Hurricanes Igor and Tomas get their names retired

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 8:19 PM GMT on March 27, 2011

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The names Tomas and Igor will no longer be used to name hurricanes in the Atlantic, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) announced this March. Hurricane Igor made landfall near Cape Race, Newfoundland on September 21, 2010, and was that island's most damaging hurricane in 75 years, with $200 million in damage. Hurricane Tomas smashed through the Lesser Antilles Islands on October 30 - 31, 2010, dealing a particularly harsh blow to St. Lucia, where eight died and damage was estimated at $500 million. Tomas also killed 35 people on Haiti, and contributed to a cholera epidemic that killed thousands.


Figure 1. Little Barsway bridge 10 km north of Grand Bank, Newfoundland, after flood waters from Hurricane Igor swept it away. Image credit: George J.B. Rose.


Figure 2. MODIS satellite image of Tropical Storm Tomas taken at 10:30am EDT Saturday October 30, 2010, as the storm began lashing the Lesser Antilles. At the time, Tomas was a Category 1 hurricane with 75 mph winds. Image credit: NASA.

The retirement of hurricane names
The WMO maintains a list of hurricane names for the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific that repeats itself every six years. The names Igor and Tomas in the Atlantic would have appeared again in 2016, but will be replaced by Ian and Tobias. Each spring, the WMO meets to decide if any names should be retired from the list, due to notable death or destruction caused by one of the past season's storms. Any country that is a member of the WMO can request that a name be retired. If a country seriously affected by a hurricane does not request retirement of the name, then the name will not be retired. In the recent past, Mexico, in particular, has been reluctant to request retirement significant storms that have affected them. In 2010, two significant hurricanes affected the country, but Mexico chose not to request retirement of either: Hurricane Alex, which killed twelve people and did $1.5 billion in damage, and Hurricane Karl, which killed 22 and did $206 million in damage. Back in 2005, Mexico also did not request retirement of Hurricane Emily, which made two landfalls in Mexico as a major hurricane, destroying thousands of buildings, but not claiming any lives. A new storm named Emily will appear this year, as we are recycling the names from 2005 that were not retired (2005 holds the record for most retired names, with five.) Probably the best example of a hurricane that did not get its name retired, but deserved to, was Hurricane Gordon of 1994, which killed 1145 people on Haiti. Haiti did not send a representative to the 1995 WMO meeting when retirements for 1994 were decided. Gordon did not affect any other countries strongly enough to motivate them to request retirement, and the name Gordon will be used again in 2012.

Since Atlantic hurricanes began getting women's names in 1953, 76 names have been retired, an average of 1.3 retired names per year. The list includes one tropical storm, Allison of 2001, that caused billions in damage from its heavy rains. The storm with the most appearances so far is Arlene, which has appeared nine times: 1959, 1963, 1967, 1971, 1981, 1987, 1993, 1999, 2005. Arlene will make its tenth appearance this year. One exception to the retirement rule: before 1979, some storm names were simply dropped. For example, in 1966, Fern was substituted for Frieda, and no reason was given. Only three Eastern Pacific hurricanes have had their names retired--Hurricane Ismael of 1995, Hurricane Pauline of 1997, and Hurricane Kenna of 2002. All of these storms hit Mexico.

Cool Katrina animation
A new visualization created by Advanced Visualization Laboratory at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois shows Hurricane Katrina spinning over the Gulf of Mexico during a 36-hour period in August, 2005. The animation is part of a full-length planetarium film called Dynamic Earth screened at the Fulldome UK festival on March 12 - 13. You can see the video at the newscientist.com or DynamicEarth web sites. The video description: Trajectories follow moist air rising into intense "hot tower" thunderstorms, and trace strong winds around the eye wall; rapidly rising air is yellow, sinking air blue. The sun, moon, and stars show the passing of time. The visualization highlights Katrina's awesome power and fierce beauty.

I'll be back with a new post Tuesday or Wednesday.

Jeff Masters

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Oh well. I'm all right, Jack.
And considering the State of Things right now, that's Good.
Hope youall are doing OK too?
Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 24245
Quoting Grothar:


Don't feel bad, fl. I can't get on this site at all.


Clean out your cookies, temp file, and update your OS, browser, and then beverage :)

Then run a full system scan!

This is not the first time I referenced this. That should help curve the issue, hopefully. Cheers!

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Quoting DontAnnoyMe:


Well then, you must be your impostor. lol


Trust me. One of me is enough.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26010
Quoting Grothar:


Don't feel bad, fl. I can't get on this site at all.


Well then, you must be your impostor. lol
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Quoting TampaSpin:


Shazam it just updated.........OMG!...LOL


You must be livin' right!
Member Since: September 11, 2007 Posts: 142 Comments: 16478
Quoting flsky:
EVERY OTHER website I access works just fine. (I sent you a WU mail)


Don't feel bad, fl. I can't get on this site at all.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26010
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
it was 34 here today come on spring where are ya


We turned the fans around on you and blew that cold air back up where it belongs. :)
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TOKYO — Already-grave conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant worsened Sunday with the highest radiation readings yet, compounding both the risks and challenges for workers trying to repair the facility’s cooling system. Leaked water sampled from one unit Sunday was 100,000 times more radioactive than normal background levels — though the Tokyo Electric Power Co., which operates the plant, first calculated an even higher, erroneous, figure that it didn’t correct for several hours.

Tepco apologized Sunday night when it realized the mistake; it had initially reported radiation levels in the leaked water from the unit 2 reactor as being 10 million times higher than normal, which prompted an evacuation of the building.

After the levels were correctly measured, airborne radioactivity in the unit 2 turbine building still remained so high — 1,000 millisieverts per hour — that a worker there would reach his yearly occupational exposure limit in 15 minutes. A dose of 4,000 to 5,000 millisieverts absorbed fairly rapidly will eventually kill about half of those exposed.

The latest confusion in the operation to stave off a full-scale nuclear meltdown at the crippled facility underscores the immense challenges for the several hundred workers in a desperate battle to restart the critical cooling systems. Seventeen workers have been exposed to high levels of radiation, including three who were hospitalized last week, as technicians conducted highly nuanced electrical work in dark conditions that one nuclear industry expert termed “hellish.”

Japanese authorities say efforts to control Fukushima’s overheated reactors will take months and during that time radiation will continue to leak into the environment, extending a nuclear emergency that already ranks as the world’s most serious in a quarter-century. Several hundred workers now shoulder the responsibility for limiting the crisis, amid potentially lethal radiation levels, and on Saturday the chief of Japan’s nuclear agency called on Tepco to improve its worker safety.

Evidence of rising contamination in and around the plant has tempered optimism from one week ago, when engineers began work to restore power to the first of the damaged reactor buildings. Japan’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said Sunday that a new measurement of seawater taken about 1,000 feet from the facility showed an iodine level 1,850.5 times the legal limit, higher than a reading taken the previous day.

The dangers in unit 2 merely add to the growing challenges. Radioactive water is pooling in four of Fukushima’s six turbine rooms and engineers have no quick way to clean it up, although they have begun efforts to do so in unit 1.

While a Tepco spokesperson said Sunday he did not know how the radioactive water was leaking from the reactor cores, Yukio Edano, chief cabinet secretary, said in a televised interview Sunday morning that the reactor itself had not been breached.

He said it was clear that water that could have been inside the unit 3 reactor had leaked, but said the reactor had not been breached. Still, he said that “unfortunately, it seems there is no question that water, which could have been inside the reactor, is leaking.’’

Unlike in newer reactor designs, the older boiling water reactors at Daiichi are pierced by dozens of holes in the bottom of their reactor vessels. Each hole allows one control rod — made of a neutron-absorbing material that quickly stops nuclear fission inside the reactor — to slide into the reactor from below, as happened when the earthquake shook the plant March 11. During normal operations, a graphite stopper covers each hole, sealing in highly radioactive primary cooling water, said Arnie Gundersen, a consultant at Fairewinds Associates with 40 years of experience overseeing boiling water reactors.

But at temperatures above 350 degrees Fahrenheit, the graphite stoppers begin to melt.

“Since it is likely that rubble from the broken fuel rods . . . is collecting at the bottom of the reactor, the seals are being damaged by high temperature or high radiation,” Gundersen said. As the graphite seals fail, water in the reactor will leak into a network of pipes in the containment buildings surrounding each reactor — the very buildings that have been heavily damaged by explosions. Gundersen said that this piping is probably compromised, leaving highly radioactive water to seep from the reactor vessels into broken pipes — and from there into the turbine buildings and beyond.

To stabilize the facility, workers are trying to repair the elaborate cooling system, necessary to keep the reactor cores and spent fuel pools from overheating. But for the moment, they are conducting this work in dark, steamy conditions. Workers must wear respirators, face masks and bulky suits. Nuclear safety experts say they must shift out of the most dangerous areas every 30 minutes to an hour, to prevent radiation overexposure.

Meantime, they’re racing to repair motor pumps the size of automobiles. Their environment resembles a cavern of cables. Some of the equipment was damaged during the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Other equipment has been corroded by saltwater, which was poured into the facility during earlier efforts to cool the reactors.

“To a layman, you’d be scared to death,” said Lake Barrett, a nuclear engineer who directed the cleanup of Three Mile Island. “You’re working with saltwater around your feet. This is not the way electricians usually work.”

The number of workers at the Fukushima plant fluctuates from day to day, ranging between 500 and 1,000. But Tepco employees account for only a part of the labor force. Last Tuesday, for instance, there were 700 people at the plant, a nuclear agency official said. The figure included 500 Tepco employees, 100 subcontracted workers and 100 members of Japan’s Self Defense Forces or the Tokyo Fire Department.

One subcontracted worker who laid cables for new electrical lines March 19 described chaotic conditions and lax supervision that made him nervous. Masataka Hishida said neither he nor the workers around him were given a dosimeter, a device used to measure one’s exposure to radiation. He was surprised that workers were not given special shoes; rather, they were told to put plastic bags over their street shoes. When he was trying on the gas mask for the first time, he said the supervisor told him and other subcontractors, “Listen carefully, I’m only going to say this one time” while explaining how to use it.

When Hishida finished his work shift, an official scanned his whole body for radiation. He came up clean, except for the very tip of his beard. He was sent into a shower where he lathered up and scrubbed his beard. He was tested again and passed.

A few days later, still worried about the extent of his radiation exposure, he trimmed his beard.
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Quoting RastaSteve:


It was 94 here today in C FL!
(Gasp).I didn't know that.Grrr I would've been on here faster than a Jack Rabbit running from a bear.I envy you Floridians,and your 80-90 degree heat,and lemonmade stands....You all might have one this time.BUT well see about that in the coming months(evil luagh).
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Quoting flsky:
86 in Daytona Beach Shores!!!!
it was 34 here today come on spring where are ya
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Quoting flsky:
(I sent you a WU mail)


Didn't get it!

Have you cleared your cache and history?
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Quoting beell:


Kind of an old graphic there, Tim


Shazam it just updated.........OMG!...LOL
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439
Quoting TampaSpin:


SPC also see's that dry line as well as the most pending danger.


Kind of an old graphic there, Tim
Member Since: September 11, 2007 Posts: 142 Comments: 16478
86 in Daytona Beach Shores!!!!
Quoting RastaSteve:


It was 94 here today in C FL!
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Excellent show on MSNBC right now (9pm EDT) about the tsunami.
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I don't know about ya'll but....I'm sure as hell ready for some warm weather!(even though I totally hate spring).
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EVERY OTHER website I access works just fine. (I sent you a WU mail)
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Quoting DontAnnoyMe:


Still need to know what happens with IE.

Also, are other web sites OK with FF4?



My IE is working fine NOW!!
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439
am happy too report that you guys are upgradeing too firefox 4
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Quoting PlazaRed:

59. DARPAsockpuppet

Reality cannot be created or destroyed.

Reality equals the sum of all available information at any given point in time.
Past reality's can be studied and future realities can be merely envisaged.


I like that word you used, "envisage."

You may have left something out if you're speaking of reality as experienced by humans. What's missing is any and each of us will have a different reality at any given moment. That is, my reality differs from yours and sockpuppet's and comanche's and aqua's and on and on because we are individual in character and life experience. Reality is also colored by emotion, or shaded at least. A bunch of computers or robots with identical programming would see a given reality the same way, but not humans. When you look at it that way, individuals do create their own reality.

...

Just took a look at the severe. Also some storms heading out of E OK and ArkLaTex that may increase in intensity. May not be much chance of tornadoes but could turn severe.
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Quoting flsky:
Actually, I'm using Firefox 4. When I first access the site, it shows only text, no graphics. If I reload 3 or times, things show up as they should. If I navigate from the initial page to another, I have to start reloading all over again.


Still need to know what happens with IE.

Also, are other web sites OK with FF4?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


SPC also see's that dry line as well as the most pending danger.
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439
no way

Darpa is really Charlie Sheen?

That explains a LOT

Hey- ya'll central floridians- quit being so GREEDY and send that bright purple stuff up here to Jax

groovy, man
Member Since: August 13, 2005 Posts: 165 Comments: 25849
That dry line stretching over Louisiana and Mississippi is looking very scary.
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439



The Tallahassesse area CAPE is also getting very high!




The Tampa area CAPE is now climbing as well!
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439
Quoting RastaSteve:


Hi Tampa, that disturbance in Arkansas will be the one causes thunderstorms to explode over the eastern Gulf and FL. C FL especially Tampa to Cedar Key better watch out because these storms could get very ugly come daybreak. Also this front appears to wonna stall out over C FL days and could be the focus of maybe 10" of rain across the I-4 corridor by end of business Friday. However S FL may only get just seabreeze storms in the afternoons.


Thanks! Ya i know what your saying. The graphic at post 61 that i posted shows nearly 5 inches of rain over the next 5 days. Days 6-7 could be even worse.
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439
Quoting RastaSteve:


Hi Tampa, that disturbance in Arkansas will be the one causes thunderstorms to explode over the eastern Gulf and FL. C FL especially Tampa to Cedar Key better watch out because these storms could get very ugly come daybreak. Also this front appears to wonna stall out over C FL days and could be the focus of maybe 10" of rain across the I-4 corridor by end of business Friday. However S FL may only get just seabreeze storms in the afternoons.


They're not calling for just seabreeze storms down here, Jeff.
Member Since: October 8, 2008 Posts: 14 Comments: 4553
Actually, I'm using Firefox 4. When I first access the site, it shows only text, no graphics. If I reload 3 or times, things show up as they should. If I navigate from the initial page to another, I have to start reloading all over again.
Quoting DontAnnoyMe:


Assuming that means you sometimes cannot connect to www.wunderground.com, or it takes a long time to connect.

What happens with IE during those times?

If IE works OK, clear your FF cookies, cache, and history.

If IE can't connect either, clear your DNS cache by entering ipconfig /flushdns at the command prompt.



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The CAPE in the New Orleans area is even higher....be careful out there!
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439










This is looking very ugly in my opinion in Mississippi. The CAPE values are very high and the Dry Line is starting to explode. Just my opinion but, looks to be big trouble over nite coming.
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439
Quite profound.
Quoting PlazaRed:

59. DARPAsockpuppet

Reality cannot be created or destroyed.

Reality equals the sum of all available information at any given point in time.
Past reality's can be studied and future realities can be merely envisaged.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439

59. DARPAsockpuppet

Reality cannot be created or destroyed.

Reality equals the sum of all available information at any given point in time.
Past reality's can be studied and future realities can be merely envisaged.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Radiation found in MA.
Link
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Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 178 Comments: 20439
Quoting DontAnnoyMe:


Assuming that means you sometimes cannot connect to www.wunderground.com, or it takes a long time to connect.

What happens with IE during those times?

If IE works OK, clear your FF cookies, cache, and history.

If IE can't connect either, clear your DNS cache by entering ipconfig /flushdns at the command prompt.





That reminds me. I do use OpenDNS, which fixes a lot of problems with DNS lookups and generally manages to make a connection when others can't.
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Quoting twincomanche:


It doesn't go into the environment. It's energy fades.


Apologies,Point, read, marked and learned!

I should have been more specific and stated that if anybody was in the 'vicinity' then they would be on the receiving end of the 'fading' as the energy has to go somewhere as according to physics, it cant be created or destroyed but its very good at passing through things and 'affecting them.'
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Sorry about this - this is certainly NOT weather related, but I just had to share. Hope you like!

http://sorisomail.com/email/74120/mais-uma-projec ao-3d-sensacional.html
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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.