Tornadoes, floods, and fires continue to pound U.S.

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:13 PM GMT on April 27, 2011

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The nation's unprecedented April tornado-fest continued full force last night, with NOAA's Storm Prediction Center logging 57 tornado reports, 295 cases of damaging thunderstorm winds, and 254 reports of large hail. The 2-day tornado count from this latest huge April tornado outbreak is already 102. With another "high risk" forecast for tornadoes today, the tornado total for this week's outbreak may rival the April 14 - 16 tornado outbreak (155 confirmed tornadoes) as the greatest April tornado outbreak in history. It is unprecedented to have two such massive tornado outbreaks occur so close together, and the April preliminary tornado count of 654 is truly stunning. Even adjusting this number downwards 15% (the typical over-count in preliminary tornado reports) yields a probable April tornado total of 550. This easily crushes the previous April tornado record of 267, set in 1974. An average April has "only" 163 tornadoes, so we are already 300% over average for the month, and may approach 400% after today's outbreak. According to a list of tornado outbreaks maintained by Wikipedia, only two other tornado outbreaks have had as many as 150 twisters--the May 2004 outbreak (385), and the May 2003 outbreak (401). One positive note--there has only been one violent EF-4 or stronger tornado this year, despite the fact we've already had about 2/3 of the 1200 tornadoes one typically gets for the entire year. Over the past 20 years, we've averaged 7 violent EF-4 or EF-5 tornadoes per year, so we should have had 4 or 5 of these most dangerous of tornadoes so far this year.


Figure 1. Satellite image of last night's storm at 8pm EDT April 26, 2011. Image credit: NASA/GSFC.

Fortunately, no one was killed in last night's tornado frenzy, but four twisters caused injuries, with 7 injuries in Hesterman, Mississippi, and 3 in Beekman, Louisiana. Over 100 homes were damaged when a tornado struck Edom, Texas, approximately 75 miles East of Dallas. One woman was injured when her mobile home was destroyed. The only killer tornado of the current outbreak occurred on Monday night at 7:30 pm CDT when a 1/2 mile-wide EF-2 tornado struck the small town of Vilonia, Arkansas. Four people died in the town, where 50 - 80 buildings were destroyed. Tornado warnings were issued 30 minutes before the storm hit, contributing to the relatively low loss of life.


Figure 2. Storm chaser video of a tornado yesterday in Ben Wheeler, Texas.

Another very dangerous tornado outbreak expected today
The busiest April in history for tornadoes continues full-force today, as NOAA's Storm Prediction Center has issued their highest level of severe weather potential, a "High Risk" forecast, for Northern Alabama, Southern Tennessee, and adjoining portions of Georgia and Mississippi. This is the second day in a row, and third time this year, that SPC has issued a "High Risk" forecast. The devastating North Carolina tornado outbreak of April 16, which generated 52 confirmed tornadoes that killed 24 people in North Carolina and 2 people in Virginia, was the other "high risk" day. Numerous tornado warnings have already been issued in Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi, Arkansas, Ohio, and Alabama this morning, but today's main action is expected to erupt late this afternoon as the cold front from a low pressure system currently over Arkansas moves eastwards over the "high risk" area. Strong daytime heating in a very moist, unstable airmass will allow a tremendous amount of energy to build up ahead of the front. The arrival of the cold front will force the warm, moist air upwards, allowing the pent-up energy to burst out and fuel supercell thunderstorms.

Related post: Are tornadoes getting stronger and more frequent?


Figure 3. Severe weather threat for Wednesday, April 27, 2011.

Unprecedented flooding predicted on Ohio River
This week's storm system, in combination with heavy rains earlier this month, have pushed the Ohio River and Mississippi River to near-record levels near their confluence. The Ohio River at Cairo, Illinois is expected to crest at 60.5 feet on May 1. This would exceed 100-year flood stage, and be the highest flood in history, besting the 59.5' mark of 1937. Heavy rains of 10 - 15 inches have inundated the region over the past few days, and one levee breach at Black River levee near Poplar Bluff, Missouri, has resulted in the evacuation of over 500 homes. Poplar Bluff has received 15.45" of rain since Friday morning. The greatest rain gauge-measured precipitation from the storm occurred in Springdale, Arkansas, where 19.70" inches has fallen since Friday morning.


Figure 4. The latest River Flood Outlook from NOAA shows major flooding is occurring over many of the nation's major rivers.

Extraordinary intentional levee breach of Mississippi River halted by lawsuit
In a sign of just how extreme this flooding situation is, yesterday the Army Corps of Engineers, which is responsible for flood control efforts on the Mississippi River, announced plans to intentionally destroy a levee protecting the west bank of the Mississippi River in Southwest Missouri. The destruction of the levee is intended to relieve pressure on the levees at Cairo, Illinois, at the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. Cairo is currently under a voluntary evacuation order. The levee to be destroyed, located at Birds Point, is called a "fuse-plug" levee, and was designed to be destroyed in the event of a record flood. The levee protects 132,000 acres of prime farmland along the New Madrid Spillway, which is designed to take 550,000 cubic feet per second of water flow out of the Mississippi and redirect it down a 3 - 10 mile wide, 36 - 56 mile long path along the west side of the Mississippi. An 11-mile long section of the levee upstream at Birds Point, and 5-mile long stretch at the downstream end, are set two feet lower than the surrounding levees and filled with holes to accommodate dynamite. These levees will be destroyed if the Army Corps has its way, but a lawsuit by the state of Missouri is currently blocking the way. The Army Corps has now agreed to wait until Saturday to decide whether or not to blow the levee. The Army Corps' website has an unofficial damage estimate of $100 million for destroying the levees and flooding the New Madrid Spillway. At least 100 people live in the spillway and have been evacuated, and it would likely take many years for the farms to recover after flooding. The levees have been blown and the spillway opened only once before, back during the record flood of 1937.

Midwest deluge enhanced by near-record Gulf of Mexico sea surface temperatures
The deluge of rain that caused this flood found its genesis in a flow of warm, humid air coming from the Gulf of Mexico. Sea surface temperatures (SSTs )in the Gulf of Mexico are currently close to 1 °C above average. Only two Aprils since the 1800s (2002 and 1991) have had April SSTs more than 1 °C above average, so current SSTs are among the highest on record. These warm ocean temperatures helped set record high air temperatures in many locations in Texas yesterday, including Galveston (84°F, a tie with 1898), Del Rio (104°F, old record 103° in 1984), San Angelo (97°F, old record 96° in 1994). Record highs were also set on Monday in Baton Rouge and Shreveport in Louisiana, and in Austin, Mineral Wells, and Cotulla la Salle in Texas. Since this week's storm brought plenty of cloud cover that kept temperatures from setting record highs in many locations, a more telling statistic of how warm this air mass was is the huge number of record high minimum temperature records that were set over the past two days. For example, the minimum temperature reached only 79°F in Brownsville, TX Monday morning, beating the previous record high minimum of 77°F set in 2006. In Texas, Austin, Houston, Port Arthur, Cotulla la Salle, Victoria, College Station, Victoria, Corpus Christi, McAllen, and Brownsville all set record high minimums on Monday, as did New Orleans, Lafayette, Monroe, Shreveport, and Alexandria in Louisiana, as well as Jackson and Tupelo in Mississippi. Since record amounts of water vapor can evaporate into air heated to record warm levels, it is not a surprise that incredible rains and unprecedented floods are resulting from this month's near-record warm SSTs in the Gulf of Mexico.


Figure 5. Departure of sea surface temperature from average for April 25, 2001. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS.

Fierce winds fan Texas, New Mexico fires
Fierce winds fanned raging fires across eastern New Mexico and Western Texas yesterday, thanks to a powerful flow of air feeding into the Midwestern storm system. Temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s combined with humidities less than 10% combined to make yesterday a nightmare fire day for firefighters attempting to control the worst springtime fires in the history of the region. At 3:53 pm MDT yesterday in Carlsbad, New Mexico, the temperature was 87°F, winds were 38 mph gusting to 46, and the humidity was 8%--a perfect storm for extreme fire weather. In Fort Stockton, Texas near the huge Rock House fire, the temperature was 91°F, winds were 35 mph gusting to 44, visibility was reduced to 5 miles due to haze and smoke, and the humidity was 5% at 5:53pm CDT. According to the Interagency Fire Center, wildfires in 2011 have already burned nearly 2.3 million acres in the U.S. This is the greatest acreage on record so early in the year, and is more area than burned all of last year. The largest U.S. acreage to burn since 1960 was the 9.9 million acres that burned in 2007, so we area already 25% of the way to the all-time record fire year--with summer still more than a month away. The fire weather forecast for today is better then yesterday, with winds not expected to blow nearly as strong.


Figure 6. Major wildfires and smoke plumes as visualized using our wundermap with the "fire" layer turned on.

For those who want to lend a helping hand to those impacted by the widespread destruction this month's severe weather has brought, stop by the portlight.org blog.

Jeff Masters

Rare Sight (Freakofnature1)
I haven't seen a storm like this in quite some time. Still no rain in Seguin, Tx. Pic taken in Seguin storm near Martindale.
Rare Sight
Mississippi @ Burlington (BURGuy)
Seating along the shore
Mississippi @ Burlington
Base of Anvil Cloud 4/26/11 (HuskerMama)
Taken within minutes after the storm cell had passed directly overhead.
Base of Anvil Cloud 4/26/11
Southern Lightning (WeatherRose)
This is a shot of a lightning strike associated with some severe storms moving through this evening in Southaven, MS.
Southern Lightning

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1323. RTLSNK
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I think that cell from the Tuscaloosa tornado is finally dying out on the Virginia / North Carolina border near Mt Airy. I am pretty sure that is the same storm.
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Deleted ... bad link
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Deleted. Old news, I think. My apologies.
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BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PEACHTREE CITY GA
228 AM EDT THU APR 28 2011

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN PEACHTREE CITY HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
SOUTHWESTERN JASPER COUNTY IN CENTRAL GEORGIA
NORTHWESTERN JONES COUNTY IN CENTRAL GEORGIA
MONROE COUNTY IN CENTRAL GEORGIA
SOUTHERN LAMAR COUNTY IN WEST CENTRAL GEORGIA

* UNTIL 315 AM EDT
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Guess i will stay up all nite watching RADARS for my Daughter and others. She is sleeping by her phone and has a mattress in the bathroom if i call her. She is prepared if i call.
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http://www.radioreference.com/apps/audio/?action= wp&feedId=3780


EMS is asking for help..........OMG! MAJOR damage they are saying south of Atlanta!
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1313. mbjjm
It's been another crazy night of tornados and severe weather.These past few days will go down in history. Overview from cnn
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I'm still coming to terms with how bad this was tonight, my gosh.........


Well, looking into history, there really is no correlation between severe weather outbreaks in the U.S. and a bad hurricane season. Hopefully, that will continue this year. Its just 2011 seems to be having more and more disturbing weather events, and you can't help but wonder if the Atlantic Hurricane Season will follow.

I mean, from a scientific perspective, the severe weather of 2011 doesn't mean the Atlantic 2011 hurricane season will be disturbing too. However, from a emotional perspective, living in Florida, I can't help but fear the future hurricane season a little....
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ULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BLACKSBURG VA
120 AM EDT THU APR 28 2011

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BLACKSBURG HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
SMYTH COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA
TAZEWELL COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA
WESTERN WYTHE COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA
SOUTHWESTERN BLAND COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA

* UNTIL 145 AM EDT.
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BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC
118 AM EDT THU APR 28 2011

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN STERLING VIRGINIA HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
HAMPSHIRE COUNTY IN EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA...
ALLEGANY COUNTY IN WESTERN MARYLAND...
MINERAL COUNTY IN EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA...

* UNTIL 145 AM EDT
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1309. skook
Link


Central Georgia News, live on air
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1308. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
anyway i am done for this night later all hopefully the weather will give us a much deserved break for a few days iam tied of trackin over the last 3 or 4 days


news in the am come first light is going to be bad i figure hope for the best but expect the worse


iam out

KOTG.


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BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BLACKSBURG VA
112 AM EDT THU APR 28 2011

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BLACKSBURG HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
SMYTH COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA
TAZEWELL COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA
WESTERN WYTHE COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA
SOUTHWESTERN BLAND COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA

* UNTIL 145 AM EDT.
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BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PEACHTREE CITY GA
108 AM EDT THU APR 28 2011

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN PEACHTREE CITY HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
SOUTHEASTERN BUTTS COUNTY IN CENTRAL GEORGIA
JASPER COUNTY IN CENTRAL GEORGIA
NORTH CENTRAL MONROE COUNTY IN CENTRAL GEORGIA
SOUTHWESTERN PUTNAM COUNTY IN CENTRAL GEORGIA

* UNTIL 200 AM EDT
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Quoting sunlinepr:


All those destroyed houses can be rebuilt with newer codes.

How about building something like a concrete small room 6X6, and 4 feet tall, in the middle of every house, {ground level} with a top sliding door, where the family can get into? That would resist a big tornado.... at least could save lives...
Yea, I know. I agree with you. But I'm just saying I'm not too certain it will happen.
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
tuscaloosa tornado storm cell looks to be finally dying, tornado is likely gone
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1303. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
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2 Tornado's just south of Atlanta now!!!!
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Quoting TomTaylor:
sorry man, confused you with sunlinepr. He said something like would the tornado devastation encourage better building codes or something


All those destroyed houses can be rebuilt with newer codes.

How about building something like a concrete small room 6X6, and 4 feet tall, in the middle of every house, {ground level} with a top sliding door, where the family can get into? That would resist a big tornado.... at least could save lives...

What about making it an obligation in order to get insurance?
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1300. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
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Quoting MississippiWx:
Debris ball heading through the town of Barnesville. Almost 100% certain a strong tornado is moving through the town.



yep got it on radar
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1298. flsky
Quoting RandomText:
Maybe we should just start making houses and stuff under ground, with earthen mounds on top of them, like Hobbits or something.

They'd just get flooded.
Member Since: October 24, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 2014
Quoting SouthDadeFish:
I don't understand what you're saying? I'm suggesting keeping building codes as they currently are, not increase spending. I was saying the probability to get hit by a tornado is relatively low.
sorry man, confused you with sunlinepr. He said something like would the tornado devastation encourage better building codes or something
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My gosh, I am absolutely stunned at what has happened today. To say it was a a historic tornado outbreak doesn't even begin to do justice. Even the local weather guys down here in Tampa Bay spent tonight covering the tornado outbreak. When I just got back from school around 5 or whenever it was, I turn on the tv, and I see the live camera feed of a massive wedge tornado tearing through Tuscaloosa on the local weather station here. That just gave me the chills.

Even with all the excellent jobs by the NWS to give advanced warnings of these tornadoes, when there are that many powerful tornadoes hitting populated areas sadly I knew some people were going to be caught off guard and killed....


Good Lord let this remind us to not let pride think we have everything under control in the modern world. We knew it was coming, but we couldn't do anything about it.
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1295. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
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Quoting SouthDadeFish:
I definitely agree. Sorry if I offended you, you are not the only one rattled by the crazy weather we have been witnessing. I hope NWS slowly gets its funding back, because as well all know, the cash invested to their programs is definitely worth it.
For future reference, I am rarely offended. On the rare occasions that I actually am, I will make it known. Our banter was no exception.

As for the funding, I thought that the government had agreed not to cease funding? Perhaps I heard wrong...?
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I'm off for the night, I will be praying for those affected by the storms over the past days. I could only imagine what it would be like to lose everything you have in 1 minute.
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Debris ball heading through the town of Barnesville. Almost 100% certain a strong tornado is moving through the town.
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MississippiWx, that wording in the NWS discussion is just downright scary. They hardly ever use language like that. The only thing I can recall similar is when they described the threat of Hurricane Ike's storm surge saying: those that do not evacuate will face certain death. (Something like that lol)
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"One of the most devastating in U.S. history: the May 3 Moore, Okla., twister that killed dozens of people had a cost of $1.1 billion in damage, according to the Storm Prediction Center".
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Quoting flsky:

I know she (he?) is great.
She.
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Quoting KoritheMan:

I know, and perhaps I shouldn't have implied such an absolute statement. I'm just rattled about tonight's events. Sorry.

I'm also all for cuts, but only where they're needed. Looking at it objectively, ALL facets of the NWS are needed. At least, if our top priority is public safety.
I definitely agree. Sorry if I offended you, you are not the only one rattled by the crazy weather we have been witnessing. I hope NWS slowly gets its funding back, because as well all know, the cash invested to their programs is definitely worth it.
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1286. flsky
Quoting Chicklit:

You never know what Skyepony will come up with.
She is a very clever person.
all's well that ends well.
As they say in crisis management: 'tonight we stabilize; tomorrow we assess the damage.'

I know she (he?) is great.
Member Since: October 24, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 2014
Very strong rotation heading toward the town of Barnesville, Georgia. Looks like another possible strong to violent tornado. Let's hope that's not the case.
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According to this article, only 31.1% of tornado fatalities occur from permanent homes anyway, so increasing that building code wont help too much with lowering the fatality rate. You still have people in mobile homes, which is the main risk, as well as people in vehicles and other things such as this. Link
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1283. flsky
Quoting Chicklit:

You never know what Skyepony will come up with.
She is a very clever person.
all's well that ends well.
As they say in crisis management: 'tonight we stabilize; tomorrow we assess the damage.'

It's been a horrible day - which is still not over....
Member Since: October 24, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 2014

Quoting SouthDadeFish:
My point is, it's not as if they deliberately don't care about saving lives.
I know, and perhaps I shouldn't have implied such an absolute statement. I'm just rattled about tonight's events. Sorry.

I'm also all for cuts, but only where they're needed. Looking at it objectively, ALL facets of the NWS are needed. At least, if our top priority is public safety.
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1281. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
storms appear to be winding down as per plymouth radar more orange now then reds and dark purples like earlier
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1280. flsky
Quoting AllyBama:


sure hope so because they are going to need it!..hopefully the government has funded FEMA for these diasters..

This is probably something that the "you-know-who's" want cut.
Member Since: October 24, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 2014
Quoting flsky:

I've never heard of this before. I think I saw one of these formations off of Ponce Inlet, FL last year. Very odd looking. I have a picture somewhere.

You never know what Skyepony will come up with.
She is a very clever person.
all's well that ends well.
As they say in crisis management: 'tonight we stabilize; tomorrow we assess the damage.'
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11351
Never seen this before from a NWS Forecast Discussion:

Jackson, MS NWS:

UPDATE...MUCH QUIETER CONDITIONS EXIST ACROSS THE REGION OPPOSED TO
EARLIER THIS AFTERNOON. DRYLINE/COLD FRONT HAS PUSHED THROUGH MUCH OF
THE ARKLAMISS REGION EXCEPT FOR THE EXTREME SOUTHEAST COUNTIES. AS
SUCH...A HANDFUL OF COUNTIES REMAIN UNDER TORNADO WATCH 243 BUT WILL
SOON BE CANCELED OUT BY 10PM AS THE FRONT SHIFT THROUGH THE ENTIRE
REGION.

HOURLY TEMPERATURES AND DEWPOINTS WERE ADJUSTED TO ACCOUNT FOR GOOD
COOLING AND DRYING TAKING PLACE BEHIND THE DRYLINE. POP AND WEATHER
GRIDS WERE ALSO TWEAKED TO REMOVE CHANCE AND SLIGHT CHANCE
THUNDERSTORMS ACROSS THE REGION EXCEPT FOR SOUTHEASTERN AREAS OF
MISSISSIPPI. MUCH QUIETER CONDITIONS WILL BE ON TAP FOR THURSDAY AND
THE THROUGH THE END OF THE WEEK. VALID PORTIONS OF PREVIOUS AFD ARE
ATTACHED AS WELL AS A NEW AVIATION DISCUSSION.


PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT OF SILENCE TO REMEMBER THOSE ACROSS THE SOUTH
THAT WERE AFFECTED BY THE DEVASTATING STORMS ON THIS UNFORTUNATE
DAY.
/ALLEN/
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Tornado season intensifies, without consensus on why By A.G. SULZBERGER | New York Times | Posted: Monday, April 25, 2011 7:23 pm

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — All the warning sirens echoing across the Great Plains, Midwest and Southeast this month leave little doubt that the tornado season — which has plowed a trail of destruction through communities from Oklahoma to Wisconsin to Georgia — is off to an unusually busy start.

So far this year, tornadoes have killed 41 people and torn apart countless neighborhoods and, this weekend, one major airport.

As the country braces for several more days of potentially violent weather, meteorologists say the number of April tornadoes is on track to top the record. There have been, according to preliminary estimates, about 250 tornadoes this month and, in all likelihood, more are still to come, said Greg Carbin, the warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service.

“It’s unusual but it does happen,” said Howard Bluestein, a meteorology professor at the University of Oklahoma who specializes in tornado research. “This isn’t a sign that the world is about to end.”

Those same experts note that drawing conclusions about the true size of, or reason for, an increase in tornado activity is difficult because historical statistics are unreliable due to changes in the way storms are tracked and measured.

Although the average number of April tornadoes steadily increased from 74 a year in the 1950s to 163 a year in the 2000s, nearly all of the increase is of the least powerful tornadoes that may touch down briefly without causing much damage. That suggests better reporting is largely responsible for the increase.

There are, on average, 1,300 tornadoes each year in the United States, which have caused an average of 65 deaths annually in recent years.

The number of tornadoes rated from EF1 to EF5 on the enhanced Fujita scale, used to measure tornado strength, has stayed relatively constant for the past half century at about 500 annually. But in that time the number of confirmed EF0 tornadoes has steadily increased to more than 800 a year from less than 100 a year, said Harold Brooks, a research meteorologist at the National Severe Storms Laboratory.

In April 1974, for example, there was a record 267 tornadoes reported but the actual number that occurred is believed to be closer to 500.

“Today we seem to know about every single tree branch knocked down,” Carbin said. “We have eyes everywhere and we have radar and satellite. It would be very difficult for a tornado to sneak through unnoticed.”

Tornadoes form when warm moist air combines with powerful dynamic winds inside a thunderstorm, sending a funnel cloud spinning toward the ground. They are most common in spring, typically peaking in May.

Though scientists believe that climate change will contribute to increasingly severe weather phenomena, including hurricanes and thunderstorms, there is little consensus about how it may affect tornadoes.

It remains unclear, partly because of the lack of historical data and partly because of their unpredictable nature, whether they will increase in number or strength or geographic range.

The large number of tornadoes so far may simply reflect normal variability, Brooks said.

Those assurances do not mean much to people like Kandice Shaw, a frequent business traveler who arrived at her hometown airport in St. Louis to find most of the windows boarded up and many other signs of storm damage. She worried about the increase in violent weather this spring. “We’ve had nothing but tornadoes,” she said. “I feel like I’m living in the Land of Oz.”
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1276. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
33 days now chicklit

lol keeper.
glad you're keeping watch on things.
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11351
If you have loved ones missing, or know that your loved ones are safe and want to let other people know they are safe, I recommend checking out this website as the Red Cross has suggested. Link
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Quoting SouthDadeFish:
I don't understand what you're saying? I'm suggesting keeping building codes as they currently are, not increase spending. I was saying the probability to get hit by a tornado is relatively low.

What is the cost of an average tornado season in the US? (asuming that saving lives is not the priority and not taking it in consideration)
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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