Forecast for the winter of 2010 - 2011

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 5:38 PM GMT on November 24, 2010

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Meteorological winter officially begins on December 1, but winter has begun a week early across much of North America, thanks to a significant cold blast that has broken dozens of daily low temperature records across much of western Canada and the Western U.S. Sheridan, Wyoming set a new record for the date this morning with -17°F, and Oakland California had its coldest November 24th with a reading of 34°F this morning. The cold blast is expected to be short-lived, though, with near-average conditions returning by the weekend. The long-range 1 - 2 week forecasts from the GFS and ECMWF models do not show the jet stream getting "stuck" in place for the beginning of meteorological winter next week, and it appears that the first two weeks of winter will be rather ordinary.


Figure 1. Forecast temperature and precipitation for the U.S. for the upcoming winter, as predicted by NOAA.

Latest winter forecast from NOAA
We currently have moderate La Niña conditions over the tropical Pacific ocean, which means that a large region of cooler than average waters exists along the Equator from the coast of South America to the Date Line. Cooler than average waters in this location tend to deflect the jet stream such that the Pacific Northwest experiences cooler and wetter winters than average, while the southern U.S. sees warmer and drier winter weather. NOAA's forecast for the upcoming winter issued on October 21 calls for a typical La Niña winter over the U.S.--warm and dry over the southern portion of the country, cool and wet over the Pacific Northwest, warmer and wetter than average over the Ohio Valley, and near average over the remainder of the country. According to NOAA's latest La Niña discussion, La Niña is expected to remain solidly entrenched throughout the coming winter and into spring.


Figure 2. Observed temperature and precipitation departures from average for the last three winters with a La Niña in the "moderate" or "strong" category. The current La Niña is right at the borderline between "moderate" and "strong." The anomaly patterns from the past three La Niña winters were dominated by the winter of 1999 - 2000, which was the warmest winter in U.S. history, and 1998 - 1999, which was the 2nd warmest in U.S. history. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

What happened during the last three La Niña winters?
The last three winters with moderate to strong La Niña conditions occurred in 2007 - 2008, 1999 - 2000, and 1998 - 1999. These winters were extremely variable. The most recent La Niña winter, in 2007 - 2008, was near average in temperature and precipitation; the other two winters were the two warmest winters in U.S. history. The winter of 1998 - 1999 set a world record for the greatest seasonal snowfall in history, when a seemingly endless parade of winter storms across the Pacific Northwest left an astonishing 1,140 inches (95 feet) of snow at Mt. Baker in northwestern Washington. It's worth noting that two of these three La Niña winters (2007 - 2008 and 1998 - 1999) saw record levels of tornado activity. Of the three winters, I believe that the winter of 2007 - 2008 may be the best historical analogue for the coming winter, since Arctic sea ice loss, which can significantly affect winter weather, was most similar to the conditions observed this year.

A look back at the winter of 2007 - 2008
The La Niña winter of 2007 - 2008 started slowly, but ended up piling up quite a bit of snow across much of the U.S. New York experienced its wettest winter on record, and Colorado, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Vermont had their second wettest winter on record. As is typical during a La Niña winter, Texas was drier than normal, but the rest of the south had near-average precipitation.

According to The Northern Tier Rules: The 2007-2008 Snow Report by David Robinson, Weatherwise, Mar-Apr 2009, eleven major cities reported more than 125 percent of average snowfall. This compares with only three in 2006-2007, and was the most since thirteen cities in 2003-2004.

Record high snow seasons occurred in Madison, Wisconsin (101.4 inches, previous record of 76.1 inches in 1978-1979); Youngstown, Ohio (102.8 inches, previous record of 90.2 inches in 2005-2006); and Caribou, Maine (197.8 inches, previous record of 181.1 inches in 1954-1955). Two stations came very close to establishing seasonal seasonal records; Spokane, Washington, 92.6", 0.9" below the 1949-1950 record, and Flint, Michigan, 82.8", just 0.1" below the record set in 1974-1975.


Figure 3. Snowfall totals for the winter of 2007 - 2008. Image credit: The Northern Tier Rules: The 2007-2008 Snow Report by David Robinson, Weatherwise, Mar-Apr 2009.

Wildcard number 1: What will the NAO do?
The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is a climate pattern in the North Atlantic Ocean of fluctuations in the difference of sea-level pressure between the Icelandic Low and the Azores High. It is one of oldest known climate oscillations--seafaring Scandinavians described the pattern several centuries ago. Through east-west oscillation motions of the Icelandic Low and the Azores High,the NAO controls the strength and direction of westerly winds and storm tracks across the North Atlantic. A large difference in the pressure between Iceland and the Azores (positive NAO) leads to increased westerly winds and mild and wet winters in Europe. Positive NAO conditions also cause the Icelandic Low to draw a stronger south-westerly flow of air over eastern North America, preventing Arctic air from plunging southward. In contrast, if the difference in sea-level pressure between Iceland and the Azores is small (negative NAO), westerly winds are suppressed, allowing Arctic air to spill southwards into eastern North America more readily. Negative NAO winters tend to bring cold winters to Europe, and the prevailing storm track moves south towards the Mediterranean Sea. This brings increased storm activity and rainfall to southern Europe and North Africa.

The winter of 2009 - 2010 had the most extreme negative NAO since record keeping began in 1950. The NAO index was -1.67, beating the previous record of -1.47 set in the winter of 1962 - 1963. The record negative NAO was responsible for unusual cold weather and snows over Eastern North America and Europe, and resulted in an upside-down winter: coldest in 25 years in the U.S., and warmest on record in Canada, with snow needing to be trucked in for the Winter Olympics in Vancouver. This "Warm Arctic-Cold Continents pattern" had occurred previously only three times in the past 160 years. If a strong negative NAO establishes itself this winter, we could have a winter like 1995 - 1996, which featured a weak La Niña and a strongly negative NAO. That winter featured many cold air outbreaks across the Eastern U.S., resulting in fifteen major cities setting new all-time seasonal snowfall total, including 75.6" at New York City's Central Park. Unfortunately, the NAO is not predictable more than about two weeks in advance.

Wildcard number 2: How will Arctic sea ice loss affect the winter?
NOAA issued their annual Arctic Report Card last month, and discussed the fact that recent record sea ice loss in the summer in the Arctic is having major impacts on winter weather over the continents of the Northern Hemisphere. The Report Card states, "There continues to be significant excess heat storage in the Arctic Ocean at the end of summer due to continued near-record sea ice loss. There is evidence that the effect of higher air temperatures in the lower Arctic atmosphere in fall is contributing to changes in the atmospheric circulation in both the Arctic and northern mid-latitudes. Winter 2009-2010 showed a new connectivity between mid-latitude extreme cold and snowy weather events and changes in the wind patterns of the Arctic; the so-called Warm Arctic-Cold Continents pattern...With future loss of sea ice, such conditions as winter 2009-2010 could happen more often. Thus we have a potential climate change paradox. Rather than a general warming everywhere, the loss of sea ice and a warmer Arctic can increase the impact of the Arctic on lower latitudes, bringing colder weather to southern locations." As a specific example of what the Report Card is talking about, Francis et al. (2009) found that during 1979 - 2006, years that had unusually low summertime Arctic sea ice had a 10 - 20% reduction in the temperature difference between the Equator and North Pole. This resulted in a weaker jet stream with slower winds that lasted a full six months, through fall and winter. The weaker jet caused a weaker Aleutian Low and Icelandic Low during the winter, resulting in a more negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), allowing cold air to spill out of the Arctic and into Europe and the Eastern U.S. Thus, Arctic sea ice loss may have been partially responsible for the record negative NAO observed during the winter of 2009 - 2010, and the emergence of the "Warm Arctic-Cold Continents pattern." This pattern is kind of like leaving the refrigerator door ajar--the refrigerator warm up, but all the cold air spills out into the house. If the Arctic Report Card is right, we'll be seeing more of this pattern during coming winters--possibly even during the winter of 2010 - 2011.

Summary
I'm often asked by friends and neighbors what my forecast for the coming winter is. My reply is usually, "Flip a coin. We don't have the capability to make very skillful predictions of the coming winter." I'll share with you my hunch for this winter, though--we are due for a rather ordinary La Niña winter like we had in 2007 - 2008. After a year of some extraordinary extreme weather, we are overdue for a relatively quiet season or two of weather.

For more information
Golden Gate Weather has a nice set of imagery showing historic La Niña winter impacts, based on whether it was a "weak", "moderate", or "strong" event.

Francis, J. A., W. Chan, D. J. Leathers, J. R. Miller, and D. E. Veron, 2009: Winter northern hemisphere weather patterns remember summer Arctic sea-ice extent. Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L07503, doi:10.1029/2009GL037274.

Honda, M., J. Inoue, and S. Yamane, 2009: Influence of low Arctic sea-ice minima on anomalously cold Eurasian winters. Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L08707, doi:10.1029/2008GL037079.

Overland, J. E., and M. Wang, 2010: Large-scale atmospheric circulation changes associated with the recent loss of Arctic sea ice. Tellus, 62A, 1.9.

Petoukhov, V., and V. Semenov, 2010: A link between reduced Barents-Kara sea ice and cold winter extremes over northern continents. J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., ISSN 0148-0227.

Seager, R., Y. Kushnir, J. Nakamura, M. Ting, and N. Naik (2010), Northern Hemisphere winter snow anomalies: ENSO, NAO and the winter of 2009/10, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L14703, doi:10.1029/2010GL043830.

Next post
Thanksgiving break is at hand, and I plan to spend it enjoying family and friends, eating far too much delicious food, and watching the invincible juggernaut that is my favorite football team, the Detroit Lions, demolish yet another hapless opponent on Thanksgiving Day (not!) I'm also looking forward to seeing the season's first snowflakes here in Michigan on Friday--winter has been late arriving here this year. I'll be back with a new post on Monday. Have a great Thanksgiving, everyone!

Jeff Masters

Nice hat (mefechter)
The snow just keeps on coming.
Nice hat
Snow Drifts (funhawg)
Blizzard made strange designs on Boone Creek, these are around 6 feet high.
Snow Drifts

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949. GeoffreyWPB
1:34 PM GMT on November 29, 2010
New Blog
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948. WxLogic
1:32 PM GMT on November 29, 2010
Good Morning...
Member Since: August 14, 2008 Posts: 4 Comments: 4972
947. JRRP
12:56 PM GMT on November 29, 2010
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5804
946. PensacolaDoug
12:21 PM GMT on November 29, 2010
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 563
945. PensacolaDoug
12:17 PM GMT on November 29, 2010
Good Mornin Ike and Aislinnpaps.

Not too bad here Pensacola this a.m.
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 563
944. IKE
11:35 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
700 AM EST MON NOV 29 2010

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

$$
FORECASTER AVILA

.............................................

Six more TWO's and it's finished for 6 months.

42 hours
25 minutes left....
Member Since: June 9, 2005 Posts: 23 Comments: 37858
943. aislinnpaps
11:16 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Good morning if anyone else is up. A much warmer morning here when taking the dogs out.
Member Since: August 22, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 3125
942. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
8:51 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Tropical Cyclone Warning Center Perth
TROPICAL CYCLONE OUTLOOK
Forecast for area south of 10S between 90E-125E
2:00 PM WST November 29 2010
=====================================

At midday, a weak low [02U] was located near 11.4S 86.1E. Although the low may develop over the next two days it is expected to remain west of 90E. On Thursday the system may approach 90E.

Tropical Cyclone Formation Potential
=====================================
Tuesday: Very Low
Wednesday: Very Low
Thursday: Low
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 50 Comments: 45301
941. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
8:42 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Fiji Meteorological Services
Tropical Disturbance Advisory #14
TROPICAL DEPRESSION 01F
18:00 PM FST November 29 2010
=======================================

At 6:00 AM UTC, Tropical Depression 01F (1000 hPa) located at 22.6S 178.2E is reported as moving east southeast at 10 knots. Position POOR based on multispectral infrared imagery with animation and peripheral surface observations. Sea surface temperature is around 29C.

Overall organization has not changed in the past 6 hours. Tropical Depression 01F lies to the south of 250 HPA outflow center under a diffluent flow. System also lies east of an upper trough. CIMSS indicates decreasing shear along projected path. System is being steered east southeast by deep layer mean northwesterly flow. Dry air evident on water vapor channel just to the west.

Most global models has picked up the system and are moving it southeastward with little intensification.

The potential for tropical depression 01F to develop into a tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours remains MODERATE

THIS IS THE FINAL TROPICAL DISTURBANCE ADVISORY FROM THE FIJI METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 50 Comments: 45301
940. DontAnnoyMe
8:07 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting STXpat:
Re:933;'Five Easy Pieces' Jack Nicholson


Nope, it is Cool Hand Luke!
Member Since: September 21, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3690
939. STXpat
8:05 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Re:924;'Five Easy Pieces' Jack Nicholson
Member Since: September 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 36
937. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
6:21 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53827
936. FLPandhandleJG
6:21 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
It could get interesting the next few weeks with the cold.. But here is some info from Allan Huffman..

Hi Folks, Sorry I haven’t written more in the way of national discussions, things have been busy, and my intention is to do so. Today seemed like a good day for it. For the month of November so far, most of the country has been above normal. The exceptions have been the southeast and the northwest while the central US has been most above normal.



However, the NAO has become very negative and we are seeing the upstream weather pattern over the US changing and becoming colder in general. Snow has fallen in the Pacific Northwest, including very early season snows in Seattle. The 6-10 and 11-15 day outlooks for the country show much of the US below normal. IT looks like a significant arctic air mass will drop into the Rockies mid to late next week and then spread south and east. This cool season we are already seeing a trend in the models that show this happen but as we get closer it gets more and more delayed. We will have to see if this is a seasonal trend in the models all winter.

This air mass if it is true could bring temperatures of 10-20 degrees below normal to large parts of the plains, Midwest, south, and east. The NAO will likely continue negative into at least the first 1/3 of December, but the EPO will be positive and the PNA negative, meaning that the Pacific will not be very supportive of the cold air staying in the east in a sustained manner. But perhaps the NAO will be the more dominant player. The pattern will likely favor the coldest temps in the Rockies and central US with the east seeing changeable weather biased mostly on the cold side.

The northern hemispheric snow cover which was above normal for much of October, then below normal for much of November, is now above normal again. So there appears to be plenty of snow cover to maintain cold air masses that will drop into the US from Canada. The most likely areas to see significant wintry precipitation will be the northern Rockies, northern and central Plains, Midwest, Ohio Valley, interior northeast, and New England. I am watching for the potential of an east coast storm in the12/5-12/8 time frame, but that is far from certain.

I still have no big changes to my overall winter ideas. I did predict that December would be colder than normal across the northern US, including the northeast, and above normal in the southeast to Deep South. The potential cold start to December in those areas could create a deficit to climb out of to get to that, but I am not changing my mind yet. I wouldn’t be surprised if December ends up colder than I forecast, but I still think January and February could be warm.

Weather Outlook
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935. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
6:20 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53827
934. FLPandhandleJG
6:15 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Hope we dont get anything bad in the panhandle of FL.. Hope nobody is in harms way.. Be safe everyone..
Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2133
932. DontAnnoyMe
6:08 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting F4PHANTOM:
"What we've got here is failure to communicate."


Hey, I used that one yesterday. And now I can't remember the movie! Time to wrap it up, 'nite all....
Member Since: September 21, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3690
931. tornadodude
6:06 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting Seawall:
Thanks, Tdude, we're only in a very marginal probability of tornadoes; maybe lots of wind and a few TStorms. Already under a Lake Wind Advisory for tomorrow.


No problem, I'll be sure to be on tomorrow to keep people updated, as a lot of people on this site live in the threat area.

Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8339
930. Seawall
6:04 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Thanks, Tdude, we're only in a very marginal probability of tornadoes; maybe lots of wind and a few TStorms. Already under a Lake Wind Advisory for tomorrow.
Member Since: September 8, 2001 Posts: 1 Comments: 401
929. tornadodude
6:01 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting tornadodude:


the new SPC outlook should be up in an hour. im expecting an upgrade to a moderate risk across much of Louisiana, with the potential for some strong tornadoes. If the cape values can become substantial we may see a pretty big outbreak



sorry,

its out now

Tornado Probability



VALID 291200Z - 301200Z

...THERE IS A SLGT RISK OF SVR TSTMS OVER THE LOWER MS VALLEY
REGION...

...SYNOPSIS...
A STRONG AND BROAD UPPER TROUGH WILL MOVE EWD ACROSS THE PLAINS AND
INTO THE MS VALLEY THROUGH THE PERIOD...WITH A 100 KT MID LEVEL JET
MAX DEVELOPING FROM TX INTO LOWER MI BY 12Z TUE. AT THE SURFACE...A
LOW WILL MOVE FROM KS INTO NRN MO DURING THE DAY...WITH A COLD FRONT
EXTENDING SWWD ACROSS ERN OK AND INTO NRN TX. PRECEDING THIS FRONT
WILL BE A DRYLINE WHICH WILL RAPIDLY MIX EWD FROM I-35 IN TX TO THE
SABINE RIVER BY 00Z. AHEAD OF THE DRYLINE...PERSISTENT SLY LOW LEVEL
FLOW WILL HELP BRING DEWPOINTS INTO THE MID 60S AS FAR N AS SRN AR
AND NRN MS FROM LATE AFTERNOON INTO THE EVENING. THE NWD RETURN OF
MOISTURE WILL BE LIMITED BY A WARM FRONT THAT WILL LIE APPROXIMATELY
FROM PBF TO JAN AT 00Z. THIS FRONT WILL BE A FOCUS FOR TORNADOES.
OVERNIGHT...THE COLD FRONT WILL ACCELERATE SEWD ACROSS LA AND
MS...WITH ADDITIONAL SEVERE ACTIVITY LIKELY ALONG IT.

...FAR E TX...LA...SRN AR...MS...WRN AL...
ELEVATED ACTIVITY IS LIKELY TO BE ONGOING ACROSS THE ARKLATEX THIS
MORNING WHERE A SWLY 50 KT LOW LEVEL JET WILL BE ENHANCING
ISENTROPIC LIFT. FORECAST SOUNDINGS INDICATE THAT SUBSTANTIAL MID
LEVEL DRY AIR...AND POOR MID LEVEL LAPSE RATES WILL
COEXIST...LIMITING INSTABILITY. HOWEVER...RAPID NWD ADVECTION OF
MOISTURE AND UVVS SHOULD RESULT IN A RASH OF PRIMARILY NON-SEVERE
CONVECTION...MOVING QUICKLY NWD ACROSS WRN AR. BY LATE
AFTERNOON...CONVERGENCE SHOULD INCREASE ALONG THE ADVANCING
DRYLINE...WITH MORE VIGOROUS SURFACE BASED DEVELOPMENT FROM NERN LA
INTO ERN AR AND INTO NRN MS DURING THE EVENING. THIS ACTIVITY WILL
HAVE ACCESS TO THE STRONGEST LOW LEVEL SHEAR NEAR THE WARM
FRONT...WITH EFFECTIVE SRH ON THE ORDER OF 300 M2/S2. AGAIN...MID
AND UPPER LEVEL LAPSE RATES WILL NOT BE VERY STEEP...WHICH MAY LIMIT
SEVERE MAGNITUDE A BIT. HOWEVER...STRONG FORCING AND SHEAR PROFILES
SUGGEST A FEW TORNADIC SUPERCELLS MAY OCCUR...AND A STRONG TORNADO
CANNOT BE RULED OUT.


STRONG SLY FLOW OFF THE GULF OF MEXICO WILL PERSIST INTO THE EVENING
AND OVERNIGHT HOURS AHEAD OF THE APPROACHING COLD FRONT...AND LINES
OF CONVECTION MAY FORM AHEAD OF THE FRONT IN THE WARM SECTOR OVER
ERN LA AND INTO CNTRL/SRN MS. SHEAR PROFILES WILL REMAIN FAVORABLE
FOR TORNADOES HERE...ALTHOUGH CELLS WILL LIKELY MERGE INTO A QLCS
WITH TRAINING ECHOS AS FLOW FIELD VEERS AS THE COLD FRONT AND UPPER
WAVE APPROACH 06-12Z. AT THAT TIME...DAMAGING WIND GUSTS WOULD BE
THE PRIMARY THREAT.

..JEWELL/ROGERS.. 11/29/2010
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8339
928. Seawall
6:01 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
The bad thing is I remember Buford Pusser in that movie.. when it premiered... God, I'm gettin' old!
Member Since: September 8, 2001 Posts: 1 Comments: 401
927. Seawall
6:00 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Hope that was 120/60 Grothar.... LOL
Member Since: September 8, 2001 Posts: 1 Comments: 401
926. Grothar
5:58 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Had a lot of fun,too. All of you who can stay up another 3 hours, don't get too carried away. I have to get to bed before the nurses come to check my blood pressure. They actually found some the other night. I was 12/6. So, looking forward to some more laughs. Stay well everyone.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26130
925. Seawall
5:58 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Thanks, TDude, it showed us with slight risk today. I was thinking the risk might go up. Gonna be a lot colder here next week than the last cold snap that made it all the way to the coast.
Member Since: September 8, 2001 Posts: 1 Comments: 401
923. tornadodude
5:56 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting Seawall:
Sorry, must be on the wrong board; thought it was weather related..
All I see is Movie quote postings....
And look at my date if you don't think I've been around for a while..
Again.. Severe weather expected tomorrow on the LA/TX border.


the new SPC outlook should be up in an hour. im expecting an upgrade to a moderate risk across much of Louisiana, with the potential for some strong tornadoes. If the cape values can become substantial we may see a pretty big outbreak
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8339
922. Seawall
5:55 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
so, anyone have any take on the severe weather forecasted in the deep south for tomorrow?
Member Since: September 8, 2001 Posts: 1 Comments: 401
921. PrivateIdaho
5:55 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
What we have here is a total lack of respect for the law!
Member Since: August 29, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 5236
920. sunlinepr
5:54 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Interesting movie facts...

Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9814
919. PSLFLCaneVet
5:54 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
i have updated my page its time to go see ya tomorrow on with the show

later


Night Keep. I must concur. It's been a real hoot!

Left Coasters, have at it! A prize for the TC quote.
Member Since: July 23, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 12414
918. Seawall
5:53 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting PensacolaDoug:


Just having a little fun is all.


I understand the fun, that's what this forum used to be about.
Member Since: September 8, 2001 Posts: 1 Comments: 401
917. PrivateIdaho
5:53 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
NO! Steve Mcqueen...AARGH!
Member Since: August 29, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 5236
916. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
5:53 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting Seawall:
Sorry, must be on the wrong board; thought it was weather related..
All I see is Movie quote postings....
And look at my date if you don't think I've been around for a while..
Again.. Severe weather expected tomorrow on the LA/TX border.


we have all the info here

Link
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53827
915. Grothar
5:53 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting F4PHANTOM:
"What we've got here is failure to communicate."


Cool Hand Luke. Also the sweatiest movie ever made, if you ever watched "Cheers"
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26130
914. PensacolaDoug
5:53 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting PrivateIdaho:
Smokey and the Bandit.


Cool Hand Luke.
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 563
913. PensacolaDoug
5:52 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting Seawall:
Sorry, must be on the wrong board; thought it was weather related..
All I see is Movie quote postings....
And look at my date if you don't think I've been around for a while..
Again.. Severe weather expected tomorrow on the LA/TX border.


Just having a little fun is all.
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 563
912. PrivateIdaho
5:52 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting F4PHANTOM:
"What we've got here is failure to communicate."
Smokey and the Bandit.
Member Since: August 29, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 5236
911. Seawall
5:51 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Sorry, must be on the wrong board; thought it was weather related..
All I see is Movie quote postings....
And look at my date if you don't think I've been around for a while..
Again.. Severe weather expected tomorrow on the LA/TX border.
Member Since: September 8, 2001 Posts: 1 Comments: 401
909. PensacolaDoug
5:51 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
i have updated my page its time to go see ya tomorrow on with the show

later



Nite. I'm gonna hit it too.
L8r all.
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 563
908. PrivateIdaho
5:50 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting Grothar:


It may have been set there, but was supposed to be in Georgia. Just like the Poseiden adventure was actually filmed in a stage set at Universal studios. Just joking with ya Idaho. I have to bust chops at least once a night and GeoffWPB isn't here so you will have to do.
Lol! I deserved some payback.;)
Member Since: August 29, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 5236
907. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
5:49 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
i have updated my page its time to go see ya tomorrow on with the show

later
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53827
906. PensacolaDoug
5:49 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Yeah Grothar!

"Speak Softly and carry a big stick" was spoken by Teddy Rooseveldt.

Sheriff Pusser co-opted it.
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 563
905. tornadodude
5:49 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
the new river gorge is amazing, went rock climbing, camping, and white water rafting there. it "gorge"ous lol
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 25 Comments: 8339
904. PSLFLCaneVet
5:49 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting DontAnnoyMe:


Tom Cruise?.... that's all I can muster up.


You are correct.

Full disclosure: it is on DTV, now.
Member Since: July 23, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 12414
903. Grothar
5:46 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting PrivateIdaho:
Deliverance was set on the New River in West Virginia I think...?


It may have been set there, but was supposed to be in Georgia. Just like the Poseiden adventure was actually filmed in a stage set at Universal studios. Just joking with ya Idaho. I have to bust chops at least once a night and GeoffWPB isn't here so you will have to do.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 26130
902. PensacolaDoug
5:46 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Some of Deliverance was filmed in Talulah Gorge in north Gorgia wasn't it?
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 563
901. sunlinepr
5:46 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Anyone remembers any weather movie?

Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9814
900. DontAnnoyMe
5:45 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
Quoting PSLFLCaneVet:


Not a single bite? TC is a big star.


Tom Cruise?.... that's all I can muster up.
Member Since: September 21, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3690
899. PensacolaDoug
5:45 AM GMT on November 29, 2010
"You made a time machine out of a DeLorean?"
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 563

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.