lee Alessi.

Recommended reading
John McPhee's fantastic essay, The Control of Nature

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 608 - 558

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17Blog Index

Not wanting anyone becoming hurt, or their property damaged, but this flooding might just be a wondrous thing for the gulf, in as much as it might flush the gulf of the BP oil mismanagement?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
606. txjac
Wow, Skye ...thats so totally re-assuring ..NOT!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
605. DDR
Its nice to see our first T-wave on the map,just picked up a 1/2 inch in about 5 mins here in Trini
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
603. Skyepony (Mod)
EPA Halts Heightened Monitoring of Fukushima Fallout (May 9th)...some highlights

The 50-year old RadNet monitoring network has wide geographic gaps and many inoperable monitors. EPA reversed plans to place deployable monitors to fill gaps up and down the West Coast. EPA is also considering withdrawing the few added monitors it had placed in Hawaii, Alaska, Guam and Spain;

Elevated levels of Iodine-131, Cesium-134, Cesium-137, and Strontium-90, radionuclides emitted from the Fukushima nuclear complex, are showing up in milk. In the case of the I-131, the levels exceed EPA’s permissible limits for drinking water under the Safe Drinking Water Act (EPA has no separate standards for milk.) There is no safe or non-harmful level of radiation for human consumption; and

Radioactive iodine levels in rainwater have been found, and continue to be found, significantly exceeding the EPA’s own Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 3piC/L for drinking water. EPA downplays the public health risk by noting that the “MCL for iodine-131 was calculated based on long-term chronic exposures over the course of a lifetime 70 years. The levels seen in rainwater are expected to be relatively short in duration.”

“With the Japanese nuclear situation still out of control and expected to continue that way for months, and with elevated radioactivity continuing to show up in the U.S., it is inexplicable that EPA would shut down its Fukushima radiation monitoring effort,” stated PEER Executive Director Jeff Ruch, noting radiation readings in seawater off the Japanese coast at depths of up to 100 feet are 1,000 times normal levels.

At the same time, EPA continues to review a plan to dramatically increase permissible radioactive levels in drinking water and soil following “radiological incidents,” such as nuclear power-plant accidents. The proposed radiation guides (called Protective Action Guides or PAGs) allow long-term cleanup standards thousands of times more lax than anything EPA has ever before accepted, permitting doses to the public that EPA itself estimates would cause a cancer in as much as every fourth person exposed.

“This is the worst possible time for EPA to roll back radiological protections for Americans,” added Ruch, pointing out that the EPA PAGs are favored by the nuclear industry but are vigorously opposed by public health professionals inside EPA. “The lesson from Fukushima should not be that we just have to learn to live with high levels of industrial radioactive pollution.”
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
602. JRRP

possible second wave south of CV ??
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
601. txjac
Thanks for all the great, infomative updates Skye.

Good almost afternoon to all
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
600. JRRP
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
599. JRRP


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
598. Skyepony (Mod)
Quoting hydrus:
Slu and MoonlightCowboy and first official T-wave... Another sign the season is close at hand.


Got to add CMC at 108hrs..

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
596. Skyepony (Mod)
Fukushima
Situation Update No. 111
On 15.05.2011 at 15:29 GMT+2

My quick summary~ Substantial damage to the fuel in 2 & 3..lack of pressure in those maybe because they melted through the floor like 1. 4's hydrogen explosion was due to 3's leak of hydrogen into many floors of 4.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
595. Skyepony (Mod)
Earthquake in Spain
Situation Update No. 16
On 15.05.2011 at 03:24 GMT+2

Around 1,600 of the buildings in Lorca (Murcia) that have been inspected so far following the earthquake which devastated the town and killed nine people on Wednesday evening have been declared uninhabitable. About six in 10 homes in Lorca are safe to live in, even though most will need repairs. Of those declared unsafe, about 1,150 have been marked with a yellow sign to show that the occupants may enter for a few minutes to collect their belongings, whilst the rest have red signs on the doors warning the owners not to enter under any circumstances. Regional president Ramón Luis Valcárcel has called for all those whose properties have been marked as safe to return home as quickly as possible in order to avoid the 'refugee camps' in the town from becoming overloaded. But many are still not happy to go back into their properties, as they have seen cracks in the walls and fear there may be undiscovered structural damage. Defence minister Carme Chacón says 'there is still a lot to do' and that at present, all efforts are being centred on supplying food and providing shelter for those affected. Over 600 members of the military are helping out, as are the Red Cross. Five marquees have been set up to house those who have lost their homes, and a further four camps have been installed in the open air. A total of 17 people remain in Murcia's La Arrixaca hospital, but the three most seriously injured are said to be out of danger. Lorca's Rafael Méndez hospital is not said to have any structural damage, and the accident and emergency and dialysis departments are due to be reopened on Monday. Very few grocery stores or supermarkets are open, and those that are see queues leading out of the door throughout the day.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
594. Skyepony (Mod)
Looks like Canada is dealing with epic flood too..

WINNIPEG, Manitoba, May 15 (UPI) -- A deliberate weekend breach of a dike in the Canadian province of Manitoba won't flood as much land as first thought, officials said.

The reluctant move to breach a large dike along the Assiniboine River near Portage la Prairie was made after several days of postponements, the Winnipeg Free Press reported.

Emergency Measures Minister Steve Ashton told reporters surveyors had determined the controlled flow would flood 70 square miles instead of the original estimate of nearly 90 miles.

Officials said the move would affect about 150 homes, but if nothing was done, at least 850 homes would have been flooded.

The seasonal spring thaw and rain flooding in southern Manitoba has been called the worst in about 300 years and property and agricultural losses are projected to surpass $1 billion, provincial leaders said last week.

Meanwhile in Winnipeg, the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers, city police said one man drowned Saturday and a second had to be rescued from the Assiniboine when their canoe capsized in fast-flowing water.

Neither was wearing a flotation vest, police said.

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2011/05/15/ Manitoba-breach-flooding-downsized/UPI-97641305470 881/#ixzz1MR83ES3T



Beachfoxx~ Your welcome:)

Neo~ I did see that. It's been pretty disturbing the last few days overall.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SLU:


yayyyyyyyyyyy!!!
Slu and MoonlightCowboy and first official T-wave... Another sign the season is close at hand.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nrtiwlnvragn:
First Tropical Wave noted on surface analysis chart:


On the first day of the Eastern Pacific hurricane season. Maybe we will do that some day. South Florida got a nice drenching....
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
How high's the water, momma?

"How high's the water, momma?" Way past five feet high and rising!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Vicksburg waterline

Waterline approaching record in Vicksburg. Taken Friday 13th, 4:30 pm.

Several weeks ago, you saw many more white lines of flood stages below this white line on the seawall. The water has risen many, many feet.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
588. SLU
Quoting nrtiwlnvragn:
First Tropical Wave noted on surface analysis chart:




yayyyyyyyyyyy!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
First Tropical Wave noted on surface analysis chart:


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Awesome weather we are having!! Making it a beautiful Sunday!
Quoting Skyepony:
Quoting IKE:
57.4 was my morning low.

TWC calling for near record lows here tomorrow night w/a low 48 w/NW winds @ 10-20 mph.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Thanks for posting this!! : )
Quoting Skyepony:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Skyepony:
Moving on to the latest developments in Japan's ongoing nuclear crisis highly radioactive substances were detected in parts of Tokyo. Japan's Asahi Shimbun reports about 3,200 and nearly 2-thousand becquerels of radioactive cesium per kilogram were found in the soil of Tokyo districts of Koto and Chiyoda, respectively, from testing conducted between April 10th and the 20th. This amount is higher than what was found in the prefectures near the Fukushima plant and experts warn that other areas may be subject to radiation contamination as clusters of clouds containing radioactive material remain in the atmosphere. Meanwhile, the plant's main operator, TEPCO, says that over 3-thousand tons of contaminated water has been found in the basement of the No. 1 reactor, causing a delay in Japan's latest approach to cool down the reactors.

Skye, did you seem my comment #527?

--TEPCO announced today that it's abandoning plans to flood and cool No. 1 reactor's containment building, since it's been verified that fuel has melted down and through the pressure vessel, creating holes through which any injected water, now highly radioactive, simply escapes. There is no alternate plan in place, and with radiation levels so high that workers can only spend two or three minutes in the building each year, it's not at all certain what options are left beyond entombment.

--It's been determined that meltdown occurred at the No. 1 reactor 16 hours after the earthquake. (That is, back when TEPCO and the Japanese government were telling us repeatedly that there was little danger of meltdown, that the situation was under control, that the worst had passed, that the explosion was simply a spectacular but harmless release of pent-up gases.)

--The Japanese government has been silently widening the no-go zone around the plant, incrementally adding towns and villages to the list. Residents of Kawamata and Iitate are being forced to leave today.

--Data suggests that it wasn't the tsunami after all that caused a loss of power that damaged the cooling systems leading to at least one meltdown (and as many as three), but rather the earthquake itself. (IOW, a rare super-tsunami isn't required to initiate a meltdown; just a quake of sufficient size, depth, and proximity.)
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13555
583. Skyepony (Mod)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
582. Skyepony (Mod)
The area affected by wildfires raging in Siberia has expanded by 560 hectares to 1,500 hectares in the past twenty-four hours, the Emergencies Ministry reported on Sunday. "There are 106 hotbeds of wildfires on a total area of 1,492.6 hectares in Siberia," the ministry said. Firefighters have localized 52 wildfires on an area of 988 hectares in the past twenty-four hours. The cause of forest fires is the activity of local residents, the ministry said. "Overall, 2,300 people and 534 pieces of equipment have been involved in the fire-fighting effort in the past twenty-four hours," the ministry said. A large number of wildfires have also been registered in the Trans-Baikal Territory, the Krasnoyarsk Territory, the Republics of Tyva and Buryatia, the Tomsk and Irkutsk Regions, the ministry said. Wildfires devastated a number of regions in central Russia last summer, killing 62 people and leaving thousands homeless.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
581. Skyepony (Mod)
Moving on to the latest developments in Japan's ongoing nuclear crisis highly radioactive substances were detected in parts of Tokyo. Japan's Asahi Shimbun reports about 3,200 and nearly 2-thousand becquerels of radioactive cesium per kilogram were found in the soil of Tokyo districts of Koto and Chiyoda, respectively, from testing conducted between April 10th and the 20th. This amount is higher than what was found in the prefectures near the Fukushima plant and experts warn that other areas may be subject to radiation contamination as clusters of clouds containing radioactive material remain in the atmosphere. Meanwhile, the plant's main operator, TEPCO, says that over 3-thousand tons of contaminated water has been found in the basement of the No. 1 reactor, causing a delay in Japan's latest approach to cool down the reactors.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting seflagamma:


I got you beat.. after almost 5 months with out rainfall...

we got 2 1/2" in my guage last night!!!!
WhoooHoooo!

technically since I have the "rainman" precise weather guage it was 2.65" of rain!

My giant guage that just gets "round about" measurements got 2 1/2"

I cannot believe my neighborhood got that much rain in a few hours...Hope most of SE Fla got it also because we were about to go up in flames!

and more rain moving in this morning from the west!

Loved reading back from conversations last night...
Aqua, I don't eat any fish from our canals either! That is urban drain water in there and the fish have 3 eyes!
and yes, Rainman just wants to buy a boat! LOL

Good morning my friends!
Got to find out what is going on in Louisiana.


Ya there was even a very strong thunderstorm up in Wellington which my dad, my friend and I chased--very heavy rain that lingered around for hours and at one point winds were gusting up to about 40 MPH.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
579. Jax82
it was nice to hear the thunder yesterday, and to see some harmless heat lightning streaking through the sky. Next 5 days look perfect.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Vicksburg, MS just went over 56'. Another new record broken from 1927
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Yesterday.93 fell in San Juan,apart from hail and a small tornado that occured.Today looks like a repeat as the trough still lingers nearby.NWS in San Juan just issued a flash flood watch for almost all of Puerto Rico until 8 PM AST.



Link
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14329
Quoting cajunkid:


Much, if not most, of the Midwest's gas and diesel comes up the Mississippi.

Ponder that for a while.


Thats scary
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting aquak9:
Sigh...Macho Banni Rooster beats peacock.
Special for you Aqua...:)Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting emcf30:


I just don't think people realize the implication this situation has on peoples lives because they think they are not directly affected. Well guess what. They will find out in a hurry if the waterway gets shut down for whatever reason and the flow of goods and products come to a halt. What a dominoes effect that would be. then they would wake up and smell the roses.


Much, if not most, of the Midwest's gas and diesel comes up the Mississippi.

Ponder that for a while.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Sigh...Macho Banni Rooster beats peacock.
Member Since: August 13, 2005 Posts: 168 Comments: 26066
567- emcf- very well put. Folks here in NE Fla, are clueless...they think it might be a redneck trailer park in backwoods Louisiana seeing about a foot of water. Definitely not newsworthy.

as I work with mostly women, they are more interested in the sales at Pottery Barn. So sad.
Member Since: August 13, 2005 Posts: 168 Comments: 26066
Quoting aquak9:
0.87"

(struts around like proud peacock)
1.10 inches just yesterday alone...struts around like macho banni rooster.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
570. mnsky
Interestinglabels=1 labels=1 labels=1:)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Complete Update





Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting spathy:


I got news for ya.
If you have ever eaten a Micky Ds fillet of fish sandwich you have eaten CARP.
lol
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting tkeith:
I cant believe the nonchalant attitude most of the people I've talked to around here have about this event.

The local media here have been covering this nonstop so I dont blame them. I dont know...


I just don't think people realize the implication this situation has on peoples lives because they think they are not directly affected. Well guess what. They will find out in a hurry if the waterway gets shut down for whatever reason and the flow of goods and products come to a halt. What a dominoes effect that would be. then they would wake up and smell the roses.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting emcf30:


When Chick posted that there was nothing on. They has just got done with the press conference. Alot of the UStreams were not working at that time. Think they were relocating. But as you said. This is major news. My 2 youngest teenagers were pissed that I made they come in a watch it. They will understand as time goes on in their studies at school. I am sure this will be one for the books.
I cant believe the nonchalant attitude most of the people I've talked to around here have about this event.

The local media here have been covering this nonstop so I dont blame them. I dont know...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting severstorm:

C'mon you have to have a heater in that jeep! 70.2 here (NICE)


Actually, no I don't. Last month when I changed out the water pump, the heater connection broke when I tried to get the hose off, so I bypassed it. Didn't think I would need it until October. Plenty of time to fix it. Who knew? :|
Member Since: August 22, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 6010
Quoting aquak9:


I stand corrected, thanks. Will modify the post.

still I think this oughtta be bigger news.


When Chick posted that there was nothing on. They has just got done with the press conference. Alot of the UStreams were not working at that time. Think they were relocating. But as you said. This is major news. My 2 youngest teenagers were pissed that I made they come in a watch it. They will understand as time goes on in their studies at school. I am sure this will be one for the books.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting IKE:

I mowed the front after the rains moved through. Fixing to do the back and burn for a couple of hours. Weather is too nice to stay inside:)

You could be right about a mid-July start with this constant pattern. Need a pattern change.

My heater in my house just kicked on...
...thinking about doing a bit of burning myself today,as todays my day off, lol.....nice line of wx moved thru swfl last night around 5am,pickd up a quick. 25 in a hr...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting IKE:
57.4 was my morning low.

TWC calling for near record lows here tomorrow night w/a low 48 w/NW winds @ 10-20 mph.


Oh my goodness, we have not been below 70 I don't think since early March!

we are upper 70's now and will get upper 80's this afternoon.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting emcf30:


Both those stations had live coverage of the opening. They just did not cut over to it until just before they lifted the gate. Had my TV on split screen and thats the 2 channels I had on.


I stand corrected, thanks. Will modify the post.

still I think this oughtta be bigger news.
Member Since: August 13, 2005 Posts: 168 Comments: 26066
Quoting IKE:
Cool few days ahead....

Tonight: Partly cloudy, with a low around 52. Northwest wind between 5 and 10 mph.

Monday: A 20 percent chance of showers after 1pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 75. Northwest wind between 5 and 10 mph.

Monday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 45. North northwest wind around 10 mph.

Tuesday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 75. North northwest wind between 5 and 15 mph.



Looks like that front will make it down to my neck of the woods...one last few cooler days.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting aquak9:
Saw a post here yesterday, said that neither CNN or TWC was carrying coverage of the Morganza opening. What nitwits are running these stations? Do they not realize the impacts this will have on the entire country?

Still, if the Mississippi rises two more feet, to 18.5 feet, the Coast Guard could suspend all boat traffic on the river, in an unusual move that could cost the country nearly $300million a day in lost revenue, and even more than that per day after the first four, reports CBS News.

The Mississippi is one of the country's most important waterways, and the port of New Orleans is one of the busiest, with 12,000 ships carrying 500-million tons of cargo annually and 700,000 cruise passengers.


Link


Both those stations had live coverage of the opening. They just did not cut over to it until just before they lifted the gate. Had my TV on split screen and thats the 2 channels I had on.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
558. IKE
57.4 was my morning low.

TWC calling for near record lows here tomorrow night w/a low 48 w/NW winds @ 10-20 mph.
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37858

Viewing: 608 - 558

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
64 °F
Overcast