Favorable winds over Japan carrying radioactivity out to sea

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:16 PM GMT on March 16, 2011

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If there is going to be a major nuclear disaster with massive release of radioactivity into the atmosphere from Japan's stricken Fukushima nuclear plant, today would be the best day meteorologically for this to occur. The low pressure system that brought rain and several inches of snow to Japan yesterday has moved northeastwards out to sea, and high pressure is building in. The clockwise flow of air around the high pressure system approaching Japan from the southwest is driving strong northwesterly winds of 10 - 20 mph over the region. These winds will continue through Thursday, and will take radiation particles emitted by the stricken reactors immediately out to sea, without lingering over Japan. Since high pressure systems are regions of sinking air, the radiation will stay close to the ocean surface as the air spirals clockwise over the Pacific. The contaminated air will remain over the ocean for at least five days, which is plenty of time for the radiation to settle out to the surface.


Figure 1. Surface weather map for 8am EDT today, taken from the 6-hour forecast from this morning's 6 UTC run of the GFS model. A high pressure system to the southwest of Japan, in combination with a low pressure system to the northeast are driving strong northwesterly surface winds over the country. Image is from our wundermap with the "Model" layer turned on. The lines are sea-level pressure (blue contours, 4 mb interval) and 1000 to 500 mb thickness (yellow contours, 60 m interval). Thickness is a measure of the temperature of the lower atmosphere, and a thickness of 5400 meters is usually close to where the dividing line between rain and snow occurs.

Thursday night and Friday morning (U.S. time), the high pressure system moves over Japan, allowing winds to weaken and potentially grow calm, increasing the danger of radioactivity building up over regions near and to the north of the nuclear plant. On Friday, the high departs and a moist southwesterly flow of air will affect Japan. These southwesterly winds will blow most of the radiation out to sea, away from Tokyo. Southwesterly winds will continue through Sunday, when the next major low pressure system is expected to bring heavy precipitation to the country. Beginning Thursday night, the sinking airmass over Japan will be replaced a large-scale area of rising air, and any radiation emitted late Thursday through Friday will be carried aloft towards Alaska and eastern Russia by this southwesterly flow of rising air.

Ground-level releases of radioactivity are typically not able to be transported long distances in significant quantities, since most of the material settles to the ground a few kilometers from the source. If there is a major explosion with hot gases that shoots radioactivity several hundred meters high, that would increase the chances for long range transport, since now the ground is farther away, and the particles that start settling out will stay in the air longer before encountering the ground. Additionally, winds are stronger away from ground, due to reduced friction and presence of the jet stream aloft. These stronger winds will transport radioactivity greater distances. I've made trajectory plots for the next three days assuming two possible release altitudes--a surface-based release near 10 meters, which should be the predominant altitude in the current situation, and a higher release altitude of 300 meters, which might occur from an explosion and fire from a Chernobyl-style incident. Given that the radioactivity has to travel 3000 miles to reach Anchorage, Alaska, and 5000 miles to reach California, a very large amount of dilution will occur, along with potential loss due to rain-out. Any radiation at current levels of emission that might reach these places may not even be detectable, much less be a threat to human health. A Chernobyl-level disaster in Japan would certainly be able to produce detectable levels of radiation over North America, but I strongly doubt it would be a significant concern for human health. The Chernobyl disaster only caused dangerous human health impacts within a few hundred miles of the disaster site, and the distance from Japan to North America is ten times farther than that.


Figure 2. Five-day forecast movement of plumes of radioactive air emitted at 10 meters altitude (red line) and 300 meters (blue line) at 18 UTC (2pm EDT) Wednesday, March 16, 2011 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The plumes spiral clockwise around the high pressure system to the southwest of Japan and stay near the surface. Images created using NOAA's HYSPLIT trajectory model.


Figure 3. Five-day forecast movement of plumes of radioactive air emitted at 10 meters altitude (red line) and 300 meters (blue line) at 18 UTC (2pm EDT) Thursday, March 17, 2011 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The plumes initially spiral clockwise around the high pressure system to the southwest of Japan and stay near the surface. By Saturday, though, the plumes get caught in a southwesterly flow of air in advance of an approaching low pressure system. Ascending air lifts the plumes to high altitudes, where winds are stronger and rapid long-range transport occurs. Images created using NOAA's HYSPLIT trajectory model.


Figure 4. Five-day forecast movement of plumes of radioactive air emitted at 10 meters altitude (red line) and 300 meters (blue line) at 18 UTC (2pm EDT) Friday, March 18, 2011 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The plumes get caught in a southwesterly flow of air in advance of an approaching low pressure system. The plume emitted near the surface (red line) stays trapped near the surface, but the plume emitted at 300 meters is lifted to 3.5 km altitude by the rising air associated with the approaching low pressure system. Images created using NOAA's HYSPLIT trajectory model.

Resources
Seven-day weather forecast for Sendai near the Fukushima nuclear plant

The Austrian Weather Service is running trajectory models for Japan.

Current radar loops from the Japan Meteorological Agency

Rare subtropical cyclone forms near Brazil
An unusual low pressure system that came close to becoming a tropical storm is in the South Atlantic, a few hundred miles east of the coast of Brazil. The Brazilian Navy Hydrographic Center has officially named the system Subtropical Storm "Arani", but I'm not sure the low would have been named by NHC, since Arani has somewhat of a loose circulation and limited heavy thunderstorm activity. The storm is expected to move slowly eastward out to sea, and does not pose a threat to South America. The latest run of the GFDL model shows little development of Arani, and the storm is now encountering a frontal system, which is bringing 20 - 30 knots of wind shear. It is unlikely that Arani will become a tropical storm. Some runs of the GFDL last weekend were predicting Arani would intensify into a Category 3 hurricane; that's the first time I've even seen such a prediction for a South Atlantic storm. The metsul.com blog has more info on Arani, for those of you who read Portugese.


Figure 5. During the daytime on Tuesday 15 March 2011 at 1820 UTC the TRMM satellite flew over a rare cyclone labeled Arani in the South Atlantic. Arani had the appearance of a tropical cyclone but has been classified as a subtropical cyclone. NOAA's Satellite and Information Service classified Arani as a T1 on the Dvorak intensity scale which would indicate an estimated wind speed of about 29 kt (~33 mph). TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data were used in the image above to show rainfall near Arani. Image credit: NASA.

Jeff Masters

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115. DDR
A weak moisture surge continues to pass through Trinidad/north eastern Venezuela,had some heavy rain a while ago amounting to half inch from around 6 am to now.
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dunno if this link got posted or not, but here it is again from last blog. well worth a watch

back to cleaning ...

Quoting WatchingThisOne:


Here is a 17-minute clip that gives a very good overview of the spent fuel rod pool problem. Rachel Maddow interviews Frank von Hippel (sp?) of Princeton. He knows about these things and has some sobering things to say. I recommend it.

msnbc: The Spent Fuel Rod Pool Problem ... it's a big one
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Possibility of increased radiation levels being measured in Alaska, still waiting for it to be confirmed.

Member Since: July 5, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1347
Quoting Floodman:


The water (most of it) is going into the slosh system for the coolant. A good deal of it is turning into steam and either collecting inside the enclosure and precipitating or, in the even of the reactors whose enclosures have been damaged or destroyed, the steam is moving into the atmosphere and going wherever the prevailing winds carry it.

As for "water fallout" the radioactive particles are carried on the current and dispersed. In the event of heavy particulates, they will precipitate and sink to the bottom. The rest will slowly disperse along the current and drop out over time.



Most is being evaporated....,but i wonder if a strong magnetic field is also developing when salt water is mixed in as well.....the Salt deposits gotta be reacting somehow.......
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
From Rob, our Navy WU-member

60. Spetrm 9:14 AM PDT on March 16, 2011
Good evening all, another busy night going on for me now.

At least now were getting in to a rythm as far as forecasting the weather around the HA/DR area. As far as the radiation, winds are out of the NW and looks like it is going to stay that way for the next 72hrs.

I know a lot of stuff as far as supplies and non-such is getting transported ashore from all the varios ships in the regions. Thus the U.S is having a decent hand in the recovery efforts. But Japan is a first world country and they really are taking the lead on the relief efforts.

With that said, I am pulling my wife and son out of the country, told the wife to catch a flight down to manilla, she has some family and friends there, thus will have her stay there until the situation gets better back home.

From her reports, gas is running out repeatedly, food is in short supply and rolling black outs are not helping on top of that. So would be better just to get the family out of that.

As for me, some rough seas made life a little miserable the last two days, another cold surge really kicked it up out here. Infidoll I'm around your region there so I'm sure you can confirm the cold northerly winds.

I know that will be a big concern for the people up north as well, we have snow in the fcst today and through out the week the cold northwesterlys. Hopefully they can get some heat turned on up there for the people with out it.

Any how stay safe out there everyone, thanks for the support and please if there is anything you can do to help the people out in Japan, I strongly suggest doing it.

Rob
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U.S. Navy sailors load supplies onto an HH-60H Seahawk helicopter aboard the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan in the Pacific Ocean, March 14, 2011. The sailors are assigned to Anti-Submarine Squadron 4. U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Kyle Carlstrom


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U.S. Forces Continue Relief Efforts in Japan
Department of Defense Photo Essay



A fishing boat crashes against a building after being swept ashore during a massive tsunami that hit theJapanese fishing port of Ofunato, Japan, March 15, 2011. The town was devastated by an 8.9-magnitude earthquake that triggered the destructive tsunami. U.S. service members have been assisting in relief efforts in the country. U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Matthew Bradley

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Radiation levels were off the scale for a brief time yesterday

DAYS JAPAN (translated)
>>
March 15, 2011
Radiation measurements around here - 16:10 Hukushima nuclear emergency;
30km%u3001 Either by wind, 30km away from short while, Measured values were very high.


Date City, Fukushima Prefecture, 16:10 Tsukitate Tsukidatemachi now [50-gun Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture Hutaba ~ 60km point;
6mRg/h/h 6mRg / h (mm x-ray) microsievert 60 %u2252 / h


16%uFF1A30 Current Village, Fukushima Prefecture - 16:30 Iidate approximately Hutaba gun Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Fukushima Prefecture, 50km point;
10mRg/h 10mRg / h (mm x-ray) microsievert 100 %u2252 / h Reta not be measured because the sensor can detect the needle detectors


From the local river is wide,
Local people were around to convey the dangers of staying, and the results of measurements, are urged to evacuate, 20km - 30km. The current evacuation instruction within 20km, 30km walking indoors evacuation recommendation is very dangerous.
As soon as possible, giving priority to child pregnancy, should be received reports of the evacuation.
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Quoting Grothar:


Could never part with it. Charlie Chaplin thought I was wasting my money.


Charlie was really drunk at the time though...remember? He and Arbuckle had drunk all that sake
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If half of those 8,606 people are alive that would still be another 4,303 dead to the already total of 4,314 currently
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Quoting MrMixon:
Fascinating video, Grothar. Thanks. Some of those scenes look all too similar to the more recent images out of Japan...



Glad you liked it. Must have been a terrible tragedy. There were other videos on that link. They also had a tsunami I believe.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26825
Quoting sunlinepr:
Where is all that contaminated Sea Water being stored?...
In the Pacific for sure...

Where are those currents heading?
How does water fallout behaves??


The water (most of it) is going into the slosh system for the coolant. A good deal of it is turning into steam and either collecting inside the enclosure and precipitating or, in the even of the reactors whose enclosures have been damaged or destroyed, the steam is moving into the atmosphere and going wherever the prevailing winds carry it.

As for "water fallout" the radioactive particles are carried on the current and dispersed. In the event of heavy particulates, they will precipitate and sink to the bottom. The rest will slowly disperse along the current and drop out over time.
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4,314 dead, 8,606 missing
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Quoting Floodman:


Yes you did...


i believe i seen one post where Gro was saying you was the the eldest and wisest on the blog...:)
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
Quoting NRAamy:
Grothar... you need to take that camera to Las Vegas, to the pawn shop on "Pawn Stars".... it's probably worth more than Charles Nelson Riley's glasses....


Could never part with it. Charlie Chaplin thought I was wasting my money.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26825
Quoting P451:


You can pretty much just call the EQ ... GODZILLA.

And if you think about it perhaps those movies are related to (based on) the EQs themselves. They just use the characters (creatures attacking cities) to portray the events (EQs and Tsunamis)

Just a thought. Probably a wrong one lol.


hey look, someone else thought the same thing, i googled it:

Link
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The death toll in Japan stands at 4,314 as of midnight Wednesday, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters. At least 8,606 people were missing and 2,282 injured, officials said.

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Quoting sunlinepr:
Where is all that contaminated Sea Water being stored?...
In the Pacific for sure...

Where are those currents heading?
How does water fallout behaves??


Ocean water is already radioactive, by its natural chemical composition. It has its own process of breaking it down. Not sure how it would handle such large doses though. Interesting question.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26825



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Japan's central bank made an additional 13.8 trillion yen ($170 billion) available to money markets Wednesday to cushion the country's banking system from the shock of Friday's earthquake and tsunami, Kyodo News reported. That brings the Bank of Japan's emergency funding total to 55.6 trillion yen ($688 billion), Kyodo said
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Grothar... you need to take that camera to Las Vegas, to the pawn shop on "Pawn Stars".... it's probably worth more than Charles Nelson Riley's glasses....
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The U.S. military is now giving potassium iodide pills to some helicopter pilots and crew members as a precautionary measure before missions flying into Japan, Pentagon spokesman Dave Lapan said Wednesday. Previously air crews had only received the pills after some missions.

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Just checking in, Grothar that is an amazing old video, and Aqua I hope you're feeling better. It's been a loooong week...and it's only Wed....will get better,I feel...or hope.:)
Member Since: September 16, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1496
Quoting Grothar:


Told you it would come in handy.


Yes you did...
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Quoting Floodman:


And we all laughed when you bought that camera...


Told you it would come in handy.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26825
Fascinating video, Grothar. Thanks. Some of those scenes look all too similar to the more recent images out of Japan...

Quoting Grothar:
Here is a rare video of the Tokyo earthquake of 1923. There is no sound because they did not it in those day.

Link
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87. P451
Quoting twhcracker:
whats even worse are all those japanese horror movies about radioactive fallout causing giant creatures like flying turtles the size of a house with flames shooting out their butt having aerial dogfights with giant flying terradactyls. you know that has to be in everyones subconsciousness. just sayin


You can pretty much just call the EQ ... GODZILLA.

And if you think about it perhaps those movies are related to (based on) the EQs themselves. They just use the characters (creatures attacking cities) to portray the events (EQs and Tsunamis)

Just a thought. Probably a wrong one lol.
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Quoting twhcracker:
whats even worse are all those japanese horror movies about radioactive fallout causing giant creatures like flying turtles the size of a house with flames shooting out their butt having aerial dogfights with giant flying terradactyls. you know that has to be in everyones subconsciousness. just sayin


Interesting point.....Most of those movies were probably a subconscious response frm Japanese filmakers as to the horrors of radiation in the wake of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
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Quoting twhcracker:
whats even worse are all those japanese horror movies about radioactive fallout causing giant creatures like flying turtles the size of a house with flames shooting out their butt having aerial dogfights with giant flying terradactyls. you know that has to be in everyones subconsciousness. just sayin


I gotta lotta weird $#)^ in my head but not that

oh great, it's there NOW
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Quoting Grothar:
Here is a rare video of the Tokyo earthquake of 1923. There is no sound because they did not have it in those day.

Link


And we all laughed when you bought that camera...
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Quoting P451:


If it were just the quake they would have (probably) had this under control.

It's the tsunami that knocked out any and all backup systems. No tsunami and the backup systems kick in and they are (probably) in the clear.

So I question the placement not in relation to tectonic faults (as that is something you cannot avoid in Japan anyway) but in terms of proximity to the ocean when the country is known to suffer tsunami events (as we would have it they named the event themselves "tsunami" and is used worldwide).



as i said earlier, nucler power plants are a water dependent industry. they have to be there.
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OMG post 74

cause I ain't gonna quote it

yeah that's one way to reduce unemployment is to have 10,000 potential job rivals get swept to sea

Probably saves the disaster relief folks a lotta trouble too
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whats even worse are all those japanese horror movies about radioactive fallout causing giant creatures like flying turtles the size of a house with flames shooting out their butt having aerial dogfights with giant flying terradactyls. you know that has to be in everyones subconsciousness. just sayin
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Quoting TampaSpin:
The Economic meltdown across the world might really take its toll on many countries. Japan holds much in US Bonds. No doubt they will have to cash them in and rightfully so! They will need the cash to rebuild their great country back. But, in cashing those Bonds in, this will nearly Bankrupt the US Economy without any other country to buy up the Bonds. China was buying and has said they won't buy any more US Bonds.
      The American people used to buy U.S. bonds, People have lost their sense of security with this country and rightfully so. Just like wall street is doing to the 401k system. We are DOOMED!
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79. P451
Quoting hydrus:
Makes me wonder why anybody would build a nuclear power plant on such a geologically active region to begin with. It is one of the most active areas of the world. Volcanically and seismic.


If it were just the quake they would have (probably) had this under control.

It's the tsunami that knocked out any and all backup systems. No tsunami and the backup systems kick in and they are (probably) in the clear.

So I question the placement not in relation to tectonic faults (as that is something you cannot avoid in Japan anyway) but in terms of proximity to the ocean when the country is known to suffer tsunami events (as we would have it they named the event themselves "tsunami" and is used worldwide).

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post 64- hi Nea- thanks for the update

it's like the domino effect but in very very very slow motion- those individual updates keep getting longer and longer

can't we just put a lid on it- oh if it was only that easy

snooooz
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Quoting jeffs713:
CFLWX - most of us are very aware of potential trolls, and when new people jump into the convo soon after joining, and mention they had an old handle... We get a tad bit hostile. I will say that I reported one of the posts (the one admitting the old handle, on the last thread), but only because I can't STAND people trying to circumvent bans.

That said, we all have our own "whitelist" of people whom we follow, and it can take a while to get onto one of those lists. All you can do is keep on contributing intelligently to the convo, and everything will be ok.
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Morning everyone, a beautiful day here in North Florida. Extended outlook is even better. Not a lick of rain in the forecast. Prayers for all in Japan, every day brings more bad news it seems. Thankfully the winds are blowing offshore is a bit of good news.
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Where is all that contaminated Sea Water being stored?...
In the Pacific for sure...

Where are those currents heading?
How does water fallout behaves??
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9874
Japan’s Quake Rebuilding May Revive Laggard Northeast
March 16, 2011, 11:02 AM EDT

More From Businessweek

(See {EXT2 } for more on the earthquake.)

March 17 (Bloomberg) -- Reconstruction from Japan’s record earthquake and ensuing tsunami may help revive a farming and manufacturing region that was already lagging behind the rest of the economy.

Job prospects in Miyagi, where an estimated 10,000 people were killed, were worse than in most of the nation’s 47 prefectures in January. Neighboring Iwate had been hemorrhaging workers to Tokyo, while Fukushima was becoming increasingly dependent on its remaining factories even as Japanese manufacturers move abroad to emerging Asian markets.

Prime Minister Naoto Kan’s government aims to compile a relief package as soon as next month, with the biggest opposition party calling for a 5 trillion yen ($62 billion) effort, about $5 billion more than South Korea’s 1997 bailout package. A new international airport at Sendai, better road and telecommunication links and incentives for businesses to move to the region could help foster a rebirth, economists said.“This was a very tragic disaster for the entire nation, but there’s a way to get this reconstruction effort right,” said Akio Makabe, an economics professor at Shinshu University in western Japan. “All these roads and train tracks and facilities are going to be brand new.”

BOJ Efforts

At the Bank of Japan’s Aomori branch at the northern tip of Tohoku, staff members are still trying to estimate the scope of the damage to the area’s economy. The bank will need to replace banknotes damaged by the tsunami and fires, checking each one as it’s submitted, an official at the branch said on condition of anonymity as he’s not approved to speak publicly.

Blackouts and a lack of gasoline are hindering businesses from returning to normal, and also making it harder for the BOJ to gauge the impact of the disaster, the official said. Further south, the lanes headed from Fukushima toward Tokyo have been clogged with cars. On the night of March 15, an unbroken line of vehicles about 40 kilometers long was seen crawling to the capital.

For now, the government remains engulfed in defusing the threat of radiation spreading from a crippled nuclear power plant in Fukushima, whose cooling system was knocked out by the earthquake on March 11. Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s consequent rolling blackouts have hampered factory operations across the country.

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Quoting TampaSpin:
The Economic meltdown across the world might really take its toll on many countries. Japan holds much in US Bonds. No doubt they will have to cash them in and rightfully so! They will need the cash to rebuild their great country back. But, in cashing those Bonds in, this will nearly Bankrupt the US Economy without any other country to buy up the Bonds. China was buying and has said they won't buy any more US Bonds.
EEK! I hadn't thought about the bonds...
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i think if this was happening here in the us people would be saying"look how messed up those americans are building nuclear plants in a coastal hazard area". but nuclear power plants are a water dependent industry. They HAVE to be on the water.
if the water isnt there they have to build a huge manmade lake. anyway, i guess my point is... we get a bum rap here in the us a lot of the time.
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71. P451
Reposting from the last blog for those that will have missed it:

===========

Anyone listen to the man that was in charge of Three Mile Island when it went up?

He said when the rods there were exposed, and it was for 2 hours, they melted and fused. He said luckily all that happened was they had some releases of steam and radioactivity but the containment vessel held and they were able to seal it off.

He said it was FIVE YEARS LATER that they were able to go back in and see what eventually happened. They had no idea the rods had melted and collapsed. He said had it been a full meltdown and not partial that the radioactive fuel would had eaten it's way through the base of the plant and made it's way outside.

He said the Japanese situation is far worse. He said the fire in Reactor #4 meant that the spent fuel rods there had to be exposed and had to be melting creating the intense heat causing the fires there. Given they are not in a containment unit he said that means that the fires were carrying radioactivity straight up into the atmosphere.

He said that the Japanese said their fuel rods were exposed for 2.5 hours. He said there was no way that plant wasn't experiencing a full meltdown.

He said the seawater experiment probably delays the inevitable and voiced concern that the fact the Japanese thinks there were leaks in the system, which is why they couldn't raise the water levels, that the seawater was going in, getting contaminated, and then exiting the building into the environment.

He reminded us that graphite was used in Chernobyl and that it burns very intense and it exacerbated their situation by helping inject radioactivity further into the atmosphere causing fallout over a greater area. The Japanese don't use graphite they use zirconium but he added that too does burn and will burn off once the heat is too great and allows all the fuel to join up and at that point there is no stopping the meltdown.

He said quite a bit more but you get the idea. The man knows what he's talking about. I figured I'd share. I wish there was a transcript of his commentary somewhere but I can't find it. He was on CNN or FOX late last night.

=========
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CFLWX - most of us are very aware of potential trolls, and when new people jump into the convo soon after joining, and mention they had an old handle... We get a tad bit hostile. I will say that I reported one of the posts (the one admitting the old handle, on the last thread), but only because I can't STAND people trying to circumvent bans.

That said, we all have our own "whitelist" of people whom we follow, and it can take a while to get onto one of those lists. All you can do is keep on contributing intelligently to the convo, and everything will be ok.
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The Economic meltdown across the world might really take its toll on many countries. Japan holds much in US Bonds. No doubt they will have to cash them in and rightfully so! They will need the cash to rebuild their great country back. But, in cashing those Bonds in, this will nearly Bankrupt the US Economy without any other country to buy up the Bonds. China was buying and has said they won't buy any more US Bonds.
Member Since: September 2, 2007 Posts: 179 Comments: 20448
Outstanding post Dr. M; if your analysis plays out (depending of course on weather conditions), then perhaps good news for the US. However, a big issue lies on the horizon as to "surface" radiation levels and how they might impact the fisheries off the coast of Japan in the Pacific. They will need to test surface catches (Tuna, etc) for radiation exposure over the next year I would think not only off of Japanese and Pacific waters but elsewhere depending on the migratory patterns of the fish that might swim through potentially contaminated waters on the way to other parts of the world.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
As I've said many times before, while I'm deeply concerned about the many issues the Japanese are dealing with in the wake of their unfortunate trio of beastly problems--earthquake, tsunami, imminent nuclear disaster--what worries me most isn't whether radiation from Fukushima will reach and affect the U.S., but that if such problems can happen there, they can certainly happen here. I've read a hundred articles and blog posts from industry flacks saying that everything's okay, this isn't a big deal, nuclear is fail-safe and foolproof and perfect for today's world--but then I listen to four days' worth of more fires, more explosions, more blasts of radiation, and I see satellite and ground-based images showing not one but four reactors in various stages of self-destruction, and all I can do is ask myself: "Do we really need this and want this? Do we really?"

Ah, well, big bucks are involved, I know, so my feeble pleas mean nothing. Just my two cents as an unhappy citizen of the planet...
Makes me wonder why anybody would build a nuclear power plant on such a geologically active region to begin with. It is one of the most active areas of the world. Volcanically and seismic.
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66. P451
Favorable winds.....for now.

Not on Saturday. Onshore all the way.
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i am not so worried that radiation is gonna come here to florida but that it is gonna somehow cause something to go even more haywire with the planet which just seems really haywire and getting worse
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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