The global tropical cyclone season of 2010: record inactivity

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:14 AM GMT on April 03, 2011

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The year 2010 was one of the strangest on record globally for tropical cyclones. Each year, the globe has about 92 tropical cyclones--called hurricanes in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific, typhoons in the Western Pacific, and tropical cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere. But in 2010, we had just 68 of these storms--the fewest since the dawn of the satellite era in 1970. The previous record slowest year was 1977, when 69 tropical cyclones occurred world-wide. Both the Western Pacific and Eastern Pacific had their quietest seasons on record in 2010, the Atlantic had its 3rd busiest season since record keeping began in 1851, and the Southern Hemisphere had a below average season. As a result, the Atlantic, which ordinarily accounts for just 13% of global cyclone activity, accounted for 28% in 2010--the greatest proportion since accurate tropical cyclone records began in the 1970s. Global Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) for 2010 was the lowest since the late 1970s (ACE is a measure of the total destructive power of a hurricane season, based on the number of days strong winds are observed.)


Figure 1. Visible satellite image of 2010's strongest tropical cyclone: Super Typhoon Megi at 2:25 UTC October 18, 2010. A reconnaissance aircraft measured a central pressure of 885 mb and surface winds of 190 mph in the storm, making Megi the 8th strongest tropical cyclone in world history. Image credit: NASA.

A record quiet 2010 Northwest Pacific Typhoon Season
The Western Pacific set records for fewest number of named storms (fifteen, previous record seventeen in 1998) and typhoons (nine, tied with the previous record of nine in 1998. Note that Tropical Storm Mindulle was upgraded to a typhoon in post-analysis after the season was over.) Reliable records began in the mid-1960s. For just the second year in history, the Atlantic had more named storms and hurricane-strength storms than the Western Pacific. The only other year this occurred was in 2005. Ordinarily, the Western Pacific has double to triple the amount of tropical cyclones of the Atlantic. One other notable feature of the 2010 season was the lack of a land-falling typhoon on the Japanese mainland. This is only the second such occurrence since 1988.

In 2010, there was only one super typhoon--a storm with at least 150 mph winds--in the Western Pacific. However, this storm, Super Typhoon Megi, was a doozy. Megi's sustained winds cranked up to a fearsome 190 mph and its central pressure bottomed out at 885 mb on October 16, making it the 8th most intense tropical cyclone in world history. Fortunately, Megi weakened significantly before hitting the Philippines as a Category 3 typhoon. Megi killed 69 people on Taiwan and in the Philippines and did $700 million in damage, and was the second deadliest and damaging typhoon of 2010. Category 3 Typhoon Fanapi was the deadliest and most damaging typhoon of 2010, doing over $1 billion in damage to Taiwan and China and killing 105.

The record quiet typhoon season in 2010 was due, in part, to the La Niña phenomena. During such events, the formation region for Western Pacific typhoons moves northwestward, closer to China. Thus, storms that form in the Western Pacific spend less time over water before they encounter land, resulting in a lesser chance to become a named storm, and less time to intensify. They also accumulate a lower ACE due to their shorter duration. Since the Western Pacific is responsible for 35% of the world's major tropical cyclones, the global ACE value is strongly tied to year-to-year variations in the El Niño/La Niña cycle.


Figure 2.
Statistics for the global tropical cyclone season of 2010. The two numbers in each box represent the actual number observed in 2010, followed by the averages from the period 1983-2007 (in parentheses). Averages and records were computed using the December 23, 2008 release of NOAA's International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship.

A record quiet 2010 Eastern Pacific Typhoon Season
In the Eastern Pacific, it was also a record-quiet season. On average, the Eastern Pacific has 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 3 intense hurricanes in a season. In 2010, there were 8 named storms, 3 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes. The previous record quietest season since 1966 was the year 1977, when the Eastern Pacific had 8 named storms, 4 hurricanes, and zero intense hurricanes. La Niña was largely responsible for the quiet Eastern Pacific hurricane season, due in part to the cool sea surface temperatures it brought. It is quite remarkable that both the Eastern and Western Pacific ocean basins had record quiet seasons in the same year--there is no historical precedent for such an occurrence.

Climate change and the 2008 global tropical cyclone season
We only have about 30 years of reliable global tropical cyclone data, and tropical cyclones are subject to large natural variations in numbers and intensities. Thus, it will be very difficult at present to prove that climate change is affecting global tropical cyclone activity. (This is less so in the Atlantic, where we have a longer reliable data record to work with.) A common theme of many recent publications on the future of tropical cyclones globally in a warming climate is that the total number of these storms will decrease, but the strongest storms will get stronger. For example, a 2010 review paper published in Nature Geosciences concluded: "greenhouse warming will cause the globally averaged intensity of tropical cyclones to shift towards stronger storms, with intensity increases of 2 - 11% by 2100. Existing modeling studies also consistently project decreases in the globally averaged frequency of tropical cyclones, by 6 - 34%. Balanced against this, higher resolution modeling studies typically project substantial increases in the frequency of the most intense cyclones, and increases of the order of 20% in the precipitation rate within 100 km of the storm centre." Last year, I discussed a paper by Bender et al that concluded that the total number of Atlantic hurricanes is expected to decrease by the end of the century, but there could be an increase of 81% in the number of Category 4 and 5 storms. The net effect of a decrease in total number of hurricanes but an increase in the strongest hurricanes should cause an increase in U.S. hurricane damages of about 30% by the end of the century, the authors computed, assuming that hurricane damages behave as they did during the past century. A new paper just published by Murakami et. al predicts that Western Pacific tropical cyclones may decrease in number by 23% by the end of the century, primarily due to a shift in the formation location and tracks of these storms.

In light of these theoretical results, it is interesting that 2010 saw the lowest number of global tropical cyclones on record, but an average number of very strong Category 4 and 5 storms. Fully 21% of last year's tropical cyclones reached Category 4 or 5 strength, versus just 14% during the period 1983 - 2007. Most notably, in 2010 we had the second strongest tropical cyclone on record in the Arabian Sea (Category 4 Cyclone Phet in June) and the strongest tropical cyclone ever to hit Myanmar/Burma (October's Tropical Cyclone Giri, an upper end Category 4 storm with 155 mph winds.) It is too early to read anything into this year's global tropical cyclone numbers, though--we need many more years of data before making any judgments on how global tropical cyclones might be responding to climate change.


Figure 3. Visible satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Phet on Thursday, June 3, 2010. Record heat over southern Asia in May helped heat up the Arabian Sea to 2°C above normal, and the exceptionally warm SSTs helped fuel Tropical Cyclone Phet into the second strongest tropical cyclone ever recorded in the Arabian Sea. Phet peaked at Category 4 strength with 145 mph winds. Only Category 5 Cyclone Gonu of 2007, which devastated Oman, was a stronger Arabian Sea cyclone. Phet killed 44 people and did $700 million in damage to Oman.


Figure 4. Visible MODIS satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Giri taken at 2:55am EDT October 22, 2010, just prior to landfall in Myanmar/Burma. At the time, Giri was a Category 4 storm with 145 mph winds. Giri killed 157 people and did $359 million in damage. Image credit: NASA.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting DARPAsockpuppet:

Well atleast the dew point is low.
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Quoting Jedkins01:




Well I don't think there will be a wild fire season down here this year in Central Florida! My rainfall for the year is over 20 inches so far, we had 13 inches last week with that crazy weather, and we just had close to an inch with the fast moving squall line yesterday!

Yes i agree, I've had 23.83 inches this year so far and got almost 13 last week. lovin it. z-hills fl.
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Quoting StAugustineFL:


A few degrees cooler in NE FL but still quite warm. Looks relatively dry for the foreseeable future. Hope the wildfire season doesn't kick into high gear.




Well I don't think there will be a wild fire season down here this year in Central Florida! My rainfall for the year is over 20 inches so far, we had 13 inches last week with that crazy weather, and we just had close to an inch with the fast moving squall line yesterday!
Member Since: August 21, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 7302
Quoting TomTaylor:
Lucky.

Here in San Diego, it's the most boring weather you can ever find. The temps are neither cold nor warm. It is neither sunny nor rainy. Air is neither dry nor humid. The wind is dead.

Overcast at 65 right now.

Year round souther california has some of the more moderate weather on earth. But it is this type of weather that is at the apex, climax, zenith, peak, pinnacle, top, summit, ridge, or crest, of boring weather.


One of my biggest fears as a kid was that one day I would be forced to live in Southern California lol, not like my parents ever considered it, but always being a weather geek from birth, Southern California was obviously the most hated weather place in the entire U.S. accept for maybe Nevada too!

That sucks for you man, look for a job opportunity in Florida or something haha
Member Since: August 21, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 7302
Good link for PR seismicity

http://redsismica.uprm.edu/english/




Quoting sunlinepr:


Who's behind that PRweather center page??
What scientific support does it has?

I prefer USGS info....
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Quoting RastaSteve:


Oh it gets worse! I live right next to the Wekiva Springs State park and he also wants to build Golf Couress in every State park in FL and a hotel for people to stay at in the STATE PARK! Rick Scott and Jack flippin Nickelson thinks this is a great idea and Jack Nickelson said he will develope the Blue prints for this project for a REDUCED FEE! Come on you idiots leave nature ALONE!




My advice to anyone, if you want to spend time doing something important or accomplish anything, and you want to keep your sanity, stay away from politics. Its a never ending losing battle between selfish people who never admit they are wrong or work together with others to actually do something good for people. Politics is like hoping to find away to avoid death, or how to stop pooping.
Member Since: August 21, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 7302
I just read the update on this upcoming hurricane season from CSU. Not much of a change, except that they really think the U.S. gets hit this year.

If a major hurricane hits the U.S. coast there someone at WU that will go out in the thing with video and audio? The only one I ever knew here that was crazy enough to do it was old CycloneOz. I do not know if he is in or out this coming year. His blog is still banned (can't remember what he did to deserve that but whatever). His website is still up but not updated.

So is someone here is ready to pick up where he left off?

I really want to see what it is like for a hurricane coming on shore without talking heads and commercials.
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Quoting UPRM1CIMA:
"There are indications that the region is becoming very unstable. At any time a large earthquake could hit"

Where are you getting this dreck? This borders on criminal mischief in my opinion.




Who's behind that PRweather center page??
What scientific support does it has?

I prefer USGS info....
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9719
Quoting Jedkins01:
Early summer is coming for Central Florida, upper 80's to 90's arriving later this week and holding strong!
Lucky.

Here in San Diego, it's the most boring weather you can ever find. The temps are neither cold nor warm. It is neither sunny nor rainy. Air is neither dry nor humid. The wind is dead.

Overcast at 65 right now.

Year round souther california has some of the more moderate weather on earth. But it is this type of weather that is at the apex, climax, zenith, peak, pinnacle, top, summit, ridge, or crest, of boring weather.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
Quoting Jedkins01:
Early summer is coming for Central Florida, upper 80's to 90's arriving later this week and holding strong!


A few degrees cooler in NE FL but still quite warm. Looks relatively dry for the foreseeable future. Hope the wildfire season doesn't kick into high gear.
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New information was released today, stated predictions of 16 expected major hurricanes this upcoming hurricane season.

Some people may think it is too early to think about hurricane season, but with the massive damage that has occurred in our South Florida area in the past from hurricanes, it is never too early to begin to prepare.

The initial 2011 Atlantic hurricane season (which begins June 1st) predicted hurricane activity already came out, but the numbers have since changed. Experts expect that five of the expected hurricanes would be major systems that would bring gusts of winds greater than 110 mph.

In December, two climatologists from Colorado State University Phil Klotzbach and William Gray predicted 17 named storms. These included nine hurricanes, five of which were to be serious storms. With the average number of storms being 11, the current number of 16 named storms constitutes a very busy season. Although not quite as busy as last year, which brought us 19 names storms, including 12 hurricanes.

Klotzbach said, “We have reduced our forecast slightly from early December due to a combination of recent ocean warming in the eastern and central tropical Pacific and recent cooling in the tropical Atlantic.”

Let’s hope to get as lucky as last year, as not one hurricane actually hit the United States coastline. Klotzbach and Gray predict a 72% chance that at least one major hurricane will hit the United States this season, with a 48% chance that a major hurricane will strike the U.S. East coast, including the Florida Peninsula.

New updated predictions will be released by The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on May 19.
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9719
Well said MrMixon (and Carl).

Quoting MrMixon:


I had the same thought. While some might find the presentation cute, it is severely lacking in data and usable information. The claim about the region becoming unstable is extraordinary. And as Carl Sagan famously said, "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence."
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Early summer is coming for Central Florida, upper 80's to 90's arriving later this week and holding strong!
Member Since: August 21, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 7302
1605. MrMixon
Quoting UPRM1CIMA:
"There are indications that the region is becoming very unstable. At any time a large earthquake could hit"

Where are you getting this dreck? This borders on criminal mischief in my opinion.




I had the same thought. While some might find the presentation cute, it is severely lacking in data and usable information. The claim about the region becoming unstable is extraordinary. And as Carl Sagan famously said, "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence."

Yes, a swarm of small earthquakes could be the precursor to a larger quake, but they could just as likely be a sign that stress has been relieved from the fault, thus reducing the likelihood of a larger earthquake.
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Hurricane forecast season is now officially open.
"The CSU team now calls for 16 named storms instead of 17 forming in the Atlantic basin between June 1 and Nov. 30. Nine of those are expected to turn into hurricanes with five developing into major hurricanes (Saffir/Simpson category 3-4-5) with sustained winds of 111 mph or greater."
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Quoting P451:


Only if it pumps the ridge and pours wine on toes is this a concern.

Seriously though we always chat temps. Always. We never look at the atmosphere on this blog. Why is that? Never mention shear. Never mention dust. Never mention moisture.

It's always "OMG THE GULF IS 90F WE ALL DOOM!"

And the 80kt winds of shear, the 10% humidity, and the choking dust are all ignored......


It could be 100F for all I care. If the atmosphere is not ripe then nothing will form and nothing will happen. Since 2008 we have seen hot water and multiple storms fail to form because of shear, lack of moist air, and dust. And only then. Only then is it mentioned. "Oh there was shear that's why it didn't take off."

Until that moment? What do we always hear? "OMFG LIKE THE GULF IS LIKE 90F AND STUFF WE ALL GUNNA DIE!!!"


Blog meteorology at it's worst.

To me, the only thing as shortsighted as claiming that SSTs are the sole driver of TC development is claiming that they play no part in it.

I think most people here are aware that it takes a lot more than warm water to create a tropical cyclone. I also think most who've been around a while can remember many times that water seemingly warm enough to boil has failed to produce a thing--just as those same people can remember times when waters thought too cool for TC development nevertheless saw something spin up. But as I and others have said before: all other things being equal, warmer water will tend to favor TC development more than cooler water will.

As Tom Taylor has pointed out, warm water in the MDR, especially when it's early, is something we can all track. And it's fairly easy to forecast: none of us can say with any degree of certainty whether there'll be a huge African dust plume across the MDR two weeks from now, or how high wind shear will be in a month. But anyone can see that waters several degrees above normal in April will almost certainly lead to waters several degrees above normal in June and July--and that is a positive thing so far as TCs are concerned.

Something else: the earlier the water warms up, the deeper that heat is driven, and the greater the pool of heat energy (TCHP) there will be for any storms to draw from. Also, the deeper the warm water extends, the less chance there is for any transiting storm to upwell those cooler, deeper, strength-sapping waters. And finally, the more heat that is stored in any one season, the more there may be for the following one--a phenomenon which may explain what's happening now.

To summarize: while high SSTs alone won't make a TC, it's a long-established fact that TCs can and will feast on those hot waters. Obsessing over SSTs may be foolish and futile, but following them is anything but.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13467
"There are indications that the region is becoming very unstable. At any time a large earthquake could hit"

Where are you getting this dreck? This borders on criminal mischief in my opinion.


Quoting PRweathercenter:
Puerto Rico Earthquake Situation
Link
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Quoting caneswatch:
Not weather related, but: Glenn Beck is leaving his show.


Can I get a THANK GOD?


Never watch the dude but I did catch a little bit of his radio show in the car the other day. One of his advertisers is a seed vault that will sell you enough seed to start your own 1-acre 'crisis garden' for when the revolution starts (i guess).

Thought that would be a great name for the Situation Room in the White House. "President Obama is meeting with the joint chiefs in the Crisis Garden."
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Quoting caneswatch:
Not weather related, but: Glenn Beck is leaving his show.


Can I get a THANK GOD?
Owwww Glenn Beck.I don't have a bone in my body that actually feels orry for that due.At least that's one maniac leaving T.V.Now I saw the CSU forecast,and I can fairly agree with that.That doesn't seem to bold or consecuative.Remember everybody no matter how you looked at it.2010 was a big hype.Some people before the season started was already calling it the worst hurricane season.
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Quoting caneswatch:
Not weather related, but: Glenn Beck is leaving his show.


Can I get a THANK GOD?
Yes, you can

Thank God!!
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
I'm sure the CSU 2011 hurricane season forecasts were already posted, but if anybody missed it, here they are



Named Storms (NS) (9.6) 17 16
Named Storm Days (NSD) (49.1) 85 80
Hurricanes (H) (5.9) 9 9
Hurricane Days (HD) (24.5) 40 35
Major Hurricanes (MH) (2.3) 5 5
Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (5.0) 10 10
Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) (96.1) 165 160
Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (100%) 180 175

The number in parenthesis is the average from 1950-2000. The second number is the Dec 8, 2010 forecast. The third number is the April 6, 2011 forecast.


As a comparison, Accuweather predicted on March 30

Named storms: 15. Hurricanes: 8. Major: 3

News Article Link
Direct Link to CSU PDF

Quotes:
"The team predicts a 72 percent chance that at least one major hurricane will make landfall in the U.S. The long-term average probability is 52 percent. The landfall chances for the East Coast, from Florida north, is put at 48 percent. The long-term average probability is 31 percent.

Last year in April, the CSU team predicted 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes. The actual count was 19 named storms (the third-most active season on record), 12 hurricanes, and 5 major hurricanes. No hurricanes made landfall in the U.S."

"The closest analogs for the 2011 setup were found to be 1955, 1996, 2006 and 2008."
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
Not weather related, but: Glenn Beck is leaving his show.


Can I get a THANK GOD?
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Quoting TomTaylor:
Weather :)

I'm not the blog controller, you are free to discuss whatever. I just would like if it stayed fairly on topic...


haha, well the weather outside is beautiful. Love the weather during spring after a cold front comes through.
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


So what are we going to talk about?
Weather :)

I'm not the blog controller, you are free to discuss whatever. I just would like if it stayed fairly on topic...
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
My thoughts of the upcoming 2011 Atlantic Hurricane Season: 15-20 named storms, 6-10 hurricanes of which 3-6 are major. A subtropical storm may form off-season like much later in the month or more likely in May, the US will see 2-3 hurricane landfalls (one significant to major, probably along the Gulf Coast and one minimal hurricane could hit Florida) there will be a very powerful hurricane in the Caribbean and a couple of names may get retired.
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Quoting TomTaylor:

Yea, pretty lame today. Seems like the minute severe weather drops off politics pop there ugly head.

I know I'm not one to really talk, but I'm going to make my effort to stay away from discussing anything not related to weather or in Dr. Masters' entry. Hopefully others on here will at least try to do the same.


There are many places on the internet to discuss politics folks. Also, we have a climate change blog on wunderground now, so if it's climate related send it over there


So what are we going to talk about?
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Quoting washingtonian115:
Talking politics?.I'm outta here.

Yea, pretty lame today. Seems like the minute severe weather drops off politics pop there ugly head.

I know I'm not one to really talk, but I'm going to make my effort to stay away from discussing anything not related to weather or what is in Dr. Masters' entry. Hopefully others on here will at least try to do the same.


There are many places on the internet to discuss politics folks. Also, we have a climate change blog on wunderground now, so if it's climate related send it over there
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
Quoting Jax82:


No more Jasoncoolman? lol


easily has the award for most nicknames...
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Quoting P451:
Also I don't care if the Gulf or Carribean are 10F above normal today. They WONT be 10F above normal come the peak of the season. Maybe a 1 or 2F above normal.

People act as if it's 80F somewhere today that it will be 100F tomorrow when in fact it will just be it's 82F tomorrow.

Water water water water WATER. That's all I see on this blog and then I see dozens of bloggers confused and angry when a patch of clouds fails to form into a Cat 5 just because it crossed that warm water.

Trying to teach you folks here.....look to the skies not the oceans.


We've had Cat 1 hurricanes in the East Atlantic in 55F water.

Wonder why?

We've had a nicely spinning tropical wave dissipate in 88F water.

Wonder why?


Idk which "people" you are referring to, but as far as I know, nobody on the blog believes that.

I've already explained this before, the reason why SSTs are posted soooo much, is not because people think they're the only factor, but because it's the easiest factor to understand and be used at this point in time (~50 days from hurricane season) to predict what type of season we may have.


Trying to determine sheer, steering currents, MJO, and other factors which are equally important when considering tc formation is much more complicated. Often times, the only way to do so is by looking at model forecasts for what the ao, nao, el nino/la nina will be doing. Of course the models aren't very helpful since they show one hundred lines going in all different directions. Additionally, you have to have a good understanding of these teleconnections to know what a positive or negative phase will mean for hurricane season.

Point being, at this point in time, SSTs are the easiest factor to be considered. And in reality, the only factor that can accurately be considered.



Aside from SSTs being the easiest to understand and predict, SSTs are important. You're right, come July/August, temps will be the same as always give or take a degree or two. But in late May early June that difference can mean the difference between a hurricane forming or not forming. Additionally, even in July/August an extra degree or two of warmth is significant because there's more fuel for storms. Meaning formation is more likely, formation is typically quicker, and the potential to reach a major hurricane is also higher.
Member Since: August 24, 2010 Posts: 19 Comments: 4357
Quoting P451:


Only if it pumps the ridge and pours wine on toes is this a concern.

Seriously though we always chat temps. Always. We never look at the atmosphere on this blog. Why is that? Never mention shear. Never mention dust. Never mention moisture.

It's always "OMG THE GULF IS 90F WE ALL DOOM!"

And the 80kt winds of shear, the 10% humidity, and the choking dust are all ignored......


It could be 100F for all I care. If the atmosphere is not ripe then nothing will form and nothing will happen. Since 2008 we have seen hot water and multiple storms fail to form because of shear, lack of moist air, and dust. And only then. Only then is it mentioned. "Oh there was shear that's why it didn't take off."

Until that moment? What do we always hear? "OMFG LIKE THE GULF IS LIKE 90F AND STUFF WE ALL GUNNA DIE!!!"


Blog meteorology at it's worst.

Um... you said the same thing yesterday, and several people posted very similar responses... At this time of the year, SSTs are ALL we have to talk about. The atmosphere is too dynamic to be talking about right now for the season that doesn't start for 2 months.

I'm well aware that the A/B high is prognosticated to park itself in a position for storms to go further west than they did last year. Do I know what the shear map is going to look like on June 18th at 12z? No. Does anyone? No. Then why talk about it???

This argument, while it is very valid, is a month or two early. If you posted this exactly two months from now, about half a dozen of us would be backing you up. Right now... we are just looking at you funny like the guy who walked into a chess club meeting wearing a toga and shouting "BEER!".

All that said... P451's words will be entirely valid come June, and many of the bloggers here would be well advised to heed his bits of wisdom.
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Talking politics?.I'm outta here.
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1582. Jax82
Quoting jasonweatherman2010:
rain coming soon


No more Jasoncoolman? lol
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Quoting RastaSteve:
No matter if you are republican or Democratic everyone should agree this is a disatrious idea buy this idiot we call Governor.


I'm an independent (lean heavily conservative on financial issues), avid golfer and huge Jack Nicklaus fan.


This is a disatrous idea by this idiot we call a governor. :o)

We already have too many golf courses in the state. Many are struggling terribly. This idea won't get very far. Smart of Nicklaus to suggest though. I'll give him credit for trying.
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1579. emcf30
img src="">

This would suck
Member Since: August 7, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1933
Puerto Rico Earthquake Situation
Link
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JRRP...what is that map indicating?
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1575. JRRP
.
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Quoting RastaSteve:
No matter if you are republican or Democratic everyone should agree this is a disatrious idea buy this idiot we call Governor.


Medicare fraud to Governor. Hmmm...he has a ton of disastrous ideas and we're likely going to have most of them rammed down our throats. We don't have recall provisions here in FL but at the rate he's going, the cronyism and conflicts of interest are piling up so who knows...maybe we'll achieve the same result.
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Not trying to start another fight on religion. I always thought the Pope was on the other side of this issue. Maybe others were not aware also. If nothing else, one more large institution weighing in on the subject of climate change.

Link is to the full NPR article
Link

......
Many Catholics in the Philippines, who make up more than 80 percent of the population, believe that God is responsible for natural phenomena. But it's a sentiment the church is trying to change and not just in the Philippines.

The Vatican has become very interested in climate change. This year, Pope Benedict XVI hosted a conference on global warming. And he has announced plans to preserve forests, install solar cells, and make Vatican City a carbon-neutral state.

The Vatican considers global warming a pressing issue in part because there is evidence that man is contributing
........
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Quoting DestinJeff:
Smells like feet in here. Weird.

I think we all learned last season especially that all the forecast agreement in the world doesn't automatically lead to verification of those forecasts.

The Dr at FSU (Ryan?) was the only one I recall indicating that 2010 would be not such a big deal for US impact.

That's because Maue is a consummate downcaster and GW denier. I believe he actually forecast a below-average Atlantic season last year so far as ACE, number of storms, and U.S. landfalls were concerned. You gotta watch that guy; he's a tricky one... ;-)
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13467
The "Golf Courses on State Parks" idea was an ignorant one, but corporate money is involved so look for Scott to approach that particular hog trough again in the future. But for now, the issue is a dead one:

Jack Nicklaus Golf Bill Withdrawn

"The Senate on Tuesday, March 15, officially accepted a motion to withdraw from consideration a bill (SB 1846) that drew heavy criticism for proposing to let Jack Nicklaus build new golf courses in state parks."

(To be fair, though, while Scott was all over this, it wasn't his idea; that goes to John Thrasher, the former head of the Republican Party of Florida, and a monstrous miscreant in his own right.)
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13467

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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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