The global tropical cyclone season of 2010: record inactivity

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:14 AM GMT on April 03, 2011

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The year 2010 was one of the strangest on record globally for tropical cyclones. Each year, the globe has about 92 tropical cyclones--called hurricanes in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific, typhoons in the Western Pacific, and tropical cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere. But in 2010, we had just 68 of these storms--the fewest since the dawn of the satellite era in 1970. The previous record slowest year was 1977, when 69 tropical cyclones occurred world-wide. Both the Western Pacific and Eastern Pacific had their quietest seasons on record in 2010, the Atlantic had its 3rd busiest season since record keeping began in 1851, and the Southern Hemisphere had a below average season. As a result, the Atlantic, which ordinarily accounts for just 13% of global cyclone activity, accounted for 28% in 2010--the greatest proportion since accurate tropical cyclone records began in the 1970s. Global Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) for 2010 was the lowest since the late 1970s (ACE is a measure of the total destructive power of a hurricane season, based on the number of days strong winds are observed.)


Figure 1. Visible satellite image of 2010's strongest tropical cyclone: Super Typhoon Megi at 2:25 UTC October 18, 2010. A reconnaissance aircraft measured a central pressure of 885 mb and surface winds of 190 mph in the storm, making Megi the 8th strongest tropical cyclone in world history. Image credit: NASA.

A record quiet 2010 Northwest Pacific Typhoon Season
The Western Pacific set records for fewest number of named storms (fifteen, previous record seventeen in 1998) and typhoons (nine, tied with the previous record of nine in 1998. Note that Tropical Storm Mindulle was upgraded to a typhoon in post-analysis after the season was over.) Reliable records began in the mid-1960s. For just the second year in history, the Atlantic had more named storms and hurricane-strength storms than the Western Pacific. The only other year this occurred was in 2005. Ordinarily, the Western Pacific has double to triple the amount of tropical cyclones of the Atlantic. One other notable feature of the 2010 season was the lack of a land-falling typhoon on the Japanese mainland. This is only the second such occurrence since 1988.

In 2010, there was only one super typhoon--a storm with at least 150 mph winds--in the Western Pacific. However, this storm, Super Typhoon Megi, was a doozy. Megi's sustained winds cranked up to a fearsome 190 mph and its central pressure bottomed out at 885 mb on October 16, making it the 8th most intense tropical cyclone in world history. Fortunately, Megi weakened significantly before hitting the Philippines as a Category 3 typhoon. Megi killed 69 people on Taiwan and in the Philippines and did $700 million in damage, and was the second deadliest and damaging typhoon of 2010. Category 3 Typhoon Fanapi was the deadliest and most damaging typhoon of 2010, doing over $1 billion in damage to Taiwan and China and killing 105.

The record quiet typhoon season in 2010 was due, in part, to the La Niña phenomena. During such events, the formation region for Western Pacific typhoons moves northwestward, closer to China. Thus, storms that form in the Western Pacific spend less time over water before they encounter land, resulting in a lesser chance to become a named storm, and less time to intensify. They also accumulate a lower ACE due to their shorter duration. Since the Western Pacific is responsible for 35% of the world's major tropical cyclones, the global ACE value is strongly tied to year-to-year variations in the El Niño/La Niña cycle.


Figure 2.
Statistics for the global tropical cyclone season of 2010. The two numbers in each box represent the actual number observed in 2010, followed by the averages from the period 1983-2007 (in parentheses). Averages and records were computed using the December 23, 2008 release of NOAA's International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship.

A record quiet 2010 Eastern Pacific Typhoon Season
In the Eastern Pacific, it was also a record-quiet season. On average, the Eastern Pacific has 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 3 intense hurricanes in a season. In 2010, there were 8 named storms, 3 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes. The previous record quietest season since 1966 was the year 1977, when the Eastern Pacific had 8 named storms, 4 hurricanes, and zero intense hurricanes. La Niña was largely responsible for the quiet Eastern Pacific hurricane season, due in part to the cool sea surface temperatures it brought. It is quite remarkable that both the Eastern and Western Pacific ocean basins had record quiet seasons in the same year--there is no historical precedent for such an occurrence.

Climate change and the 2008 global tropical cyclone season
We only have about 30 years of reliable global tropical cyclone data, and tropical cyclones are subject to large natural variations in numbers and intensities. Thus, it will be very difficult at present to prove that climate change is affecting global tropical cyclone activity. (This is less so in the Atlantic, where we have a longer reliable data record to work with.) A common theme of many recent publications on the future of tropical cyclones globally in a warming climate is that the total number of these storms will decrease, but the strongest storms will get stronger. For example, a 2010 review paper published in Nature Geosciences concluded: "greenhouse warming will cause the globally averaged intensity of tropical cyclones to shift towards stronger storms, with intensity increases of 2 - 11% by 2100. Existing modeling studies also consistently project decreases in the globally averaged frequency of tropical cyclones, by 6 - 34%. Balanced against this, higher resolution modeling studies typically project substantial increases in the frequency of the most intense cyclones, and increases of the order of 20% in the precipitation rate within 100 km of the storm centre." Last year, I discussed a paper by Bender et al that concluded that the total number of Atlantic hurricanes is expected to decrease by the end of the century, but there could be an increase of 81% in the number of Category 4 and 5 storms. The net effect of a decrease in total number of hurricanes but an increase in the strongest hurricanes should cause an increase in U.S. hurricane damages of about 30% by the end of the century, the authors computed, assuming that hurricane damages behave as they did during the past century. A new paper just published by Murakami et. al predicts that Western Pacific tropical cyclones may decrease in number by 23% by the end of the century, primarily due to a shift in the formation location and tracks of these storms.

In light of these theoretical results, it is interesting that 2010 saw the lowest number of global tropical cyclones on record, but an average number of very strong Category 4 and 5 storms. Fully 21% of last year's tropical cyclones reached Category 4 or 5 strength, versus just 14% during the period 1983 - 2007. Most notably, in 2010 we had the second strongest tropical cyclone on record in the Arabian Sea (Category 4 Cyclone Phet in June) and the strongest tropical cyclone ever to hit Myanmar/Burma (October's Tropical Cyclone Giri, an upper end Category 4 storm with 155 mph winds.) It is too early to read anything into this year's global tropical cyclone numbers, though--we need many more years of data before making any judgments on how global tropical cyclones might be responding to climate change.


Figure 3. Visible satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Phet on Thursday, June 3, 2010. Record heat over southern Asia in May helped heat up the Arabian Sea to 2°C above normal, and the exceptionally warm SSTs helped fuel Tropical Cyclone Phet into the second strongest tropical cyclone ever recorded in the Arabian Sea. Phet peaked at Category 4 strength with 145 mph winds. Only Category 5 Cyclone Gonu of 2007, which devastated Oman, was a stronger Arabian Sea cyclone. Phet killed 44 people and did $700 million in damage to Oman.


Figure 4. Visible MODIS satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Giri taken at 2:55am EDT October 22, 2010, just prior to landfall in Myanmar/Burma. At the time, Giri was a Category 4 storm with 145 mph winds. Giri killed 157 people and did $359 million in damage. Image credit: NASA.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting jeffs713:

Yep. This drought is actually one of the reasons my wife and I chose to get sprinklers instead of a new washer and dryer. They cost more, but if water restrictions come into play (which they likely will out in Tomball, TX), our entire yard won't die. We've spent too much money (and time) on landscaping for everything to become tinder.


They'll order mandatory rationing, then they start fining people for using water on certain days. They did it in League City, but I kept watering anyway because I'm not losing my grass, cost a lot more to resod the yard than just paying a fine and a high water bill.
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Quoting RitaEvac:
Everything west of I45 the freeway from Galveston to Dallas is just gonna die from drought I'm afraid. Not even summer and its extreme already? wait'll when Texas summer heat comes slamming down the doors, it's gonna get totally outta control.

Yep. This drought is actually one of the reasons my wife and I chose to get sprinklers instead of a new washer and dryer. They cost more, but if water restrictions come into play (which they likely will out in Tomball, TX), our entire yard won't die. We've spent too much money (and time) on landscaping for everything to become tinder.

In other news, tubing on the Guadalupe and Comal Rivers will be popular this year.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
Everything west of I45 the freeway from Galveston to Dallas is just gonna die from drought I'm afraid. Not even summer and its extreme already? wait'll when Texas summer heat comes slamming down the doors, it's gonna get totally outta control.
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Quoting IFuSAYso:


Encourage bats. A bat eats an average of 1000 bugs/insects per day.
Tried, but they don't last long out here due to rabies fears (had a few issues with that in the recent past in the area), and a lack of good habitat not in houses.

I also encourage frogs, since they seem to enjoy eating mosquitos too... When we moved into this house, my wife and I found one frog. 4 months later, we had 6. The more frogs we had, the less mosquito problems we had.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
Quoting IFuSAYso:


Encourage bats. A bat eats an average of 1000 bugs/insects per day.


Dragonflies are also mosquito predators. We have one of those mosquito zappers but they're pretty labor intensive when there is a heavy mosquito population. They get so clogged up with skeeter carcasses that you have to blow out the outer grid with compressed air almost daily. UGH!
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Quoting eddy12:
neopolitan he is a legend in his own mind


Uh, whether or not you agree with him Neapolitan is extremely intelligent and well researched. Maybe it's the facts that you dislike so much?
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Quoting jeffs713:

Exactly. I'm VERY strict about no standing water at my house, (I banned my wife from getting a bird feeder, for one thing), and I also encourage birds to be near our yard with some of the plants I grow (like sunflowers, which they LOVE in the summer).

I know the birds are going to really irritate me later this year when my garden starts doing well (they are already hitting my early strawberries), but I can manage that with netting. I can handle spending 20 minutes to put up netting if it means less mosquitos all summer.


Encourage bats. A bat eats an average of 1000 bugs/insects per day.
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Austin NWS said the hell with it too, and just shut down the radar for maintenence. Guess they figure cap in place no need to keep the thing on.
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Quoting kwgirl:
We are fighting Dengue Fever which is being spread by mosquito. Thankfully there has not been any new cases this year. And I suspect the origin of the dengue was brought back by relief workers in Haiti. Especially since it erupted around the Coast Guard housing. There is a big push to reduce standing water, which is really the trick for any mosquito control.


Right on. When we built our house and moved out into the country in 2008 it was a heavy rainy season (we picked up 8 inches from TS Faye too) and there was a heavy mosquito and frog population. 2009,2010 and so far this year have been much lighter mosquito populations likely due to the dry rainy seasons we've been having.
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Stupid cap
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Not gonna get Jack Squat in Houston/Galveston area
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Quoting Neapolitan:

Based on the overwhelming number of positive and supportive emails I get from quality bloggers, there's not a lot of laughing going on from people whose opinion matters to me. (But thanks for using my correct handle; it helps me build those FMP [Frequent Mention Program] points I can redeem later for catalog items.) ;-)

Looks like a really good chance for some very nasty stuff across much of the U.S, today; I read that up to 60 million people live in areas that may be threatened today. Keeping my fingers crossed...


Preach on brother Jim!
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THERE IS A SLIGHT RISK OF SEVERE WEATHER ACROSS THE ENTIRE
OUTLOOK AREA THIS AFTERNOON AND THIS EVENING. ISOLATED TO
SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS ARE EXPECTED TO AFFECT THE AREA TODAY
AHEAD OF AN APPROACHING COLD FRONT. A FEW OF THESE THUNDERSTORMS
WILL HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO PRODUCE DAMAGING STRAIGHT LINE WINDS.
IN ADDITION...LARGE HAIL AND A TORNADO OR TWO ARE POSSIBLE ACROSS
THE THIS AFTERNOON AND THIS EVENING.

AS THE COLD FRONT MOVES THROUGH THE AREA...IT WILL BE ACCOMPANIED
BY A STRONG SQUALL LINE WITH NUMEROUS THUNDERSTORMS...SOME OF
WHICH WILL BE STRONG TO SEVERE. THE MAIN THREAT FROM THESE
THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE DAMAGING STRAIGHT LINE WINDS...THOUGH LARGE
HAIL AND ISOLATED TORNADOES WILL REMAIN POSSIBLE. THE MOST LIKELY
TIMING FOR SEVERE WEATHER APPEARS TO BE IN THE AFTERNOON AND
EVENING HOURS. THE THREAT OF SEVERE WEATHER SHOULD END BY LATE
EVENING AS THE FRONT MOVES EAST OF THE AREA.



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Quoting hcubed:
OK, so maybe mention of DDT was the wrong point, but it seems that there are efective ways to control mosquito populations, rather than just say "CAGW is the sole cause of mosquito-bourne ilnesses, and we can't do anything about it".

That link that Nea posted didn't mention anything about ways they're trying to combat the mosquito population.

Things listed here, for example:

American Mosquito Control Association - mosquito.org

And, as an answer to jeffs713, there is a bacterium that can be used to control the larval stages (biorational larvicides, bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) or S-methoprene (IGR) containing products). It is not harmful to fish, pets, wildlife or humans.

And, instead of DDT, they recommend synergized pyrethrum or synthetic pyrethroids (which have their own health problems, unfortunately).

Does the bacteria survive "in the wild"? Or does it have to be cultivated/replenished via artificial means?
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
Quoting kwgirl:
We are fighting Dengue Fever which is being spread by mosquito. Thankfully there has not been any new cases this year. And I suspect the origin of the dengue was brought back by relief workers in Haiti. Especially since it erupted around the Coast Guard housing. There is a big push to reduce standing water, which is really the trick for any mosquito control.

Exactly. I'm VERY strict about no standing water at my house, (I banned my wife from getting a bird feeder, for one thing), and I also encourage birds to be near our yard with some of the plants I grow (like sunflowers, which they LOVE in the summer).

I know the birds are going to really irritate me later this year when my garden starts doing well (they are already hitting my early strawberries), but I can manage that with netting. I can handle spending 20 minutes to put up netting if it means less mosquitos all summer.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
OK, so maybe mention of DDT was the wrong point, but it seems that there are efective ways to control mosquito populations, rather than just say "CAGW is the sole cause of mosquito-bourne ilnesses, and we can't do anything about it".

That link that Nea posted didn't mention anything about ways they're trying to combat the mosquito population.

Things listed here, for example:

American Mosquito Control Association - mosquito.org

And, as an answer to jeffs713, there is a bacterium that can be used to control the larval stages (biorational larvicides, bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) or S-methoprene (IGR) containing products). It is not harmful to fish, pets, wildlife or humans.

And, instead of DDT, they recommend synergized pyrethrum or synthetic pyrethroids (which have their own health problems, unfortunately).
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Quoting jeffs713:
The current larvicide is effective, but still has to many side effects on the rest of the environment, and isn't good for truly large scale areas (instead of just a small city or island, I'm talking metropolitan cities and counties).

Yeah, they spray during the summer, but there is some evidence they are growing adapted to the spray, and its only partially effective (ask anyone who BBQs in the summer near Houston).

You don't want to kill ALL of the mosquitos, you just want to knock them down enough to have a self-limiting effect on disease spread. Thin them out enough, and it becomes harder for a virus/infection to sustain itself in the environment.
We are fighting Dengue Fever which is being spread by mosquito. Thankfully there has not been any new cases this year. And I suspect the origin of the dengue was brought back by relief workers in Haiti. Especially since it erupted around the Coast Guard housing. There is a big push to reduce standing water, which is really the trick for any mosquito control.
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Quoting kwgirl:
Here in the Keys they use a larvicide that destroys the mosquito larvae without too much damage to other things. I have my misgivings about this since I have found dead catepillars and there is suspect that it is affecting the larvae of spiny lobster. Another item that will be attempted, if we get permission, is to release hundreds of sterile male mosquitoes into the environment. Talk about micro surgery LOL>
The current larvicide is effective, but still has to many side effects on the rest of the environment, and isn't good for truly large scale areas (instead of just a small city or island, I'm talking metropolitan cities and counties).

Yeah, they spray during the summer, but there is some evidence they are growing adapted to the spray, and its only partially effective (ask anyone who BBQs in the summer near Houston).

You don't want to kill ALL of the mosquitos, you just want to knock them down enough to have a self-limiting effect on disease spread. Thin them out enough, and it becomes harder for a virus/infection to sustain itself in the environment.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
Quoting atmoaggie:
Moisture? Check.

Dew points shaded. Lightest green 68 - 72 F. Next darkest green, 68 to 64 F. And on.


Nasty cap in place - Check.

BLAH.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
Quoting jeffs713:

EXACTLY!

IMO, more research should be done to eliminate mosquito larvae effectively in large-scale applications. Also, what about the possibility of a biological control for mosquitos, like a bacterium that doesn't infect humans?
Here in the Keys they use a larvicide that destroys the mosquito larvae without too much damage to other things. I have my misgivings about this since I have found dead catepillars and there is suspect that it is affecting the larvae of spiny lobster. Another item that will be attempted, if we get permission, is to release hundreds of sterile male mosquitoes into the environment. Talk about micro surgery LOL>
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Moisture? Check.

Dew points shaded. Lightest green 68 - 72 F. Next darkest green, 68 to 64 F. And on.

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Quoting RastaSteve:


Sorry brother! I posted it fast and actually didn't see what the 30 percent was for. Hey man noticing thunderstorms building toward Houston.

Yep.

The NWS is saying there is a strong cap in place over us, so no widespread event is expected. All they are forecasting is a thin line attached to, or just in front of the cold front, and thats it. The Houston area might see a quarter inch, possibly half an inch out of the storms. Barely enough to even put a dent in our current deficit. (but enough to save me one day's worth of water on the lawn, since I just planted new grass)

Would be a lot easier to see the actual atmosphere if they launched soundings anywhere closer than Lake Charles, but they haven't responded to my e-mail bugging them about that yet. (been a week now... thinking im not going to get a response)
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
The lines taking shape in North and Central TX look to be fairly potent storms, as I've noticed tops between 40k and 50k. Not entirely unusual in this area (more unusual as to get towards the coast), but interesting nonetheless. No reason to panic right now, but some of TX looks to get some much-needed rain, and the Miss. and Tenn. valleys will likely get some rather strong storms this afternoon. Keep your eyes peeled!
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
Quoting jeffs713:

EXACTLY!

IMO, more research should be done to eliminate mosquito larvae effectively in large-scale applications. Also, what about the possibility of a biological control for mosquitos, like a bacterium that doesn't infect humans?


I just use the 10 for $1 feeder gold fish in my rain barrels, they get fat on Skeeter larvae. :P
Member Since: March 8, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 154
Quoting RastaSteve:


I'm sorry some of us actually work and posted quickly to get the word out. I miss read the 30 percent. Sorry Cat5. Have a good day and I hope you can squeeze some rain out of this.

No need to apologize. I also work (which is why you will sometimes notice large gaps in my posting during the day). I tend to review SPC forecasts very quickly.

Its Monday, so my smart-*** side is in high gear this morning.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
434. IKE
100% chance tomorrow will be interesting on here...based on this map....get ready Florida-casters!


Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37858
Quoting Gearsts:


Lessee...

- La Nina is showing significant weakness near South America.
- The North Pacific is showing a cold PDO.
- The North Atlantic is slightly warmer than normal overall, with what looks like a tripole developing
- The GOM is a bathtub.
- I'm ordering a new case of MREs for hurricane supplies.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
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A nasty line has already formed between Dallas and Shreveport (this is the line that will likely cause problems in the Mississippi and Alabama areas later).



There is also another line forming up to the south - will Houston get some much-needed rain? (you can see the northern end of the line being visibily enhanced by an outflow boundary)
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
Quoting Inyo:
DDT mongers: give it up! Due to overuse of this chemical, mosquitos quickly developed immunity to it. If we had been smart with it, and used very small amounts, we might have been able to have an actual effect on mosquito populations, but by filling the environment with the stuff, we just bred resistant bugs. Mosquitos, bedbugs, etc, might decrease in population for a couple of years if we brought back DDT, but in the long term, it would make thigns worse.

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171, 942339,00.html

It's not rocket science, people... DDT kills birds... but this isn't just a tree-hugger issue. What do you think eats mosquitos? We'd just kill the birds, and we'd end up with more mosquitos than ever... and maybe a bunch more breast cancer too. More mosquitos, more cancer, less birds, sounds great right? We need to think long-term. Manage wetlands and watersheds properly, and develop mosquito control without so many harmful side effects.

EXACTLY!

IMO, more research should be done to eliminate mosquito larvae effectively in large-scale applications. Also, what about the possibility of a biological control for mosquitos, like a bacterium that doesn't infect humans?
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
429. Inyo
DDT mongers: give it up! Due to overuse of this chemical, mosquitos quickly developed immunity to it. If we had been smart with it, and used very small amounts, we might have been able to have an actual effect on mosquito populations, but by filling the environment with the stuff, we just bred resistant bugs. Mosquitos, bedbugs, etc, might decrease in population for a couple of years if we brought back DDT, but in the long term, it would make thigns worse.

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171, 942339,00.html

It's not rocket science, people... DDT kills birds... but this isn't just a tree-hugger issue. What do you think eats mosquitos? We'd just kill the birds, and we'd end up with more mosquitos than ever... and maybe a bunch more breast cancer too. More mosquitos, more cancer, less birds, sounds great right? We need to think long-term. Manage wetlands and watersheds properly, and develop mosquito control without so many harmful side effects.
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425.

Please closely read your own link! 30% severe t-storm, 5% tornado.

Contrary to popular belief, some of us on here do know a thing or two about thunderstorms, NOAA forecasts, and reading.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
424.

What Cat5 said IS correct. SPC is highlighting a severe thunderstorm threat. The mention about tornadoes is a "footnote" on the actual text of the warning. I'm sorry if you feel that the SPC is wrong, and you are right...
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
426. sotv
Quoting aspectre:
Ever wonder how, in opposition to political pressure to avoid giving out info that might distrees the public, US EnergySecretary StevenChu had sufficient confidence to announce that "70% of the core of one reactor had been damaged, and that another reactor had undergone a 33% meltdown"
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
"...workers were using concrete [that failed to plug the crack believed to be responsible for] "seven tonnes of water with 10,000 times higher radioactivity than normal* escaping from the [nuclear] plant every hour, but are now using a mixture of sawdust, shredded [[news]paper and a polymer [based on cornstarch, used in diapers and kitty litter] capable of absorbing 50 times its own volume in water.
'We were hoping the polymers would function like diapers [and jam the leak with its expansion] but [have] yet to see a visible effect' said...a deputy director general of [Japan's] Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.
There are also plans to dump 11,500 tonnes of radioactive water at sea to free up storage space at the plant."

* ie normal reactor core coolant water: disinformation through misuse of partial truths once again.
Seawater has been found to contain nearly 5,000times the radioactive contamination level considered to be safe under industrial regulations...
...after mixing with 330metres(~1100feet) of ocean circulation to the measuring point. So that "10thousand times normal" uses a norm that is a LOT more than what the public thinks of as normal.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


Sounds like they have employed the same people that thought they could plug the oil well in the Gulf last year with tights and golf balls.......
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Quoting Neapolitan:

SRM (solar radiation management) is Big Energy's ultimate dream come true: it can continue pumping vast amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere, then turn around and claim that, since aerosols and airborne particulates provide a shading, cooling effect, they need to a) be allowed to stop filtering and scrubbing their industrial emissions, and b) get paid for polluting, as they are providing a valuable service for GW mitigation. Win-win, it is! Of course, combating a self-induced summer by instituting a self-induced winter seems incredibly stupid, especially when there are other things we can try such as, you know, alternate energy or--heaven forbid--conservation. But where there's a Koch Brothers will, there's a Koch Brothers way, so you never know.

Meanwile:

--Government officials in Thailand are placing the blame for the recent, ongoing, and unprecedented flooding squarely at the feet of climate change.. Some parts of the nation have seen more than 86" of rain in just the past four months, killing at least 41.

--The Philippines government says that an uptick in insect-borne illnesses in that nation is likely caused by warming. "Higher temperatures and more humid climates caused by climate change favor the growth in the populations of insects and vectors that spread diseases," says a spokesperson.


"...The Philippines government says that an uptick in insect-borne illnesses in that nation is likely caused by warming..."

And also just as likely as a result of a refusal to use effective insect controls, such as DDT and mosquito netting.

Instead, blame CAGW.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.