The global tropical cyclone season of 2010: record inactivity

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:14 AM GMT on April 03, 2011

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The year 2010 was one of the strangest on record globally for tropical cyclones. Each year, the globe has about 92 tropical cyclones--called hurricanes in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific, typhoons in the Western Pacific, and tropical cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere. But in 2010, we had just 68 of these storms--the fewest since the dawn of the satellite era in 1970. The previous record slowest year was 1977, when 69 tropical cyclones occurred world-wide. Both the Western Pacific and Eastern Pacific had their quietest seasons on record in 2010, the Atlantic had its 3rd busiest season since record keeping began in 1851, and the Southern Hemisphere had a below average season. As a result, the Atlantic, which ordinarily accounts for just 13% of global cyclone activity, accounted for 28% in 2010--the greatest proportion since accurate tropical cyclone records began in the 1970s. Global Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) for 2010 was the lowest since the late 1970s (ACE is a measure of the total destructive power of a hurricane season, based on the number of days strong winds are observed.)


Figure 1. Visible satellite image of 2010's strongest tropical cyclone: Super Typhoon Megi at 2:25 UTC October 18, 2010. A reconnaissance aircraft measured a central pressure of 885 mb and surface winds of 190 mph in the storm, making Megi the 8th strongest tropical cyclone in world history. Image credit: NASA.

A record quiet 2010 Northwest Pacific Typhoon Season
The Western Pacific set records for fewest number of named storms (fifteen, previous record seventeen in 1998) and typhoons (nine, tied with the previous record of nine in 1998. Note that Tropical Storm Mindulle was upgraded to a typhoon in post-analysis after the season was over.) Reliable records began in the mid-1960s. For just the second year in history, the Atlantic had more named storms and hurricane-strength storms than the Western Pacific. The only other year this occurred was in 2005. Ordinarily, the Western Pacific has double to triple the amount of tropical cyclones of the Atlantic. One other notable feature of the 2010 season was the lack of a land-falling typhoon on the Japanese mainland. This is only the second such occurrence since 1988.

In 2010, there was only one super typhoon--a storm with at least 150 mph winds--in the Western Pacific. However, this storm, Super Typhoon Megi, was a doozy. Megi's sustained winds cranked up to a fearsome 190 mph and its central pressure bottomed out at 885 mb on October 16, making it the 8th most intense tropical cyclone in world history. Fortunately, Megi weakened significantly before hitting the Philippines as a Category 3 typhoon. Megi killed 69 people on Taiwan and in the Philippines and did $700 million in damage, and was the second deadliest and damaging typhoon of 2010. Category 3 Typhoon Fanapi was the deadliest and most damaging typhoon of 2010, doing over $1 billion in damage to Taiwan and China and killing 105.

The record quiet typhoon season in 2010 was due, in part, to the La Niña phenomena. During such events, the formation region for Western Pacific typhoons moves northwestward, closer to China. Thus, storms that form in the Western Pacific spend less time over water before they encounter land, resulting in a lesser chance to become a named storm, and less time to intensify. They also accumulate a lower ACE due to their shorter duration. Since the Western Pacific is responsible for 35% of the world's major tropical cyclones, the global ACE value is strongly tied to year-to-year variations in the El Niño/La Niña cycle.


Figure 2.
Statistics for the global tropical cyclone season of 2010. The two numbers in each box represent the actual number observed in 2010, followed by the averages from the period 1983-2007 (in parentheses). Averages and records were computed using the December 23, 2008 release of NOAA's International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship.

A record quiet 2010 Eastern Pacific Typhoon Season
In the Eastern Pacific, it was also a record-quiet season. On average, the Eastern Pacific has 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 3 intense hurricanes in a season. In 2010, there were 8 named storms, 3 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes. The previous record quietest season since 1966 was the year 1977, when the Eastern Pacific had 8 named storms, 4 hurricanes, and zero intense hurricanes. La Niña was largely responsible for the quiet Eastern Pacific hurricane season, due in part to the cool sea surface temperatures it brought. It is quite remarkable that both the Eastern and Western Pacific ocean basins had record quiet seasons in the same year--there is no historical precedent for such an occurrence.

Climate change and the 2008 global tropical cyclone season
We only have about 30 years of reliable global tropical cyclone data, and tropical cyclones are subject to large natural variations in numbers and intensities. Thus, it will be very difficult at present to prove that climate change is affecting global tropical cyclone activity. (This is less so in the Atlantic, where we have a longer reliable data record to work with.) A common theme of many recent publications on the future of tropical cyclones globally in a warming climate is that the total number of these storms will decrease, but the strongest storms will get stronger. For example, a 2010 review paper published in Nature Geosciences concluded: "greenhouse warming will cause the globally averaged intensity of tropical cyclones to shift towards stronger storms, with intensity increases of 2 - 11% by 2100. Existing modeling studies also consistently project decreases in the globally averaged frequency of tropical cyclones, by 6 - 34%. Balanced against this, higher resolution modeling studies typically project substantial increases in the frequency of the most intense cyclones, and increases of the order of 20% in the precipitation rate within 100 km of the storm centre." Last year, I discussed a paper by Bender et al that concluded that the total number of Atlantic hurricanes is expected to decrease by the end of the century, but there could be an increase of 81% in the number of Category 4 and 5 storms. The net effect of a decrease in total number of hurricanes but an increase in the strongest hurricanes should cause an increase in U.S. hurricane damages of about 30% by the end of the century, the authors computed, assuming that hurricane damages behave as they did during the past century. A new paper just published by Murakami et. al predicts that Western Pacific tropical cyclones may decrease in number by 23% by the end of the century, primarily due to a shift in the formation location and tracks of these storms.

In light of these theoretical results, it is interesting that 2010 saw the lowest number of global tropical cyclones on record, but an average number of very strong Category 4 and 5 storms. Fully 21% of last year's tropical cyclones reached Category 4 or 5 strength, versus just 14% during the period 1983 - 2007. Most notably, in 2010 we had the second strongest tropical cyclone on record in the Arabian Sea (Category 4 Cyclone Phet in June) and the strongest tropical cyclone ever to hit Myanmar/Burma (October's Tropical Cyclone Giri, an upper end Category 4 storm with 155 mph winds.) It is too early to read anything into this year's global tropical cyclone numbers, though--we need many more years of data before making any judgments on how global tropical cyclones might be responding to climate change.


Figure 3. Visible satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Phet on Thursday, June 3, 2010. Record heat over southern Asia in May helped heat up the Arabian Sea to 2°C above normal, and the exceptionally warm SSTs helped fuel Tropical Cyclone Phet into the second strongest tropical cyclone ever recorded in the Arabian Sea. Phet peaked at Category 4 strength with 145 mph winds. Only Category 5 Cyclone Gonu of 2007, which devastated Oman, was a stronger Arabian Sea cyclone. Phet killed 44 people and did $700 million in damage to Oman.


Figure 4. Visible MODIS satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Giri taken at 2:55am EDT October 22, 2010, just prior to landfall in Myanmar/Burma. At the time, Giri was a Category 4 storm with 145 mph winds. Giri killed 157 people and did $359 million in damage. Image credit: NASA.

Jeff Masters

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1269. kwgirl
Quoting MrMixon:


Here ya go - from wikipedia:


Magnificent Frigatebird

Seeing a bunch of these guys in one place must be breathtaking...

They are, especially since they rarely flap their wings, just wheel and soar with the thermals. Thank you for the picture.
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1268. MrMixon
Quoting kwgirl:
Sorry I don't know how to post pictures. And I do forget that one species common to me can be new to someone else. You should see when they are nesting. There is a spot in the back country, the marquesas to be exact where they nest every winter. I went there one year and watched them wheel in the air with the males (I think) showing off their red display. We just drifted with the tide, played the "Florida Suite" and watched the ballet. Beautiful. Something I will never forget!


Here ya go - from wikipedia:


Magnificent Frigatebird

Seeing a bunch of these guys in one place must be breathtaking...
Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
Quoting CatfishJones:


Here in Pinellas we're at 17" (on the money, apparently). Four more inches and we're at the annual average at the end of JUNE.


I'm pretty sure 21 inches is not the average by the end of June. I think it would be more around 25 inches. But whatever!

Ive had 20.32 for the year so far now that today's rain is over. Very pleased to have this much in the dry season.
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The Gulf has pretty much been untouched since 2008.
Member Since: March 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 885
Quoting jeffs713:
1255.

2005 was a TOTALLY different animal. Its not even an analog. Stop being a doomcaster.


Member Since: March 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 885
1264. kwgirl
Quoting MrMixon:


Thanks for making me look up "Magnificent Frigate birds". We obviously don't see many of them around the continental divide, and apparently I missed the National Geographic special on this species... very interesting bird and interesting name to match. :)
Sorry I don't know how to post pictures. And I do forget that one species common to me can be new to someone else. You should see when they are nesting. There is a spot in the back country, the marquesas to be exact where they nest every winter. I went there one year and watched them wheel in the air with the males (I think) showing off their red display. We just drifted with the tide, played the "Florida Suite" and watched the ballet. Beautiful. Something I will never forget!
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Quoting CalebDancemastah:


What's his name? I'm really considering taking Calculus w/Analytic Geometry I in the Summer... I also had an middle eastern teacher for statistics when I took classes down at Miami-Dade albeit he had a real strong accent, but as the semester went on I grew accustom to it, & ended up passing the class with a B. His test were easy to understand.


His name is Vibor Guatam, I'm not sure i spelled that correctly, but I tried, lol.
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Quoting TomasTomas:


Yeah Jeff, and i'm sure all those Cat 4's and 5's we get in the gulf this year will bee line for C FL. People in Orlando better watch out, doom doom doom doom.

Member Since: March 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 885
Quoting Grothar:


You are supposed to say.....that being said! The new annoying catch-phrase that everyone is wearing out fast. Rude expression.


Well, "that being said" is a great transition, it just shouldn't be used to end statements. In fact I use "that being said" often as a transition, and being someone who gets straight A's and sometimes 100's with ease on college papers, writing correctly comes natural. Therefore you can't just dismiss "that being said" as all around, horrible to use.
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1260. MrMixon
Quoting kwgirl:
Well that first little squall line gave us some rain, but I am looking at the radar, as well as the sky, and We are definitely in for more. I was watching some Magnificent Frigate birds circling the Pier House. They probably got blown in from the Gulf with that first squall line. They are circling trying to catch an updraft, with a little bit of success over the land mass. Still hasn't cooled off yet.


Thanks for making me look up "Magnificent Frigate birds". We obviously don't see many of them around the continental divide, and apparently I missed the National Geographic special on this species... very interesting bird and interesting name to match. :)
Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
1255.

2005 was a TOTALLY different animal. Its not even an analog. Stop being a doomcaster.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5890
1258. kwgirl
Well that first little squall line gave us some rain, but I am looking at the radar, as well as the sky, and We are definitely in for more. I was watching some Magnificent Frigate birds circling the Pier House. They probably got blown in from the Gulf with that first squall line. They are circling trying to catch an updraft, with a little bit of success over the land mass. Still hasn't cooled off yet.
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Quoting RastaSteve:
I think this years ACE could pass 180 and maybe get close to 200. I really think we are going to have some cat.4 or 5's coming thru the Gulf this year. There's no way we will have a season like last year of minimal landfalls. The SST's in the Gulf right now are getting pretty darn scary because it is very early to temps this warm in the Gulf. I remember last year the tropical systems clustered in an area of the C ATL that had the highest heat content and that highest heat content maybe in the Gulf and around FL this year so definitly something to watch down the road.


Yeah Jeff, and i'm sure all those Cat 4's and 5's we get in the gulf this year will bee line for C FL. People in Orlando better watch out, doom doom doom doom.
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------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------

PROGNOSTIC DISCUSSION FOR 6 TO 10 AND 8 TO 14 DAY OUTLOOKS
NWS CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER CAMP SPRINGS, MD
300 PM EDT TUE APRIL 05 2011

6-10 DAY OUTLOOK FOR APR 11 - 15 2011

TODAY'S ENSEMBLE MEANS SOLUTIONS ARE IN GENERALLY GOOD AGREEMENT ON THE
EXPECTED MEAN 500-HPA CIRCULATION PATTERN OVER NORTH AMERICA FOR THE 6-10 DAY
PERIOD. A TROUGH IS FORECAST TO EXTEND SOUTHWARD ACROSS ALASKA TO JUST OFF THE
U.S. WEST COAST. A RELATIVELY LOW-AMPLITUDE FLOW PATTERN IS FORECAST OVER THE CONUS. THE RECENT OPERATIONAL RUNS OF THE GFS ARE IN REASONABLY GOOD AGREEMENT
WITH THEIR RESPECTIVE ENSEMBLE MEANS. THE OPERATIONAL RUNS ARE A BIT MORE
AMPLIFIED WITH THE MAIN CIRCULATION FEATURES. DUE TO THE CONSISTENCY OF THE
RECENT GFS ENSEMBLES AND OPERATIONAL RUNS, THEY WERE FAVORED IN TODAY'S
FORECAST.

THE ENSEMBLE SPAGHETTI DIAGRAMS GENERALLY INDICATE LOW TO MODERATE SPREAD OVER
MOST OF THE FORECAST DOMAIN. TODAYS BLEND CHART INDICATES NEAR TO BELOW NORMAL
HEIGHTS ACROSS MOST PARTS OF ALASKA AND THE NORTHERN HALF OF THE CONUS EXCEPT
FOR MAINE, AND NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL HEIGHTS ACROSS THE SOUTHERN HALF OF THE CONUS.

ENHANCED PROBABILITIES FOR BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES ARE EXPECTED ACROSS THE
WESTERN COAST OF THE CONUS, THE GREAT LAKES, THE NORTHEAST, AND PARTS OF THE
MIDDLE ATLANTIC AREA AND ALASKA, WHILE THE FORECAST OF ABOVE NORMAL HEIGHTS
LEADS TO ENHANCED PROBABILITIES FOR ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES FOR THE SOUTHERN
PLAINS, PARTS OF THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI VALLEY, THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN ROCKIES
AND FLORIDA.

THE TROUGH FORECAST OFF THE U.S. WEST COAST LEADS TO ENHANCED PROBABILITIES FOR
ABOVE MEDIAN PRECIPITATION OVER NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST, THE
NORTHERN GREAT BASIN, THE GREAT LAKES, AND THE NORTHEAST REGION. BELOW MEDIAN
PRECIPITATION IS MOST LIKELY FOR THE SOUTHERN PLAINS, PARTS OF THE SOUTHERN
ROCKIES, THE CENTRAL PLAINS AND THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI VALLEY.


TODAY'S OFFICIAL 500-HPA BLEND CONSISTS OF 10 PERCENT OF TODAY'S OPERATIONAL 0Z GFS CENTERED ON DAY 8...10 PERCENT OF TODAY'S OPERATIONAL 6Z GFS CENTERED ON
DAY 8...10 PERCENT OF TODAY'S 0Z GFS ENSEMBLE MEAN CENTERED ON DAY 8...10
PERCENT OF TODAY'S 6Z GFS ENSEMBLE MEAN CENTERED ON DAY 8...40 PERCENT OF
TODAY'S GFS SUPERENSEMBLE MEAN CENTERED ON DAY 8...10 PERCENT OF TODAY'S 0Z
EUROPEAN ENSEMBLE MEAN CENTERED ON DAY 8...AND 10 PERCENT OF TODAY'S 0Z
CANADIAN ENSEMBLE MEAN CENTERED ON DAY 8.

MODEL OF THE DAY: GFS SUPERENSEMBLE MEAN

FORECAST CONFIDENCE FOR THE 6-10 DAY PERIOD: AVERAGE, 3 ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 5,
DUE TO FAIRLY GOOD MODEL AGREEMENT OFFSET BY A RELATIVELY LOW-AMPLITUDE FLOW
PATTERN OVER THE CONUS

8-14 DAY OUTLOOK FOR APR 13 - 19 2011
FOR WEEK 2 THE ENSEMBLE MEAN SOLUTIONS SHOW A ZONAL FLOW PATTERN OVER NORTH
AMERICA. THE VARIOUS ENSEMBLES ARE IN GOOD AGREEMENT INDICATING NEAR AVERAGE
HEIGHTS ACROSS THE CONUS AND A TROUGH OVER THE GULF OF ALASKA. THE ENSEMBLE
SPAGHETTI CHARTS INDICATE MODERATE SPREAD ACROSS THE ENTIRE PACIFIC-NORTH
AMERICA REGION HIGHLIGHTING THE UNCERTAINTY ASSOCIATED WITH THE SHORTWAVE
ENERGY. TODAYS BLEND CHART INDICATES NEAR TO BELOW NORMAL HEIGHTS ACROSS THE
NORTHERN HALF OF THE CONUS, AND NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL HEIGHTS ACROSS THE
SOUTHERN HALF OF THE CONUS.


ENHANCED PROBABILITIES FOR BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES ARE FORECAST ACROSS THE
NORTHERN PARTS OF THE CONUS AND FOR SOUTHERN PARTS OF ALASKA, WHILE ENHANCED
PROBABILITIES FOR NEAR TO ABOVE NORMAL TEMPERATURES ARE EXPECTED FOR THE
SOUTHWEST, THE SOUTHERN AND CENTRAL ROCKIES, THE SOUTHERN PLAINS, THE LOWER AND
MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY. ENHANCED PROBABILITIES FOR NEAR TO ABOVE MEDIAN
PRECIPITATION ARE INDICATED OVER THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST, THE NORTHERN ROCKIES,
THE UPPER GREAT LAKES REGION AND FOR FLORIDA.
ENHANCED PROBABILITIES FOR BELOW
MEDIAN PRECIPITATION ARE MOST LIKELY FOR THE SOUTHERN PLAINS, THE SOUTHERN
ROCKIES, THE SOUTHWEST, AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND ALASKA.


Member Since: March 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 885
Quoting jeffs713:
1250.

I don't think ACE will get that high, as many of the signs are pointing away from long-track Cape Verde storms. Those storms pump ACE up quite a bit. This year looks to be more homegrown storms, and stuff popping west of 60.


2005 ring a bell. Although I don't expect 2005 #'s But I do agree with you that with the heat content clustering itself around FL and Gulf could spell lots of homegrown activity. The kind where we go from a TD to a cat 3 in 36 to 48 hours. Could be some explosive developement this year close to the US IMO.
Member Since: March 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 885
1254. SeALWx
1251.

Good point. A large amount of ACE is generated from even a few long track cyclones.
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Quoting StAugustineFL:


First attempt at this............

http://radblast-mi.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/radar /WUNIDS_map?station=BYX&brand=wui&num=20&a mp;delay=15& type=N0R&frame=0&scale=0.750&noclutter =0&t=1302031 964&lat=0&lon=0&label=you&showstor ms=0&map.x=400&m ap.y=240¢erx=477¢ery=317&transx=77&trans y=77&sho wlabels=1&severe=0&rainsnow=Show&light ning=Show&sm ooth=0


And I get an F.......lol
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Quoting RastaSteve:
Big Bow Echo heading for Key West. That line west of them I'm sure has 45 to 55mph winds with it.


First attempt at this............

http://radblast-mi.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/radar /WUNIDS_map?station=BYX&brand=wui&num=20&delay=15& type=N0R&frame=0&scale=0.750&noclutter=0&t=1302031 964&lat=0&lon=0&label=you&showstorms=0&map.x=400&m ap.y=240¢erx=477¢ery=317&transx=77&transy=77&sho wlabels=1&severe=0&rainsnow=Show&lightning=Show&sm ooth=0
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1250.

I don't think ACE will get that high, as many of the signs are pointing away from long-track Cape Verde storms. Those storms pump ACE up quite a bit. This year looks to be more homegrown storms, and stuff popping west of 60.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5890
I think this years ACE could pass 180 and maybe get close to 200. I really think we are going to have some cat.4 or 5's coming thru the Gulf this year. There's no way we will have a season like last year of minimal landfalls. The SST's in the Gulf right now are getting pretty darn scary because it is very early to temps this warm in the Gulf. I remember last year the tropical systems clustered in an area of the C ATL that had the highest heat content and that highest heat content maybe in the Gulf and around FL this year so definitly something to watch down the road.
Member Since: March 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 885
1249. MrMixon
Quoting jeffs713:

I'm in the Houston, TX area. Moved away from Colorado due to my little sister's health (5000 feet altitude does not do good things to kids with heart defects - and Houston has excellent hospitals).

My wife and I are trying to figure out when we can go back for a vacation on the front range. She's from NOLA, and has never really seen much of Colorado... I remember enough to be considered a "local" (and I still have family on the western slope, too).


Well that's certainly a good excuse to leave Colorado, though I'm sorry to hear about your little sister. I hope she's been doing better with the thicker air in Houston. If I had to choose a time to visit Colorado (and I wasn't planning to ski), I'd definitely come out in late September or early October to catch the aspens turning...

Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
More BS numbers
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 9676
1247. raggpr
TSR Hurricane season 2011 predictions are out.
They call for:
14.2 tropical storms
7.5 hurricanes
3.6 intense hurricane

Link
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Neapolitan probably already posted this but it's worth repeating:

7 tons of Radioactive Waste is Flowing into the Ocean Every Hour at Fukushima

In Japan – officials estimate that 7 tons of radioactive waste is flowing into the ocean every hour at the crippled Daiichi nuclear facility. The source of the leaking waste appears to be reactor 2. Attempts to clog the leak with cement have failed – and new attempts to plug the hole with a “junk-shot” of saw dust – chemicals, and shredded newspaper doesn’t appear to be working either.

Officials have now put a timeframe on containing the situation, saying it could take several months for the plant’s cooling systems to come back online and for the radiation to be contained.

Of course – that would just be a first step. It will then take hundreds of thousands of years for the mess caused by the use of nuclear power to decay to safety.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2899
TSR April Forecast Update for Atlantic Hurricane Activity in 2011


Tropical Storms: 14.2
Hurricanes: 7.5
Intense Hurricanes: 3.6
ACE: 124

Yes I know, you cannot have a partial cyclone, those are their numbers.
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.
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I just had a thought for the admin- it would be helpful to show the post number that is being quoted along with the name of the poster. It would make it easier to refer back to the post that someone is quoting. Notice for instance post 1221, it would be helpful to know which post that refers to. Thanks
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big t.storm next to miami FL at this time!!
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Big Bow Echo heading for Key West. That line west of them I'm sure has 45 to 55mph winds with it.
Member Since: March 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 885
Not sure if this was posted earlier but I thought it was interesting:

New fresh water in Arctic could shift Gulf Stream
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2899
1239. hydrus
Quoting Grothar:



I haven't had my nap today! Don't get technical.
whine,...cry...snffle, snurf...Wants some tissue?
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22245
Quoting MrMixon: I'm an Ohio native, and despite Ohio's rural reputation, you can't travel a half mile in any direction in that state without hitting a suburban neighborhood or strip mall.


It's similar in Florida, but replace "mall" with club.
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Quoting Grothar:



I haven't had my nap today! Don't get technical.
Morning nap, afternoon nap, or after-dinner nap, oh ancient one?
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5890
Quoting MrMixon:


Where are you now? I sure hope you had a good reason to leave Colorado. :)

You're welcome back any time... despite what some locals might say, we've still got plenty of room out here... just mind your water use.

(I'm an Ohio native, and despite Ohio's rural reputation, you can't travel a half mile in any direction in that state without hitting a suburban neighborhood or strip mall. So, I know the difference between "full" and "full" and Colorado ain't full yet).

I'm in the Houston, TX area. Moved away from Colorado due to my little sister's health (5000 feet altitude does not do good things to kids with heart defects - and Houston has excellent hospitals).

My wife and I are trying to figure out when we can go back for a vacation on the front range. She's from NOLA, and has never really seen much of Colorado... I remember enough to be considered a "local" (and I still have family on the western slope, too).
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5890
Quoting Grothar:



I haven't had my nap today! Don't get technical.


WELL, WELL...how much did ya get?
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1234. Grothar
Quoting hydrus:
how do you take pics from inside your computer and post them on the blog..?



I haven't had my nap today! Don't get technical.
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1233. MrMixon
Quoting jeffs713:

I miss my home... :(

(I was born in Greeley, and still miss seeing mountains to the west daily... even after 20-something years)


Where are you now? I sure hope you had a good reason to leave Colorado. :)

You're welcome back any time... despite what some locals might say, we've still got plenty of room out here... just mind your water use.

(I'm an Ohio native, and despite Ohio's rural reputation, you can't travel a half mile in any direction in that state without hitting a suburban neighborhood or strip mall. So, I know the difference between "full" and "full" and Colorado ain't full yet).
Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
1232. kwgirl
Yeah! The rain is here!!!
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1231. hydrus
Quoting MrMixon:


First you reach inside your computer... um... you might want to wear some gloves or something... then pull out the photos... dust them off... and then I recommend thumbtacks to post them to the blog (never tape!), but try to put the thumbtack holes somewhere inconspicuous in case you want to use the photos later.

If you want to do it digitally you'll need to post the photos online somewhere (either post them to your wunderground account, or use a service like photobucket or flickr). Browse to the image, right click the image and click "copy image location", then use the handy image button above the comment box and paste the link into the box that pops up. Click "post comment" and you're done.

:)
That was cool...Thank you..:)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22245
Quoting MrMixon:
Clear skies and lots of UFO-style lenticular clouds floating above the Colorado Front Range today. Sorry I don't have photos, I left the camera at home. But check out this webcam:



I miss my home... :(

(I was born in Greeley, and still miss seeing mountains to the west daily... even after 20-something years)
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5890
1229. MrMixon
Quoting RitaEvac:
How far are those mountains in the background?


It's about 15 miles from that webcam to the first "hogbacks" and maybe another 15-20 miles to the highest snowpacked peaks visible in that image (so about 30 miles from the cam to the continental divide). My office is about 6 miles southwest of that webcam, so a smidge closer to the mountains, but my mountain view is blocked by Davidson Mesa. So, when I'm here at the office the sky is my view...

:)
Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
How far are those mountains in the background?
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 2 Comments: 9676
1227. MrMixon
Clear skies and lots of UFO-style lenticular clouds floating above the Colorado Front Range today. Sorry I don't have photos, I left the camera at home. But check out this webcam:


Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
Quoting MrMixon:


First you reach inside your computer... um... you might want to wear some gloves or something... then pull out the photos... dust them off... and then I recommend thumbtacks to post them to the blog (never tape!), but try to put the thumbtack holes somewhere inconspicuous in case you want to use the photos later.

If you want to do it digitally you'll need to post the photos online somewhere (either post them to your wunderground account, or use a service like photobucket or flickr). Browse to the image, right click the image and click "copy image location", then use the handy image button above the comment box and paste the link into the box that pops up. Click "post comment" and you're done.

:)

LOL at the first part.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5890
1225. MrMixon
Quoting hydrus:
how do you take pics from inside your computer and post them on the blog..?


First you reach inside your computer... um... you might want to wear some gloves or something... then pull out the photos... dust them off... and then I recommend thumbtacks to post them to the blog (never tape!), but try to put the thumbtack holes somewhere inconspicuous in case you want to use the photos later.

If you want to do it digitally you'll need to post the photos online somewhere (either post them to your wunderground account, or use a service like photobucket or flickr). Browse to the image, right click the image and click "copy image location", then use the handy image button above the comment box and paste the link into the box that pops up. Click "post comment" and you're done.

:)
Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
1224. hydrus
Quoting Grothar:


I've got some good ones, too. I have been trying to upload them on the PC but I don't think my camera is compatible.

how do you take pics from inside your computer and post them on the blog..?
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22245
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Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1222. Jax82
Quoting hydrus:
Cool pic...Love that blow up of T-storms over the loop current..


I was going to mention that you can see the loop current feeding the storms. Interesting indeed.
Member Since: September 2, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 1261
1221. hydrus
Quoting Jax82:
Cool pic...Love that blow up of T-storms over the loop current..
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22245
1220. hydrus
Quoting Grothar:


I've got some good ones, too. I have been trying to upload them on the PC but I don't think my camera is compatible.

You bought that off of George Eastman didnt cha..?...
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22245
Quoting jeffs713:

But its not near the radar site. more like 40 miles away. Looks like an outflow boundary, except its not, since there wasn't a storm to produce it.
The distance algorithms don't work well with dew that close...but if what you guys saw was moving substantially, then it prolly wasn't dew.

(I didn't see it and time is short today.)

But, on a good, humid day, watch a long loop in the evening and in the morning. You'll see the clutter appear and dissipate, respectively.

L8R.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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