Hurricane season draws to a close

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:01 PM GMT on November 29, 2010

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November 30 marks the final day of the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season--a strange and highly active season. While it was an exceptionally active year, with 19 named storms, 12 hurricanes, and 5 intense hurricanes, deaths and damages were far below what one would expect from so much activity. To me, this year is most memorable for what didn't happen--we did not get a full fledged hurricane rip through the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, nor did a devastating hurricane cause massive loss of life in Haiti's vulnerable earthquake zone. However, two hurricanes from this year are virtually certain to get their names retired--Tomas and Igor--and two other storms that did billions of damage to Mexico, Karl and Alex, are likely to have their names retired, as well.

The 19 named storms, 12 hurricanes, and 5 intense hurricanes were 198%, 203%, and 217% of the 1950-2000 average for named storms, hurricanes and major hurricanes, respectively. The nineteen named storms ties 2010 with 1995 and 1887 for 3rd place for most number of named storms in an Atlantic hurricane season. Only 2005 (28 named storms) and 1933 (21 named storms) were busier (Atlantic hurricane records go back to 1851, though there were likely many missed named storms prior to the beginning of satellite coverage in the mid-1960s.) This year also featured twelve hurricanes, tying 2010 with 1969 for second place for most hurricanes in a season. The record is held by 2005 with fifteen hurricanes. The five major hurricanes this year puts us in a tie for ninth place for most major hurricanes in a season. This year's Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index was 163, putting it in 13th place for ACE since 1944. A "hyperactive" hurricane season is considered to have an ACE index of >175% of the median. According to Wikipedia, median ACE measured over the period 1951–2000 for the Atlantic basin was 87.5, so 2010 is a hyperactive year by that definition (183% of the median.)



Friendly steering currents for the U.S.
As active as the 2010 season was, only one weak tropical storm made a direct landfall on the U.S. (Tropical Storm Bonnie, which hit South Florida in August as minimal tropical storm with 40 mph winds.) During the 15-year active hurricane period from 1995 - 2009, 33% of all named storms in the Atlantic hit the U.S., and 30% of all Atlantic hurricanes hit the U.S. at hurricane strength. Thus, the U.S. should have expected the landfall of six named storms, four of them being hurricanes, and two being intense hurricanes. So, the U.S. really lucked out this year. For comparison, here's how the U.S. fared in the four other hurricane seasons as busy or more busy:

2005: 28 storms, 7 hit the U.S. (5 were hurricanes, and 4 of those major hurricanes)
1933: 21 storms, 7 hit the U.S. (5 were hurricanes, and 3 of those were major hurricanes)
1995: 19 storms, 5 hit the U.S. (2 were hurricanes, and 1 was major)
1887: 19 storms, 5 hit the U.S. (3 were hurricanes, no majors)

We had twelve hurricanes in the Atlantic in 2010, yet none of them struck the U.S. Since 1900 there is no precedent of an Atlantic hurricane season with ten or more hurricanes where none has struck the U.S. as a hurricane. The eleven previous seasons with ten or more hurricanes--1870, 1878, 1886, 1893, 1916, 1933, 1950, 1969, 1995, 1998, and 2005--each had at least two hurricane strikes on the U.S. Since hurricane Ike (2008), there have been eighteen consecutive non US-landfalling hurricanes. Such a sequence last happened between Irene (1999) and Lili (2002), with 22 consecutive non US-landfalling hurricanes, and between Allen (1980) and Alicia (1983) with seventeen consecutive non US-landfalling hurricanes (thanks go to Adam Lea of tropicalstormrisk.com for these stats.)

No major Category 3 and stronger hurricanes have hit the U.S. since Hurricane Wilma of 2005. This is just the third such major hurricane drought since 1851. The other two such 5-year major hurricane droughts were 1901 - 1905 and 1910 - 1914. Also, 2010 is the only year besides 1951 when there have been five major hurricanes in the Atlantic, and none have hit the U.S. (1958 is also listed as such a year, but preliminary results from a re-analysis effort shows that Hurricane Helene hit North Carolina as a major hurricane that year.) There has never been a six year period without a U.S. major hurricane landfall.

The reason the U.S. got so lucky--and that Canada and Mexico took a much more severe beating than usual--was that the Azores/Bermuda high was farther east than usual, and there were more strong troughs of low pressure over the U.S. East Coast than usual. In addition, there was stronger high pressure than usual over the U.S. Gulf Coast, which deflected Caribbean storms into Mexico.

Intense hurricanes in unprecedented locations
Another remarkable feature of this year was that we saw three major hurricanes in rare or unprecedented locations. Julia was the easternmost major hurricane on record, Karl was the southernmost major hurricane on record in the Gulf of Mexico, and Earl was the 4th strongest hurricane so far north. This unusual major hurricane activity is likely due, in part, to the record tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures this year. Sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic from the Caribbean to the coast of Africa were at their warmest levels on record for almost the entire year.

Rare simultaneous hurricane occurrences and activity levels
On September 16, there were three simultaneous hurricanes--Karl, Igor, and Julia--in the Atlantic. According to Phil Klotzbach at Colorado State, three simultaneous Atlantic hurricanes is a rare phenomena, having occurred only eight other times since 1851. The other years were 1893, 1926, 1950, 1961, 1967, 1980, 1995, and 1998. Two of those years--1998 and 1893--had four simultaneous hurricanes.


Figure 2. Triple trouble: From left to right, Hurricanes Karl, Igor, and Julia roil the Atlantic. Image credit: NASA/GSFC.

On September 15, Hurricane Julia and Hurricane Igor were both Category 4 storms. This was just the second time in recorded history that two simultaneous Category 4 or stronger storms have occurred in the Atlantic. The only other occurrence was on 06 UTC September 16, 1926, when the Great Miami Hurricane and Hurricane Four were both Category 4 storms for a six-hour period. The were also two years, 1999 and 1958, when we missed having two simultaneous Category 4 hurricanes by six hours. The four Category 4 storms in 2010 makes this year tied for third place for most Category 4+ storms in a year. Only two other seasons have had as many as five Category 4 or stronger storms (2005 and 1999). This year is also holds the record for the earliest a fourth Category 4 or stronger storm has formed (though the fourth Category 4 of 1999, Hurricane Gert, formed just 3 hours later on September 15 in 1999.) We also had four Cat 4+ storms in just twenty days, which beat the previous record for shortest time span for four Cat 4+ storms to appear. The previous record was 1999--24 days. Eleven named storms formed between August 22 and September 29. This is the most named storms to form during this period, breaking the old record of nine named storms set in 1933, 1949, 1984 and 2002 (thanks go to Phil Klotzbach of CSU for the last two stats.)

Rare activity levels
Five hurricanes formed during the month of October. Only 1870 (six hurricanes) and 1950 (five hurricanes) have had five or more October hurricanes. We also had four Cat 4+ storms in just twenty days, which beat the previous record for shortest time span for four Cat 4+ storms to appear. The previous record was 1999--24 days. Eleven named storms formed between August 22 and September 29. This is the most named storms to form during this period, breaking the old record of nine named storms set in 1933, 1949, 1984 and 2002 (thanks go to Phil Klotzbach of CSU for the last two stats.)

Hurricane Alex
Hurricane Alex had the highest sustained winds (100 mph) of any June hurricane since Hurricane Alma of 1966 (125 mph.)

Hurricane Earl
As Hurricane Earl approached North Carolina on September 2, its 140 mph winds made it the fourth strongest Atlantic hurricane on record so far north. Only Hurricane Esther of 1961, Hurricane Connie of 1955, and Hurricane Two of 1922 had stronger winds at a more northerly latitude.


Figure 2. Hurricane Earl as seen from the International Space Station on Thursday, September 2, 2010. Image credit: NASA astronaut Douglas Wheelock.

Hurricane Igor: Newfoundland's worst hurricane in memory
Igor killed one person on Newfoundland, and damage exceeded $100 million, making Igor the most damaging tropical cyclone in Newfoundland history. A summary of the impact of Igor prepared by Environment Canada put it this way:

"Hurricane Igor and its severe impacts certainly represent a rare event in Newfoundland history which has been described as the worst in memory. In statistical terms, this was effectively a 50 - 100 year event depending on how one chooses to define it. There are no hurricanes/post tropical events of this magnitude striking Newfoundland in the modern era. Hurricane Juan in Nova Scotia was the last Atlantic Canadian hurricane to cause extreme damage. Prior to the naming of hurricanes, the 1935 Newfoundland Hurricane 75 years ago was of similar intensity."


Figure 3. A ravine carved by Hurricane Igor's flood waters washed out the Trans-Canada Highway, isolating Southeast Newfoundland from the rest of the province. Image credit: CBC News.

Hurricane Julia: strongest hurricane so far east
Hurricane Julia put on a remarkable and unexpected burst of intensification to become the season's fourth Category 4 storm. Julia's 135 mph winds made it the strongest hurricane on record so far east; the previous record was held by the eighth storm of 1926, which was only a 120 mph Category 3 hurricane at Julia's longitude. Julia's intensification was a surprise, since SSTs in the region were about 27.5°C, which is just 1°C above the threshold needed to sustain a Category 1 hurricane.

Hurricane Karl: strongest hurricane ever in the Bay of Campeche
Hurricane Karl was the first major hurricane on record in the Gulf of Mexico's Bay of Campeche--the region bounded by the Yucatan Peninsula on the east. There were two other major hurricanes that grazed the northern edge of the Bay of Campeche, Hurricane Hilda of 1955 and Hurricane Charley of 1951, but Karl is by far the farthest south a major hurricane has been in the Gulf of Mexico. Hurricane records go back to 1851, but Karl was a small storm and could have gotten missed as being a major hurricane before the age of aircraft reconnaissance (1945). Flooding from Karl caused an estimated $5.6 billion in damage to Mexico, making Karl this year's most damaging storm.


Figure 4. Tracks of all major hurricanes since 1851 near Mexico's Bay of Campeche. Karl is most southerly storm on record in the Gulf of Mexico. Image credit: NOAA Coastal Services Center.

Hurricane Paula sets a rapid intensification record
Hurricane Paula, the 16th named storm and 9th hurricane of the season, set a modern record for the fastest intensification from the issuance of the first advisory to hurricane strength. Paula reached hurricane strength just twelve hours after the first advisory was issued. Since reliable record keeping of intensification rates of Atlantic hurricanes began in 1970, when regular satellite coverage became available, no storm has ever intensified into a hurricane that quickly. Hurricane Humberto of 2007 held the previous record for fastest intensification from first advisory issued to hurricane strength--18 hours. However, there is one caveat to keep in mind. It is likely that when the final Atlantic hurricane data base (HURDAT) is constructed, Paula will be recognized as having been a tropical depression 3 - 9 hours before the first advisory was issued. Thus, it may turn out that Paula will be recognized as intensifying from first advisory to a hurricane in eighteen hours, tying Humberto's record. There have been six storms that accomplished the feat in 24 hours.

Hurricane Tomas
The formation of Tomas so far south and east so late in the season (October 29) is unprecedented in the historical record; no named storm has ever been present east of the Lesser Antilles (61.5°W) and south of 12°N latitude so late in the year. Hurricane Six of 1896 came close--it was also a tropical storm south of 12°N and east of 61.5°W on October 29, but nine hours earlier in the day. That storm recurved to the north and missed the Lesser Antilles. Tomas' track through the southern Lesser Antilles so late in the year is unprecedented. Another unusual aspect of Tomas' formation is that we had simultaneous hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean on October 30--Tomas and Shary. There has been only one hurricane season since 1851 that had two simultaneous hurricanes later in the year--1932, when Hurricane Ten and Hurricane Eleven both existed November 7 - 10. Tomas was the 6th deadliest late-season Atlantic hurricane on record, and its preliminary death toll of 31 - 41 makes it the deadliest storm of the 2010 season. Tomas killed at least nine people and did at least $100 million in damage to St. Lucia, making it that island's second most damaging storm on record.


Figure 5. This landslide on St. Lucia after Tomas destroyed an art studio located just below the white car, killing several people. Image credit: Bernd Rac, Anse Chastanet.

Pre-season forecasts do well
Phil Klotzbach and Bill Gray of CSU have a more in-depth summary of this year's hurricane season. Kudos to them and all the other seasonal forecasting groups, whose forecasts of an exceptionally active Atlantic hurricane season were spot-on. CSU will make their first forecast for the 2011 hurricane season on Wednesday, December 12.

Jeff Masters

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Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2133
Quoting EYEStoSEA:


Tornadodude....can u estimate a time for that line in Natchitoches to come into Jackson, ms and surrounding areas ?


Id go with probably 5 hours or so

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damage reported in Atlanta, Louisiana
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Quoting tornadodude:


that is the moisture that's fueling the storms over Louisiana right now


Tornadodude....can u estimate a time for that line in Natchitoches to come into Jackson, ms and surrounding areas ?
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Quoting tornadodude:


that is the moisture that's fueling the storms over Louisiana right now


I was talking about the first radar i put up.. thats near my viewing area.. but I know whats happening towards LA tho..
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163. MTWX
Going to be a long night!
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thought these images are nice colorful graphics..
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Quoting FLPandhandleJG:
already getting some pop up t'storms in my area..



that is the moisture that's fueling the storms over Louisiana right now
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already getting some pop up t'storms in my area..



Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2133
man this isnt good.. hope everyone be safe today and into the night..
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Quoting MTWX:
Holy cow look at the circulation on that one!!Link


looked impressive, may be weakening
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You all stay safe and have a good evening. I will see ya'll tomorrow.
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156. MTWX
Holy cow look at the circulation on that one!!Link
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NEXRAD Radar
Fort Polk, Base Reflectivity 0.50 Degree Elevation Range 124 NMI

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College of DuPage Meteorology
Severe Weather and Flash Flood Warnings


TORNADO WARNING SHREVEPORT LA - KSHV 257 PM CST MON NOV 29 2010
TORNADO WARNING SHREVEPORT LA - KSHV 230 PM CST MON NOV 29 2010
TORNADO WARNING SHREVEPORT LA - KSHV 201 PM CST MON NOV 29 2010
TORNADO WARNING SHREVEPORT LA - KSHV 130 PM CST MON NOV 29 2010
TORNADO WARNING LAKE CHARLES LA - KLCH 110 PM CST MON NOV 29 2010


920
WFUS54 KSHV 292057
TORSHV
LAC043-127-292130-
/O.NEW.KSHV.TO.W.0073.101129T2057Z-101129T2130Z/

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SHREVEPORT LA
257 PM CST MON NOV 29 2010

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN SHREVEPORT HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
NORTHWESTERN GRANT PARISH IN NORTH CENTRAL LOUISIANA...
SOUTHWESTERN WINN PARISH IN NORTH CENTRAL LOUISIANA...
THIS INCLUDES THE CITY OF WINNFIELD...

* UNTIL 330 PM CST

* AT 255 PM CST...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE METEOROLOGISTS DETECTED A
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO NEAR
MONTGOMERY...OR 11 MILES SOUTHEAST OF NATCHITOCHES...MOVING
NORTHEAST AT 40 MPH. DOPPLER RADAR SHOWS STRONG ROTATION WITH
THIS THUNDERSTORM.

* OTHER LOCATIONS IN THE WARNING INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO
ATLANTA...CALVIN AND JOYCE.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

THE SAFEST PLACE TO BE DURING A TORNADO IS IN A BASEMENT. GET UNDER A
WORKBENCH OR OTHER PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT IS
AVAILABLE...SEEK SHELTER ON THE LOWEST FLOOR OF THE BUILDING IN AN
INTERIOR HALLWAY OR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET. USE BLANKETS OR PILLOWS TO
COVER YOUR BODY AND ALWAYS STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS.

IF IN MOBILE HOMES OR VEHICLES...EVACUATE THEM AND GET INSIDE A
SUBSTANTIAL SHELTER. IF NO SHELTER IS AVAILABLE...LIE FLAT IN THE
NEAREST DITCH OR OTHER LOW SPOT AND COVER YOUR HEAD WITH YOUR HANDS.

STAY TUNED FOR FURTHER UPDATES FROM YOUR NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN
SHREVEPORT.
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152. MTWX
Quoting EYEStoSEA:
Rankin/Simpson Co area

WOW, you had those couple of F-1's in your area last Tuesday! Were they close to you?
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Quoting MTWX:

No kidding! There is always the night time lightning to take advantage of though!


thats true!
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150. MTWX
Quoting tornadodude:


so you cant chase em (;

rotation developing


No kidding! There is always the night time lightning to take advantage of though!
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Rankin/Simpson Co area
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Quoting EYEStoSEA:
Closely watching from scentral Ms.......please keeps reports and visuals coming as the Weather Channel Is out in "LaLA Land" sure there are more like me lurking and watching WU....TIA


will do, stay safe!
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147. MTWX
Quoting EYEStoSEA:
Closely watching from scentral Ms.......please keeps reports and visuals coming as the Weather Channel Is out in "LaLA Land" sure there are more like me lurking and watching WU....TIA

They always are!! Thats why I stick close to this blog and SPC's website. Where at in SCentral MS?? I live in Columbus.
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Closely watching from scentral Ms.......please keeps reports and visuals coming as the Weather Channel Is out in "LaLA Land" sure there are more like me lurking and watching WU....TIA
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Quoting MTWX:
How come the wicked storms alway come through here in the middle of the night?!?


so you cant chase em (;

rotation developing

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144. MTWX
How come the wicked storms alway come through here in the middle of the night?!?
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The concern will increase as the Line along the Cold Front moves Eastward this evening and overnight.

The Threat will run thru Midnight into the early Morning Hours from NOLA Eastward across the Miss and Ala Gulf Coast,then into the Fla.panhandle come dawn.
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Quoting HurricaneDean07:
One thing ive been paying very close attention to is all the "I" Names that have been retired this decade:
2000 none
2001 Iris- 145 MPH Cat.4 russian
2002 Isidore- 125 MPH Cat.3 russian
2003 Isabel- 160 MPH Cat.5 ?
2004 Ivan- 165 MPH Cat.5 russian
2005 none
2006 none
2007 none
2008 Ike- 145 MPH Cat.4 russian
2009 none
2010 Igor- 155 MPH Cat.4 russian

more than half of the years this decade contain a retired I name.

Another interesting thing,
Same naming lists
2002 - Isidore ~ 2008 - Ike
2004 - Ivan ~ 2010 - Igor
both years of different naming list are only 2 years apart.
all of the names are russian.

Isidore isn't Russian, it is more Germanic in nature. Also, Isabel is Spanish in origin. And... Ike isn't Russian.

(this is coming from someone who has taken 2 years of Russian language and culture)
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Quoting hydrus:
We may see more severe weather from this than originally forecast.


yeah the most intense shear hasnt even moved in yet
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NEXRAD Radar
New Orleans, Base Reflectivity 0.50 Degree Elevation Range 124 NMI

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Quoting tornadodude:


no kidding!

rotation tightening up on this cell



We may see more severe weather from this than originally forecast.
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Still under just a watch here

tatement as of 2:03 PM CST on November 29, 2010

Tornado Watch 753 remains in effect until 900 PM CST for the
following locations

TX
. Texas counties included are

Angelina Hardin Jasper
Jefferson Nacogdoches Newton
Orange Panola Sabine
San Augustine Shelby Tyler



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Quoting MTWX:
Talk about starting the afternoon off with a bang! Just waiting for the reports to start rolling in.


no kidding!

rotation tightening up on this cell



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135. MTWX
Talk about starting the afternoon off with a bang! Just waiting for the reports to start rolling in.
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"Hurricane Paula sets a rapid intensification record
Hurricane Paula, the 16th named storm and 9th hurricane of the season, set a modern record for the fastest intensification from the issuance of the first advisory to hurricane strength. Paula reached hurricane strength just twelve hours after the first advisory was issued. Since reliable record keeping of intensification rates of Atlantic hurricanes began in 1970, when regular satellite coverage became available, no storm has ever intensified into a hurricane that quickly."


Lol....for real? Everyone who watched that storm knew it was a TS 12-24 hours before the NHC finally made their move. It was just about the easiest diagnoses for classification as I have ever seen, and yet they had to wait for a plane for an entire day while it was lashing the Honduras/Nicaraguan coasts with northwest winds. Paula is no record-breaker, and never will be.

Records can be determined by the course of action taken by the NHC, and the very fact that they had to set the initial advisory intensity at 60mph speaks to the fact that they missed its formation entirely, and it happened far earlier than when they finally classified it. It doesn't deserve the record for intensification to a hurricane.
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hey guys I have a new blog out come and check it out

Link
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very pronounced rotation

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back later...
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Special weather statement
Issued by Environment Canada Ontario region.
2:40 PM EST Monday 29 November 2010.

Special weather statement continued for..
City of Toronto
Windsor - Essex - Chatham-Kent
Sarnia - Lambton
Elgin
London - Middlesex
Simcoe - Delhi - Norfolk
Dunnville - Caledonia - Haldimand
Oxford - Brant
Niagara
City of Hamilton
Halton - Peel
York - Durham
Huron - Perth
Waterloo - Wellington
Dufferin - Innisfil
Grey - Bruce
Barrie - Orillia - Midland
Belleville - Quinte - Northumberland
Kingston - Prince Edward
Peterborough - Kawartha Lakes
Stirling - Tweed - South Frontenac
Bancroft - Bon Echo Park
Brockville - Leeds and Grenville
City of Ottawa
Gatineau
Prescott and Russell
Cornwall - Morrisburg
Smiths Falls - Lanark - Sharbot Lake
Parry Sound - Muskoka
Haliburton
Renfrew - Pembroke - Barry's Bay
Algonquin
Burk's Falls - Bayfield Inlet.

Rainy, windy and very mild on Tuesday.

A significant low pressure system over Iowa this afternoon is
forecast to intensify and move northeastwards towards Lake Superior
Tuesday. It will pick up considerable moisture from the gulf of
Mexico along with very mild air siphoned northwards in the
strengthening southerly winds ahead of the low.

Current indications suggest the rain will begin shortly after
midnight tonight over Southwestern Ontario, reaching Toronto in
The pre-dawn hours and the extreme east around midday Tuesday. It
will ease off with the passage of a cold front in the southwest late
Tuesday but linger much of Tuesday night around the Golden Horseshoe
and persist through much of Wednesday for Eastern Ontario.

General rainfall amounts from this system will be in the 15 to 30 mm
range with somewhat less for regions neighbouring Lake Huron and
Georgian Bay. Higher amounts are expected for Eastern Ontario where
total rainfall amounts from both Tuesday and Wednesday may very well
exceed 50 mm. Strong southerly winds along with temperatures about
10 degrees above the seasonal averages are also expected for most
regions Tuesday, except for regions bordering the Québec border
Where weaker southeast winds will keep a lid on temperatures to
About 5 degrees above average.

This is a dynamic developing system with uncertainties regarding the
paths of the heavier rainfall corridors. Environment Canada will
continue to monitor the development of this system closely and
Update this statement accordingly and/or issue watches and warnings
if the rainfall amounts are significantly more than what is expected
at this time.

Listen for further statements. Additional information
may also be found by consulting the latest public forecast.
The next public forecast will be issued by 3.30 PM.

END/OSPC
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 175 Comments: 54827
Quoting HurricaneDean07:
One thing ive been paying very close attention to is all the "I" Names that have been retired this decade:
2000 none
2001 Iris- 145 MPH Cat.4 russian
2002 Isidore- 125 MPH Cat.3 russian
2003 Isabel- 160 MPH Cat.5 ?
2004 Ivan- 165 MPH Cat.5 russian
2005 none
2006 none
2007 none
2008 Ike- 145 MPH Cat.4 russian
2009 none
2010 Igor- 155 MPH Cat.4 russian

more than half of the years this decade contain a retired I name.

Another interesting thing,
Same naming lists
2002 - Isidore ~ 2008 - Ike
2004 - Ivan ~ 2010 - Igor
both years of different naming list are only 2 years apart.
all of the names are russian.


Hmmm.... some research at www.behindthename.com:

ISIDORE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Hebrew
Pronounced: IZ-i-dawr (English), ee-zee-DOR (French) [key]
From the Greek name Ισιδωρος (Isidoros) which meant "gift of Isis", from the name of the Egyptian goddess ISIS combined with Greek δωρον (doron) "gift". Saint Isidore of Seville was a 6th-century archbishop, historian and theologian. It has never been popular in the English-speaking world among Christians, though it has historically been a common Jewish name.


IKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IEK [key]
Diminutive of ISAAC. This was the nickname of the American president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969), based on the initial sound of his surname.


IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, French, Spanish
Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch) [key]
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the English word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.


ISABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Pronounced: ee-sah-BEL (Spanish), IZ-ə-bel (English), ee-za-BEL (French), ee-zah-BEL (German) [key]
Medieval Provençal form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.
This is the usual form of name Elizabeth in Spain and Portugal, though elsewhere it is considered a parallel name, such as in France where it is used alongside Élisabeth.


IVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovene, Macedonian, English
Other Scripts: Иван (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), Іван (Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ee-VAHN (Russian), IE-vən (English) [key]
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.


IGOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Игорь (Russian), Игор (Macedonian)
Pronounced: EE-gahr (Russian), EE-gawr (Polish) [key]
Russian form of Ingvarr (see INGVAR). It was brought to Russia by the Varangians in the 10th century. This name was borne by Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), a Russian composer whose most famous work is 'The Rite of Spring'.
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possible tornado on the ground

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Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 175 Comments: 54827
<
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 175 Comments: 54827
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Quoting MTWX:

Maybe we should quit using Russian names...
LOL
i think the worlwide tropical cyclones naming center uses many different countries' names
like Tomas is a Fiji name
Igor is a Russian Name
Colin is somewhat british
so we dont just use english names
They save I names for russian names its just one thing they do to keep the naming list going.
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^ now has a tornado warning

TORNADO WARNING
LAC069-127-292015-
/O.NEW.KSHV.TO.W.0070.101129T1930Z-101129T2015Z/

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SHREVEPORT LA
130 PM CST MON NOV 29 2010

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN SHREVEPORT HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
SOUTHWESTERN WINN PARISH IN NORTH CENTRAL LOUISIANA...
CENTRAL NATCHITOCHES PARISH IN NORTHWEST LOUISIANA...
THIS INCLUDES THE CITY OF NATCHITOCHES...

* UNTIL 215 PM CST

* AT 130 PM CST...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE METEOROLOGISTS DETECTED A
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO 7 MILES
SOUTHWEST OF NATCHITOCHES...MOVING NORTHEAST AT 40 MPH.

* OTHER LOCATIONS IN THE WARNING INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO
NATCHEZ...GRAND ECORE...ST. MAURICE...CLARENCE...CLEAR LAKE AND
GOLDONNA.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A TORNADO WARNING MEANS THAT STRONG ROTATION HAS BEEN DETECTED IN THE
STORM. A TORNADO MAY ALREADY BE ON THE GROUND...OR IS EXPECTED TO
DEVELOP SHORTLY. IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF THIS DANGEROUS STORM...
MOVE INDOORS AND TO THE LOWEST LEVEL OF THE BUILDING. STAY AWAY FROM
WINDOWS. IF DRIVING...DO NOT SEEK SHELTER UNDER A HIGHWAY OVERPASS.

&&

LAT...LON 3206 9296 3187 9272 3160 9314 3169 9325
TIME...MOT...LOC 1930Z 222DEG 34KT 3168 9315

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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