Favorable winds over Japan carrying radioactivity out to sea

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:16 PM GMT on March 16, 2011

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If there is going to be a major nuclear disaster with massive release of radioactivity into the atmosphere from Japan's stricken Fukushima nuclear plant, today would be the best day meteorologically for this to occur. The low pressure system that brought rain and several inches of snow to Japan yesterday has moved northeastwards out to sea, and high pressure is building in. The clockwise flow of air around the high pressure system approaching Japan from the southwest is driving strong northwesterly winds of 10 - 20 mph over the region. These winds will continue through Thursday, and will take radiation particles emitted by the stricken reactors immediately out to sea, without lingering over Japan. Since high pressure systems are regions of sinking air, the radiation will stay close to the ocean surface as the air spirals clockwise over the Pacific. The contaminated air will remain over the ocean for at least five days, which is plenty of time for the radiation to settle out to the surface.


Figure 1. Surface weather map for 8am EDT today, taken from the 6-hour forecast from this morning's 6 UTC run of the GFS model. A high pressure system to the southwest of Japan, in combination with a low pressure system to the northeast are driving strong northwesterly surface winds over the country. Image is from our wundermap with the "Model" layer turned on. The lines are sea-level pressure (blue contours, 4 mb interval) and 1000 to 500 mb thickness (yellow contours, 60 m interval). Thickness is a measure of the temperature of the lower atmosphere, and a thickness of 5400 meters is usually close to where the dividing line between rain and snow occurs.

Thursday night and Friday morning (U.S. time), the high pressure system moves over Japan, allowing winds to weaken and potentially grow calm, increasing the danger of radioactivity building up over regions near and to the north of the nuclear plant. On Friday, the high departs and a moist southwesterly flow of air will affect Japan. These southwesterly winds will blow most of the radiation out to sea, away from Tokyo. Southwesterly winds will continue through Sunday, when the next major low pressure system is expected to bring heavy precipitation to the country. Beginning Thursday night, the sinking airmass over Japan will be replaced a large-scale area of rising air, and any radiation emitted late Thursday through Friday will be carried aloft towards Alaska and eastern Russia by this southwesterly flow of rising air.

Ground-level releases of radioactivity are typically not able to be transported long distances in significant quantities, since most of the material settles to the ground a few kilometers from the source. If there is a major explosion with hot gases that shoots radioactivity several hundred meters high, that would increase the chances for long range transport, since now the ground is farther away, and the particles that start settling out will stay in the air longer before encountering the ground. Additionally, winds are stronger away from ground, due to reduced friction and presence of the jet stream aloft. These stronger winds will transport radioactivity greater distances. I've made trajectory plots for the next three days assuming two possible release altitudes--a surface-based release near 10 meters, which should be the predominant altitude in the current situation, and a higher release altitude of 300 meters, which might occur from an explosion and fire from a Chernobyl-style incident. Given that the radioactivity has to travel 3000 miles to reach Anchorage, Alaska, and 5000 miles to reach California, a very large amount of dilution will occur, along with potential loss due to rain-out. Any radiation at current levels of emission that might reach these places may not even be detectable, much less be a threat to human health. A Chernobyl-level disaster in Japan would certainly be able to produce detectable levels of radiation over North America, but I strongly doubt it would be a significant concern for human health. The Chernobyl disaster only caused dangerous human health impacts within a few hundred miles of the disaster site, and the distance from Japan to North America is ten times farther than that.


Figure 2. Five-day forecast movement of plumes of radioactive air emitted at 10 meters altitude (red line) and 300 meters (blue line) at 18 UTC (2pm EDT) Wednesday, March 16, 2011 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The plumes spiral clockwise around the high pressure system to the southwest of Japan and stay near the surface. Images created using NOAA's HYSPLIT trajectory model.


Figure 3. Five-day forecast movement of plumes of radioactive air emitted at 10 meters altitude (red line) and 300 meters (blue line) at 18 UTC (2pm EDT) Thursday, March 17, 2011 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The plumes initially spiral clockwise around the high pressure system to the southwest of Japan and stay near the surface. By Saturday, though, the plumes get caught in a southwesterly flow of air in advance of an approaching low pressure system. Ascending air lifts the plumes to high altitudes, where winds are stronger and rapid long-range transport occurs. Images created using NOAA's HYSPLIT trajectory model.


Figure 4. Five-day forecast movement of plumes of radioactive air emitted at 10 meters altitude (red line) and 300 meters (blue line) at 18 UTC (2pm EDT) Friday, March 18, 2011 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The plumes get caught in a southwesterly flow of air in advance of an approaching low pressure system. The plume emitted near the surface (red line) stays trapped near the surface, but the plume emitted at 300 meters is lifted to 3.5 km altitude by the rising air associated with the approaching low pressure system. Images created using NOAA's HYSPLIT trajectory model.

Resources
Seven-day weather forecast for Sendai near the Fukushima nuclear plant

The Austrian Weather Service is running trajectory models for Japan.

Current radar loops from the Japan Meteorological Agency

Rare subtropical cyclone forms near Brazil
An unusual low pressure system that came close to becoming a tropical storm is in the South Atlantic, a few hundred miles east of the coast of Brazil. The Brazilian Navy Hydrographic Center has officially named the system Subtropical Storm "Arani", but I'm not sure the low would have been named by NHC, since Arani has somewhat of a loose circulation and limited heavy thunderstorm activity. The storm is expected to move slowly eastward out to sea, and does not pose a threat to South America. The latest run of the GFDL model shows little development of Arani, and the storm is now encountering a frontal system, which is bringing 20 - 30 knots of wind shear. It is unlikely that Arani will become a tropical storm. Some runs of the GFDL last weekend were predicting Arani would intensify into a Category 3 hurricane; that's the first time I've even seen such a prediction for a South Atlantic storm. The metsul.com blog has more info on Arani, for those of you who read Portugese.


Figure 5. During the daytime on Tuesday 15 March 2011 at 1820 UTC the TRMM satellite flew over a rare cyclone labeled Arani in the South Atlantic. Arani had the appearance of a tropical cyclone but has been classified as a subtropical cyclone. NOAA's Satellite and Information Service classified Arani as a T1 on the Dvorak intensity scale which would indicate an estimated wind speed of about 29 kt (~33 mph). TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data were used in the image above to show rainfall near Arani. Image credit: NASA.

Jeff Masters

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The first atomic bomb to be detonated at Bikini was code-named "Able", a bomb similar in most respects to "Fat Man," which was dropped on Nagasaki. The B-29 designated to drop Able was named "Dave's Dream," and on July 1, 1946, at about 8:45 AM, the first peacetime detonation of a nuclear ordnance occurred. Of the animals left on board the ships at anchor in Bikini Lagoon, approximately 10% died instantly. The Naval vessels managed to withstand the blast for the most part, but many were destroyed during Test "Baker" on July 25. In the coming years, some twenty additional bomb tests would be conducted before the United States government officially returned control of the islands over to their natives in 1969. The largest test, Castle Bravo, also proved to be a large radiation fallout disaster: ashes from the explosion flew miles into inhabited islands, putting nuclear fallout into the public minds of many.

[edit] The AftermathShortly after the announcement that the islands were safe, a group of the native people left their makeshift home to return to Bikini, but were evacuated ten years later after developing radiation poisoning from Cesium-137, (some sources also state Strontium-90), a remnant of the radioactive fallout. As of 2009, the islands remain uninhabitable, and many of the displaced natives now reside in the Carolines and Marshall Islands in the Western Pacific; also some live in California, and in Nevada.

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662. N3EG
Quoting Orcasystems:


Not sure.. I know it was decommissioned when they found out.. after the fact.. that they actually built it ON the fault line.


Satsop. Link
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United States - (Nuclear Testing Sites) 1,054 tests by official count (involving at least 1,151 devices, 331 atmospheric tests), most at Nevada Test Site and the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands, with 10 other tests taking place at various locations in the United States, including Amchitka Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, and New Mexico
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Quoting twincomanche:


Portland General Electric started up the Trojan 1095 MWe 4 Loop Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor in May 1976. The reactor operated until November 1992, when the facility was shutdown due to the cost associated with replacing the 4 steam generators.

This one?


Not sure.. I know it was decommissioned when they found out.. after the fact.. that they actually built it ON the fault line.
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Quoting TampaSpin:
Extreme Super Moon coming March 19th


OMG - This hasn't happened in in in in 19 years!!!!!! ;)
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Quoting SquallyWx:
What exactly is the radiation doing to the ocean? Is seafood being impacted?


Everybody seems to forget all the nuclear testing done in the Pacific prior to 1963. Nobody gives it a thought these days. Alamagordo is a tourist destination.

I suppose the fallout shelter should be an in thing again. Ever been in one? I remember two from my childhood. There were people who actually built those things back then.

Most radiation is easily detectable and thereby avoided.
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Quoting twincomanche:

From the article:
"Health and nuclear experts emphasize that radiation in the plume will be diluted as it travels and, at worst, would have extremely minor health consequences in the United States, even if hints of it are ultimately detectable. In a similar way, radiation from the Chernobyl disaster in 1986 spread around the globe and reached the West Coast of the United States in 10 days, its levels measurable but minuscule."


We have nothing to worry about... every NBCD plotting course I ever took tells me that there is absolutely no way that harmful radiation can make it here from there... even if it had been a ground burst 2 MT Nuc.
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Link

a 6.5 earthquake
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Quoting Neapolitan:
After reading a lot from different seismologists, I am becoming a bit more concerned about the possibility of


If that happens, check the Nuclear plants that can be compromised...

Link

Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9882
Orca - Wow, 4 on Vancouver Island???

How many are there along the coast of CA??

Anyone know?

648.

Kendall said there are four federally run sites on Vancouver Island and one in the Lower Mainland that continuously sample for radiation and data can also be drawn from other international stations in the Pacific at islands like Guam.
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647. Neapolitan 3:24 AM GMT on March 17, 2011

We are also in the zone for our Big one..
There is a decommissioned Plant right on the fault line also (trying to remember the name, looking it up)

Earthquake timing

The last known great earthquake in the northwest was in January 1700, the Cascadia Earthquake. Geological evidence indicates that great earthquakes may have occurred at least seven times in the last 3,500 years, suggesting a return time of 300 to 600 years. There is also evidence of accompanying tsunamis with every earthquake, and one line of evidence for these earthquakes is tsunami damage, and through Japanese records of tsunamis.[9]

A future rupture of the Cascadia Subduction Zone would cause widespread destruction throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Other similar subduction zones in the world usually have such earthquakes every 100 to 200 years; the longer interval here may indicate unusually large stress buildup and subsequent unusually large earthquake slip.[citation needed]
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Scientists Project Path of Radiation Plume
By WILLIAM J. BROAD
Published: March 16, 2011

A United Nations forecast of the possible movement of the radioactive plume coming from crippled Japanese reactors shows it churning across the Pacific and touching the Aleutian Islands on Thursday before hitting Southern California late Friday.
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Officials see no risk to B.C. from Japanese radiation

By Jeff Nagel - BC Local News
Published: March 16, 2011 4:00 PM
Updated: March 16, 2011 4:37 PM

Public health officials are trying to calm fears that B.C. residents may become contaminated by radiation carried here from the nuclear disaster underway in Japan.

The B.C. Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) said Wednesday no abnormal radiation levels have so far been detected by an international network of monitoring sites put in place along the entire West Coast in the wake of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident.

"We do not expect any health risk following the nuclear reactor releases in Japan," said provincial health officer Dr. Perry Kendall.

That hasn't stopped some people from snapping up supplies of potassium iodide tablets, which can be used to neutralize the harmful effects of radioactive iodine, including thyroid cancer.

BCCDC officials said the potassium iodide tablets would only help people exposed to higher levels of radiation within 30 kilometres of the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, where explosions or coolant failures at multiple reactors threaten to cause a meltdown.

Kendall urged pharmacies not to dispense or stockpile the pills after an apparent run on them by spooked shoppers.

Even if there is a major release of radiation into the atmosphere from northeast Japan, Kendall said the particles would be so widely dispersed on their five- to six-day jet stream trip to North America that it's unlikely they could pose a health risk.

"All the scenarios say that for us, because of the distance we are away, no they would not be posing a significant health risk to British Columbians."

He cautioned against comparing Chernobyl, where the reactor fuel burned and sent large amounts of long-lasting radiation across Europe, to the Japanese reactors, which have containment facilities and are less likely to release large amounts of long-lasting radioactive isotopes.

Metro Vancouver Board Chair Lois Jackson said she wants a better picture of the potential threat in a worst-case scenario after the issue was raised at a meeting of the region's mayors Wednesday morning.

"The outcome of a disaster of this sort could be very widespread," she said. "The cloud rises up into the jet stream and what goes up must come down.

"My concern is that we are kept up to date honestly so we're not as a nation scrambling if the worst was to happen."

Jackson wants to find out from the federal government precisely where and how many radiation monitoring stations are located in B.C.

"It's concerning to me that we don't have that information."

Neither Metro Vancouver's air quality monitoring network nor the provincial government have any capability to measure wind-borne radiation that could come across the Pacific if nuclear reactors in Japan melt down.

Air quality planning manager Roger Quan said Metro monitors various types of pollutants at stations across the Lower Mainland, but they aren't equipped to detect radiation.

Kendall said there are four federally run sites on Vancouver Island and one in the Lower Mainland that continuously sample for radiation and data can also be drawn from other international stations in the Pacific at islands like Guam.

SFU nuclear chemist Jean-Claude Brodovitch said he agrees with Kendall's assessment of the risks, adding there is no sign of radiation reaching B.C.

"We have our own equipment we monitor with and we haven't seen anything," he said.

Although small amounts of radioactive iodine were detected in plants such as seaweed off the North American coast after Chernobyl, Brodovitch said that doesn't equate to any significant human risk.

"There could be transportation of some dust in the atmosphere," he said. "But when it gets around the globe it's extremely diluted. After 7,000 kilometres, it would not be a real concern."

Asked about the potential that radiation could enter the food chain, potentially via contaminated crops, Brodovitch said that was a possibility, but only in Japan and the local area around it.

"If there's deposition in the ocean, there would be some impact on seafood," added Kendall, who predicted authorities will be vigilant about protecting Canadian consumers.

"We're going to see a lot of monitoring of foodstuffs in areas around the plume and in the ocean," he said. "But that's a longer-term concern."
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After reading a lot from different seismologists, I am becoming a bit more concerned about the possibility of a so-called Tokai earthquake. These are major quakes--8.0 and higher--that have hit the Tokyo area roughly every 100 to 150 years. Such quakes occurred in:

--684 8.3MM
--887 (203 years later) 8.5MM
--1096 (209) 8.4MM
--1361 (265) 8.5MM
--1498 (137) 8.4MM
--1605 (106) 7.9MM
--1707 (102) 8.4MM
--1854 (147) 8.4MM

That is, of course, an average period of 167 years. And 167 years, as you'll see, from 1854 is 2021 (but note that the period has been shortening as of late. Now, the aftershocks from last week's quake have been slowly shifting southward, so many seismologists are publicly restating the official forecast that calls for a 30% chance of a 7.5 or larger quake in the region in the next 30 years. In private and off the record, however, some are saying they would not be the least bit surprised to see such a thing happen within the next few months or even weeks. And, of course, an 8.4 or 8.5 in or near Tokyo would be extremely devastating, likely killing tens of thousands, causing property damage in the hundreds of billions of dollars, and--perhaps worst of all--plunging Japan into unsustainable economic chaos, which could very well drag our fragile global economic recovery down with it.

Here's a page showing various tsunami animations in the event of a Tokai quake. And here's a page decrying nuclear power plants in Japan at risk because of a Tokai quake. Of particular interest was this passage: "We must also consider it could be the large-scale cooling-water loss which results in a nuclear core meltdown and container destruction". Sound familiar?

Anyway, food for thought. But here are two takeaways:

1) There will be an extremely catastrophic earthquake in the Tokyo area within the next 30 to 50 years.

2) Nuclear power as currently used and regulated is potential mass suicide.
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News Canada
Radiation threat thwarts Canadian medics in Japan

By RICHARD ZUSSMAN, QMI Agency

Last Updated: March 16, 2011 9:31pm



VANCOUVER – A threat of radiation in Japan following last week’s earthquake has forced a Canadian Medical Assistance Team to come back home.

The five-member team, plus two American counterparts, arrived at the Vancouver airport Wednesday morning after spending three days stuck in Tokyo.

The early departure came because the team wasn’t equipped to work in a medical emergency.

“The emotional part came with leaving early,” said team member Kevin Sanford. “We were really disappointed we had to leave, but it was a safety factor with our team.”

The team’s job was to travel to the areas affected by the quake and tsunami and report back to North America to co-ordinate further volunteer efforts.

“We got a lot done over there. We made a lot of contacts,” said CMAT paramedic Ryan Thorburn. “The insertion of the second team will go a lot further. The three days we were working will make it three days less for them.”

The non-governmental organization has the capability to work in high radiation areas, but didn’t bring the right gear for the trip.

“When things calm down in terms of how the nuclear situation goes, we will perhaps redeploy,” paramedic Kelly Kaley said. “Hopefully, we can get a medical team in there to do work on the affected area.”
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Quoting twincomanche:


Well then they are not likely to win the World Series are they?


Pretty sure it went over his head...
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Quoting Orcasystems:


My point exactly.. glad you noticed.. ain't gonna happen :)


Nice cover up..........LOL
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Quoting TampaSpin:


Not sure you know your Sports since the BUCS don't play baseball........ROFLMAO


My point exactly.. glad you noticed.. ain't gonna happen :)
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Quoting Orcasystems:


Just as likely as the Bucs winning the World series this season


Not sure you know your Sports since the BUCS don't play baseball........ROFLMAO
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
In Haiti, before the earthquake, many people slept under a roof, with their loved ones; they ate what they could buy with the money that was send from any family member in the US, France or any other country.
But most people had no electricity, no water, no bathroom (a hole in the backyard, if you had one), no equitative distribution of government and social resources, corruption, police & military abuse, Cholera, other plagues, and so on.

After the quake
, many people lost their loved ones, their homes; and they still eat with whatever they can buy with the money that is sent from any family member in the US, France or any other country.
Most of them have no roof, no electricity, no water, no bathroom , no equitative distribution of government and social resources, looting, corruption, police & military abuse, an extra amount of Cholera, other plagues, and so on.

The Dow Jones, The oil prices and global economy barely felt the quake. There was no Nuclear contamination. There were No technological devices and high tech automoviles floating in the Tsunami. There was NO injection of money to banks to maintain the economy and make the stocks look good...

And now here is Japan...

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Quoting Ossqss:

Some thoughts for ya, prior to exit ;)

The US has not allowed many new plants over the last several decades. (China has 28 under construction right now, 40% of those world wide)

20% of the US electricity comes from Nuke plants as of today.

The plant in Japan was over 40 years old and is similar to most of the US planta in construction methodology and age.

Now the questions from the basic, but much deeper available info referenced.

Are we:

Putting ourselves in more danger of the same problem by inhibiting the construction of new plants to replace the old?

Providing a path for more use of Oil, coal and gas power plants as we move forward?

Bringing to the forefront the inability of current alternative energy resources to stand in for that of which we all benefit from.

Like it or not, what has happened recently, will impact us for decades.

Someone will have to Show me how to live soon!

Gnight>>>>>>

I hear and understand everything you are saying. Your questions are very valid questions. There is one question that remains to be answered and it is the question I have always asked. What do you do with the spent fuel rods? These do not become safe in 3 weeks, 3 months, or even 3 years. They have to be kept in the cooling ponds for 6-10 years before they are even cool enough to handle. They remain a radioactive hazard for a 1,000 years? Someone correct me, if this is wrong.

Set aside any and all of the close calls and the known disasters the nuclear industry has suffered. Let us say they have a clean slate. What do you do with the spent fuel rods? When this question can be reasonably answered I will help build the reactors with a pick and shovel.

Gnight,
Ossqss. I think we all need some rest now.






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Quoting TampaSpin:
Extreme Super Moon To Cause Major Earthquakes?
March 8, 2011 in Disasters & Extreme Weather, Earthquakes.



Check out the date of this article before the Big Quake........Could the Moon have caused this? MAYBE


Just as likely as the Bucs winning the World series this season
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Quite an interview in CNN. Anderson Cooper is calling out Noriyuki Shikata on the handling of and the mis information they are giving the public. Quite interesting.
Member Since: August 7, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1957
"A Chernobyl-level disaster in Japan would certainly be able to produce detectable levels of radiation over North America, but I strongly doubt it would be a significant concern for human health."

I/we certainly hope you're correct that that would be the worst possible outcome, however what about the impact on crops?
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Quoting Patrap:
Bill O'Reilly is the "Expert" on the Moon and Tides,,I'll check with Him maybe.


Maybe you should....didn't know he said anything about the moon!
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448

Bill O'Reilly is the "Expert" on the Moon and Tides,,I'll check with Him maybe.


Supermoon: Yet Another Alarmist Theory Debunked by Logic
March 13, 2011 12:05 PM EDT



"Bad Moon Rising" might be a theme song for the latest super scare rumors flying around about a supermoon. Astrologer Richard Nolle takes credit for the latest internet frenzy, telling people to prepare themselves for increases in tidal surges, earthquakes, and volcanic activity. Why? Because the moon will be closer to Earth than it has been in the past 18 years. Here we go again.

Peter Goldreich disagrees, using of all things, "conclusive evidence" as his reasoning. The professor for the Astronomy and Planetary Science Department at Caltech says there is none.

The idea is that the strain builds up in the Earth until only a small little bit of extra gravitational force could tip it over and cause an earthquake, and this could come from the moon. But there's been no absolutely no correlation for that.

Another NASA executive, Gordon Johnston also is skeptical of the dire predictions. He hopes people don't take everything they hear as gospel. In a Fox News interview, Johnston says the moon is a bit closer, but the March 19 event will be cosmetic, looking bigger and brighter.

Nolle points to past events that have occurred within the "risk windows" he had established. His reverse study seems a bit weak, but many who latch on to these catastrophic theories don't need much confirmation. It may also be a little late to start planning for the supermoon super ruse, so let's just sit back and enjoy the show.
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Extreme Super Moon To Cause Major Earthquakes?
March 8, 2011 in Disasters & Extreme Weather, Earthquakes.



Check out the date of this article before the Big Quake........Could the Moon have caused this? MAYBE

Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
Quoting GeoffreyWPB:


And "ONE" astrologer believes it could inflict massive damage on the planet.



Sheesh :(
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#
0301: As we know choppers resumed water drops on the plant today. Defence Minister Toshimi Kitazawa approved the operation as the radiation level was 4.13 millisievert per hour at an altitude of 1,000 feet, Kyodo reports.
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Quoting TampaSpin:
Extreme Super Moon coming March 19th


And "ONE" astrologer believes it could inflict massive damage on the planet.

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Extreme Super Moon coming March 19th
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
Some thoughts for ya, prior to exit ;)

The US has not allowed many new plants over the last several decades. (China has 28 under construction right now, 40% of those world wide)

20% of the US electricity comes from Nuke plants as of today. 124 or so I think.

The plant in Japan was over 40 years old and is similar to most of the US plants in construction methodology and age.

Now the questions from the basic, but much deeper available info referenced.

Are we:

Putting ourselves in more danger of the same problem by inhibiting the construction of new plants (Edit - which have much more stringent standards) to replace the old?

Providing a path for more use of Oil, coal and gas power plants as we move forward?

Bringing to the forefront the inability of current alternative energy resources to stand in for that of which we all benefit from.

Like it or not, what has happened recently, will impact us for decades.

Someone will have to Show me how to live soon!

Gnight>>>>>>

PS, did you know the reason the hardened back up power generators for the Japan plants were stopped by their fuel tanks disappearing? Check it.





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Quoting presslord:


we got a feeler today about possibly helping with some medical supplies...working through logistics, finances, etc.

Way to go Paul.
Time is of the essence!
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11410
re: post 617

I believe the term is biomagnification - for each step up the food chain, the concentration increases an order of magnitude. so if the grass is contaminated at 1 ppm, and the cow eats a steady diet of grass, then the cow ends up with a concentration of 10 ppm. then the people that eat a steady diet of cow meat (or drink milk in this case), they end up with a concentration of 100 ppm. At least that is my understanding of how it works, but i am not an expert.

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Joe Bastardi's New Spot Video on weathebell.com

"The Atmospheric Avenger"
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Why countries go to war

Countries go to war for numerous reasons. It is almost inevitable that countries will end up at war at some point in history. Conflicts over resources such as food, minerals, or other needs result in war. Religous and ideological differences can escalate into war. Land itself can cause nations to war as space is needed. Sometimes those in power are simply greedy and what it all.

One of the major reasons for wars is resources. One country holds all the chips, or at least more of the chips. Sometimes a nation is in desperate need of food or say oil. The country holding the food or oil is not cooperating. They want too much or want submission for what they hold. This can cause the needy country to see no alternative but to take what they need instead of barter. In the potentially troublesome times ahead with global warming and oil dependance these conflicts will once again return in full force.
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Quoting Chicklit:
Not long ago we were sweating the Deepwater fiasco and now this.
I feel very sorry for the Japanese.
So much to bear in less than a week.
And still no end in sight for any of the disasters.
Was listening to a doctor on NPR this afternoon who said that soon their critical medical supplies would run out. We know the food is disappearing off the shelves. And further, is the harsh cruelty of radiation poisoning in a land already familiar with its effects.
It cannot get much worse in so many ways that I look forward to turning the corner and seeing things get better.


we got a feeler today about possibly helping with some medical supplies...working through logistics, finances, etc.
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Thats my visit for tonight everyone. Hopefully Japan, New Zealand and so many other places struggling with adversity will begin to make headway that is positive.

Soon we will be turning our attention to the 2011 season and maybe neutral conditions for ENSO which would not be good. Ah well, that's for another day.

Good night all
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Quoting SquallyWx:
What exactly is the radiation doing to the ocean? Is seafood being impacted?


I read about concerns in relation to the Japanese oyster trade with the US being at risk. All depends how much of what type of radioactive material gets into the environment and the food chain. Drinking milk from cows that eat contaminated grass is a good example.
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Not long ago we were sweating the Deepwater fiasco and now this.
I feel very sorry for the Japanese.
So much to bear in less than a week.
And still no end in sight for any of the disasters.
Was listening to a doctor on NPR this afternoon who said that soon their critical medical supplies would run out. We know the food is disappearing off the shelves. And further, is the harsh cruelty of radiation poisoning in a land already familiar with its effects.
It cannot get much worse in so many ways that I look forward to turning the corner and seeing things get better.
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11410
Quoting pottery:

Indeed!
Historic Time, right now.
And no end in the near future, with any of it.
All seems reasonably quiet here, though...
Keeping well. Hope you and yours are too.


Funny thing about living on a small island,things seem pretty calm most days. All is well here. Who could think of complaining when you could be getting shot at in search of democracy or freezing cold without food or shelter with no expectation of rescue any time soon.
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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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