Karl makes landfall near Veracruz; Igor slightly weaker

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 8:29 PM GMT on September 17, 2010

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Hurricane Karl made landfall on the Mexican coast ten miles north of Veracruz at 1pm EDT today as a Category 3 hurricane with 115 mph winds. Veracruz was on the weak (left) side of Karl's eyewall, and did not receive hurricane force winds, except perhaps at the extreme northern edge of the city. Winds at the Veracruz Airport, located on the west side of the city, peaked at sustained speeds of 46 mph, gusting to 58 mph, at 11:54am local time. Radar out of Alvarado shows that Karl has kept its eyewall intact well inland, even as the storm moves into the high mountains east of Mexico City. Karl was the first major hurricane on record in the Bay of Campeche--the region of the Gulf of Mexico bounded by the Yucatan Peninsula on the east. There were two other major hurricanes that grazed the northern edge of the Bay of Campeche, Hurricane Hilda of 1955 and Hurricane Charley of 1951, but Karl is by far the farthest south a major hurricane has been in the Gulf of Mexico. Hurricane records go back to 1851, but Karl is a small storm and could have gotten missed as being a major hurricane before the age of aircraft reconnaissance (1945).


Figure 1. Tracks of all major hurricanes since 1851 near Mexico's Bay of Campeche. Karl is most southerly storm on record in the Gulf of Mexico. Image credit: NOAA Coastal Services Center.

With Karl's ascension to major hurricane status, we are now ahead of the pace of the terrible hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005 for number of major hurricanes so early in the year. In 2005, the fifth major hurricane (Rita) did not occur until September 21, and in 2004, the fifth major hurricane (Karl) arrived on September 19. Wunderblogger Cotillion has put together a nice page showing all the seasons with five or more major hurricanes. The last time we had five major hurricanes earlier in the season was in 1961, when the fifth major hurricane (Esther) arrived on September 13. This morning we continue to have three simultaneous hurricanes, Hurricanes Igor, Julia, and Karl. This is a rare phenomena, having occurred only eight previous years since 1851. The last time we had three simultaneous hurricanes in the Atlantic was in 1998. That year also had four simultaneous hurricanes--Georges, Ivan, Jeanne and Karl--for a brief time on September 25. There has been just one other case of four simultaneous Atlantic hurricanes, on August 22, 1893. The year 2005 came within six hours of having three hurricanes at the same time, but the official data base constructed after the season was over indicates that the three hurricanes did not exist simultaneously.

Also remarkable this year is that are seeing major hurricanes in rare or unprecedented locations. Julia was the strongest hurricane on record so far east, Karl was the strongest hurricane so far south in the Gulf of Mexico, and Earl was the 4th strongest Atlantic hurricane so far north. This unusual major hurricane activity is likely due, in part, to the record Atlantic sea surface temperatures this year.


Figure 2. Hurricane Karl as seen by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite at 12:20 pm CDT on Thursday, September 16, 2010. Image credit: NASA.


Figure 3. Radar image of Karl at landfall in Mexico. Image credit: Mexican Weather Service.

Impact of Karl on Mexico
Given that the Bay of Campeche coast has never experienced a hurricane as strong as Karl, its impact is likely to cause major damage to a 50-mile wide coastal area beginning ten miles north of Veracruz. Fortunately, the coast is not heavily populated there, and is not particularly low-lying, so the 12 - 15 foot storm surge will not be the major concern from Karl. The main concern will be flooding from Karl's torrential rains. The region has been hit by three Category 2 hurricanes over the past 55 years, and two of these storms caused flooding that killed hundreds. The strongest hurricanes in history to affect the region were Item in 1950, with 110 mph winds, Janet in 1955, with 100 mph winds, and Diana of 1990, with 100 mph winds. Flooding from Janet killed over 800 people in Mexico. and flooding from Diana killed at least 139 people. Karl's high winds are also a major concern, and these winds are likely to extensive damage.

Igor
The Hurricane Hunters just left Hurricane Igor, and found that the hurricane has continued to slowly weaken. On their last pass through the eye of Igor at 1:49 pm EDT, an Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft found a central pressure of 947 mb. The eyewall was missing a chunk on its southwest side. Top winds at the surface as seen by their SFMR instrument were barely Category 1 strength, 76 mph, though the aircraft did see 117 mph winds at 10,000 feet, which suggests the surface winds were probably of Category 2 strength, 105 mph.


Figure 4. Hurricane Igor as seen by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite at 10:50 am EDT on Thursday, September 16, 2010. Image credit: NASA.

Igor's impact on Bermuda
Hurricane warnings are now flying for Bermuda, and tropical storm force winds will arrive at the island late Saturday night. Igor is a huge storm, and tropical storm force winds extend out 290 miles to the north of its center. As the hurricane moves north, it will expand in size, as it takes advantage of the extra spin available at higher latitudes due to Earth's rotation. By Saturday night, Igor's tropical storm force winds are expected to extend outwards 320 miles from the center. Igor will be moving at about 11 - 13 mph during the final 24 hours of its approach to Bermuda, so the island can expect a period of 39+ mph tropical storm force winds to begin near midnight Saturday night--a full 24 hours before the core of Igor arrives. Igor will speed up to about 15 mph as it passes the island near midnight Sunday night, and Bermuda's battering by tropical storm force winds will not be as long as Igor moves away, perhaps 10 hours long. Hurricane force winds will probably extend out about 70 miles from the center when the core of Igor reaches Bermuda, and the island can expect to be pounded by hurricane force winds for up to 6 - 8 hours. In all, Bermuda is likely to suffer a remarkably long 36-hour period of tropical storm force winds, with the potential for many hours of hurricane force winds. Long duration poundings like this are very stressful for buildings, and there is the potential for significant damage on Bermuda. However, buildings in Bermuda are some of the best-constructed in the world, and if Igor weakens to Category 2 strength, as appears likely, damage on the island may be just a few million dollars. According to AIR Worldwide, "Homes in Bermuda are typically one or two stories and constructed of 'Bermuda Stone,' a locally quarried limestone, or of concrete blocks. Roofs are commonly made of limestone slate tiles cemented together. Commercial buildings, typically of reinforced concrete construction, rarely exceed six stories. In both residential and commercial buildings, window openings are generally small and window shutters are common. These features make Bermuda's building stock quite resistant to winds, and homes are designed to withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and gusts of up to 150 mph."

Bermuda's hurricane history
Igor is similar in strength and projected track to Hurricane Fabian of 2003. Fabian hit Bermuda as a Category 3 hurricane with 120 mph winds. It was the most damaging hurricane ever to hit the island, with $355 million in damage. Fabian's storm surge killed four people crossing a causeway on the island. These were the first hurricane deaths on Bermuda since 1926. The most powerful hurricane on record to strike Bermuda was the Category 4 Havana-Bermuda Hurricane, which hit on October 22, 1926, with 135 mph winds. The hurricane sank two British warships, claiming 88 lives, but no one was killed on the island. The deadliest hurricane to affect the island occurred on September 12, 1839, when a Category 3 hurricane with 125 mph winds and an 11-foot storm surge hit, tearing off the roofs of hundreds of buildings and wrecking several ships. An estimated 100 people were killed (source: Encyclopedia of Hurricanes, Typhoons, and Cyclones, by David Longshore.)

Elsewhere in the tropics
A tropical wave off the coast of Africa, a few hundred miles south of the Cape Verdes Islands, is disorganized, but has the potential for some slow development over the next few days. The NOGAPS model develops this wave into a tropical depression 4 - 5 days from now. NHC is giving the wave a 10% of developing into a tropical depression by Sunday.

I'll have a new post on Saturday.

Jeff Masters

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948. DDR
Quoting pottery:

Hi!!
I heard that there was a prob with the highway, but dont know the details.
No maintenance for years, will do that...
I know that you have had more rain than me, but did not know it was so much.
You still floating??? LOL !

LoL
I'm quiet surprised myself,this is my second year/second rainy season up here in St Benedict.Last year was below average,i need some more years to work out an average.
We all know this country has infrastructural nightmares
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Quoting EricSFL:


Actually, now that I think about it, there is an area called Stiltsville south of Key Biscayne FL. There are houses on stilts over the reef/sand banks.
LPL
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Igor is likely to become a Major Hurricane again tomorrow.

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I pray that when "the playa" this season shows up for his/her game....that our "A" team also shows up to keep us informed. Alot of hurt feelings it seems and many are on "self imposed" injured reserve. It's time for everyone to put the Weather back in WU. I fear it's only a matter of time before the CONUS faces a real and very dangerous legitimate threat. I for one always appreciate the wx related info given by all...some better than others...but it's all our personal choice what we do with it. I, for one ignore some of it, laugh at some of it, use some of it, but most always appreciate those that are sincere in their quest to contribute to this blog. The ones who come here just to stir the pot...well again...that's a personal choice. Have a great evening all!! To those I recognize and respect, I thank you. Prayers to those in Mexico whose lives are now forever changed by Karl and those in Bermuda who are in for a very long weekend..........
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So Karl exits the stage. His final numbers:

ACE: 5.8725
HDP: 4.5525
Initial TWO: 5 PM EDT 2010/09/14
Final TWO: 5 PM EDT 2010/09/17
TWOs as TS: 7
TWOs as HU: 6
TWOs as MH: 2
Total TWOs: 13
Time in existence: 78 hours / 3.25 days
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Quoting jrweatherman:
Quoting flstormhog:


jumping ship and going to:

http://palmharborforecastcenter.wordpress.com/


Noted and bookmarked.


No thanks. I am not a fan of his forecasting style. I prefer Levi and his videos. I am a kid trying to learn and he has taught me so much. Storm post pictures with no comments leaving me wondering as to what he is trying to tell us. Also, he is notorious for saying more "west" but never defining what that means. The storm could go 10 or 500 miles west and he will say he is right.


And as you grow older, you'll understand its that "wondering" that stimulates the mind. Same with my kids. They would always want me to GIVE them the answer to the homework problem, rather than having me show them HOW to do it themselves.

Regarding the size of Igor: 550 miles is about the distance (straight line) from New Orleans, LA to San Antonio,TX.
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940. beell
A chunk of dust coming off Africa (upper left). Just N of the area of disturbed weather.

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Quoting PcolaDan:
rain trivia

The 10 rainiest cities in the U.S. by amount of annual rainfall include:

* Mobile, Alabama--67 inches average annual rainfall; 59 average annual rainy days
* Pensacola, Florida--65 inches average annual rainfall; 56 average annual rainy days
* New Orleans, Louisiana--64 inches average annual rainfall; 59 average annual rainy days
* West Palm Beach, Florida--63 inches average annual rainfall; 58 average annual rainy days
* Lafayette, Louisiana--62 inches average annual rainfall; 55 average annual rainy days
* Baton Rouge, Louisiana--62 inches average annual rainfall; 56 average annual rainy days
* Miami, Florida--62 inches average annual rainfall; 57 average annual rainy days
* Port Arthur, Texas--61 inches average annual rainfall; 51 average annual rainy days
* Tallahassee, Florida--61 inches average annual rainfall; 56 average annual rainy days
* Lake Charles, Louisiana--58 inches average annual rainfall; 50 average annual rainy days

The study ranked 195 cities in the contiguous 48 states by the amount of rainfall they received annually over a 30-year period, although Olympia actually had the most rainy days on average across the three decades (63) of all the cities in the study. Mobile came in second on the latter scale, with 59 average annual rainy days. (Several cities in Alaska and Hawaii actually receive more than 100 inches of rain a year, but were not included in the study.)

Interesting info. Thanks for that.
In central Trinidad, I get an average (12 year av) of 7.25 Feet of rainfall.
Some areas, in the Northern hills (up to 3000 feet high) get in the 12 foot range.
DDR in the foothills has measured 115" since May 15th...
Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 24033


Hurricane Karl is coming ashore in Mexico right now. Hurricane Igor is about to pound Bermuda. We are prepared to render assistance in both areas as need dictates.

As usual, we will focus on the needs of unserved, under served and forgotten people...and the needs of people with disabilities.

Your contribution will be used to defray deployment expenses, such as fuel...and to purchase food and water in support of our mobile kitchen resources.

We understand that it is difficult to envision the devastation of a natural disaster before it strikes. But, to the extent you can, please try to imagine it.

Your help will be critical. So please consider supporting our efforts with your thoughts, prayers and, of course, financial contribution.

Contributions can be made using the PayPal button above.

Thank you for your faith in our efforts!!!!

Link
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If I was in Bermuda I would be freaking.. If it looks like anything like that is on its way to Tampa I will be out of here 4 days in advance.
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Quoting StormJunkie:
Shouldn't he be in Fla by now...With all the "west" movement he's been doing :) The NHC has done a pretty damn good job thus far this season.



But I can't help being in FL. Agreed, NHC: the boys with the nice toys.
Member Since: July 23, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 12414
894. JP2010 2:52 AM GMT on September 18, 2010

Stay safe, I wouldn't want to trade places with you. I have a bad feeling that Igor is going to strengthen again which will make the waves higher, no matter what he is at landfall. Take care and don't risk your life, but if all's good then post the link for your live feed.
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Quoting Kristina40:
Wow PColaDan. I always thought the Pacific NorthWest was the rainiest. Thanks for the info.


One of those quirky facts a lot of people are mistaken of. (BOY was that poor sentence structure) They probably have more total hours of rain, but when it rains here sometimes, we can get an inch in 15 minutes. And this happens all the time. And sometimes the raindrops can feel like hail they get so big.
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931. bwat
I should of posted this first, but looking at WV loops, steering currents, and history of Igor, I think Levi's synopsis might hold some water. Igor may very well stay more NW before a major turn. I pray for Bermuda I am looking at this right. Anyone in Bermuda reading this, I am just speculating, the NHC forecast is what you should go by! Does my theory hold water? Would love to hear some feedback.
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What ammount of the main island can be covered with the surge?? Your highest point is around 240 feet, so how do you manage???

Quoting JP2010:
I'm in Bermuda now on the south shore the waves and swells are large and thunder pound waves already are running about 10-15 foot high outer reef. The water is already pushing its way to back of some of the resort structures.
People are slowing boarding up some lines at gas stations not to bad. The locals are very calm but very concerned after they remember Fabian about five years ago.
I have chased a number of hurricanes over the years. When you see waves already this big days before it make landfall regardless of its intensity thing are going to get much worse. IE wave height swells 40-50 foot range. IE Cat-2 hurricane but more like a cat 4 storm surge!!
The storm has a 250 mi radius from the center of TS winds so Bermuda will have 36 hours of TS winds and about 12 hour of Hurricane force winds.

I will try to have live stream up later Saturday and Sunday if we have power and internet.
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928. srada
Quoting tropicfreak:
...LARGE HURRICANE IGOR GETTING BETTER ORGANIZED AGAIN AS IT CONTINUES TO MOVE NORTHWESTWARD...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

11:00 PM AST Fri Sep 17
Location: 24.6°N 62.0°W
Max sustained: 110 mph
Moving: NW at 13 mph
Min pressure: 947 mb



So when does Igor supposed to turn NORTH?
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IGOR IS A PARTICULARLY LARGE HURRICANE. HURRICANE-FORCE WINDS EXTEND
OUTWARD UP TO 105 MILES...165 KM...FROM THE CENTER...AND TROPICAL-
STORM-FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 345 MILES...555 KM.
DURING
THE PAST HOUR...TROPICAL-STORM-FORCE WINDS NEAR 40 MPH...65 KM/HR...
WERE REPORTED AT NOAA BUOY 41049 LOCATED ABOUT 225 MI...365 KM...
NORTHWEST OF THE CENTER OF IGOR.

wow
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Shouldn't he be in Fla by now...With all the "west" movement he's been doing :) The NHC has done a pretty damn good job thus far this season.



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Is Igor eating dry air or shedding some weight
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923. 7544
is igor going west again looks like 2 degrees more west ?
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Quoting BaltOCane:


Take away that ONE thing it thrives on and it goes away.

(should be a mantra for this place)


True enough.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 553 Comments: 19915
Wow PColaDan. I always thought the Pacific NorthWest was the rainiest. Thanks for the info.
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Quoting Thundercloud01221991:
Here is a hint about the size of Hurricane Igor:

(all of these are straight lines)

From Cape Hatteras to Cape Cod is 538 miles
Southern Tip of Florida to Pensacola, FL is 546 miles
Bermuda to Cape Hatteras is 640 miles
Honduras to Northern Cuba is 555 miles
From the border of Texas and Arkansas to the Border of Texas and New Mexico is 528 miles
Cleveland to NYC is 529 miles
Spain and Portugal from east to west is 613 miles


The Size of Igor is now 575 miles
If Igor was centred over the Bahamas, the entire archipelago would be invisible underneath its CDO....
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 21487
Quoting washingtonian115:
Accuweather thinks we could possibly see more U.S threats in late september through ocrober.Link

haha that doesnt take much...all you need is one. Way to go out on a limb accuweather. there really hasnt been a threat to the US other than Earl but that was even obvious the eye was going to stay offshore and provide min impacts.
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000
WTNT41 KNHC 180301
TCDAT1
HURRICANE IGOR DISCUSSION NUMBER 40
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL112010
1100 PM AST FRI SEP 17 2010

INFRARED SATELLITE IMAGERY INDICATES IGOR HAS BECOME BETTER
ORGANIZED WITH A RING OF CONVECTIVE CLOUD TOPS OF -70C AND COLDER
ENCIRCLING A 20-25 NMI DIAMETER EYE THAT HAS BECOME MORE DISTINCT
DURING THE PAST COUPLE OF HOURS. A 17/2026Z AMSU OVERPASS ALSO
INDICATED THE UPPER-LEVEL WARM CORE HAS STRENGTHENED AND MOVED
UPWARD FROM 300 MB TO THE 200 MB...SUGGESTING THAT IGOR IS LIKELY
STRENGTHENING. AN AIR FORCE RESERVE RECON AIRCRAFT WILL BE
INVESTIGATING IGOR AROUND 06Z AND PROVIDE A BETTER INTENSITY
ESTIMATE.

THE INITIAL MOTION ESTIMATE IS 315/11. IGOR HAS MADE A TROCHOIDAL
WOBBLE TO THE RIGHT OF THE PREVIOUS FORECAST TRACK...BUT THIS IS
LIKELY JUST A TEMPORARY MOTION. IGOR IS EXPECTED TO MOVE BACK ON OR
CLOSE TO THE PREVIOUS ADVISORY TRACK BASED ON 00Z UPPER-AIR DATA
FROM BERMUDA SHOWING 24-HOUR MID-LEVEL HEIGHTS HAVE INCREASED BY 20
METERS AND WINDS HAVE SHIFTED AROUND TO AN EASTERLY DIRECTION...
WHICH INDICATES THE SUBTROPICAL RIDGE HAS BUILT WESTWARD TO THE
NORTH OF BERMUDA. UNFORTUNATELY...THIS RIDGING PATTERN WILL BE
SHORT-LIVED DUE TO A STRONG SHORTWAVE TROUGH CURRENTLY LOCATED JUST
OFF THE U.S. EAST COAST FORECAST BY ALL THE GLOBAL AND REGIONAL
MODELS TO CONTINUE TO MOVE EASTWARD AND CREATE A WEAKNESS IN THE
RIDGE BETWEEN 60W-70W LONGITUDE BY 24 HOURS. THIS WILL ALLOW IGOR
TO GRADUALLY MOVE NORTHWARD THROUGH THIS BREAK IN THE SUBTROPICAL
RIDGE PATTERN AND PASS VERY CLOSE TO BERMUDA IN ABOUT 48 HOURS. BY
72 HOURS...IGOR IS FORECAST TO BE CAPTURED BY A SECOND SHORTWAVE
TROUGH AND BE ACCELERATED OVER THE FAR NORTH ATLANTIC AS A POWERFUL
EXTRATROPICAL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM. THE OFFICIAL FORECAST IS SIMILAR
TO THE PREVIOUS ADVISORY AND IS CLOSE TO THE MODEL CONSENSUS.

IGOR IS EXHIBITING AN IMPRESSIVE OUTFLOW PATTERN THAT CONTINUES TO
EXPAND IN ALL QUADRANTS. THE HURRICANE IS EXPECTED TO MAINTAIN THIS
FAVORABLE OUTFLOW REGIME FOR THE NEXT 36-48 HOURS. AFTERWARDS...
INCREASING SOUTHWESTERLY UPPER-LEVEL FLOW AHEAD OF A MID- TO
UPPER-LEVEL TROUGH WILL INCREASE THE SHEAR ACROSS THE CYCLONE...
WHICH COUPLED WITH DECREASING SSTS...SHOULD INDUCE WEAKENING. BY 96
HOURS...IGOR IS FORECAST TO TRANSITION INTO A LARGE AND POWERFUL
EXTRATROPICAL CYCLONE OVER THE FAR NORTH ATLANTIC WHEN IGOR MERGES
WITH A FRONTAL SYSTEM. THE OFFICIAL INTENSITY FORECAST IS SIMILAR
TO THE SHIPS INTENSITY MODEL.

THE EXTRATROPICAL FORECAST TRACK AND INTENSITIES AT 96 AND 120 HOURS
IS BASED ON GUIDANCE FROM THE NOAA OCEAN PREDICTION CENTER.


FORECAST POSITIONS AND MAX WINDS

INITIAL 18/0300Z 24.6N 62.0W 95 KT
12HR VT 18/1200Z 25.6N 63.2W 100 KT
24HR VT 19/0000Z 27.1N 64.4W 105 KT
36HR VT 19/1200Z 29.1N 65.0W 105 KT
48HR VT 20/0000Z 31.7N 64.5W 100 KT
72HR VT 21/0000Z 36.2N 61.2W 85 KT
96HR VT 22/0000Z 45.0N 50.0W 65 KT...POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
120HR VT 23/0000Z 52.5N 42.0W 65 KT...POST-TROP/EXTRATROP

$$
FORECASTER STEWART
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 553 Comments: 19915


Wow.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 21487
916. bwat
Just got done reading all the "non weather related posts". He'll be missed, But "WT sixth letter ing the alphabet"! I love his posts and will continue to follow him, but lets stay focused here! Back to the tropics. I think Igor is looking quite impressive yet again. Models seem to be in good agreement, what kind of intesity are we looking at for Bermuda? I'm gonna say 125 MPH. Looks like they are going to have a prolonged period of TS/Hurricane winds. Not good for the island at all.
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Quoting SunnyDaysFla:
Tampa--actually nw Hillsborough county.


If you think you get bad thunderstorms, you should see the Ocala area during the summer - "Lightning City USA".
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Quoting DDR:
WTH happened to the highway ???
Calpsed into the river today?

Hi!!
I heard that there was a prob with the highway, but dont know the details.
No maintenance for years, will do that...
I know that you have had more rain than me, but did not know it was so much.
You still floating??? LOL !
Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 24033
Quoting sammywammybamy:


Hey Baha, You and Taz are the Only Familar Face Left on this Blog. We all Date Back to 2005/2006.
Hey... lots of others out there who are just not on the blog tonight. The blog is my Friday evening hangout because I'm always "ducking" traffic after work or killing time until I go out.... Now I'm back online because wanted to see the 11 p.m. on Igor.

Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 21487
Typhoon Fanapi - 945 hPa - 85 knot 10-minute winds
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Mountains work wonders.


Take away that ONE thing it thrives on and it goes away.

(should be a mantra for this place)
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Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

I'm not sure, but I think she's not in the Top 10.
where did you/are you getting your statistics from ?
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rain trivia

The 10 rainiest cities in the U.S. by amount of annual rainfall include:

* Mobile, Alabama--67 inches average annual rainfall; 59 average annual rainy days
* Pensacola, Florida--65 inches average annual rainfall; 56 average annual rainy days
* New Orleans, Louisiana--64 inches average annual rainfall; 59 average annual rainy days
* West Palm Beach, Florida--63 inches average annual rainfall; 58 average annual rainy days
* Lafayette, Louisiana--62 inches average annual rainfall; 55 average annual rainy days
* Baton Rouge, Louisiana--62 inches average annual rainfall; 56 average annual rainy days
* Miami, Florida--62 inches average annual rainfall; 57 average annual rainy days
* Port Arthur, Texas--61 inches average annual rainfall; 51 average annual rainy days
* Tallahassee, Florida--61 inches average annual rainfall; 56 average annual rainy days
* Lake Charles, Louisiana--58 inches average annual rainfall; 50 average annual rainy days

The study ranked 195 cities in the contiguous 48 states by the amount of rainfall they received annually over a 30-year period, although Olympia actually had the most rainy days on average across the three decades (63) of all the cities in the study. Mobile came in second on the latter scale, with 59 average annual rainy days. (Several cities in Alaska and Hawaii actually receive more than 100 inches of rain a year, but were not included in the study.)
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...LARGE HURRICANE IGOR GETTING BETTER ORGANIZED AGAIN AS IT CONTINUES TO MOVE NORTHWESTWARD...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

11:00 PM AST Fri Sep 17
Location: 24.6°N 62.0°W
Max sustained: 110 mph
Moving: NW at 13 mph
Min pressure: 947 mb

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Accuweather thinks we could possibly see more U.S threats in late september through ocrober.Link
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16412
Quoting SunnyDaysFla:
I do kind of like the big downpours, however mine are often accompanied by lightning. My house has been hit 3 times in the last 25 years.
Insurance had a big payout for 1 hit,over $2500 on top of my deductible but the last one cost less than the deductible (I now have every surge protection system on the market LOL)

I like downpours too, and we've had out house hit by lightning three times in the past 15 years(actually on our property our house is fine) earlier this year lightning hit a tree in out backyard twice the same night. Igor is a monster, Bermuda hasn't seen the constant battering of hurricanes it used to in the early 1900s, still I think they're prepared and hopefully Igor won't become the next Fabian
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Quoting bappit:

A lot of that was just to troll easy targets.


No, no I was seriously think that.
Not trolling at all.
And my second thought was, wow: 7 out of the last 9 storms formed in the ATL. WHY?
and the Levi put out his video yesterday and I had my answer.
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Quoting BaltOCane:
...KARL EXPECTED TO DISSIPATE SOON OVER THE HIGH MOUNTAINS OF
SOUTHERN MEXICO...

SUMMARY OF 1000 PM CDT...0300 UTC...INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...18.6N 97.4W
ABOUT 55 MI...85 KM ESE OF PUEBLA MEXICO
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...35 MPH...55 KM/HR
PRESENT MOVEMENT...WSW OR 250 DEGREES AT 7 MPH...11 KM/HR
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1000 MB...29.53 INCHES


That didn't take long.

It kinda still amazes me, even though I know the forces at work, that these storms take day, sometimes a week or more to get itself together and then mere hours to kill it.


Mountains work wonders.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 553 Comments: 19915
Tampa--actually nw Hillsborough county.
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899. xcool


E;P;O come


Member Since: September 26, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 15620
...KARL EXPECTED TO DISSIPATE SOON OVER THE HIGH MOUNTAINS OF
SOUTHERN MEXICO...

SUMMARY OF 1000 PM CDT...0300 UTC...INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...18.6N 97.4W
ABOUT 55 MI...85 KM ESE OF PUEBLA MEXICO
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...35 MPH...55 KM/HR
PRESENT MOVEMENT...WSW OR 250 DEGREES AT 7 MPH...11 KM/HR
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1000 MB...29.53 INCHES


That didn't take long.

It kinda still amazes me, even though I know the forces at work, that these storms take day, sometimes a week or more to get itself together and then mere hours to kill it.
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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.