Hurricane Otto's deluge continues; world extreme heat record of 136.4°F bogus?

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:51 PM GMT on October 08, 2010

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The deluge continues over Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and the northern Lesser Antilles Islands from Hurricane Otto, which is bringing a fourth straight day of heavy rains. Otto is the eighth hurricane of this very active 2010 hurricane season; our tally now stands at 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 5 intense hurricanes. An average season has 10 - 11 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes. Otto's rains have caused a fair degree of trouble in the islands. According to Wikipedia, Heavy downpours in the U.S. Virgin Islands caused flooding across several local roads. In Saint Croix, a roadway section leading into Enfield Green collapsed on the night of October 6, temporarily cutting the south-side neighborhood off to vehicle traffic until a makeshift roadway through Carlton Estate was created the next day. On the island's North Shore in La Vallee, landslides and localized flooding in low-lying areas created some issues. There were no reports of major damage, however, and the roads remained passable. Torrential floods across the British Virgin Islands toppled several cars and caused extensive damage to utility lines and drainage pipes; dozens of people (mostly in Road Town) were left without power and water. An estimated 100 homes were flooded in Saint Lucia, and a fishing village on the island's east coast was declared a disaster zone. Schools, businesses and government offices across all of the Virgin Islands and in Saint Kitts and Nevis were closed until further notice.

In Puerto Rico, heavy rainfalls fell across the municipality of Utuado on October 7. As a result, a road to a neighborhood was made inaccessible after being severely damaged by gushing waters when parts of the Arecibo River overflowed. That same day, a landslide dragged away a communication post along the road and made it impossible for larger vehicles--including ambulances--to access the site. Meanwhile, fourteen families in the municipality of Ponce were cut off from communication because of several landslides. A residence alongside a road suffered significant damage and its inhabitants were forced to evacuate. Furthermore, a district in Cayey was isolated after a bridge collapsed, while burst riverbanks caused flooding across streets, trapping dozens of families in their homes. Across the island, 40 roads were closed due to torrential rainfall, and 19 streets had at least one lane closed.



Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Otto.

Weather radar out of Puerto Rico shows that a large area of heavy rain will continue to affect the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico today, and flash flood warnings are posted on these islands through tonight. Martinique radar shows considerably less activity over the Lesser Antilles.

Satellite imagery shows a well-organized storm with an expanding Central Dense Overcast (CDO) of high cirrus clouds covering the center. Infrared satellite imagery shows a region of intense thunderstorms with very cold cloud tops, with the suggestion of a warm spot--an eye--forming. Otto should continue to intensify until Saturday morning, when wind shear will quickly rise to a very high 30+ knots.


Figure 2. Radar-estimated rainfall from Otto over Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands this week shows that rains in excess of eight inches (white colors) have fallen in many regions. The strange ray-like pattern to the east of the radar location (the white "+" symbol) is due to mountains blocking the radar beam.

Western Caribbean disturbance
An area of disturbed weather in the Western Caribbean, a few hundred miles east of the coast of Nicaragua, has only a small amount of intense thunderstorms, but is showing some spin. The disturbance is nearly stationary, and is under a moderate 15 - 20 knots of wind shear. Some dry air in the Western Caribbean is interfering with development. I expect the storm will begin to build some significant heavy thunderstorms over the weekend, bringing heavy rains to northeastern Honduras and Nicaragua. None of the models develop the disturbance into a tropical depression, but it does have some potential for slow development over the next few days, and NHC is giving the disturbance a 20% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Sunday. The ECMWF model has the disturbance drifting northward next week and crossing Central Cuba on Wednesday or Thursday. Most of the other models keep the storms confined to the Caribbean.

A challenge to the validity of the world extreme heat record of 136.4°F (58°C) at Al Aziza, Libya
One of the "sacred cows" of world weather extremes has been the widely reported "hottest temperature ever recorded on earth", a reading of 58°C (136.4°F) reported from Al Azizia, Libya on Sept. 13, 1922. In a remarkable piece of research, our featured Weather Extremes blogger Christopher C. Burt concludes: the temperature observations at Al Azizia prior to 1927 (when the site and instruments were changed) are obviously invalid. The shelter housing the thermometer was most likely over exposed and measuring heat radiating of off the black-tarred concrete of the terrace on which it was placed.

Has Mr. Burt slain one of meteorology's most sacred cows? You be the judge. Check out the full story at his blog.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
Ok. I guess you are right. IDK :)


Lets move on lol
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Quoting txjac:
I for one couldnt imagine riding out a storm in a boat ...couldnt imagine the fear ...I'm a baby
I second that. Some people just don't think.
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
After Ivan here the three outer districts took the longest to get power back. East End was 2 1/2 months without power. We had to go in to work(I work at the post office)every day with no power, no water etc. What a mess. But you know what they say about the mail. It was a real mess and being without power was about the hardest part. VERY hot.

I understand they gave out awards for places that bounced back so fast after hurricanes, I always wonder why Grand Cayman wasn't awarded one because we bounced back fast. I guess it was because of the way the Government of the time treated those that wanted to help and the international press at the time, once again just my personal opinion, I could be totally wrong!
Member Since: April 29, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7506
405. txjac
I for one couldnt imagine riding out a storm in a boat ...couldnt imagine the fear ...I'm a baby
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Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
Quoting wunderkidcayman:
umm stormwatcherCI my dad knows that guys that was with is boat during ivan asnd he said that he decided to ride out the storm in the boat on the water so that is the reason he's dead and after ivan one of guys who died from carbon-monoxide poisoning was a very very good friend of mine and my family he was an eletrision
Some people think they are invincible.
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Quoting doorman79:


Then it should have a footnote ;P
Ok. I guess you are right. IDK :)
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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
It is not plagiarized if he did not present it as if it was authored by him.


Then it should have a footnote ;P
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umm stormwatcherCI my dad knows that guys that was with is boat during ivan asnd he said that he decided to ride out the storm in the boat on the water so that is the reason he's dead and after ivan one of guys who died from carbon-monoxide poisoning was a very very good friend of mine and my family he was an eletrision
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Quoting txjac:
stormwather ...my quotie thing not working either ....I think that I was the only one in my area that didnt lose power during Ike ...good in way ...bad because I was the onle one that could work!
After Ivan here the three outer districts took the longest to get power back. East End was 2 1/2 months without power. We had to go in to work(I work at the post office)every day with no power, no water etc. What a mess. But you know what they say about the mail. It was a real mess and being without power was about the hardest part. VERY hot.
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
Quoting KerryInNOLA:
Plagiarized from hurricane-facts.com
It is not plagiarized if he did not present it as if it was authored by him.
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
396. txjac
stormwather ...my quotie thing not working either ....I think that I was the only one in my area that didnt lose power during Ike ...good in way ...bad because I was the onle one that could work!
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Quoting aspectre:
And yes, TropicalAnalystwx13, I saw your question almost immediately after it was posted. And the answer depends on whether you believe "Curiosity killed the cat" trumps "Trust but verify."
An deeper explanation will be posted on the front page of tomorrow's new blog (if I catch it) or soon after you appear on it (if I miss the beginning of the new blog).

TS.Otto
7Oct 03pmGMT - - 23.8n68.0w - - 60mph - - - - 992mb -- NHC.Adv.#6
7Oct 06pmGMT - - 23.7n67.8w - - 50knots - - - 992mb -- NHC-ATCF *23.6n67.9w
7Oct 09pmGMT - - 24.0n67.6w - - 60mph - - - - 992mb -- NHC.Adv.#7
8Oct 12amGMT - - 23.9n67.0w - - 55knots - - - 992mb -- NHC-ATCF *23.8n67.1w
8Oct 03amGMT - - 24.1n66.6w - - 60mph - - - - 992mb -- NHC.Adv. #8
8Oct 06amGMT - - 24.4n66.1w - - 60knots - - - 989mb -- NHC-ATCF
8Oct 09amGMT - - 24.8n65.5w - - 70mph - - - - 986mb -- NHC.Adv. #8
8Oct 12pmGMT - - 25.4n64.6w - - 60knots - - - 986mb -- NHC-ATCF
H.Otto
8Oct 03pmGMT - - 25.9n64.0w - - 75mph - - - - 986mb -- NHC.Adv. #10
50knots=~57.5mph=93.6km/h __ 60mph=~96.6km/h __ 55knots=~63.3mph=~101.9km/h
65mph=~104.6km/h __ 60knots=~69mph=~111.1km/h __ 70mph=~112.7km/h
75mph =~120.7k/h __ 75knots=~86.3mph=138.9km/h
MaximumSustainedWind speeds are rounded to the nearest 5mph or to the nearest 5knots

Copy&paste 23.8n68.0w, 23.7n67.8w, 24.0n67.6w, 23.9n67.0w, 24.1n66.6w-24.4n66.1w, 24.4n66.1w-24.8n65.5w, 24.8n65.5w-25.4n64.6w, 25.4n64.6w-25.9n64.0w, ngd into the GreatCircleMapper for a look at the last 12hours

I want to say I personally look forward to your updates and posts and I find them very informative with precise movements and intensity, rather than yes, this is what it is ventually suppose to do , so we'll post it anyways, Thanks again!
Member Since: April 29, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7506
Quoting KerryInNOLA:
Plagiarized from hurricane-facts.com


LOL
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Quoting hurricanecrab:
My quote thingie isn't working (grumpy face)

Yep, Stormwatcher CI.... I wasn't so surprised to see coconut trees blown down, but dozens snapped halfway up the trunk...... that was weird. Paloma was a very small storm too.. very intense, but small in size.

I'll never forget walking past Fellowship Church....... gone down to the slab, except for a single pew sitting in the middle, hymnals still in the back.
I know, I live in East End and it was touch and go for a while whether she was going to miss us or not. As it was, we had 96 mph winds on this end but funnily enough East End was the only part of the island that never lost power.
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
Link
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389. txjac
He sounds young. He'll get over it. ;)

He is a she and on meds too ...
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Quoting txjac:
Joke ..notice the lol ..meds too here for stuff ...wasnt attacking anyone ..take the baby aspirin too ...geez
Sorry, I misunderstood.
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
My quote thingie isn't working (grumpy face)

Yep, Stormwatcher CI.... I wasn't so surprised to see coconut trees blown down, but dozens snapped halfway up the trunk...... that was weird. Paloma was a very small storm too.. very intense, but small in size.

I'll never forget walking past Fellowship Church....... gone down to the slab, except for a single pew sitting in the middle, hymnals still in the back.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
And yes, TropicalAnalystwx13, I saw your question almost immediately after it was posted. And the answer depends on whether you believe "Curiosity killed the cat" trumps "Trust but verify."
A deeper explanation will be posted on the front page of tomorrow's new blog (if I catch it) or soon after you appear on it (if I miss the beginning of the new blog).

TropicalStormOtto
8Oct 12amGMT - - 23.9n67.0w - - 55knots - - 992mb -- NHC-ATCF *23.8n67.1w
8Oct 03amGMT - - 24.1n66.6w - - 60mph - - - 992mb -- NHC.Adv.#8
8Oct 06amGMT - - 24.4n66.1w - - 60knots - - 989mb -- NHC-ATCF
8Oct 09amGMT - - 24.8n65.5w - - 70mph - - - 986mb -- NHC.Adv.#8
HurricaneOtto
8Oct 12pmGMT - - 25.4n64.6w - - 65knots - - 986mb -- NHC-ATCF *60knots
8Oct 03pmGMT - - 25.9n64.0w - - 75mph - - - 986mb -- NHC.Adv.#10
8Oct 06pmGMT - - 26.3n63.1w - - 70knots - - 977mb -- NHC-ATCF
8Oct 09pmGMT - - 26.8n62.3w - - 80mph - - - 976mb -- NHC.Adv.#11
9Oct 12amGMT - - 27.2n61.7w - - 75knots - - 972mb -- NHC-ATCF
* Before NHC reevaluated&altered the numbers
50knots=~57.5mph=93.6km/h __ 60mph=~96.6km/h __ 55knots=~63.3mph=~101.9km/h
65mph=~104.6km/h __ 60knots=~69mph=~111.1km/h __ 70mph=~112.7km/h
65knots=~74.8mph=~120.4km/h __ 75mph =~120.7k/h __ 70knots=~80.6mph=~129.6km/h
80mph=~128.7km/h __ 75knots=~86.3mph=138.9km/h
MaximumSustainedWind speeds are rounded to the nearest 5mph or to the nearest 5knots

Copy&paste 23.9n67.0w, 24.1n66.6w, 24.4n66.1w, 24.8n65.5w, 25.4n64.6w-25.9n64.0w, 25.9n64.0w-26.3n63.1w, 26.3n63.1w-26.8n62.3w, 26.8n62.3w-27.2n61.7w, ngd into the GreatCircleMapper for a look at the last 12hours
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385. txjac
Joke ..notice the lol ..meds too here for stuff ...wasnt attacking anyone ..take the baby aspirin too ...geez
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Quoting RufusBaker:
NEVER use candles or have any open flame while the wind is blowing.
During Ivan there were only two deaths here which could have been avoided. One man went to check on his boat and drowned and another one went outside for some stuoid reason and was hit in the chest with flying debris. AFTERIvan we had several deaths by carbon-monoxide poisoning by people putting their generators either inside a porch or garage or too close to their house.
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
Quoting txjac:
Meds ...all of us suffer from somthing ...except pilotguy ...lol
He sounds young. He'll get over it. ;)
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sorry,

Causing a rukus to keep the peace! :)

Maybe a good vibe will help all!
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Quoting RufusBaker:
The word hurricane comes from the Taino Native American word, hurucane, meaning evil spirit of the wind.

The first time anyone flew into a hurricane happened in 1943 in the middle of World War II.

A tropical storm is classified as a hurricane once winds goes up to 74 miles per hour or higher.

Hurricanes are the only weather disasters that have been given their own names.

All hurricanes begin life in a warm moist atmosphere over tropical ocean waters.

A typical hurricane can dump 6 inches to a foot of rain across a region.

The most violent winds and heaviest rains take place in the eye wall, the ring of clouds and thunderstorms closely surrounding the eye.

Every second, a large hurricane releases the energy of 10 atomic bombs.

Hurricanes can also produce tornadoes. They are not as strong as regular tornadoes and last only a few minutes.

Slow moving hurricanes produce more rainfall and can cause more damage from flooding than faster-moving, more powerful hurricanes.

Hurricane Floyd was barely a category I hurricane, but it still managed to mow down 19 million trees and caused over a billion dollars in damage.

Most people who die in hurricanes are killed by the towering walls of sea water that comes inland.

In the Pacific Ocean, Hurricanes are generally known as typhoons. In the Indian Ocean they are called tropical cyclones.

The man who first gave names to hurricanes was an Australian weather forecaster named C. Wragge in the early 1900s.

The first hurricane of the year is given a name beginning with the letter “A”.

Hurricane season is from June to November when the seas are at their warmest and most humid, which are ripe conditions for a hurricane to develop.

The planet Jupiter has a hurricane which has been going on for over 300 years. It can be seen as a red spot on the planet. This hurricane on Jupiter is bigger than the Earth itself.

In 1938, a man on Long Island bought a barometer. The instrument signaled a hurricane but the man thought it was defective and went back to the store to complain. When he returned, he found his house has been swept away from a hurricane. It turned out the barometer was correct.


Wow! But must take exception to the cause of most deaths, it's inland flooding acc. to NHC

See here
Member Since: September 21, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3690
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
pilotguy1, just for the record. In 2004 Grand Cayman was seriously devastated by Hurricane Ivan who hit us as a Cat4/5 and in 2008 Cayman Brac was also seriously devastated by Hurricane Paloma. I love tracking the storms but I pray we never go through another one like these.

Thanks for understanding what I was trying impart here! Yep As you know from East End to South Sound suffered the most the devastation damage wise, I'm in South Sound, though my house received some of less damage in the area, just a few shingles but water one foot in my house, just enough to destroy my furniture and utilities yet 2 days after I was able to move back in! Personally I can understand why pilotguy might have interpreted my comment the way he did , as I told surfmom , I hope it didn't rub some the wrong way but it actually what I wrote was very true, I think pilotguy is a good guy deep down inside so I don't hold any malice against him whatsoever!
Member Since: April 29, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7506
Link
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Quoting cat5hurricane:
Hurricane OTTO: Probability of tropical storm winds to 33 hours lead
Hope he doesn't move any further west or Bermuda might get a brush again.
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
Quoting txjac:
Meds ...all of us suffer from somthing ...except pilotguy ...lol
That's not necessary either.
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Quoting hurricanecrab:
Evening everybody....

quoting StormwatcherCI: "Plants have developed different ways of protecting themselves from powerful winds. Palm trees trow mainly in tropical parts of the world where hurricanes sometimes occur. Their flexible trunks bend and spring back in high winds but rarely break."

That's part of what was so shocking in the aftermath of Paloma on the Sister Islands in Nov. of 2008 -- coconut trees snapped like carrots about 6-10 feet of the ground. We lost over 20 of them on our little sticker patch alone. Still have four that have grown horizontally with the coconuts just 2-3 feet off the ground.

Yeah, we're watching, especially this time of year when storms form below us and ramp up quickly.
In Ivan the house I was living in had about 40 coconut trees in the yard but Ivan took out about 90% of them and the few that were left are growing almost horizontal too.
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373. txjac
Meds ...all of us suffer from somthing ...except pilotguy ...lol
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nother oneeeeeee!

Link
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Evening everybody....

quoting StormwatcherCI: "Plants have developed different ways of protecting themselves from powerful winds. Palm trees trow mainly in tropical parts of the world where hurricanes sometimes occur. Their flexible trunks bend and spring back in high winds but rarely break."

That's part of what was so shocking in the aftermath of Paloma on the Sister Islands in Nov. of 2008 -- coconut trees snapped like carrots about 6-10 feet of the ground. We lost over 20 of them on our little sticker patch alone. Still have four that have grown horizontally with the coconuts just 2-3 feet off the ground.

Yeah, we're watching, especially this time of year when storms form below us and ramp up quickly.
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NEVER use candles or have any open flame while the wind is blowing.
Member Since: July 5, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 578
Quoting ShenValleyFlyFish:


1000

If I tell folks I take medication for a heart condition the response is "So What". If I tell them that I also take meds for a brain condition they tend to draw away. Two organs 2 chemicals. Go figure.


Shen I got one for ya!!!!!!!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Imb4tYOk8GE&feature=related

Evening Everyone!Link
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367. txjac
My my Rufus...arent you full of interesting facts this evening ...thanks for sharing
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Quoting pilotguy1:


I love you man.
pilotguy1, just for the record. In 2004 Grand Cayman was seriously devastated by Hurricane Ivan who hit us as a Cat4/5 and in 2008 Cayman Brac was also seriously devastated by Hurricane Paloma. I love tracking the storms but I pray we never go through another one like these or that anyone else does.
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
Quoting stormpetrol:

You're not in touch with reality Captain, even Pilots these days are allowed antidepressants and yes , I'm on lexapro and clonazepam so what you got to say about that , I for one can admit that I suffer from anxiety disorder plus a very serious physical medical condition, What can you admit to Captain?!


+1000

If I tell folks I take medication for a heart condition the response is "So What". If I tell them that I also take meds for a brain condition they tend to draw away. Two organs 2 chemicals. Go figure.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The word hurricane comes from the Taino Native American word, hurucane, meaning evil spirit of the wind.

The first time anyone flew into a hurricane happened in 1943 in the middle of World War II.

A tropical storm is classified as a hurricane once winds goes up to 74 miles per hour or higher.

Hurricanes are the only weather disasters that have been given their own names.

All hurricanes begin life in a warm moist atmosphere over tropical ocean waters.

A typical hurricane can dump 6 inches to a foot of rain across a region.

The most violent winds and heaviest rains take place in the eye wall, the ring of clouds and thunderstorms closely surrounding the eye.

Every second, a large hurricane releases the energy of 10 atomic bombs.

Hurricanes can also produce tornadoes. They are not as strong as regular tornadoes and last only a few minutes.

Slow moving hurricanes produce more rainfall and can cause more damage from flooding than faster-moving, more powerful hurricanes.

Hurricane Floyd was barely a category I hurricane, but it still managed to mow down 19 million trees and caused over a billion dollars in damage.

Most people who die in hurricanes are killed by the towering walls of sea water that comes inland.

In the Pacific Ocean, Hurricanes are generally known as typhoons. In the Indian Ocean they are called tropical cyclones.

The man who first gave names to hurricanes was an Australian weather forecaster named C. Wragge in the early 1900s.

The first hurricane of the year is given a name beginning with the letter “A”.

Hurricane season is from June to November when the seas are at their warmest and most humid, which are ripe conditions for a hurricane to develop.

The planet Jupiter has a hurricane which has been going on for over 300 years. It can be seen as a red spot on the planet. This hurricane on Jupiter is bigger than the Earth itself.

In 1938, a man on Long Island bought a barometer. The instrument signaled a hurricane but the man thought it was defective and went back to the store to complain. When he returned, he found his house has been swept away from a hurricane. It turned out the barometer was correct.
Member Since: July 5, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 578
Quoting txjac:
Hello gambler ...long time no see ..
Hello Yep, Haven't been here since what, Danielle, I don't remember. Too much BS this year so I decided to stay away. Just wanted to stop by and say hello to everyone
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In 1502, Christopher Columbus was in Santo Domingo when he saw the signs of a violent hurricane storm approaching. He warned the governor of the city but the governor did not heed his words and made no attempts to stop a fleet of ships from going out to sea. Most of the fleet ended up being destroyed by the hurricane. It killed over 500 men with untold treasures being sunk into the bottom of the sea.

In 1893, a hurricane made a direct hit on New York City. Hog Island which was located off the Southern Coast of the Rockaways, was wiped out. This is believed to be the only reported incident in history where a hurricane removed an entire island.

Before the great Galveston Hurricane hit Galveston in September 1900, it was the second largest port in the Gulf next to New Orleans and at the time was considered much more important than places like Houston and Dallas. When the city was destroyed by the hurricane, it never recovered its former prominence.

Hurricane Camille from 1969 was the strongest hurricane to hit the United States in modern meteorological times. It was a category 5 hurricane that was strong enough to stay at category 5 when it hit land and had set many records with sustained winds that were estimated to be at 190 mph during landfall and a reported storm surge of 28 feet. Its lowest central pressure was at 909mb when it came onshore. Hurricane Camille completely destroyed everything that was in its path for the first half mile inland.
Member Since: July 5, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 578
Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
I consider 'weird' an understatement, lol.
Ok, you're right. LOL
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
Quoting RufusBaker:
In the 1950's and 1960's, people went to Hurricane parties with party-goers to watch hurricanes rather than flee from danger. There were claims that in 1969, Hurricane Camille wrecked a hotel where a hurricane party was being held and killed 8 people. Some survivors who were at the hotel at the time claim there was never a hurricane party there and that the actual number of fatalities were not accurate. Nevertheless, a hollywood movie was created out of this story.

Hurricanes didn't start having boys' names until 1979.

Most hurricanes die at sea when they pass over areas of cooler water.

In 1967, a hurricane in Texas caused more than 140 twisters.

The worst hurricane damage is often caused by a storm surge. A storm surge is like a giant wall of water pushed onshore by hurricane winds.

In 1989, Hurricane Hugo completely destroyed several forests in South Carolina.

In 1971, Hurricane Ginger lasted for over three weeks.

In 1970, a hurricane in Pakistan killed more than 300,000 people.

When a hurricane is especially devastating, its name is permanently retired and another name replaces it.

In 1944, the US Navy's Pacific fleet was crushed by Typhoon Cobra, which sank three destroyers and damaged many ships.

Bangladesh was a country that was created from a hurricane. In 1970, this region of Pakistan was struck by a cyclone and 500,000 people died. The people felt their government did not do enough to help after the disaster so in 1971, they voted to be independent of Pakistan and Bangladesh was born.

Hurricanes do not occur in the South Atlantic Ocean, where the waters are too cold for them to form.

Plants have developed different ways of protecting themselves from powerful winds. Palm trees trow mainly in tropical parts of the world where hurricanes sometimes occur. Their flexible trunks bend and spring back in high winds but rarely break.

Taping your windows in preparation for a hurricane is a waste of time and money. Tape does not strengthening the glass. Flying debris will smash a taped window as if the tape weren't there.

Hurricane Fox was the first storm to be named in an official weather bureau advisory.

Two hurricanes were named Alice in 1954. One in June and one in December.

The first hurricane with a male's name was Hurricane Bob which hit near New Orleans in July 1979.

The first hurricane to hit the American Colonies happened on August 25, 1635.


+1
Member Since: October 9, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 8242
Quoting stormwatcherCI:
Hello. Blog is kinda weird and slow tonight. Otto is the center of attraction right now with 98L trying to gather herself together.
I consider 'weird' an understatement, lol.
Member Since: September 2, 2009 Posts: 130 Comments: 21032
Quoting pilotguy1:


I take one aspirin a day. That's it.

LMAO!! Smart guy , me too!
Member Since: April 29, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7506

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About JeffMasters

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.