Forecast for the winter of 2010 - 2011

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 5:38 PM GMT on November 24, 2010

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Meteorological winter officially begins on December 1, but winter has begun a week early across much of North America, thanks to a significant cold blast that has broken dozens of daily low temperature records across much of western Canada and the Western U.S. Sheridan, Wyoming set a new record for the date this morning with -17°F, and Oakland California had its coldest November 24th with a reading of 34°F this morning. The cold blast is expected to be short-lived, though, with near-average conditions returning by the weekend. The long-range 1 - 2 week forecasts from the GFS and ECMWF models do not show the jet stream getting "stuck" in place for the beginning of meteorological winter next week, and it appears that the first two weeks of winter will be rather ordinary.


Figure 1. Forecast temperature and precipitation for the U.S. for the upcoming winter, as predicted by NOAA.

Latest winter forecast from NOAA
We currently have moderate La Niña conditions over the tropical Pacific ocean, which means that a large region of cooler than average waters exists along the Equator from the coast of South America to the Date Line. Cooler than average waters in this location tend to deflect the jet stream such that the Pacific Northwest experiences cooler and wetter winters than average, while the southern U.S. sees warmer and drier winter weather. NOAA's forecast for the upcoming winter issued on October 21 calls for a typical La Niña winter over the U.S.--warm and dry over the southern portion of the country, cool and wet over the Pacific Northwest, warmer and wetter than average over the Ohio Valley, and near average over the remainder of the country. According to NOAA's latest La Niña discussion, La Niña is expected to remain solidly entrenched throughout the coming winter and into spring.


Figure 2. Observed temperature and precipitation departures from average for the last three winters with a La Niña in the "moderate" or "strong" category. The current La Niña is right at the borderline between "moderate" and "strong." The anomaly patterns from the past three La Niña winters were dominated by the winter of 1999 - 2000, which was the warmest winter in U.S. history, and 1998 - 1999, which was the 2nd warmest in U.S. history. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

What happened during the last three La Niña winters?
The last three winters with moderate to strong La Niña conditions occurred in 2007 - 2008, 1999 - 2000, and 1998 - 1999. These winters were extremely variable. The most recent La Niña winter, in 2007 - 2008, was near average in temperature and precipitation; the other two winters were the two warmest winters in U.S. history. The winter of 1998 - 1999 set a world record for the greatest seasonal snowfall in history, when a seemingly endless parade of winter storms across the Pacific Northwest left an astonishing 1,140 inches (95 feet) of snow at Mt. Baker in northwestern Washington. It's worth noting that two of these three La Niña winters (2007 - 2008 and 1998 - 1999) saw record levels of tornado activity. Of the three winters, I believe that the winter of 2007 - 2008 may be the best historical analogue for the coming winter, since Arctic sea ice loss, which can significantly affect winter weather, was most similar to the conditions observed this year.

A look back at the winter of 2007 - 2008
The La Niña winter of 2007 - 2008 started slowly, but ended up piling up quite a bit of snow across much of the U.S. New York experienced its wettest winter on record, and Colorado, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Vermont had their second wettest winter on record. As is typical during a La Niña winter, Texas was drier than normal, but the rest of the south had near-average precipitation.

According to The Northern Tier Rules: The 2007-2008 Snow Report by David Robinson, Weatherwise, Mar-Apr 2009, eleven major cities reported more than 125 percent of average snowfall. This compares with only three in 2006-2007, and was the most since thirteen cities in 2003-2004.

Record high snow seasons occurred in Madison, Wisconsin (101.4 inches, previous record of 76.1 inches in 1978-1979); Youngstown, Ohio (102.8 inches, previous record of 90.2 inches in 2005-2006); and Caribou, Maine (197.8 inches, previous record of 181.1 inches in 1954-1955). Two stations came very close to establishing seasonal seasonal records; Spokane, Washington, 92.6", 0.9" below the 1949-1950 record, and Flint, Michigan, 82.8", just 0.1" below the record set in 1974-1975.


Figure 3. Snowfall totals for the winter of 2007 - 2008. Image credit: The Northern Tier Rules: The 2007-2008 Snow Report by David Robinson, Weatherwise, Mar-Apr 2009.

Wildcard number 1: What will the NAO do?
The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is a climate pattern in the North Atlantic Ocean of fluctuations in the difference of sea-level pressure between the Icelandic Low and the Azores High. It is one of oldest known climate oscillations--seafaring Scandinavians described the pattern several centuries ago. Through east-west oscillation motions of the Icelandic Low and the Azores High,the NAO controls the strength and direction of westerly winds and storm tracks across the North Atlantic. A large difference in the pressure between Iceland and the Azores (positive NAO) leads to increased westerly winds and mild and wet winters in Europe. Positive NAO conditions also cause the Icelandic Low to draw a stronger south-westerly flow of air over eastern North America, preventing Arctic air from plunging southward. In contrast, if the difference in sea-level pressure between Iceland and the Azores is small (negative NAO), westerly winds are suppressed, allowing Arctic air to spill southwards into eastern North America more readily. Negative NAO winters tend to bring cold winters to Europe, and the prevailing storm track moves south towards the Mediterranean Sea. This brings increased storm activity and rainfall to southern Europe and North Africa.

The winter of 2009 - 2010 had the most extreme negative NAO since record keeping began in 1950. The NAO index was -1.67, beating the previous record of -1.47 set in the winter of 1962 - 1963. The record negative NAO was responsible for unusual cold weather and snows over Eastern North America and Europe, and resulted in an upside-down winter: coldest in 25 years in the U.S., and warmest on record in Canada, with snow needing to be trucked in for the Winter Olympics in Vancouver. This "Warm Arctic-Cold Continents pattern" had occurred previously only three times in the past 160 years. If a strong negative NAO establishes itself this winter, we could have a winter like 1995 - 1996, which featured a weak La Niña and a strongly negative NAO. That winter featured many cold air outbreaks across the Eastern U.S., resulting in fifteen major cities setting new all-time seasonal snowfall total, including 75.6" at New York City's Central Park. Unfortunately, the NAO is not predictable more than about two weeks in advance.

Wildcard number 2: How will Arctic sea ice loss affect the winter?
NOAA issued their annual Arctic Report Card last month, and discussed the fact that recent record sea ice loss in the summer in the Arctic is having major impacts on winter weather over the continents of the Northern Hemisphere. The Report Card states, "There continues to be significant excess heat storage in the Arctic Ocean at the end of summer due to continued near-record sea ice loss. There is evidence that the effect of higher air temperatures in the lower Arctic atmosphere in fall is contributing to changes in the atmospheric circulation in both the Arctic and northern mid-latitudes. Winter 2009-2010 showed a new connectivity between mid-latitude extreme cold and snowy weather events and changes in the wind patterns of the Arctic; the so-called Warm Arctic-Cold Continents pattern...With future loss of sea ice, such conditions as winter 2009-2010 could happen more often. Thus we have a potential climate change paradox. Rather than a general warming everywhere, the loss of sea ice and a warmer Arctic can increase the impact of the Arctic on lower latitudes, bringing colder weather to southern locations." As a specific example of what the Report Card is talking about, Francis et al. (2009) found that during 1979 - 2006, years that had unusually low summertime Arctic sea ice had a 10 - 20% reduction in the temperature difference between the Equator and North Pole. This resulted in a weaker jet stream with slower winds that lasted a full six months, through fall and winter. The weaker jet caused a weaker Aleutian Low and Icelandic Low during the winter, resulting in a more negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), allowing cold air to spill out of the Arctic and into Europe and the Eastern U.S. Thus, Arctic sea ice loss may have been partially responsible for the record negative NAO observed during the winter of 2009 - 2010, and the emergence of the "Warm Arctic-Cold Continents pattern." This pattern is kind of like leaving the refrigerator door ajar--the refrigerator warm up, but all the cold air spills out into the house. If the Arctic Report Card is right, we'll be seeing more of this pattern during coming winters--possibly even during the winter of 2010 - 2011.

Summary
I'm often asked by friends and neighbors what my forecast for the coming winter is. My reply is usually, "Flip a coin. We don't have the capability to make very skillful predictions of the coming winter." I'll share with you my hunch for this winter, though--we are due for a rather ordinary La Niña winter like we had in 2007 - 2008. After a year of some extraordinary extreme weather, we are overdue for a relatively quiet season or two of weather.

For more information
Golden Gate Weather has a nice set of imagery showing historic La Niña winter impacts, based on whether it was a "weak", "moderate", or "strong" event.

Francis, J. A., W. Chan, D. J. Leathers, J. R. Miller, and D. E. Veron, 2009: Winter northern hemisphere weather patterns remember summer Arctic sea-ice extent. Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L07503, doi:10.1029/2009GL037274.

Honda, M., J. Inoue, and S. Yamane, 2009: Influence of low Arctic sea-ice minima on anomalously cold Eurasian winters. Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L08707, doi:10.1029/2008GL037079.

Overland, J. E., and M. Wang, 2010: Large-scale atmospheric circulation changes associated with the recent loss of Arctic sea ice. Tellus, 62A, 1.9.

Petoukhov, V., and V. Semenov, 2010: A link between reduced Barents-Kara sea ice and cold winter extremes over northern continents. J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., ISSN 0148-0227.

Seager, R., Y. Kushnir, J. Nakamura, M. Ting, and N. Naik (2010), Northern Hemisphere winter snow anomalies: ENSO, NAO and the winter of 2009/10, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L14703, doi:10.1029/2010GL043830.

Next post
Thanksgiving break is at hand, and I plan to spend it enjoying family and friends, eating far too much delicious food, and watching the invincible juggernaut that is my favorite football team, the Detroit Lions, demolish yet another hapless opponent on Thanksgiving Day (not!) I'm also looking forward to seeing the season's first snowflakes here in Michigan on Friday--winter has been late arriving here this year. I'll be back with a new post on Monday. Have a great Thanksgiving, everyone!

Jeff Masters

Nice hat (mefechter)
The snow just keeps on coming.
Nice hat
Snow Drifts (funhawg)
Blizzard made strange designs on Boone Creek, these are around 6 feet high.
Snow Drifts

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Quoting SuperYooper:
Marquette has a 70% chance of Ice Pellets tomorrow, which is the first time I have heard of something on a forcast like that.

Deer pellets, rabbit pellets, iron ore pellets, pellet stoves.........heard of all of them. Ice pellets is a new one to me.


Here in KC they changed the term from sleet to Ice pellets about 5 to 6 years ago, not sure of the reasoning however. I was surprised to hear it on local news back then. Never have found info on why it changed. no telling!
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Here's wishing all you WU Bloggers and Lurkers a very "Happy and Blessed Thanksgiving" .
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47. DDR
Orca id be glad to trade you this rain for some snow :D
2 inches this afternoon

Met office...
The Trinidad and Tobago Meteorological Services
in continuing its Flood Alert for Trinidad wish
to advise that most rivers in south and central
Trinidad have crested. Despite the subsiding of
rainfall activity over the last few hours, we can
still experience some overnight showers and are
also expecting to see more showers during the day
tomorrow. With this additional rainfall we can
expect that the major Caroni River to be quickly
overwhelmed given the existing and anticipated
rainfall run-off.
Riverine flooding in areas of south and central
Trinidad will continue into tomorrow with a
potential to worsen!



Reports from the Water Resources Agency indicate
that all rivers in South Trinidad are bankful.
Those in central like the Caparo are currently
overtopping. The Caroni River has reached
threshold levels.
Reports reaching us this afternoon are indicating
that the following areas have already experienced
some degree of flooding; Vega de Oropouche, North
Oropouche, Sangre Grande, Guaico Tamana, Las
Lomas#3, the Carapo Basin in the vicinity of
Todds Rd, Ravine Sable and Mamoral.



If as expected later tonight or tomorrow, the
Caroni River overtops, areas such as St. Helena,
Caroni and Kelly Village amongst others will feel
the brunt of the inundation.
Next high tide is approximately 6:40am tomorrow.
Its occurrence will slow river outflows and
prolong the flood event.
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Member Since: September 21, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3690
Sense of HeeHaw.... poof gone :(

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Scratch that comment.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
hooks are becoming better defined, no doubt there's more to come. Nice imagery!!
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Top left: Reflectivity

Top Right: Base Velocity

Bottom Left: SW

Bottom Right: VIL
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thanks for update doc enjoy thanksgiving and also all wunder ground peeps in the US happy thanksgiving

regards
KOTG
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Volume Explorer shows a possible tornado with the tornado warned storm (Would make sense :P)

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Quoting Neapolitan:

Since each storm's KMZ files is updated one final time when that storm's TCR is released, there's a good chance the data in those KMZ files could and likely will change. IOW, nothing's final until the TCR is out.


They aren't likely to change..In fact, there is a good chance that there are final.
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35. EvPv
Great post Dr. Masters!
In your summary you stated "we are overdue for a relatively quiet season or two of weather." Take it to a general point beyond weather: We are overdue for a general normality in this country.
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Hi everybody!

Last week I heard Rep. Bob Inglis speech at a house hearing on climate change and because
I think it's a very good and thoughtful speech I would like to share it with all of you.
Maybe you've already heard it but it's worth to be heard more than once.

Happy Thanksgiving everybody!


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URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BUFFALO NY
348 PM EST WED NOV 24 2010


NYZ006>008-250500-
/O.NEW.KBUF.LE.A.0004.101126T2000Z-101128T0000Z/
OSWEGO-JEFFERSON-LEWIS-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...OSWEGO...WATERTOWN...LOWVILLE
348 PM EST WED NOV 24 2010

...LAKE EFFECT SNOW WATCH IN EFFECT FROM FRIDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
SATURDAY EVENING...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BUFFALO HAS ISSUED A LAKE EFFECT
SNOW WATCH...WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM FRIDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
SATURDAY EVENING.

* LOCATIONS: HEAVY LAKE EFFECT SNOW IS POSSIBLE EAST OF LAKE
ONTARIO INCLUDING JEFFERSON...LEWIS...AND NORTHERN OSWEGO
COUNTIES.

* TIMING: LAKE EFFECT SNOW IS EXPECTED TO DEVELOP LATE FRIDAY
AFTERNOON AND CONTINUE THROUGH SATURDAY EVENING.

* ACCUMULATIONS: SNOW ACCUMULATIONS MAY EXCEED ONE FOOT IN AREAS
WHERE LAKE EFFECT SNOW PERSISTS THE LONGEST.


* WINDS: WEST TO SOUTHWEST WINDS OF 20 TO 30 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 40
MPH ARE EXPECTED PRODUCING BLOWING AND DRIFTING SNOW.

* VISIBILITIES: VISIBILITIES MAY BE REDUCED TO NEAR ZERO AT TIMES
IN VERY HEAVY LAKE EFFECT SNOW AND BLOWING SNOW.

* IMPACTS: HEAVY LAKE EFFECT SNOW AND BLOWING SNOW MAY PRODUCE
VERY DIFFICULT TRAVEL CONDITIONS WITH SNOW COVERED ROADS AND
NEAR ZERO VISIBILITY AT TIMES.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A LAKE EFFECT SNOW WATCH MEANS THAT SIGNIFICANT WINTER WEATHER IS
POSSIBLE IN LOCALIZED AREAS WITHIN THE NEXT 36 HOURS. STAY TUNED
TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO OR YOUR FAVORITE SOURCE OF WEATHER
INFORMATION FOR THE LATEST UPDATES. ADDITIONAL DETAILS CAN ALSO
BE FOUND AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV/BUFFALO.

&&

$$

HITCHCOCK/JJR/SAGE
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Looking forward to snow on Friday :)
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and here it is... TORNADO WATCH 750 IS IN EFFECT UNTIL 1000 PM CST FOR THE
FOLLOWING LOCATIONS
MO
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Everyone have a wonderful Turkey Day!
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A very thorough and excellent discussion of La Nina, its effects and the outlook for the upcoming winter season over North America. Thank you very much Dr. Masters for an excellent analysis.

I want to take this time to wish Dr. Masters, the other blog administrators, and to all of the fellow bloggers of WU Happy Thanksgiving! Everyone please take care and be safe during this long holiday weekend.
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I have to take off, so everyone have a great Thanksgiving. To all who are getting snow, I leave you some lyrics from Da Yoopers, a song called "My Car Won't Go". With a average of 184.5" of snow a year, you can't imagine how many times I hear that. Later.

I WAKE UP IN THE MORNING AND ITS FORTY BELOW
THE WEATHERMAN TELLS ME ITS TOO COLD TO SNOW
I LOOK OUT THE WINDOW AND I KNOW THAT HE'S LYING
MY CAR'S OUT OF SIGHT AND THE SNOWS STILL FLYING
"WILL THE CAR START?" YOU KNOW IT WON'T
"DID THEY PLOW THE ROAD?" YOU KNOW THEY DON'T
"AM I LATE FOR WORK?" YOU KNOW YOU ARE
STUCK AGAIN? SO'S YOUR CAR

I SHOVEL AND I SHOVEL AND I SHOVEL THAT SNOW
I GOTTA GET OUT, BUT MY CAR WON'T GO
I GET THE CABIN FEVER WHEN THE NORTH WIND BLOWS
I GOTTA GET OUT, BUT MY CAR WON'T GO

I CALL UP THE NEIGHBOR, HE'S GOT FOUR WHEEL DRIVE
HE CAN'T GET OUT HE'S BURIED ALIVE
SNOWSHOE OVER, PLAY SOME FIFTEEN TWO (cribbage, for those that don't know)
I GOTTA CHEER UP CAUSE I FEEL SO BLUE
"CRANK UP THE BLOWER," IT WON'T RUN
"GRAB THE SHOVEL," ITS MUCH MORE FUN
"MY BACK IS BROKE," YOU'RE HALFWAY THERE
SNOWING AGAIN, BUT I DON'T CARE

I SHOVEL AND I SHOVEL AND I SHOVEL THAT SNOW
I GOTTA GET OUT, BUT MY CAR WON'T GO
I GET THE CABIN FEVER WHEN THE NORTH WIND BLOWS
I GOTTA GET OUT, BUT MY CAR WON'T GO

I HAVE A HOT DATE, CAN'T BE LATE
STILL SNOWED IN SHE JUST CAN'T WAIT
STUCK IN THE DRIVE, STUCK IN THE HOUSE
WATCHING TV STUCK ON THE COUCH
"START EATING AGAIN," OH WHAT A BORE
"I JUMPED A SIZE," OH EAT SOME MORE
"I LOOK LIKE HELL," WELL LOOSEN THE BELT
ONE OF THESE DAYS THIS SNOWS GONNA MELT

I SHOVEL AND I SHOVEL AND I SHOVEL THAT SNOW
I GOTTA GET OUT, BUT MY CAR WON'T GO
I GET THE CABIN FEVER WHEN THE NORTH WIND BLOWS
I GOTTA GET OUT, BUT MY CAR WON'T GO

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Quoting previous post by CybrTeddy:

Igor's KMZ file hasn't been updated, but Richard's has. All these new intensities are coming from the updated KMZ files.


Since each storm's KMZ files is updated one final time when that storm's TCR is released, there's a good chance the data in those KMZ files could and likely will change. IOW, nothing's final until the TCR is out.
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25. MTWX
Quoting Minnemike:
Springfield, MO and Tulsa nexrads picking up cells starting to fire on that moist inflow. most that do develop there will probably all have some rotation come 3pm and onward. wonder when a tornado watch will be issued.

Should be any time now. The storms are really starting to materialize.
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Quoting MTWX:
It's starting...Link
Springfield, MO and Tulsa nexrads picking up cells starting to fire on that moist inflow. most that do develop there will probably all have some rotation come 3pm and onward. wonder when a tornado watch will be issued.
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Its still fereekin snowing here :(

Complete Update





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22. MTWX
It's starting...Link
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surprised by the radar coming out of Des Moines, and nearby... seems to be a sign of the ramp up, with some deepening low pressure and vorticity picking up in the midwest. any have maps that illustrate this?
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Quoting previous post by CybrTeddy:

Igor's KMZ file hasn't been updated, but Richard's has. All these new intensities are coming from the updated KMZ files.

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19. XLR8
#13

Very pretty
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At least the Lions are trying to turn it around... I love the sarcasm in the post, though. (The Saints are still my team... WHO DAT!)

Anyway, I also made a blog posting over our absolute favorite topic, and am interested in seeing some *intelligent* discussion on there...

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/jeffs713/comment.html?entrynum=12
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.
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Quoting SuperYooper:


I'll trade any day. Once you have done that it gets old fast.

It really isn't the snow that I get tired of (though I still am wanting summer NOW). It's the cloudy weather that just seems to NEVER go away. Especially when you are next to the lake. Interior places will get sunshine while lakeshore will have clouds due to lake effect snow bands. Back in 02 I remember having a all sunny day for 2 days between February and mid-April. We got 325 inches of snow that year, most of it lake effect. I shoveled the roof of my house 6 times and had snowbanks (hand shoveled, couldn't afford a snowblower at the time) that were 6 feet tall by 30 feet wide by 90 feet in length. All I wanted to do was cry.
I did live in Scotland for 1 1/2 years so I know what you mean about the dark. But I just turned on my lights and didn't look outside. I had to do that in the summer as well so I wouldn't be affected by the dusk at 11PM. However, you are correct. I am sure the hassle with the snow would wear thin real quick. In fact reading your comment has worn me out!!!LOL What you need to do is schedule a trip to the sunshine during the winter. We have plenty down here.
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I'm definitely going to invest in an ice scraper this year for my car. Of course, knowing my luck, I won't get to use it...
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Quoting kwgirl:
Maybe it is a cross between a snowflake and a hail stone. But what do I know. I have lived in the tropics most of my life. What I wouldn't give to be able to fall into a snowdrift and dig my way out. Sounds like fun for me!


I'll trade any day. Once you have done that it gets old fast.

It really isn't the snow that I get tired of (though I still am wanting summer NOW). It's the cloudy weather that just seems to NEVER go away. Especially when you are next to the lake. Interior places will get sunshine while lakeshore will have clouds due to lake effect snow bands. Back in 02 I remember having a all sunny day for 2 days between February and mid-April. We got 325 inches of snow that year, most of it lake effect. I shoveled the roof of my house 6 times and had snowbanks (hand shoveled, couldn't afford a snowblower at the time) that were 6 feet tall by 30 feet wide by 90 feet in length. All I wanted to do was cry.
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Aurora in the backround, fog over western England and Europe, and clear night in Paris.
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Quoting SuperYooper:
Marquette has a 70% chance of Ice Pellets tomorrow, which is the first time I have heard of something on a forcast like that.

Deer pellets, rabbit pellets, iron ore pellets, pellet stoves.........heard of all of them. Ice pellets is a new one to me.
Maybe it is a cross between a snowflake and a hail stone. But what do I know. I have lived in the tropics most of my life. What I wouldn't give to be able to fall into a snowdrift and dig my way out. Sounds like fun for me!
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Marquette has a 70% chance of Ice Pellets tomorrow, which is the first time I have heard of something on a forcast like that.

Deer pellets, rabbit pellets, iron ore pellets, pellet stoves.........heard of all of them. Ice pellets is a new one to me.
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Thanks Dr. Masters. I was hoping for a cool Thanksgiving, weather wise, but I guess it will be another typical tropical day in the Keys. Happy Thanksgiving to all of you.
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Dallas / Fort Worth International Airport 11:53 Mostly Cloudy and Windy 80 63 56 S 33 G 39 29.78
Dallas Love Field 11:53 Mostly Cloudy 79 62 56 SW 18 G 29 29.79
Dallas Executive Airport 11:53 Mostly Cloudy 82 62 51 S 14 G 26 29.79
Dallas / Addison Airport 11:47 Mostly Cloudy 79 64 61 S 17 G 32 29.79
Grand Prairie Municipal Airport 11:50 Mostly Cloudy 81 63 54 SW 18 G 38 29.81
Collin County Regional Airport 11:53 Mostly Cloudy and Breezy 78 63 60 SW 23 G 36 29.78
Arlington Municipal Airport 11:53 Overcast and Breezy 79 62 56 SW 23 G 36 29.79
Denton Municipal Airport 11:53 Overcast and Windy 79 63 58 S 30 G 37 29.77
Fort Worth Alliance Airport 11:53 Mostly Cloudy 79 62 56 S 16 G 35 29.76
Fort Worth, Meacham International Airport 11:53 Overcast 78 62 58 S 16 G 30 29.77
Fort Worth, Naval Air Station 11:52 Overcast and Breezy 79 60 52 S 22 G 37 29.82
Mineral Wells Airport 11:53 Overcast and Breezy 82 61 49 S 21 G 32 29.76
Terrell Municipal Airport 11:53 Overcast and Breezy 80 62 54 S 21 G 29 29.80
Gainesville Municipal Airport 11:46 Overcast and Breezy 79 64 61 S 22 G 31 29.78
Waco Regional Airport 11:51 Mostly Cloudy and Breezy 80 63 56 S 24 G 33 29.82
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great image of the nile at night
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Dallas / Fort Worth International Airport
Lat: 32.91 Lon: -97.03 Elev: 560
Last Update on Nov 24, 11:53 am CST

Mostly Cloudy and Windy

80 °F
(27 °C)
Humidity: 56 %
Wind Speed: S 33 G 39 MPH
Barometer: 29.78" (1007.5 mb)
Dewpoint: 63 °F (17 °C)
Heat Index: 81 °F (27 °C)
Visibility: 10.00 m
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Thanks for the update Doc.

Hey look, we're number 1 on the list. I'm pretty sure that is a list I don't care to be #1 on.

Any thoughts on how warm lake temperatures might affect snowfall? I've heard it go both ways....warmer temps will increase lake effect......colder temps will make the storms worse.....who knows?
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Thanks Jeff...none here either
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Happy Thanksgiving Dr. Masters.

Good Luck to the Lions .

Saints vs Dallas in the Second Game.

Enjoy the Holiday
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No snow here.
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Dry and warm. Fantastic. Fire season should be magical again in FL.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.