Two EF-5 tornadoes confirmed from last week's outbreak; record Ohio River flood

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:23 PM GMT on May 02, 2011

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Damage surveys and the hunt for missing victims continues today in the areas devastated by last week's historic tornado outbreak. With the death toll in the 340 - 350 range, the April 25 - 28 tornado outbreak has surpassed the April 3 - 4, 1974 Super Outbreak (315 killed) as the deadliest U.S. tornado outbreak of the past 50 years. Hardest hit was Alabama, with 249 deaths; Tennessee and Mississippi had 34 deaths each, and deaths were also reported in Arkansas, Georgia, Virginia, Louisiana, and Ontario, Canada. Twenty-eight separate tornadoes killed people. According wunderground's weather historian, Christopher C. Burt, in his post The World's Deadliest Tornadoes, only the death toll of the great Tri-State tornado outbreak of 1925 (747 killed) and the 1936 Tupelo-Gainsville tornado outbreak (454 killed) were greater. These outbreaks both occurred during an era before Doppler radar and tornado warnings. Had last week's outbreak occurred back in those days, I expect the death toll would have been in the thousands. The National Weather Service provided warning times of 15 - 30 minutes for all of last week's killer storms, allowing time for most people to get to safe shelters.


Figure 1. MODIS satellite image from NASA's Aqua satellite taken on Friday, April 29, 2011, showing the damage paths of three of Wednesday's tornadoes in Alabama.


Figure 2. Damage paths of Wednesday's tornadoes as compiled by the National Weather Service office in Birmingham, Alabama.

Damage surveys will continue for another week, so it is uncertain exactly how many tornadoes were spawned in last week's outbreak. The confirmed count is already at 146, which would make it the 4th largest tornado outbreak in history. The total is likely to surpass the 155 confirmed tornadoes logged during the April 14 - 16, 2011 tornado outbreak. According to a list of tornado outbreaks maintained by Wikipedia, only two other tornado outbreaks have had as many as 150 twisters--the May 2004 outbreak (385), and the May 2003 outbreak (401). So, remarkably, two of the top four outbreaks in history occurred within two weeks of each other. In addition, the period from 8am April 27 - 8am April 28 during last week's outbreak has a good chance of breaking the record for most tornadoes in a 24-hour period, which is currently 148 (set in the April 3 - 4, 1974 Super Outbreak.)

Two EF-5 tornadoes confirmed
Damage surveys have confirmed that last week's April 25 - 28 outbreak spawned at least eleven violent EF-4 tornadoes (winds 166 - 200 mph) and two EF-5 tornadoes (winds greater than 200 mph.) This is only the 5th time since tornado ratings began in 1950 that two top-end tornadoes have occurred on the same day. The last time was on March 13, 1990 in Kansas. An EF-5 with 205 mph winds hit Smithville, Mississippi at 3:44pm EDT on Wednesday. The tornado's path was only 3 miles long, but was 1/2 miles wide and did extreme damage. Fifteen were killed, 40 injured, and 166 buildings destroyed. Some well-built modern 2-story homes that were bolted to their foundations were completely destroyed, leaving only the foundation. This type of damage is characteristic of an EF-5 tornado with 205 mph winds. The Smithville tornado is the first EF-5 tornado in Mississippi since the Candlestick Park tornado of March 3, 1966. The other EF-5 tornado of the day, the Hackleburg tornado, touched down in Northwest Alabama in Marion County at 3pm CDT, and devastated the towns of Phil Campbell and Hackleburg. This tornado killed at least 25 people. Meteorologist Gary Dobbs, with WAAY-TV since 1984, spotted this tornado from his car and was unable to get to his storm shelter. While his house was destroyed around him, Dobbs was thrown 40 feet from the house. The door of the storm shelter blew off, and none of the friends therein were seriously injured. Dobbs required hospitalization. One other tornado that may get an EF-5 rating is the violent Tuscaloosa/Birmingham tornado, which killed at least 66 people and injured over 1000. It was the deadliest tornado in the U.S. since 1955, when 80 people died in Udall, Kansas. This tornado had a path length of 80.3 miles, and has been preliminarily rated at high-end EF-4 with 190 mph winds. The Tuscaloosa-Birmingham tornado is likely to be the most expensive tornado of all-time, and damage from the April 25 - 28 outbreak is likely rank as the most expensive tornado outbreak in history. Insured damages have been rated at $2 - $5 billion, and uninsured losses will be several billion more. The previous most expensive tornado outbreak in history was the $3.5 billion price tag, in 2005 dollars, of the April 3 - 4, 1974 Super Outbreak .


Figure 3. Radar reflectivity image of the Hackleburg, Alabama tornado of April 27, 2011, a few minutes after it devastated the town of Hackleburg, Alabama (white cross at center of image.) The Hackleburg tornado was rated an EF-5 with greater than 200 mph winds.


Figure 4. Remarkable video of the tornado that hit Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Beginning at about 2:30 into the video, one can see the ominous mini-vorticies and cloud of debris that encircled the tornado.

Unprecedented flooding on Ohio River
Last week's storm system, in combination with heavy rains earlier this month and over past 24 hours, pushed the Ohio River at Cairo, Illinois to 60.6 feet at 1am CDT May 1. This is the highest flood in history, besting the 59.5' mark of 1937. Additional heavy rains of 2 - 4 inches are expected over the next five days, and the river is not expected to crest until Wednesday, at a height of 61.5 feet. As the record flood waters from the Ohio River pour into the Mississippi and are joined by melt water from the this winter's record snow pack over the Upper Mississippi, all-time flood heights are likely to be exceeded at many points along a 400-mile stretch of the Mississippi below its confluence with the Ohio. I'll have a more detailed look in my next post.

Jeff Masters

Bartow County Georgia Tornado Damage 10 (marlin01)
April 28th, 2011
Bartow County Georgia Tornado Damage 10

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364. KeysieLife
4:56 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting MrMixon:


Ha! I've never even heard of it... but it sounds like something Dr. DeJong should've shown us in our structural geology class...


Edit: The movie was actually 10.5..based on the San Andreas fault and they used nukes to try and fuse the fault...making it worse. LOL Awesome!

Quoting dfwWxDude:
I am no geologist, but it seems like you'd have to get it just right, and how could you, without knowing exactly how much tension is in the fault? Too big of a pop, and you compress the fault more, and the stress builds up even worse before it releases. Too little and you are wasting your time digging holes just right. Unless Chesapeake Energy has been practicing this....

Seems like I read, after the really bad New Madrid quakes from way back, the Mississippi River flowed backwards for awhile. That would be a mess right now.

But fun to think about.



In the movie, the Kern River was flowing backwards as well.
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363. Skyepony (Mod)
4:49 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
No new news on the Grand Gulf Nuclear Plant leaking tritium into the Mississippi River.
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361. aquak9
4:46 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Aussie- don't know if this helps- I think the area outlined in green, is the area they expect to be flooded after birds point goes. Then the water is supposed to re-enter the river further south.


Member Since: August 13, 2005 Posts: 165 Comments: 25931
360. AussieStorm
4:44 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting MrMixon:


I think faults are too complex to be "fused" by a single explosion. Rather than imagining two bricks sliding against eachother, imagine two bricks with a 3-D puzzle of broken brick chunks and gravel between them. The failure surfaces during an earthquake are often numerous and along fractures which may only be connected via a very complex path.

I definitely think it's possible, theoretically, to trigger an earthquake with a nuke, but the fault would have to be ready to go (i.e. - stress within the fault would have to be near the breaking point) and you'd have to place the nuke at the correct location and depth to be successful.

I wasn't thinking of fusing the whole fault, just the part where the nuclear explosion would to happen. wouldn't that lock the fault and that extra stress cause a bigger quake, or extend the time between to the next quake?

2:45am and I'm off to bed. Goodnight
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15935
358. dfwWxDude
4:43 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
I am no geologist, but it seems like you'd have to get it just right, and how could you, without knowing exactly how much tension is in the fault? Too big of a pop, and you compress the fault more, and the stress builds up even worse before it releases. Too little and you are wasting your time digging holes just right. Unless Chesapeake Energy has been practicing this....

Seems like I read, after the really bad New Madrid quakes from way back, the Mississippi River flowed backwards for awhile. That would be a mess right now.

But fun to think about.

Member Since: September 21, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 80
357. AussieStorm
4:41 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting aquak9:
from 6abc.com:

Among those that could be tapped are the 58-year-old Morganza floodway near Morgan City, La., and the Bonnet Carre floodway about 30 miles north of New Orleans. The Morganza has been pressed into service just once, in 1973. The Bonnet Carre, which was christened in 1932, has been opened up nine times since 1937, the most recent in 2008.

Officials in Louisiana and Mississippi are warning that the river could bring a surge of water unseen since 1927.

The corps has said about 241 miles of levees along the Mississippi River between Cape Girardeau, Mo., and the Gulf of Mexico need to be made taller or strengthened. George Sills, a former Army Corps engineer and levee expert in Vicksburg, Miss., said the volume of water moving down the river would test the levee system south of Memphis into Louisiana.


I so often think of flooding, as deep water that is standing...not so often as deep water that is rushing. That's a major part of the problem- not only the depth and excess of the water, but the FLOW that can add so much more damage to the underneath, where we have no clear idea of what's happening.

When would the flow of this water re-enter the river?
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15935
356. aquak9
4:37 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
from 6abc.com:

Among those that could be tapped are the 58-year-old Morganza floodway near Morgan City, La., and the Bonnet Carre floodway about 30 miles north of New Orleans. The Morganza has been pressed into service just once, in 1973. The Bonnet Carre, which was christened in 1932, has been opened up nine times since 1937, the most recent in 2008.

Officials in Louisiana and Mississippi are warning that the river could bring a surge of water unseen since 1927.

The corps has said about 241 miles of levees along the Mississippi River between Cape Girardeau, Mo., and the Gulf of Mexico need to be made taller or strengthened. George Sills, a former Army Corps engineer and levee expert in Vicksburg, Miss., said the volume of water moving down the river would test the levee system south of Memphis into Louisiana.


I so often think of flooding, as deep water that is standing...not so often as deep water that is rushing. That's a major part of the problem- not only the depth and excess of the water, but the FLOW that can add so much more damage to the underneath, where we have no clear idea of what's happening.
Member Since: August 13, 2005 Posts: 165 Comments: 25931
355. jeffs713
4:35 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting KeysieLife:


Of course it's possible! Hasn't anyone seen the movie 10.0? LOL

LOL.

Run this one through Occam's Razor...

Possibility A: Hollywood makes a movie VERY loosely based on reality, that is designed to sell (very few) tickets and/or commercial spots.
Possibility B: Our government, in an effort to depopulate a very productive agricultural region, detonates a nuclear weapon underground without any outside knowledge, in order to set off a major earthquake near several major metropolitan areas.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5882
354. MrMixon
4:35 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting KeysieLife:


Of course it's possible! Hasn't anyone seen the movie 10.0? LOL


Ha! I've never even heard of it... but it sounds like something Dr. DeJong should've shown us in our structural geology class...
Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
352. KeysieLife
4:29 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting MrMixon:


I think faults are too complex to be "fused" by a single explosion. Rather than imagining two bricks sliding against eachother, imagine two bricks with a 3-D puzzle of broken brick chunks and gravel between them. The failure surfaces during an earthquake are often numerous and along fractures which may only be connected via a very complex path.

I definitely think it's possible, theoretically, to trigger an earthquake with a nuke, but the fault would have to be ready to go (i.e. - stress within the fault would have to be near the breaking point) and you'd have to place the nuke at the correct location and depth to be successful.


Of course it's possible! Hasn't anyone seen the movie 10.5? LOL
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351. Skyepony (Mod)
4:29 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Pat~ Yeah, it doesn't make much sense. That was built to be blown for extreme flooding..the helicorder ecmf posted earlier looks like bomb, no real earthquake following. You can see there has been very weak tremors like the weight of the flooding.

MrMixon has another good point about how quick nuclear explosions have been noted in the past..
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350. sunlinepr
4:27 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
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349. emcf30
4:24 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Birds Point New Madrid Floodway Joint Information Center
The Corps estimates the next blast in the lower levee section (outflow crevasse) of the Birds Point New Madrid Floodway operation could take place around noon. We'll continue to post updates as soon as they become available.
9 minutes ago

Birds Point New Madrid Floodway Joint Information Center
We are planning to post images of this morning's flyover as soon as we can
45 minutes ago
Member Since: August 7, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1933
348. MrMixon
4:22 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting AussieStorm:

Wouldn't the heat created by a nuclear explosion fuse the fault together hence making the next quake even more destructive.


I think faults are too complex to be "fused" by a single explosion. Rather than imagining two bricks sliding against eachother, imagine two bricks with a 3-D puzzle of broken brick chunks and gravel between them. The failure surfaces during an earthquake are often numerous and along fractures which may only be connected via a very complex path.

I definitely think it's possible, theoretically, to trigger an earthquake with a nuke, but the fault would have to be ready to go (i.e. - stress within the fault would have to be near the breaking point) and you'd have to place the nuke at the correct location and depth to be successful.
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347. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
4:13 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
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346. Gearsts
4:04 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
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345. Patrap
4:03 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
There has never been a Nuclear Device used in the CONUS for any fault relief,,the EMP sig alone would have been a given,easily.



Lawdy,,have mercy.


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344. jeffs713
4:03 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Neapolitan:

I like how you can easily see the primacord detonating at its leisurely 4 miles-per-second pace. ;-)
"leisurely" hehe.

Yes, it is very cool seeing the primacord, and also how they did the detonation from a central point radiating out.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5882
343. AussieStorm
4:02 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Neapolitan:

I suppose so: a sharp, full-scale bang followed by a short falloff, then a slow buildup to a lengthy rumble. Depending, of course, on the size of the quake created; smaller, localized quakes obviously have a very short signature as there's no long fault break to drag it out.

Wouldn't the heat created by a nuclear explosion fuse the fault together hence making the next quake even more destructive.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15935
342. MrMixon
4:00 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Well, it's daylight in Missouri now... I'm surprised we haven't seen any images of the flood waters pouring across the now-destroyed levee. Anyone found any photos taken today? I did a quick search and turned up nothin'...
Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
341. Neapolitan
3:58 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Rainman32:
Video: Birds Point levee breach, slowed down frame by frame



Real time and slowed down frame by frame play back of the explosion breaching the Birds Point levee in Mississippi County, Mo. on Monday. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers blew an 11,000 foot hole in the Birds Point levee, breaching it to allow water to fill the floodway and relieve pressure and lower the flood levels upstream at Cairo, Ill., and other communities. Video by David Carson-dcarson@post-dispatch.com

I like how you can easily see the primacord detonating at its leisurely 4 miles-per-second pace. ;-)
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340. Rainman32
3:52 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Video: Birds Point levee breach, slowed down frame by frame



Real time and slowed down frame by frame play back of the explosion breaching the Birds Point levee in Mississippi County, Mo. on Monday. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers blew an 11,000 foot hole in the Birds Point levee, breaching it to allow water to fill the floodway and relieve pressure and lower the flood levels upstream at Cairo, Ill., and other communities. Video by David Carson-dcarson@post-dispatch.com
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339. Neapolitan
3:48 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
This image shows rainfall for the past 30 days over the eastern 2/3 of the U.S. Easy to see why it's flooding, no? (From NWS Southern Region HQ)

Click for larger image:

Appropriate tropical weather-related image.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13536
338. MrMixon
3:47 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Skyepony:
If you managed to trigger an earthquake with a bomb would it look like bomb imposed over earthquake?


Essentially, yes. You'd have a big initial spike and then sometime after (maybe even immediately) you'd have the long, irregular rumbling of the earthquake signature. But I'm skeptical of the nuclear test theory. I try to keep an open mind too, but there are multiple ways of detecting a nuclear test (seismographs, post-explosion interferometry of the ground surface, trace amounts of nuclear material in the air and/or water) and I'd guess that the world media would jump all over a story like that if anyone gathered enough evidence to support it (like they did when N. Korea tested the underground nuke).

I tend to apply Occam's Razor to theories like this... If there are two competing theories (real earthquake vs nuclear test), then go with the theory that requires the fewest assumptions.
Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
337. Neapolitan
3:42 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Skyepony:
If you managed to trigger an earthquake with a bomb would it look like bomb imposed over earthquake?

I suppose so: a sharp, full-scale bang followed by a short falloff, then a slow buildup to a lengthy rumble. Depending, of course, on the size of the quake created; smaller, localized quakes obviously have a very short signature as there's no long fault break to drag it out.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13536
336. jeffs713
3:40 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Skyepony:
If you managed to trigger an earthquake with a bomb would it look like bomb imposed over earthquake?
In theory, yes, but there are a few catches... bombs put off P-waves in abundance (compression waves), while quakes also put those off. The quake is unlikely to be instantaneous (due to the need to propagate the waves outward along the rupture zone), so an observer would likely see two separate sets of P-waves. Secondly, the New Madrid fault, IIRC, is a transverse fault, meaning the two edges are sliding past each other on a N/S plane. I really, really don't think a nuke can act as a "spark plug" to start a quake - not to mention the machinations to get the nuke in place would be nigh-impossible to ignore.

And finally, even underground tests release some radionucletides, which would be detectable, and have a slight effect of reducing the secrecy.
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335. emcf30
3:36 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Skyepony:
If you managed to trigger an earthquake with a bomb would it look like bomb imposed over earthquake?

I would think you would have the bomb signature show up first followed by the typical earthquake signature
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334. Skyepony (Mod)
3:32 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
If you managed to trigger an earthquake with a bomb would it look like bomb imposed over earthquake?
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333. emcf30
3:28 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Member Since: August 7, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1933
332. hydrus
3:28 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting DestinJeff:
The re port feature is the worst thing about the blog. Not so much the humor.
Humor is good sometimes....hail the power of the mighty chart..
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331. Skyepony (Mod)
3:25 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting emcf30:
Sky was it helicorder or something different


It may have been or could be like Jeff713 posted. I've seen people point out the differences for different events in the past here. People that know way more about earthquakes than me. Kinda looking for their take.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 162 Comments: 37840
330. Neapolitan
3:22 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Skyepony:
Lastnight~ something that youtube posted showing the explosion of the leeve got me listning to..one of the next videos, really runs off in conspirisy world & indulge me here..ya'll know how I occationally like looking at these with an open mind til something like a loop current eddy braking off in the GOM is being perceived as something unnatural.

This one was about a bunch of nuclear detonations underground along the New Madrid fault line. Trying to release some stress. They got everyone evacuated..working under the cover of dark. Yeah I know~ we are saving Ciaro, but their argument was we let some other smaller towns go under first..it's all a cover up for something bigger.. Also those strong fore shocks in Japan & that recent quake in the GOM were claimed to be a result of underground nuclear explosions. They were saying it was evident from the USGS plots they were explosions not earthquakes.

Now I do remember..'09 when the MS river experience extreme flooding the Madrid fault line wolk up & when N Korea detonated that Nuclear bomb underground we knew it was a bomb by some plot someone posted..like that has some sort of signature different from an earthquake. Any earthquake junkies out there this morning that know what graph I'm talking about? I don't know where they are.

Well, the seismographic signature of a nuclear explosion is radically different from that of an earthquake; an earthquake signature slowly ramps up as a fault ruptures, then almost as slowly fades away. A nuke's seismogram, on the other hand, starts with an instantaneous bang, then quickly fades to nothingness. So it would be pretty easy for anyone with access to a backyard seismograph and a little knowledge to tell whether nukes had been set off.

On the bigger picture, I can't see the government doing this; the risks would be simply too great and the rewards too few. Besides, the pressure on the New Madrid fault has been building for 200 years; it seems that a properly-placed nuke of sufficient size could maybe set the thing off, so what would be the difference between that and a natural quake so far as damage is concerned?
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329. naviguesser
3:19 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
humor can be good - sometimes we need a dam release (I'll stop now...)
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328. emcf30
3:18 PM GMT on May 03, 2011



These poor folks, front needs to hurry up and move out
Member Since: August 7, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1933
327. jeffs713
3:17 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Skyepony:
Lastnight~ something that youtube posted showing the explosion of the leeve got me listning to..one of the next videos, really runs off in conspirisy world & indulge me here..ya'll know how I occationally like looking at these with an open mind til something like a loop current eddy braking off in the GOM is being perceived as something unnatural.

This one was about a bunch of nuclear detonations underground along the New Madrid fault line. Trying to release some stress. They got everyone evacuated..working under the cover of dark. Yeah I know~ we are saving Ciaro, but their argument was we let some other smaller towns go under first..it's all a cover up for something bigger.. Also those strong fore shocks in Japan & that recent quake in the GOM were claimed to be a result of underground nuclear explosions. They were saying it was evident from the USGS plots they were explosions not earthquakes.

Now I do remember..'09 when the MS river experience extreme flooding the Madrid fault line wolk up & when N Korea detonated that Nuclear bomb underground we knew it was a bomb by some plot someone posted..like that has some sort of signature different from an earthquake. Any earthquake junkies out there this morning that know what graph I'm talking about? I don't know where they are.

Bombs and explosions have very strong P-waves, and rather weak S-waves and surface waves. Also, explosions start very strongly, and quickly fade, while quakes start slowly and build.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5882
324. naviguesser
3:13 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Frankly I don't know why they blow up Levee. He does flood us with info, but he seems a decent sort.
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323. emcf30
3:11 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Sky was it helicorder or something different
Member Since: August 7, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1933
322. Skyepony (Mod)
3:02 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Lastnight~ something that youtube posted showing the explosion of the leeve got me listning to..one of the next videos, really runs off in conspirisy world & indulge me here..ya'll know how I occationally like looking at these with an open mind til something like a loop current eddy braking off in the GOM is being perceived as something unnatural.

This one was about a bunch of nuclear detonations underground along the New Madrid fault line. Trying to release some stress. They got everyone evacuated..working under the cover of dark. Yeah I know~ we are saving Ciaro, but their argument was we let some other smaller towns go under first..it's all a cover up for something bigger.. Also those strong fore shocks in Japan & that recent quake in the GOM were claimed to be a result of underground nuclear explosions. They were saying it was evident from the USGS plots they were explosions not earthquakes.

Now I do remember..'09 when the MS river experience extreme flooding the Madrid fault line wolk up & when N Korea detonated that Nuclear bomb underground we knew it was a bomb by some plot someone posted..like that has some sort of signature different from an earthquake. Any earthquake junkies out there this morning that know what graph I'm talking about? I don't know where they are.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 162 Comments: 37840
321. emcf30
2:57 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting Tazmanian:



i would watch what you post some one may be reporting you all so some one us got a little banned not too long a go for posting too many pohotos that dos not go with this blog so i would watch it


I understand, after several weeks of discussing all the death and destruction on this blog, a little humor does not hurt, but fully get what your saying. Thanks

Now on the weather, as others, we need some rain n CFL. brush fires starting to occur in the area again
Member Since: August 7, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1933
320. Tazmanian
2:56 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting jeffs713:
Taz, its not peak season yet. And thats the first one posted by EMC...



Admins dont care if it peak of seaon or not if the Admin see that some one posting too many off key photos or some in that dos not go with this blog why not you ask RitaEvac sheor he was doing the same thing and got a few days banned for it
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319. AtHomeInTX
2:54 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting emcf30:


Lol.
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318. jeffs713
2:53 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Taz, its not peak season yet. And thats the first one posted by EMC...
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317. Tazmanian
2:50 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting emcf30:



i would watch what you post some one may be reporting you all so some one us got a little banned not too long a go for posting too many pohotos that dos not go with this blog so i would watch it
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316. jeffs713
2:47 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting emcf30:
LOL.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5882
315. FtMyersgal
2:45 PM GMT on May 03, 2011
Quoting greentortuloni:


Trento.

Florence is actually one of the cities I was thinking of. They've recently closed more of the downtown. Now the entire Duomo area is pedestrian all the way to Ponte Vecchio. That is due to the mayor who, God knows how in Italy, is young and seems to enjoy telling the entrenched politicos to go put it in a hat. You will see more of him in the future.

Thanks. My husband and I planned on mostly walking in Florence. We wouldn't dream of renting a car LOL
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.