Strongest storm ever recorded in the Midwest smashes all-time pressure records

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:09 PM GMT on October 27, 2010

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Tornadoes, violent thunderstorms, and torrential rains swept through a large portion of the nation's midsection yesterday, thanks to the strongest storm ever recorded in the Midwest. NOAA's Storm Prediction Center logged 24 tornado reports and 282 reports of damaging high winds from yesterday's spectacular storm, and the storm continues to produce a wide variety of wild weather, with tornado watches posted for Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia, a blizzard warning for North Dakota, high wind warnings for most of the upper Midwest, and near-hurricane force winds on Lake Superior.

The mega-storm reached peak intensity late yesterday afternoon over Minnesota, resulting in the lowest barometric pressure readings ever recorded in the continental United States, except for from hurricanes and nor'easters affecting the Atlantic seaboard. So far, it appears the lowest reading (now official) was a pressure of 28.21" (955.2 mb) reduced to sea level reported from Bigfork, Minnesota at 5:13pm CDT. Other extreme low pressures from Minnesota during yesterday's storm included 28.22" (956 mb) at Orr at 5:34pm CDT, 28.23" at International Falls (3:45pm), and 28.23" at Waskuh at 5:52pm. The 28.23" (956mb) reading from International Falls yesterday obliterated their previous record of 28.70" set on Nov. 11, 1949 by nearly one-half inch of mercury--a truly amazing anomaly. Duluth's 28.36" (961 mb) reading smashed their old record of 28.48" (964 mb) set on Nov. 11, 1998. Wisconsin also recorded its lowest barometric pressure in history yesterday, with a 28.36" (961 mb) reading at Superior. The old record was 28.45" (963.4 mb) at Green Bay on April 3, 1982. The previous state record for Minnesota was 28.43" (963 mb) at Albert Lea and Austin on Nov. 10, 1998.


Figure 1. Visible satellite image of the October 26, 2010 superstorm taken at 5:32pm EDT. At the time, Bigfork, Minnesota was reporting the lowest pressure ever recorded in a U.S. non-coastal storm, 955 mb. Image credit: NASA/GSFC.

Yesterday's records in context
Yesterday's 28.21" (955 mb) low pressure reading in Minnesota breaks not only the 28.28" (958 mb) previous "USA-interior-of-the-continent-record" from Cleveland, Ohio during the Great Ohio Storm of Jan. 26, 1978 (a lower reading in Canada during this event bottomed out at an amazing 28.05"/950 mb), but also the lowest pressure ever measured anywhere in the continental United States aside from the Atlantic Coast. The modern Pacific Coast record is 28.40" (962mb) at Quillayute, Washington on Dec. 1, 1987. An older reading, taken on a ship offshore from the mouth of the Umpqua River in Oregon during the famous "Storm King" event on January 9, 1880, was 28.20" (954.9 mb)--slightly lower than the 2010 storm.

The lowest non-hurricane barometric pressure reading in the lower 48 states is 28.10" (952 mb) measured at Bridgehampton, New York (Long Island) during an amazing nor'easter on March 1, 1914 (see Kocin and Uccellini, "Northeast Snowstorms; Vol. 2., p. 324, American Meteorological Society, 2004.) The lowest non-hurricane barometric pressure reading from anywhere in the United States was a 27.35" (927 mb) reading at Dutch Harbor, Alaska on Oct. 25, 1977. The lowest hurricane pressure reading was the 26.34" (892 mb) recorded in 1935 during the Great Labor Day Hurricane.


Figure 2. Storm reports received by NOAA's Storm Prediction Center from the October 26, 2010 superstorm.

The six most intense storms in history to affect the Great Lakes
According to the Chicago branch of the National Weather Service and Christopher C. Burt, our Weather Records blogger, the following are the six lowest pressures measured in the U.S. Great Lakes region:

1. Yesterday's October 26, 2010 Superstorm (955 mb/28.20")
2. Great Ohio Blizzard January 26, 1978 (958 mb/28.28")
3. Armistice Day Storm November 11, 1940 (967 mb/28.55")
4. November 10, 1998 storm (967 mb/ 28.55")
5. White Hurricane of November 7 - 9, 1913 (968 mb/28.60")
6. Edmund Fitzgerald Storm of November 10, 1975 (980 mb/28.95")

So, the famed storm that sank the ore carrier Edmund Fitzgerald in 1974, killing all 29 sailors aboard, was weaker than the current storm. Indeed, I wouldn't want to be on a boat in Lake Superior today--sustained winds at the Rock of Ages lighthouse on Isle Royale were a sustained 68 mph, gusting to 78 mph at 3am EDT this morning!

Yet Another Remarkable Mid-latitude Cyclone so far this Year!
Yesterday's superstorm is reminiscent of the amazing low pressures reached earlier this year (Jan. 19-22) in the West, where virtually every site in California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, southern Oregon, and southern Idaho--about 10 - 15% of the U.S. land area--broke their lowest on record pressure readings. However, the lowest readings from that event fell well short of yesterday's mega-storm with 28.85" (977 mb) being about the lowest recorded at any onshore site.

Commentary
We've now had two remarkable extratropical storms this year in the U.S. that have smashed all-time low pressure records across a large portion of the country. Is this a sign that these type of storms may be getting stronger? Well, there is evidence that wintertime extratropical storms have grown in intensity in the Pacific, Arctic, and Great Lakes in recent decades. I discuss the science in detail in a post I did earlier this year. Here is an excerpt from that post:

General Circulation Models (GCMs) like the ones used in the 2007 IPCC Assessment Report do a very good job simulating how winter storms behave in the current climate, and we can run simulations of the atmosphere with extra greenhouse gases to see how winter storms will behave in the future. The results are very interesting. Global warming is expected to warm the poles more than the equatorial regions. This reduces the difference in temperature between the pole and Equator. Since winter storms form in response to the atmosphere's need to transport heat from the Equator to the poles, this reduced temperature difference reduces the need for winter storms, and thus the models predict fewer storms will form. However, since a warmer world increases the amount of evaporation from the surface and puts more moisture in the air, these future storms drop more precipitation. During the process of creating that precipitation, the water vapor in the storm must condense into liquid or frozen water, liberating "latent heat"--the extra heat that was originally added to the water vapor to evaporate it in the first place. This latent heat intensifies the winter storm, lowering the central pressure and making the winds increase. So, the modeling studies predict a future with fewer total winter storms, but a greater number of intense storms. These intense storms will have more lift, and will thus tend to drop more precipitation--including snow, when we get areas of strong lift in the -15°C preferred snowflake formation region.

Invest 90L
A low pressure system (Invest 90L) in the middle Atlantic Ocean has developed a broad circulation, but has very limited heavy thunderstorm activity. NHC is giving 90L a 10% of developing into a tropical depression by Friday. Another area of disturbed weather a few hundred miles west of 90L is disorganized, and is also being given a 10% chance of developing.

Next update
I'll have an update on Thursday morning. I'm at the National Hurricane Center in Miami this week, as part of their visiting scientist program, and hopefully the weather in the rest of the country will slow down enough so I can write about goings-on here at the Hurricane Center!

Christopher C. Burt is responsible for most of the content of this post, with the exception of the commentary, which I wrote.

Jeff Masters

The Big Blow! (pjpix)
This photo and the other in my series were both take from the same spot ... just different directions and just a representative scene mirroring so many others here in the midwest. These were taken yesterday morning right after the thunderstorm front had gone through but the winds continued to increase in intensity as the barometer dropped ... to a record low in some midwest spots. The big Blow was the equivlant of a Cat 2 or Cat 3 hurricane and indeed a very unusual storm in the upper midwest for this time of the year.
The Big Blow!
Cell Rotation Animation (SunsetSailor)
Gif Created on Make A Gif
Cell Rotation Animation
()
Disappearing Pier 5 (mactoot)
I posted a video of continuous hits at youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckrpWF-dXwU
Disappearing Pier 5
October Storm (cambuck1)
October Storm

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Good mornin wu-bloggers! Good coffee to all.

Oh there he is.

swooon....kerthunk.
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I will be very interested to see if all 3 invests develop.. I suspect 92L will become Shary, 90L will become Tomas and 91L will become Virginie.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23878
wow the Atlantic blew up I think 90L won't develop however 92L will become ts/ss shary and 91l will eventually become Tomas. I think the million dollar question now will be how far south 91L travels. a northern route would give us a category 1 Omar(08) where as a southern path over S America could give us anything
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743. ackee
Quoting alfabob:
I'm guessing this won't be at 20% for very long.

I agree probaly up to 40% at 8am
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To summarize (from ATCF & NHC):

90L: 35 knots | 1008 mb | 26.9N/41.1W | 50% (orange)

91L: 30 knots | 1006 mb | 06.8N/46.8W | 20% (yellow)

92L: 30 knots | 1009 mb | 23.5N/56.7W | 60% (red)

So neither the one with the lowest central pressure nor the one with the highest wind speed have the best odds for development. Just goes to show that the pros do, indeed, no more than most of us armchair mets do. ;-)

------------------------------------------

HAMweather says that 326 record high, or high minimum, temps have been set or tied in the United States in the past 24 hours, while just 21 record lows or low maximums have been. The map's very lopsided though, clearly showing the general location of the cold front; as that moves off the east coast later, there's no doubt the record high/record low ratio will go back to being a lot less lopsided.
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740. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Japan Meteorological Agency
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #65
TYPHOON CHABA (T1014)
15:00 PM JST October 28 2010
=================================

SUBJECT: Category Four Typhoon In Sea South Of Okinawa

At 6:00 AM UTC, Typhoon Chaba (935 hPa) located at 24.8N 129.2E has 10 minute sustained winds of 90 knots with gusts of 130 knots. The cyclone is reported as moving northeast at 7 knots

Dvorak Intensity: T6.5

Storm Force Winds
=================
100 NM from the center

Gale Force Winds
================
260 NM from the center

Forecast and Intensity
=======================
24 HRS: 27.2N 131.0E - 80 knots (CAT 3/Typhoon)
48 HRS: 31.6N 134.8E - 65 knots (CAT 3/Typhoon)
72 HRS: 37.0N 144.0E - Extratropical
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Quoting KoritheMan:


No. 91L is the tropical wave east of the Windwards. 92L is the disturbance north of the Leewards.


Yeah, see my edit. When it was referred twice, I double-checked.

Still don't get why the one that was already tagged was not the first invest.

Completely irrelevant to anything, though. Just a curiosity to me.
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738. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Mauritius Meteorological Services
Tropical Cyclone Advisory Number TWELVE
PERTURBATION TROPICALE 01 2010-2011
10:00 AM Réunion October 28 2010
=====================================

At 6:00 AM UTC, Tropical Disturbance 01R (1001 hPa) located at 13.6S 81.9E has 10 minute sustained winds of 25 knots with gusts of 40 knots. The disturbance is reported as moving west southwest at 9 knots.

Dvorak Intensity: T1.5/2.0

Forecast and Intensity
=======================
12 HRS: 14.5S 79.9E - 25 knots (Perturbation Tropicale)
24 HRS: 15.1S/77.9E - 25 knots (Perturbation Tropicale)
48 HRS: 15.3S 74.3E - 20 knots (Depression se comblant)

Additional Information
========================

Sea surface temperature (around 26C) limits convective activity despite a weakening vertical wind shear. Strongest winds mainly extend far in the southern semi-circle due to the gradient effect with the subtropical high pressures. Winds extension has been recalibrated thanks to 0327z ASCAT swath. Significative re-intensification is not expected within the next 120 hours over this globally westward forecasted track. Available numerical weather prediction models are in good agreement to forecast a west southwestward track within the next 36 hours to 48 hours and then a recurve west northwestward track on the equatorward edge of the low level subtropical anticyclonic belt.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Still hoping we hit Alpha.


That would be something :)

2005 we hit Alpha, then 5 years later Alpha?
Member Since: July 1, 2008 Posts: 13 Comments: 7361
Quoting reedzone:
Subtropical Storm Shary is forming near Bermuda, all 3 invests may in fact develop, that would put us to 20 named storms. See, it wasn't impossible lol. We'll what happens, it seems 92L has the best chance to become a named system out of the 3 invests.


Still hoping we hit Alpha.
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Quoting Seastep:


That's 91L and I thought it had the most potential of the three starting this morning.

Really improved in all areas.


No. 91L is the tropical wave east of the Windwards. 92L is the disturbance north of the Leewards.
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Subtropical Storm Shary is forming near Bermuda, all 3 invests may in fact develop, that would put us to 20 named storms. See, it wasn't impossible lol. We'll what happens, it seems 92L has the best chance to become a named system out of the 3 invests.
Member Since: July 1, 2008 Posts: 13 Comments: 7361
Quoting CaribBoy:
so 92L went from 30 to 60% ...


I thought it had the most potential of the three starting this morning.

Really improved in all areas.

Edited: For some reason I cannot get that they labeled the newer probable system 91 and the one already tagged with a % 92.
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732. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
274
TCNA21 RJTD 280600
CCAA 28060 47644 CHABA(1014) 18248 11292 12344 265// 90508=

October 28 2010, 0600z
Typhoon Chaba (TY 18)
24.8N 129.2E
Dvorak Intensity: T6.5

---
Chaba is almost a Category 5.
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so 92L went from 30 to 60% ...
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000
ABNT20 KNHC 280546
TWOAT
TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
200 AM EDT THU OCT 28 2010

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

SHOWER AND THUNDERSTORM ACTIVITY ASSOCIATED WITH A NEARLY STATIONARY
LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM LOCATED ABOUT 1200 MILES NORTHWEST OF THE
NORTHERNMOST CAPE VERDE ISLANDS HAS CHANGED LITTLE DURING THE
PAST COUPLE OF HOURS. RECENT SATELLITE DATA INDICATE THAT THE LOW
IS PRODUCING WINDS TO GALE FORCE. ALTHOUGH UPPER-LEVEL WINDS ARE
ONLY MARGINALLY CONDUCIVE FOR DEVELOPMENT...ONLY A SMALL INCREASE
IN ORGANIZATION WOULD RESULT IN THE FORMATION OF A TROPICAL STORM.
THERE IS A MEDIUM CHANCE...50 PERCENT...OF THIS SYSTEM BECOMING A
TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

SATELLITE IMAGES INDICATE THAT A SURFACE LOW IS FORMING WITHIN THE
DEEP LAYER TROUGH LOCATED ABOUT 550 MILES NORTHEAST OF THE NORTHERN
LEEWARD ISLANDS. SHOWER AND THUNDERSTORM ACTIVITY HAS BEEN
INCREASING DURING THE PAST FEW HOURS...AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
ARE BECOMING CONDUCIVE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TROPICAL OR
SUBTROPICAL DEPRESSION DURING THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS. THERE IS A
HIGH CHANCE...60 PERCENT...OF THIS SYSTEM BECOMING A SUBTROPICAL OR
TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS AS IT MOVES WESTWARD AT
ABOUT 15 MPH.

A VIGOROUS TROPICAL WAVE IS LOCATED OVER THE TROPICAL ATLANTIC
ABOUT 1050 MILES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF THE WINDWARD ISLANDS.
ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS APPEAR FAVORABLE FOR SOME SLOW DEVELOPMENT
OF THIS SYSTEM DURING THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS. THERE IS A LOW
CHANCE...20 PERCENT...OF THIS SYSTEM BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE
DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS AS IT MOVES WESTWARD OR WEST-NORTHWESTWARD
AT 15 TO 20 MPH.

ELSEWHERE...TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS.

$$
FORECASTER BLAKE/BROWN
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729. JRRP
see you tomorrow
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5696
Many NC counties are being dropped from tornado watches. Glad to see that! Thoughts go out to those affected by yesterday's storms.
Member Since: September 21, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3690
Gnite all...
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Quoting Seastep:


Not on catalytic converters. On CO being naturally turned into CO2.


There are a lot of links; do a search on Yahoo.... or any search engine

I found this

Link

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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


haha, yeah Im required to take 4 semesters of computer science for it, so I should get enough. Alright im heading to bed, Night all great chattin


Sleep well :)

I best head off too -- need to get back, fire up the barbie, and start cooking before my gf gets in :) Thanks for plenty of fun debating folks :)
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Quoting Quadrantid:


It's a strange situation -- my D.Phil. took me three years -- the usual in the UK is about three and a half to four years, these days. Again, though, you're much more narrowly focussed, which I'm not sure is a good thing!

Thermo and hydrodynamics sound pretty key to meteorology to me -- though I suspect Quantum could be useful to you too, at some point! Basically, I tend to find everything can have a use, one way or another -- and you're more likely to do well in something if you're interested or enjoy it :)

Given how everything is heavily computer model based, could always be worth doing a computer module, too :) I learned fortran as part of my undergrad studies (yes, I know that makes me a fossil), and I still use it in pretty much every piece of research I do :)


haha, yeah Im required to take 4 semesters of computer science for it, so I should get enough. Alright im heading to bed, Night all great chattin
Member Since: September 6, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6288
I love catalytic converters, btw.

Good stuff.
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


Yeah here it take 5 years or more to get a masters degree. And sometimes over ten years in school for a PHD, its actually the same advice I got, get a physics degree as meteorology, like astronomy, is all based off physics. Im sure for the weather side ill be told to do thermo and fluid dynamics, but quantum mechanics interests me.


It's a strange situation -- my D.Phil. took me three years -- the usual in the UK is about three and a half to four years, these days. Again, though, you're much more narrowly focussed, which I'm not sure is a good thing!

Thermo and hydrodynamics sound pretty key to meteorology to me -- though I suspect Quantum could be useful to you too, at some point! Basically, I tend to find everything can have a use, one way or another -- and you're more likely to do well in something if you're interested or enjoy it :)

Given how everything is heavily computer model based, could always be worth doing a computer module, too :) I learned fortran as part of my undergrad studies (yes, I know that makes me a fossil), and I still use it in pretty much every piece of research I do :)
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Quoting sunlinepr:


Catalytic Converters - Various types

Link


Not on catalytic converters. On CO being naturally turned into CO2.
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Have a nice night all!
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Que mucho Chaba....





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Sorry I am not good at links, I don't post often, goggle: what happens to CO in the atmosphere? The first entry is "toxic profile for carbon monoxide".
Quoting Seastep:


Please enlighten me.
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Quoting Quadrantid:


To get onto an Astro Ph.D., all the advice I was given said it was more important to do a Physics degree than an Astronomy degree -- basically, the basic physics you get taught on a Physics degree is really important...

So I did a 4 year Physics & Astronomy degree at the University of Durham in the UK -- it was a master's degree (three year version would have been batchelors). Meant that I ended up doing things like Quantum, Thermodynamics, Relativity, and all the rest, as well as my astro stuff. Which gave me a broader background to take into my astronomy career.

It sounds kind of perverse (doing less Astro at degree if you want it as a career), but things worked out, so I guess it was good advice :) Degrees in the UK are much more narrowly focussed than those in the US, as best I can gather, so the only none physics/maths/astronomy course I did in my four years was a first year single module on the philosphy of science... which seemed pointless at the time, but has come in handy since.

So the net result is that I got a very focussed education, finished my Ph.D. (well, D.Phil. :P) at 24, and started work as a post-doc much earlier than I would have in the US or mainland Europe, but the flip side is that I'm not as broadly educated. Personally, I think the broader degree schemes in the US and Europe are a great idea :)


Yeah here it take 5 years or more to get a masters degree. And sometimes over ten years in school for a PHD, its actually the same advice I got, get a physics degree as meteorology, like astronomy, is all based off physics. Im sure for the weather side ill be told to do thermo and fluid dynamics, but quantum mechanics interests me.
Member Since: September 6, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6288
Quoting Seastep:


Please enlighten me with a link.


Catalytic Converters - Various types

Link
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


What physics did you have to do, Im thinking about either doing Quantum or Thermodynamics, not sure what to do.


To get onto an Astro Ph.D., all the advice I was given said it was more important to do a Physics degree than an Astronomy degree -- basically, the basic physics you get taught on a Physics degree is really important...

So I did a 4 year Physics & Astronomy degree at the University of Durham in the UK -- it was a master's degree (three year version would have been batchelors). Meant that I ended up doing things like Quantum, Thermodynamics, Relativity, and all the rest, as well as my astro stuff. Which gave me a broader background to take into my astronomy career.

It sounds kind of perverse (doing less Astro at degree if you want it as a career), but things worked out, so I guess it was good advice :) Degrees in the UK are much more narrowly focussed than those in the US, as best I can gather, so the only none physics/maths/astronomy course I did in my four years was a first year single module on the philosphy of science... which seemed pointless at the time, but has come in handy since.

So the net result is that I got a very focussed education, finished my Ph.D. (well, D.Phil. :P) at 24, and started work as a post-doc much earlier than I would have in the US or mainland Europe, but the flip side is that I'm not as broadly educated. Personally, I think the broader degree schemes in the US and Europe are a great idea :)
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Quoting SunnyDaysFla:
If we stopped using catalytic converters, it would simply mean a delay in converting CO to CO2. It would happen anyway, naturally. You can learn a lot goggling the question.


Please enlighten me with a link.

How long is that conversion and at what rate?

Seriously, I do not know.
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MENTAWAI ISLANDS, Indonesia – The death toll from a tsunami and a volcano rose to more than 340 Thursday as more victims of Indonesia's double disasters were found and an official said a warning system installed after a deadly ocean wave in 2004 had broken from a lack of maintenance.
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Quoting Quadrantid:


The people I work with are doing radial velocity work (looking at the spectrum of the star, and watching the spectral lines be red- then blue-shifted as the planet and star orbit their centre of mass). That basically takes the light gathered by the telescope and puts it through a spectrometer -- so you don't need perfect dark skies. Other astronomy projects (mainly extragalactic things, and projects looking at very faint objects) take the dark time - the radial velocity search isn't really affected by moonlight (since it's looking at pretty bright stars, in order to have enough light to get accurate spectra), so makes do with bright time so everyone gets their turn at the telescope :D


What physics did you have to do, Im thinking about either doing Quantum or Thermodynamics, not sure what to do.
Member Since: September 6, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6288
The mind boggles :(

From the BBC website

'No alert' in Indonesian tsunami

A crucial link in Indonesia's tsunami warning system was not working during Monday's tsunami because it had been vandalised, says an Indonesian official.

-------------------------------

Really depressing to think that vandalism could have cost so many lives -- although of course (as the article says) the earthquake was so close to shore that the waves arrived within just a few minutes -- maybe the buoys would have made no difference, but it's really sad to think that people would vandalise something that has the potential to save hundreds of lives :(
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


why wouldnt they do it during a new moon?


The people I work with are doing radial velocity work (looking at the spectrum of the star, and watching the spectral lines be red- then blue-shifted as the planet and star orbit their centre of mass). That basically takes the light gathered by the telescope and puts it through a spectrometer -- so you don't need perfect dark skies. Other astronomy projects (mainly extragalactic things, and projects looking at very faint objects) take the dark time - the radial velocity search isn't really affected by moonlight (since it's looking at pretty bright stars, in order to have enough light to get accurate spectra), so makes do with bright time so everyone gets their turn at the telescope :D
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Quoting Seastep:


Meh, it's only 500 deaths per year and most of those are from stupidity.

CO2 will supposedly kill billions.

The CO will be converted anyway to CO2---we use converters so it is immediate and we do not have the toxic effects while waiting for "natural" conversion.
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


Its a poisonous gas, carbon monoxide kills a lot of people now, even with them. anytime you drive down the road youd need to wear a gas mask...


Meh, it's only 500 deaths per year and most of those are from stupidity.

CO2 will supposedly kill billions.
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Quoting Quadrantid:


It's amazing what you can do with good equipment, and above the atmosphere :)

You need to get out on the sea on a moonless night -- if you think full moon is awesome, wait until you see the milky way so bright you almost feel like you could read a book by it :) I think, nominally, the only Venus, Jupiter and Mars are bright enough for you to read (aside from Sun + Moon), but it's still breathtaking :D

Sadly, most planet search work is done during "bright" time (around full moon), so my trips to the observatory while I'm at UNSW will be when the moon is too bright to get to know the southern sky. Still, I can't complain really :D


why wouldnt they do it during a new moon?
Member Since: September 6, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6288
Quoting Quadrantid:


Pretty much -- here's the Kepler home page. Dunno why I keep mispelling it :)

Anyways, if there are exoEarths out there, then Kepler should find loads (and likely already has detected some!). I don't think it'll find any close enough to study in any depth, but it'd still be awesome to have it confirmed that they're out there!


Agreed! To quote the movie Contact, "it'd be an awful waste of Space", if we were alone in the universe.
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


thats insane I was watching the show The Universe, I cant believe how sensitive it is. Im sure your telescope can take it ;) Ive been out at sea at night with a full moon. It was almost as bright as day. It is still the most beautiful sight ive ever seen.


It's amazing what you can do with good equipment, and above the atmosphere :)

You need to get out on the sea on a moonless night -- if you think full moon is awesome, wait until you see the milky way so bright you almost feel like you could read a book by it :) I think, nominally, the only Venus, Jupiter and Mars are bright enough for you to read (aside from Sun + Moon), but it's still breathtaking :D

Sadly, most planet search work is done during "bright" time (around full moon), so my trips to the observatory while I'm at UNSW will be when the moon is too bright to get to know the southern sky. Still, I can't complain really :D
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Quoting Seastep:


You're right, it is worse for population centers, imo, but the planet comes first. Not an extremely small percentage of the earth's surface area.


That's one of the problems in Mexico City; they have to alternate cars by day, depending on their plate numbers in order to have less cars going around (That what I been told by some friends who live there)
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Chaba is looking pretty good if you ask me!

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Quoting traumaboyy:


Right now I will accept any weather that includes RAIN!!


Seconded! Pretty dry here as well. No fire warning yet, but it's not far away.
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If we stopped using catalytic converters, it would simply mean a delay in converting CO to CO2. It would happen anyway, naturally. You can learn a lot goggling the question.
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Quoting Quadrantid:


Pretty much -- here's the Kepler home page. Dunno why I keep mispelling it :)

Anyways, if there are exoEarths out there, then Kepler should find loads (and likely already has detected some!). I don't think it'll find any close enough to study in any depth, but it'd still be awesome to have it confirmed that they're out there!


thats insane I was watching the show The Universe, I cant believe how sensitive it is. Im sure your telescope can take it ;) Ive been out at sea at night with a full moon. It was almost as bright as day. It is still the most beautiful sight ive ever seen.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.