Hurricane season draws to a close

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:01 PM GMT on November 29, 2010

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November 30 marks the final day of the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season--a strange and highly active season. While it was an exceptionally active year, with 19 named storms, 12 hurricanes, and 5 intense hurricanes, deaths and damages were far below what one would expect from so much activity. To me, this year is most memorable for what didn't happen--we did not get a full fledged hurricane rip through the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, nor did a devastating hurricane cause massive loss of life in Haiti's vulnerable earthquake zone. However, two hurricanes from this year are virtually certain to get their names retired--Tomas and Igor--and two other storms that did billions of damage to Mexico, Karl and Alex, are likely to have their names retired, as well.

The 19 named storms, 12 hurricanes, and 5 intense hurricanes were 198%, 203%, and 217% of the 1950-2000 average for named storms, hurricanes and major hurricanes, respectively. The nineteen named storms ties 2010 with 1995 and 1887 for 3rd place for most number of named storms in an Atlantic hurricane season. Only 2005 (28 named storms) and 1933 (21 named storms) were busier (Atlantic hurricane records go back to 1851, though there were likely many missed named storms prior to the beginning of satellite coverage in the mid-1960s.) This year also featured twelve hurricanes, tying 2010 with 1969 for second place for most hurricanes in a season. The record is held by 2005 with fifteen hurricanes. The five major hurricanes this year puts us in a tie for ninth place for most major hurricanes in a season. This year's Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index was 163, putting it in 13th place for ACE since 1944. A "hyperactive" hurricane season is considered to have an ACE index of >175% of the median. According to Wikipedia, median ACE measured over the period 1951–2000 for the Atlantic basin was 87.5, so 2010 is a hyperactive year by that definition (183% of the median.)



Friendly steering currents for the U.S.
As active as the 2010 season was, only one weak tropical storm made a direct landfall on the U.S. (Tropical Storm Bonnie, which hit South Florida in August as minimal tropical storm with 40 mph winds.) During the 15-year active hurricane period from 1995 - 2009, 33% of all named storms in the Atlantic hit the U.S., and 30% of all Atlantic hurricanes hit the U.S. at hurricane strength. Thus, the U.S. should have expected the landfall of six named storms, four of them being hurricanes, and two being intense hurricanes. So, the U.S. really lucked out this year. For comparison, here's how the U.S. fared in the four other hurricane seasons as busy or more busy:

2005: 28 storms, 7 hit the U.S. (5 were hurricanes, and 4 of those major hurricanes)
1933: 21 storms, 7 hit the U.S. (5 were hurricanes, and 3 of those were major hurricanes)
1995: 19 storms, 5 hit the U.S. (2 were hurricanes, and 1 was major)
1887: 19 storms, 5 hit the U.S. (3 were hurricanes, no majors)

We had twelve hurricanes in the Atlantic in 2010, yet none of them struck the U.S. Since 1900 there is no precedent of an Atlantic hurricane season with ten or more hurricanes where none has struck the U.S. as a hurricane. The eleven previous seasons with ten or more hurricanes--1870, 1878, 1886, 1893, 1916, 1933, 1950, 1969, 1995, 1998, and 2005--each had at least two hurricane strikes on the U.S. Since hurricane Ike (2008), there have been eighteen consecutive non US-landfalling hurricanes. Such a sequence last happened between Irene (1999) and Lili (2002), with 22 consecutive non US-landfalling hurricanes, and between Allen (1980) and Alicia (1983) with seventeen consecutive non US-landfalling hurricanes (thanks go to Adam Lea of tropicalstormrisk.com for these stats.)

No major Category 3 and stronger hurricanes have hit the U.S. since Hurricane Wilma of 2005. This is just the third such major hurricane drought since 1851. The other two such 5-year major hurricane droughts were 1901 - 1905 and 1910 - 1914. Also, 2010 is the only year besides 1951 when there have been five major hurricanes in the Atlantic, and none have hit the U.S. (1958 is also listed as such a year, but preliminary results from a re-analysis effort shows that Hurricane Helene hit North Carolina as a major hurricane that year.) There has never been a six year period without a U.S. major hurricane landfall.

The reason the U.S. got so lucky--and that Canada and Mexico took a much more severe beating than usual--was that the Azores/Bermuda high was farther east than usual, and there were more strong troughs of low pressure over the U.S. East Coast than usual. In addition, there was stronger high pressure than usual over the U.S. Gulf Coast, which deflected Caribbean storms into Mexico.

Intense hurricanes in unprecedented locations
Another remarkable feature of this year was that we saw three major hurricanes in rare or unprecedented locations. Julia was the easternmost major hurricane on record, Karl was the southernmost major hurricane on record in the Gulf of Mexico, and Earl was the 4th strongest hurricane so far north. This unusual major hurricane activity is likely due, in part, to the record tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures this year. Sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic from the Caribbean to the coast of Africa were at their warmest levels on record for almost the entire year.

Rare simultaneous hurricane occurrences and activity levels
On September 16, there were three simultaneous hurricanes--Karl, Igor, and Julia--in the Atlantic. According to Phil Klotzbach at Colorado State, three simultaneous Atlantic hurricanes is a rare phenomena, having occurred only eight other times since 1851. The other years were 1893, 1926, 1950, 1961, 1967, 1980, 1995, and 1998. Two of those years--1998 and 1893--had four simultaneous hurricanes.


Figure 2. Triple trouble: From left to right, Hurricanes Karl, Igor, and Julia roil the Atlantic. Image credit: NASA/GSFC.

On September 15, Hurricane Julia and Hurricane Igor were both Category 4 storms. This was just the second time in recorded history that two simultaneous Category 4 or stronger storms have occurred in the Atlantic. The only other occurrence was on 06 UTC September 16, 1926, when the Great Miami Hurricane and Hurricane Four were both Category 4 storms for a six-hour period. The were also two years, 1999 and 1958, when we missed having two simultaneous Category 4 hurricanes by six hours. The four Category 4 storms in 2010 makes this year tied for third place for most Category 4+ storms in a year. Only two other seasons have had as many as five Category 4 or stronger storms (2005 and 1999). This year is also holds the record for the earliest a fourth Category 4 or stronger storm has formed (though the fourth Category 4 of 1999, Hurricane Gert, formed just 3 hours later on September 15 in 1999.) We also had four Cat 4+ storms in just twenty days, which beat the previous record for shortest time span for four Cat 4+ storms to appear. The previous record was 1999--24 days. Eleven named storms formed between August 22 and September 29. This is the most named storms to form during this period, breaking the old record of nine named storms set in 1933, 1949, 1984 and 2002 (thanks go to Phil Klotzbach of CSU for the last two stats.)

Rare activity levels
Five hurricanes formed during the month of October. Only 1870 (six hurricanes) and 1950 (five hurricanes) have had five or more October hurricanes. We also had four Cat 4+ storms in just twenty days, which beat the previous record for shortest time span for four Cat 4+ storms to appear. The previous record was 1999--24 days. Eleven named storms formed between August 22 and September 29. This is the most named storms to form during this period, breaking the old record of nine named storms set in 1933, 1949, 1984 and 2002 (thanks go to Phil Klotzbach of CSU for the last two stats.)

Hurricane Alex
Hurricane Alex had the highest sustained winds (100 mph) of any June hurricane since Hurricane Alma of 1966 (125 mph.)

Hurricane Earl
As Hurricane Earl approached North Carolina on September 2, its 140 mph winds made it the fourth strongest Atlantic hurricane on record so far north. Only Hurricane Esther of 1961, Hurricane Connie of 1955, and Hurricane Two of 1922 had stronger winds at a more northerly latitude.


Figure 2. Hurricane Earl as seen from the International Space Station on Thursday, September 2, 2010. Image credit: NASA astronaut Douglas Wheelock.

Hurricane Igor: Newfoundland's worst hurricane in memory
Igor killed one person on Newfoundland, and damage exceeded $100 million, making Igor the most damaging tropical cyclone in Newfoundland history. A summary of the impact of Igor prepared by Environment Canada put it this way:

"Hurricane Igor and its severe impacts certainly represent a rare event in Newfoundland history which has been described as the worst in memory. In statistical terms, this was effectively a 50 - 100 year event depending on how one chooses to define it. There are no hurricanes/post tropical events of this magnitude striking Newfoundland in the modern era. Hurricane Juan in Nova Scotia was the last Atlantic Canadian hurricane to cause extreme damage. Prior to the naming of hurricanes, the 1935 Newfoundland Hurricane 75 years ago was of similar intensity."


Figure 3. A ravine carved by Hurricane Igor's flood waters washed out the Trans-Canada Highway, isolating Southeast Newfoundland from the rest of the province. Image credit: CBC News.

Hurricane Julia: strongest hurricane so far east
Hurricane Julia put on a remarkable and unexpected burst of intensification to become the season's fourth Category 4 storm. Julia's 135 mph winds made it the strongest hurricane on record so far east; the previous record was held by the eighth storm of 1926, which was only a 120 mph Category 3 hurricane at Julia's longitude. Julia's intensification was a surprise, since SSTs in the region were about 27.5°C, which is just 1°C above the threshold needed to sustain a Category 1 hurricane.

Hurricane Karl: strongest hurricane ever in the Bay of Campeche
Hurricane Karl was the first major hurricane on record in the Gulf of Mexico's Bay of Campeche--the region bounded by the Yucatan Peninsula on the east. There were two other major hurricanes that grazed the northern edge of the Bay of Campeche, Hurricane Hilda of 1955 and Hurricane Charley of 1951, but Karl is by far the farthest south a major hurricane has been in the Gulf of Mexico. Hurricane records go back to 1851, but Karl was a small storm and could have gotten missed as being a major hurricane before the age of aircraft reconnaissance (1945). Flooding from Karl caused an estimated $5.6 billion in damage to Mexico, making Karl this year's most damaging storm.


Figure 4. Tracks of all major hurricanes since 1851 near Mexico's Bay of Campeche. Karl is most southerly storm on record in the Gulf of Mexico. Image credit: NOAA Coastal Services Center.

Hurricane Paula sets a rapid intensification record
Hurricane Paula, the 16th named storm and 9th hurricane of the season, set a modern record for the fastest intensification from the issuance of the first advisory to hurricane strength. Paula reached hurricane strength just twelve hours after the first advisory was issued. Since reliable record keeping of intensification rates of Atlantic hurricanes began in 1970, when regular satellite coverage became available, no storm has ever intensified into a hurricane that quickly. Hurricane Humberto of 2007 held the previous record for fastest intensification from first advisory issued to hurricane strength--18 hours. However, there is one caveat to keep in mind. It is likely that when the final Atlantic hurricane data base (HURDAT) is constructed, Paula will be recognized as having been a tropical depression 3 - 9 hours before the first advisory was issued. Thus, it may turn out that Paula will be recognized as intensifying from first advisory to a hurricane in eighteen hours, tying Humberto's record. There have been six storms that accomplished the feat in 24 hours.

Hurricane Tomas
The formation of Tomas so far south and east so late in the season (October 29) is unprecedented in the historical record; no named storm has ever been present east of the Lesser Antilles (61.5°W) and south of 12°N latitude so late in the year. Hurricane Six of 1896 came close--it was also a tropical storm south of 12°N and east of 61.5°W on October 29, but nine hours earlier in the day. That storm recurved to the north and missed the Lesser Antilles. Tomas' track through the southern Lesser Antilles so late in the year is unprecedented. Another unusual aspect of Tomas' formation is that we had simultaneous hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean on October 30--Tomas and Shary. There has been only one hurricane season since 1851 that had two simultaneous hurricanes later in the year--1932, when Hurricane Ten and Hurricane Eleven both existed November 7 - 10. Tomas was the 6th deadliest late-season Atlantic hurricane on record, and its preliminary death toll of 31 - 41 makes it the deadliest storm of the 2010 season. Tomas killed at least nine people and did at least $100 million in damage to St. Lucia, making it that island's second most damaging storm on record.


Figure 5. This landslide on St. Lucia after Tomas destroyed an art studio located just below the white car, killing several people. Image credit: Bernd Rac, Anse Chastanet.

Pre-season forecasts do well
Phil Klotzbach and Bill Gray of CSU have a more in-depth summary of this year's hurricane season. Kudos to them and all the other seasonal forecasting groups, whose forecasts of an exceptionally active Atlantic hurricane season were spot-on. CSU will make their first forecast for the 2011 hurricane season on Wednesday, December 12.

Jeff Masters

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571. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Mauritius Meteorological Services
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #9
TEMPETE TROPICALE MODEREE ABELE (02-20102011)
16:00 AM Réunion December 1 2010
=======================================

At 12:00 PM UTC, Moderate Tropical Storm Abele (988 hPa) located at 15.3S 85.9E has 10 minute sustained winds of 45 knots with gusts of 65 knots. The cyclone is reported as moving south southeast at 6 knots.

Dvorak Intensity: T3.5/3.5/D1.0/12H

Gale-Force Winds
======================
20 NM radius from the center

Near Gale-Force Winds
=====================
80 NM radius from the center locally extending up to 120 NM from the center

Forecast and Intensity
========================
12 HRS: 16.1S 87.0E - 50 knots (Forte Tempête Tropicale)
24 HRS: 16.9S 88.1E - 50 knots (Forte Tempête Tropicale)
48 HRS: 18.8S 91.4E - 35 knots (Tempête Tropicale Modereé)
72 HRS: 21.4S 94.3E - 25 knots (Perturbation Tropicale)

Additional Information
======================

System has rapidly intensified within the last 12 hours and has therefore been named "ABELE" by Mauritius Meteorological Services at 0900z. Microwave TRMM 0703z 85ghz reveal now a closed ring of deep convection around a warm point. ABELE keeps on intensifying and shows now a METEOSAT7 visible channel curved band patter wrapping at about .10, very close to severe tropical storm stage. System is expected to track east-southeastward undergoing the steering flow of the low to mid levels highs in its north and in its east. In this forecast track, the system should keep on intensifying within the next 12-24 hours. Beyond, it is expected to weaken, undergoing a strengthening northwesterly wind shear in its south and marginal oceanic heat content on cooler and cooler sea surface temperatures.
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 50 Comments: 45211
The hurricane talisman necklace is now hanging back on the beachcombing jar in the front hallway, and the beachcombing necklace is around my neck! Bring on the sea glass and sea bean season ! The pantry in the supply room is now open for grazing, as long as the looter logs what's taken out for shopping in the Spring. We are looking at our first freeze here on the beach on the FL Panhandle. Ahhhhhh......carry on. Next Player.....Fire Season. Grrrr.
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Something to talk about on a slow day. Changing hurricanes through plankton.
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Complete Update





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565. IKE
Looks like post 548 has messed up the blog.
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564. IKE
Quoting PakaSurvivor:


Currently 36.9 in Crestview. Ike, you must have had an appointment in Pensacola. I try to stay off of I-10 and SR85 when we have weather like we did yesterday. Not the roads are bad it the idiot drives on those roads.


My wife had to sign some papers at an attornies office. Fortunately I have a 2010 Ford Focus...handles excellently.

Just a pain getting around 18 wheelers with the spray.

It's cold this morning. Now at 37.0...windy. Had 1.47 inches of rain yesterday.

Suns up!
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This is a full-length animation of the complete 2010 Hurricane Season (from June 1 through November 30) as compiled from available GOES East Hurricane Sector satellite imagery.
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Quoting IKE:
37.6 at my location...Defuniak Springs,FL.

Took a trip on I10 yesterday from DFS to Pensacola. Terrible weather. That road is a nightmare when it's raining.


Currently 36.9 in Crestview. Ike, you must have had an appointment in Pensacola. I try to stay off of I-10 and SR85 when we have weather like we did yesterday. Not the roads are bad it the idiot drives on those roads.
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560. IKE
37.6 at my location...Defuniak Springs,FL.

Took a trip on I10 yesterday from DFS to Pensacola. Terrible weather. That road is a nightmare when it's raining.
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Good Morning...

Now that HURR Season is officially over, we'll now switch to Winter WX. Sure looks like this is going to be a very interesting Winter as we already going to start having chances of wintry mix to snow in the Gulf coast next week and we're just getting started with Winter. :O
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Whilst you fellas are basking in 14-15degsC (Ithaca), we're having -16degsC and lower (Avimore, Scotland) and 2 or 3 feet of snow, (Northumberland, England). Very exceptional for a relatively small, maritime, island at these latitudes. Still, it's great to have the neighbours in for a hot lunch; happened twice so far!

Cheers ...... Boboffife
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Quoting Neapolitan:
This is one of my favorite tornado picks of the year; it was a finalist in the 2010 Energizer Ultimate Photo Contest. Well, I like it, anyway...


It's a landspout, isn't it? It's a nature's wonder!
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MOBILE NWS
LONG TERM...FRIDAY NIGHT ON...FRIDAY NIGHT...WITH A STRONG SHORTWAVE
DIVING SOUTHEAST OVER THE NORTHEASTERN CONUS...THE ECMWF COMES IN LINE
WITH THE NAM...SHIFTING THE SURFACE HIGH OVER THE FA EASTWARD AND
RETURNING ONSHORE FLOW...AND MOISTURE TO THE FA...WHILE THE
GFS...EVEN WITH SOME EASTWARD SHIFTING OF THE SURFACE HIGH...KEEPS
THE MOISTURE RETURN WEST OF THE FA...OVER SE LA AND MS.THROUGH
SATURDAY INTO SATURDAY NIGHT...THIS SOUTHEAST DIVING SHORTWAVE PUSHES
A SURFACE FRONT WITH. THE ECMWF IS MUCH MORE AGGRESSIVE IN PUSHING
THIS FRONT SOUTH...SUCH THAT BY MIDNIGHT SATURDAY...THE ECMWF IS
ADVERTISING THE FRONT MOVING OVER THE MARINE PORTION OF THE
FA...WHILE THE 00Z GFS HAS IT JUST MOVING OVER CENTRAL AL/MS. THE 06Z
GFS JUST CAME IN AS I TYPE THIS...AND HAS SPED THINGS UP
SIGNIFICANTLY...TO EQUAL THE ECMWF TO THIS POINT.

THIS TIMING DIFFERENCE CONTINUES THROUGH THE WEEKEND...WITH THE ECMWF
ADVERTISING A STRONG SHORTWAVE DIVING SE OVER THE EASTERN CONUS
SUNDAY INTO MONDAY...WITH A STRONG RIDGE HAVING BUILT UP OVER THE
US/CA ROCKIES SOUTH OVER MEX. BY MONDAY MORN...THIS NEXT SHORTWAVE IS
TOPPING THE SOUTHERN US ROCKIES...WITH SOUTHERLY FLOW OVER THE PLAINS.

RESULT FOR MONDAY THROUGH TUESDAY IS THE GFS ADVERTISING A ROUND OF
RAIN...AND EVEN SOME WINTRY PRECIP MIXED IN AT THE END
TUESDAY...WHILST THE ECMWF IS DRY THE FIRST SEVERAL DAYS OF THE
COMING WEEK. THIS SCENARIO IS A FLIP-FLOP FROM YESTERDAY...WITH THE
ECMWF ADVERTISING A POSSIBILITY OF RAIN ENDING WITH A WINTRY
MIX...WHILE THE GFS WAS DRY. WITH THIS FLIP-FLOPPING...HAVE LESS THAN
AVERAGE CONFIDENCE IN THE FORECAST IN THE LATTER HALF OF THE
FORECAST.

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554. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Mauritius Meteorological Services
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #8
DEPRESSION TROPICALE 02-20102011
10:00 AM Réunion December 1 2010
=======================================

At 6:00 AM UTC, Tropical Depression 02R (997 hPa) located at 14.8S 85.4E has 10 minute sustained winds of 30 knots with gusts of 45 knots. The depression is reported as moving south southeast at 5 knots.

Dvorak Intensity: T2.5/2.5/D0.5/12H

Gale-Force Winds
======================
80 NM radius from the center locally extending up to 120 NM from the center

Forecast and Intensity
========================
12 HRS: 15.6S 85.9E - 35 knots (Tempête Tropicale Modereé)
24 HRS: 16.5S 86.9E - 40 knots (Tempête Tropicale Modereé)
48 HRS: 18.2S 89.9E - 30 knots (Depression Tropicale)
72 HRS: 19.8S 92.5E - 30 knots (Depression Tropicale)

Additional Information
======================

Due to its southward motion, system is penetrating within a weak sheared environment under the upper level ridge. Low level inflow remains good, thanks to the equatorward westerlies and the good trade winds in the south. Infrared pattern has therefore improved during the second half of the night and system shows now a curved band pattern wrapping around .4 to .6. System is expected to track east southeastward undergoing the steering flow of the low to mid levels high in its north. In this forecast track, the system should keep on intensifying within the next 24 hours and should reach moderate tropical storm status. Beyond, it is expected to weaken, undergoing a strengthening northwesterly wind shear in its south and marginal oceanic heat content on cooler and cooler sea surface temperatures.
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552. BtnTx
December 1 ?
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what the hell happen to the page
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550. BtnTx
I would like to have that awesome pic up on a wall
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549. BtnTx
Quoting Neapolitan:
This is one of my favorite tornado picks of the year; it was a finalist in the 2010 Energizer Ultimate Photo Contest. It's a weak but very photogenic Colorado twister taken by Zachary Caron:

Click for larger image:

Appropriate tropical weather-related image

Well, I like it, anyway...
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Quoting sunlinepr:
Exclusive video shot by Mike Theiss from ground zero of Hurricane Katrina's historic 28 foot storm surge that ripped through Gulfport, Mississippi on August 29th, 2005.




Nice post, sunline. Thanks!
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Exclusive video shot by Mike Theiss from ground zero of Hurricane Katrina's historic 28 foot storm surge that ripped through Gulfport, Mississippi on August 29th, 2005.

Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9780
Quoting Orcasystems:


I am hoping Toronto can measure their snowfall without using the "c"'

Instead of 2 cm, the should get 2 m :)
ya ya sure we will
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
astro you are going to get that much snow this year you will not want to see any for a while


I am hoping Toronto can measure their snowfall without using the "c"'

Instead of 2 cm, the should get 2 m :)
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Quoting AstroHurricane001:


About time S. Ontario got more than 1 cm of snow.
astro you are going to get that much snow this year you will not want to see any for a while
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Quoting atmoaggie:


About time S. Ontario got more than 1 cm of snow.
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Tornado captured during NOAA Project Vortex. The photo was taken south of Dimmit, Texas, in June 1995.
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9780
Quoting xcool:

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539. xcool

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This is one of my favorite tornado picks of the year; it was a finalist in the 2010 Energizer Ultimate Photo Contest. It's a weak but very photogenic Colorado twister taken by Zachary Caron:

Click for larger image:

Appropriate tropical weather-related image


Well, I like it, anyway...
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Quoting atmoaggie:
The large image, 250m resolution version of that shot: http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/?2008347-1212/Mississippi.A2008347.1650.250m.jpg


If I still had dial up, I'd never have been able to view that in a million years. :P
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 572 Comments: 20344
Quoting KoritheMan:


Same here, although I wasn't born quite as early as you were. No, I'm not insinuating anything about your age, either. ;)
The large image, 250m resolution version of that shot: http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/?2008347-1212/Mississippi.A2008347.1650.250m.jpg
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Quoting atmoaggie:
Longest I've seen in stick around in 30+ years in SE LA.


Same here, although I wasn't born quite as early as you were. No, I'm not insinuating anything about your age, either. ;)
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 572 Comments: 20344
Quoting KoritheMan:


I remember that event. 'Twas quite fun. And unusual, of course. :)

Snow was on the ground for like three or four days.
Longest I've seen it stick around in 30 years in SE LA.
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Quoting atmoaggie:
Dec 12, 2008 satellite image, ~30 hours after the snow stopped falling...no, there are NO clouds in the shot. That's snow cover.



I remember that event. 'Twas quite fun. And unusual, of course. :)

Snow was on the ground for like three or four days.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 572 Comments: 20344
Quoting KoritheMan:


Actually yes. February 12 was the last snowfall event for my area. We actually had three snow events during the winter of 2009-2010. And, while this year's winter promises not to be a particularly severe one for us, I'm still hoping that this possible snowstorm pans out.

You're in Mobile, though, right? Hate to break it to you, but uh... good luck with seeing any appreciable snowfall there. :/
Dec 12, 2008 satellite image, ~30 hours after the snow stopped falling...no, there are NO clouds in the shot. That's snow cover.

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Dramatic storm clouds
Link

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Complete Update





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I don't know why they use some names over and others never get on the list. oh well...have a nice evening everyone. over and out.
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Quoting Neapolitan:

What I find particularly, er, amusing about the replacement names is that "Rina" is merely a variation of "Katrina", while "Katia" is a variation of "Katie", which is itself a short form of "Katherine"--of which "Katrina" is a variant form.

I guess unique female 'K' names are hard to come by, huh? ;-)


Yes, but it's likely the general public won't notice this.
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It's 72.5 degrees along the beach here tonight at Canaveral Seashore.
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Quoting IKE:
TODAY MARKS THE END OF THE 2010 HURRICANE SEASON. ISSUANCE OF THIS
PRODUCT WILL RESUME ON 1 JUNE 2011. SHOULD THE CURRENT DISTURBANCE
DEVELOP FURTHER...OR ANY OTHER SIGNIFICANT DISTURBANCES DEVELOP
DURING THE OFF-SEASON...SPECIAL TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOKS WOULD BE
ISSUED AS NEEDED UNDER THE SAME WMO HEADER ABNT20 KNHC...AND AWIPS
HEADER MIATWOAT.
.............................................

Best news I've read all day.

It's over.....



"It's over". You've been saying that since September.
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Quoting Neapolitan:

What I find particularly, er, amusing about the replacement names is that "Rina" is merely a variation of "Katrina", while "Katia" is a variation of "Katie", which is itself a short form of "Katherine"--of which "Katrina" is a variant form.

I guess unique female 'K' names are hard to come by, huh? ;-)


You gotta like Don though lol
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Tornado Watch
Statement as of 9:03 PM EST on November 30, 2010

Tornado Watch 759 remains in effect until 1000 PM EST for the following locations

GA
. Georgia counties included are
Baldwin Bleckley Burke
Columbia Dodge Elbert
Emanuel Franklin Glascock
Habersham Hancock Hart
Jefferson Johnson Laurens
Lincoln McDuffie Montgomery
Pulaski Rabun Richmond
Stephens Taliaferro Telfair
Toombs Treutlen Twiggs
Warren Washington Wheeler
Wilcox Wilkes Wilkinson
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Quoting IKE:
TODAY MARKS THE END OF THE 2010 HURRICANE SEASON. ISSUANCE OF THIS
PRODUCT WILL RESUME ON 1 JUNE 2011. SHOULD THE CURRENT DISTURBANCE
DEVELOP FURTHER...OR ANY OTHER SIGNIFICANT DISTURBANCES DEVELOP
DURING THE OFF-SEASON...SPECIAL TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOKS WOULD BE
ISSUED AS NEEDED UNDER THE SAME WMO HEADER ABNT20 KNHC...AND AWIPS
HEADER MIATWOAT.
.............................................

Best news I've read all day.

It's over.....



Just one question Ike. You wished em away all year, so what is the winning powerball numbers? :)
Member Since: August 11, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 895
Got your .hu link. Thank you.

515 517
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.