Senate committee proposes less drastic budget cuts for NOAA

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 10:16 PM GMT on March 07, 2011

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Last month, the U.S. House of Representatives proposed a new budget (HR 1) for the remainder of the fiscal year that would slash funding of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) by $454 million. This would mean a draconian 28% cut for the National Weather Service, the agency entrusted to protect us from natural hazards such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods. Monday, the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee released a proposed alternative to HR 1 that would make a $110 million reduction to NOAA operations for the remainder of the fiscal year. Of the $110 million cut, $104 million was from earmarks that are no longer funded. This effectively only cuts the NOAA budget by $6 million, and would allow NOAA to continue its efforts through the coming tornado, flood, and hurricane seasons to help protect lives and property without suffering from crippling budget cuts.

Now is the time to mobilize to ensure adequate funding for NOAA, and the National Weather Service Employees Organization issued these recommendations in a letter posted on their website today:

-----------------

Assuming the Senate adopts this proposal, the effort goes to convincing House Leadership of the important work of the NWS and fully funding NOAA. At this important stage, we ask you to contact Congressmen John Boehner and Eric Cantor and respectfully request that they support the Senate's proposal for NOAA's budget. These congressmen hold the key to the future of the NWS.

To email or call Speaker John Boehner
http://www.speaker.gov/Contact/

To email or call Representative Eric Cantor
http://cantor.house.gov/contact/

You can also join the Protect the National Weather Service Facebook group, which was created for this cause. Our fan count is growing rapidly but we need more. We want Congress to take notice of how much support our fans have shown. Please share this message with your friends and ask them to click "like" directly on our page. We will have more information, some cool photos and interesting tidbits to share in the coming days.

Sample letters and talking points are available below. Please feel free to use these letters and also tailor them to the particular types of weather for your geographic area. The links below provide email addresses and phone numbers to help you in this effort.

Your support of the National Weather Service is greatly appreciated. You are making the difference in helping the agency continue their mission of saving lives and property. Thank you.


Dear Mr. Speaker (for Speaker John Boehner) OR
Dear Mr. Cantor (for Rep. Eric Cantor)

I am writing to ask you to support the Senate's proposal for NOAA's budget. This proposal will help NOAA and the National Weather Service continue the mission of saving lives and property.

The Senate's proposal includes responsible funding levels in stark contrast to the draconian cuts included in HR1. HR1 would have resulted in the following impacts on the National Weather Service:

* Reduced staffing at Weather Forecast Offices and River Forecast Centers would result in incomplete forecast production which could prove disastrous in a significant weather event. Even in the best of cases, it will still mean incomplete forecast production at WFOs that have major product workloads for aviation, marine, tropical and public services.

* This is going to have a negative impact on the economy and on almost every aspect of our daily lives. There will be a large scale economic impact on aviation, agriculture, and the cost shipping food and other products.

* Service backup of 24 Weather Forecasting Offices has never been tested and runs a very significant risk of a missed tornado, flood or severe weather warning. It is risking lives at the onset of both tornadoes and hurricane season. This is also doubling the area of responsibility for operations and adds the risk of degraded service delivery.

* The National Hurricane Center is not immune to these cuts as furloughs and staffing cuts will add strain to the program. The Hurricane Hunter Jet, which provides lifesaving data and helps determine a hurricane.s path, could also be eliminated.

* Information that is vital for weather modeling and accurate tornado watches and warnings will be reduced and in some cases lost. Reduced upper air observations currently made twice a day could be reduced to once every other day. Buoy and surface weather observations, the backbone of most of the weather and warning systems, may be temporarily or permanently discontinued.

Recent advances in aviation weather forecasting have resulted in as much as a 50 percent reduction in weather related flight delays. The Senate.s proposal for funding will help progressive programs such as these continue and may, in turn, prove beneficial to strengthening the economy.
For the safety of our citizens, the protection of property, and the large scale economic impact on aviation, agriculture, and commerce, I am asking you to vote in support the Senate.s proposal for NOAA's budget.

Sincerely,
Your Name

------------------

I encourage all of you to make your voices heard and help preserve funding for NOAA and the National Weather Service.

You can call or email your U.S. Senator using this link: http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information /senators_cfm.cfm

You can call or email your U.S. House of Representatives member using this link: https://writerep.house.gov/writerep/welcome.shtml

The National Weather Service Employees Organization web site has talking points and sample letters (printable) you can use to contact your Senators and Representative.

Climate Science and EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Regulations
The U.S. House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power, chaired by Rep. Ed Whitfield (R-KY), will hold a hearing on Tuesday, March 8, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. in room 2123 of the Rayburn House Office Building. The hearing is entitled, “Climate Science and EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Regulations.” Full Committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI) and Rep. Whitfield have joined Democratic leaders in the U.S. House in authoring the Energy Tax Prevention Act (H.R. 910), a bill to block EPA’s controversial backdoor climate change agenda that would further drive up the price of energy for American consumers and job creators at a time when gas prices are already spiking and job creation remains weak.

The hearing is open to the public and press. Opening statements, witness testimony, and a live webcast will be available online at http://energycommerce.house.gov

Jeff Masters

Your Pot of Gold... (catilac)
is at the Atlantis Casino! Overlooking Reno at 6200 ft.
Your Pot of Gold...

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Quoting Eagle101:


Greetings Neapolitan,

I am not going to go back and quote directly, but I am quite sure you knew I was addressing an assertion that Gov. Scott was going to shut down Florida State Parks. Clearly, that is not the case. I was not, and did not, address Florida Forever. You have mentioned in the past that you are a member of a certain group of exceptionally gifted thinkers. Yet, you deflect the issue to gain what you see as a “win” for you, and play partisan politics. It truly troubles me that you would sink to the level that the partisans want the “common” folk at, and that is to divide us and keep us occupied while getting us into the mess we now find ourselves in.

Debate is a healthy thing Nea. Deflecting and inserting other issues in response to ones post so you can “one-up” them is not constructive, and quite frankly, is just plain dishonest. You and I have had disagreements in the past. That’s ok. I do not harbor ill feelings toward you. I just ask that you be respectful and honest, as I am towards you.

Please take care, and have a great evening.

Very Respectfully,

Jon

Uh...what?

Someone commented that Florida Governor Rick Scott wanted to close a large number of state parks. You chimed in by saying that Scott wasn't planning to close them, and you provided links to several articles that stated as much. There were several comments from others that indicated no small amount of confusion on the issue, so I put in my own two cents as a way of clarifying things. There was nothing negative or nasty in my comment; I merely noted that the confusion doubtless arose because Scott's budget proposal includes no many for a land-buying program. (That wasn't my opinion, by the way; there are numerous news articles saying the same thing.) I also mentioned a well-publcized reason for Scott's bumpy transition from the corporate world to governance.

But then, you quoted me in your post #570, stating that I "deflected the issue to gain a win", that I "sank to the level that the partisans want", that I am trying to "divide and keep us occupied while getting us into the mess we now find ourselves in", that I was "plain dishonest", that I was "disrespectful".

Again: what?

At first I figured you'd responded to the wrong comment, but, no, I found it was clearly a response to me. So I read what I'd written, and re-read it, and re-read it again, and to be honest I'm still a bit confused. I defy you (or anyone else) to go back to my original comment and find any of the things of which you accused me. Unless a person is obsessively and blindly infatuated with Scott and his (so far) very unwelcome way of governing, it won't be found. You don't put yourself in that group do you? And if not, is it too much to hope for an apology from you?
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13457
Quoting swampliliy:



OK- I'm a moron- sorry :))))


Understandable> My mistake as we operate in different languages. The real full name of the town is ''Moron de la Frontera'' but everybody here being mostly Spanish call it 'Moron,' the Spanish air force have a lot of planes there as well.
I think the US have 4 bases that they use, here in Spain at the present time.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
"By the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes."
(Shakespeare), Macbeth, Act IV, Scene 1

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.
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Quoting JFLORIDA:
Actually I dont understand why we pay if a contracted system fails. Esp if it has more than once.


Greetings JFlorida,

You win the ‘observation of the year award,’ my friend. Government contracts are quite complicated, as I am sure you realize. There may, or may not, be a performance clause in the contract. I sure as heck hope there was. I fear, however, that we may be left holding this bag, so to speak, yet again.

In the post accident press conference, both NASA and the contractor were visibly shaken up, as one might expect. The lead engineer for the contractor went through a protracted period of explaining the previous malfunction, and describing the changes to the current vehicle, based on the previous failure.

It was quite clear that a couple of the briefers probably knew that would be their last briefing, at least for the positions they held. I was listening to the engineer describe the failure mode, both previous, and best guess for the current. I will just throw this two cents worth in: If I was responsible for this vehicle, I would have demanded multiple tests, to ensure all the possible failure modes were identified, and addressed. It is quite evident, that they did not fully understand all the possibilities. I will be looking forward to reading the mishap report in another year or two. Should be quite interesting, for sure.

Take care,

Very Respectfully,

Jon
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Quoting Skyepony:
Spathy you do have some good points that shorting everyone at least a little points out the waste.. I think 6 million is plenty enough for NWS. They are such an investment.

I see govt work from the NASA aspect. The way this budget wasn't passed before the start of the year has been hard on internal budgets & employees. It's messed up enough the way money & times money is allocated to throw in not knowing how much you get to accomplish your torn goals with.


Greetings Skye,

I have felt this pain, unfortunately, many times. When the Congress fails to pass a budget, and we (the Government) end up working on continuing resolutions, it drives many to complete distraction. Contracts that were paid for with last year’s money continue, as they should. However, working in the current fiscal year, quite often, is quite an adventure for sure. You have to pick and choose what to accomplish, and hope you picked the right items. If not, if for example, someone’s priority changes, look out. The preverbal you know what is going to hit the fan.

We deal with those scenarios, and move on. What really drives me crazy is at the end of the fiscal year, when the flood gates open. You then expend many hours of overtime trying to find ways to spend, in an efficient manner, all the money that has magically dropped out of the sky that you could have really used throughout the year. And, you better spend every last penny, otherwise, you lose funding the following year. It is a catch twenty-two, and one of the many items we must reform to make government more efficient. Yes, it quite maddening, for sure. Thank goodness I no longer have to deal with these issues.

As for the NASA/NOAA/NWS budget issues, I am in complete agreement that we must choose which fights to engage in. Protecting people clearly must be the number one issue. Period. After that, everything else is gravy, especially considering the enormous budget cuts that are sure to come. I am sure I am going to take some serious flack for this, but in my humble opinion, NASA Space Flight needs to take a serious safety timeout to, yet again, examine its operations and safety. Splashing yet another satellite, is well, just unbelievable. Before anybody tries to flame me, I am fully aware that current launch vehicles’ are contractor provided. Clearly, something must change. I actually listened to the press briefing following the failure. It was, well, just sad. With the current fiscal restraints, how are these folks going to ask Congress for a “do-over.” Good question, indeed. The sad reality is that we may have to wait a number of years before these very important sensors can be realized. In the meantime, we have lost yet another nearly invaluable research tool. Truly sad, indeed.

Very Respectfully,

Jon
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Quoting spathy:
Sky I still say NOAA is NOAA.
The differing %s as departments are divided is a waste of math.
NOAA Is NOAA
The Noaa budget is just that a singular entity.
The cut is a singular cut.
The pot has been stirred.
NOAA needs to cut 14%.
They better get to work,... not toss the cards and shuffle the cups.
The Tax payer is not just blowing hot air here.
This is real.


You're blowing smoke on the math, sorry.

Since it's late at night, let me set forth an example.

Suppose you are working for me and we agree that you will work for $4000 a month. You have a 1-year contract, with a negotiated renewal after that.

Six months into the year, I tell you that you now have to work for $2000 a month.

Before I tell you this, I have paid you $4000 a month for six months. You have received $24,000 at that point.

Now you will work the rest of the year, and any year after that that you choose to work for me, for half as much. So you will receive $12,000 rather than $24,000 for the remaining 6 months of the contract and $24,000 per year instead of $48,000 per year for each following year.

The cut in your budgeted income is 50% for the remainder of this year ($12,000 rather than $24,000) and 50% for next year ($24,000 rather than $48,000). That I paid you for the six months just ended at the originally agreed rate is completely irrelevant. You still have to give up the car. Or, in the case of the NWS, really important stuff. They have to slash spending by 28% if the House proposal is the final budget.

Skye is right ... Dr. Masters didn't make any mistakes in math.

One more thing ... the longer the cuts are postponed, the deeper they are going to have to be (for this fiscal year) to satisfy the Congressional newcomers.

The federal government runs out of money (well, actually, authorized borrowing) next Friday. Let's all hope some sort of compromise can be hammered together between now and then.

p.s. Finance MBA, 20 years as CFO for various public and private corporations. I understand budgeting and spending (they are not the same) and how budget cuts operate. Just so you stop arguing :)
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Beware Uzo.

Ash Wednesday arrives in NOLA.

When's Jazz Fest ?
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Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:




Beware of Greeks bearing Gifts.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25352
Quoting Levi32:


Ice cores are on land, not ocean. Ice is not added to the bottom of a land-based icecap. Everything is from snowpack on top.

Furthermore, ice getting added to the bottom of a floating ice sheet is nothing new, and is perfectly natural. It occurs whenever a body of water freezes over. That's the only way ice on top of a lake thickens over time.


Re-read the abstract then. They mention Dome A, which, according to wiki, is 1200km inland.

They seem to be saying that ice is being added to the bottom of the LAND ice sheets - "Persistent freeze-on thickens the ice column, alters basal ice rheology and fabric and upwarps the overlying ice sheet, including the oldest atmospheric climate archive..."
Member Since: May 18, 2007 Posts: 289 Comments: 1639
593. Skyepony (Mod)
Spathy~ Follow me here.. from masters' entry.. This would mean a draconian 28% cut for the National Weather Service. He's link the NWS saying they would get a 28% cut..NWS because their parent directory NOAA gets a 14%.. your working out the math for NOAA. NWS is just a part of them, the part that saves people, not fish.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37341
Quoting hcubed:


And yet the ice in Antarctica is freezing FROM THE BOTTOM.

Widespread Persistent Thickening of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet by Freezing from the Base

Abstract:

"...An International Polar Year aerogeophysical investigation of the high interior of East Antarctica reveals widespread freeze-on that drives significant mass redistribution at the bottom of the ice sheet. While surface accumulation of snow remains the primary mechanism for ice sheet growth, beneath Dome A 24% of the base by area is frozen-on ice. In some places, up to half the ice thickness has been added from below. These ice packages result from conductive cooling of water ponded near the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountain ridges and supercooling of water forced up steep valley walls. Persistent freeze-on thickens the ice column, alters basal ice rheology and fabric and upwarps the overlying ice sheet, including the oldest atmospheric climate archive, and drives flow behavior not captured in present models..."

If the ice is freezing from the bottom, doesn't that upset the ice cores? Deeper ice may be NEWER ice.


Ice cores are on land, not ocean. Ice is not added to the bottom of a land-based icecap. Everything is from snowpack on top.

Furthermore, ice getting added to the bottom of a floating ice sheet is nothing new, and is perfectly natural. It occurs whenever a body of water freezes over. That's the only way ice on top of a lake thickens over time.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting jeffs713:


Just to address a few things:

1. True.
2. You have a better solution?
3. Gasoline and motor oil is considered hazardous waste, too.
4. A good chunk of the weight in the battery pack is offset by the decreased weight in the engine compartment. Also, many current battery packs rely on outdated technology (Ni-Cd and Ni-MH batteries), which are much heavier than other current battery technologies (Li-polymer, for example). The biggest hurdle for development of the new battery technologies is the car maker's resistance to investing in mass production of the new batteries. (and issues getting the raw materials, since they are not terribly common)
5. See #4. Also, think about how much it costs to replace a gasoline fuel system in a car. And to maintain said fuel system. Batteries are a bigger one-time cost, but over the long haul, tend to even out.

Right now, electric and hybrid vehicles are in their developmental stages. Think about it - whenever a new technology comes out, it doesn't get mass appeal right away. Remember back when mobile phones were gigantic, heavy, cumbersome things? (some of the younger generation may not remember those days) You have a cell phone now, don't you? Adoption of new technologies takes time. It takes several generations of the technology to gain mass market appeal. If you compare cell phones and electric vehicles, I would relate today's electric/hybrid technology to be at about the same stage as when cell phones first became completely hand-held, and you didn't need to carry a battery pack with you.


Greetings Jeff,

To address some of your questions/comments:

2. Yes. And, it would not take one-billion dollars to do it. Many universities have already demonstrated exceptional solutions. The problem is one of integration. The designs are typically quite small and aerodynamic. Mixing them with the one-ton plus vehicles’ we commonly drive would not be an ideal solution. The closest analogy I can provide for you is that it would be just like taking on the risk of driving a motorcycle. (Before anyone comments…I drive a sport bike, and I know.) Clean, small designs, like motorcycles, are hard to see, or at least that is the most common excuse given when there is an accident.

3. Agreed.

4. Here are some interesting facts for you: If you thoroughly read my response, I mentioned “chemical” batteries. This would include Lion, etcetera. Converting, for example, a Chevrolet Cavalier produced some surprising results. Curb weight came in at 3700 lbs. Ouch! This particular conversion used a twenty horsepower motor, and if driven with care, you could expect 60 to 70 miles, with a top speed of 75 mph (but not for long!) A new, modern design, could easily achieve 100 or more miles (again, with careful planning on the drivers part.) You will not lose as much weight as you think, when converting. New design is the way to go, but how many people are you going to convince to deal with the issues addressed in 2, above? BTW…the operating cost savings of an EV are quite good, pennies on the dollar compared to gasoline, and needless to say, much better for the environment. Again, until you have to replace the batteries.

While battery technology has come a long way, the best performing, are, of course, the most expensive. Power density is getting better. Again, we have a long way to go. Physics (and economics) just can’t be beat, no matter how noble the cause.

I hope I have not left you with the impression that I am against EV’s. Quite to the contrary, I would love to see fleets and fleets of them. The reality, right now, is that our best hope is going to be with hybrids until more R & D can produce a product the public can embrace. The cell phone analogy just won’t work here. Apples to apples, oranges to oranges. That is how it works.

Take care and have a great evening.

Very Respectfully,

Jon
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
590. Skyepony (Mod)
Spathy you do have some good points that shorting everyone at least a little points out the waste.. I think 6 million is plenty enough for NWS. They are such an investment.

I see govt work from the NASA aspect. The way this budget wasn't passed before the start of the year has been hard on internal budgets & employees. It's messed up enough the way money & times money is allocated to throw in not knowing how much you get to accomplish your torn goals with.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37341
Quoting Neapolitan:
Earth's ice sheets melting at faster pace, study finds

"The ice sheets covering both ends of Earth are losing mass at an accelerating pace, and are on a faster-than-projected path to surpass other sources of rising sea levels, according to a new study.

"'The magnitude of the acceleration suggests that ice sheets will be the dominant contributors to sea level rise in forthcoming decades,' the team of researchers concluded after surveying 18 years of satellite and modeling data from Antarctica and Greenland.

"'That ice sheets will dominate future sea level rise is not surprising — they hold a lot more ice mass than mountain glaciers,' lead author Eric Rignot, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in a statement. 'What is surprising is this increased contribution by the ice sheets is already happening,' he added. 'If present trends continue, sea level is likely to be significantly higher than levels projected by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007'.

"The study will be published later this month in the peer-reviewed Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union."

Article...

(Never mind that the ice that's disappearing is in some cases tens of thousands of years old; we've only got 40 years' worth of observational data, so it's probably nothing to worry about.)


And yet the ice in Antarctica is freezing FROM THE BOTTOM.

Widespread Persistent Thickening of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet by Freezing from the Base

Abstract:

"...An International Polar Year aerogeophysical investigation of the high interior of East Antarctica reveals widespread freeze-on that drives significant mass redistribution at the bottom of the ice sheet. While surface accumulation of snow remains the primary mechanism for ice sheet growth, beneath Dome A 24% of the base by area is frozen-on ice. In some places, up to half the ice thickness has been added from below. These ice packages result from conductive cooling of water ponded near the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountain ridges and supercooling of water forced up steep valley walls. Persistent freeze-on thickens the ice column, alters basal ice rheology and fabric and upwarps the overlying ice sheet, including the oldest atmospheric climate archive, and drives flow behavior not captured in present models..."

If the ice is freezing from the bottom, doesn't that upset the ice cores? Deeper ice may be NEWER ice.
Member Since: May 18, 2007 Posts: 289 Comments: 1639
586. Skyepony (Mod)


There's more..

Impact of HR 1 reductions on NWS

Section 1327 of HR 1 cuts NOAA’s ORF by $454 million (or 14%) over FY 10 enacted levels.

• NWS ORF makes up 27% of NOAA ORF ($892 million in FY 10).

• Assuming Administration allocates cuts to NOAA ORF proportionately to
all NOAA line offices, NWS will be required to assume $125 million in
reduction in funding for remainder of FY 11.

As FY 11 is already half over, the effective rate of reduction to NWS
funding would be 28%.
In other words, $125 million reduction must be taken from
remaining $446 million six-month expenditures.

• NWS is already underfunded at FY 10 levels. According to a November 5,
2010 memorandum from the NWS’s CFO to the NWS Director:

Congress has also under-funded NWS’s labor costs by not fully funding yearly pay adjustments, associated benefits, and GS step increases. Yearly under-funding without authority to align labor with available funding has created a
structural shortfall that adds to an increasing legacy of unrecoverable debt. In FY11, OCFO is projecting the NWS structural labor funding shortfall at $15M.


Dr Masters didn't mess up his math..
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37341

Quoting Grothar:


A little zing never hurt anybody. Pythagoras didn't teach any quantative math and Euclid was always late to his classes, so I was a little deprived. They tried to teach me, but I told them it was all "Greek" to me. I did get as far as Quantum physics, but only because it was required. I never did that well, though. Theory I understood well, application, not so well.

Yes, I remember Pythagoras as well. I seem to remember he was always trying to find a new angle for doing things. I never could figure out was wrong with the old angles. Euclid was a bit iffy, at times. He told me once that his sun dial was broke. I tried to explain to him that it will work, if he moved it from under that shade tree. He said no. Pythagoras told him it work better at that angle. I was still a rookie then too and did not offer my suggestion again. I don't know if he ever did make it anywhere on time.

Yes, the Greeks. That kept trying leave me a gift at my doorstep, but I never did find the angle to get inside. I wonder what they finally did with it. One day, it was just gone. Somebody told me that Troy bought it. Seems they had a bigger doorway.

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584. Skyepony (Mod)
From the link Masters' left..

(March 7, 2011) The Senate Appropriations Committee has released a proposed alternative to HR 1 that would make a $110 million reduction to NOAA operations for the remainder of the fiscal year, rather than the $454 reduction approved by the House. Of the $110 million cut, $104 million was from earmarks that are no longer funded. This effectively only cuts the NOAA ORF budget by $6 million.

The Senate Appropriations Committee justified the higher funding levels for NOAA stating in their March 4 press release, "The House cuts an additional $340 million which would threaten critical weather forecasts and warnings."

Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37341
Grothar, get ready to amp up your geritol intake next Sunday
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Quoting spathy:

Thats odd?
I end up wandering around in a sheet thinking It is the old days.
Ya gotta laugh sometimes.
Otherwise its just depressing algorithms.
Groundhog day over daylight savings time.
Multiplied by GMT.
Oh very messy calculations for that one!


It's not nice too confuse old people. By the way, when is DST this year, must be coming soon. That really sends me over the top.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25352
Quoting spathy:

Sorry not buying it.
The previous explanation makes way more sense mathematically.
You are confusing remaining budget with total cuts.
NOT total cuts as a percentage of total budget.


Sigh. The budget for the year to date has been SPENT. The proposed cuts come out of what is LEFT in the budget, i.e. about $1.7 billion.

Has the blog discussed the recent "SQUISHY ICE" report in Science? Ice sheet modeling may be in for an overhaul. I don't have the link to the Science paper, but here is the msnbc.com (yeah I know) report on it:

Robin Bell's Squishy Antarctic Ice
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Just plugged everything back in, still raining here but at least the lightning has subsided for now. Cant wait to take a look at my rain gauge in the morn...tremendous rains here and more coming. The Mighty Mississippi was already at flood stage...gonna be bad, I would think.
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Quoting spathy:


Some Mathematics is all Greek Hieroglyphics to me.



I think that pic is the grocery bill after taxes?
I could be mistaken.



Where did you get that, Publixus? That is funny!!!! Sometimes I dress up in a sheet to remind me of the old days.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25352
Quoting spathy:


Thanks for the shared insight.
Thats a very friendly gesture.
And it warms the shared Spirit(humility) of humanities shortcomings as individuals.
And highlights the overwhelming possibilities of the individuals' spirit to strive.


That was a nice thought.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25352
Quoting Grothar:


They expect some severe flooding in the Northeast at the end of the week. I have a home there. They told me this afternoon the creeks were a'risin and the rivers are just at flood stage. Won't take much to get them going. They have a tremendous amount of snow on the ground and with that much rain, it is not a good thing.
lots of water with this one putting alot over the flood stage its going to be a long spring
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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