Karl makes landfall near Veracruz; Igor slightly weaker

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 8:29 PM GMT on September 17, 2010

Share this Blog
5
+

Hurricane Karl made landfall on the Mexican coast ten miles north of Veracruz at 1pm EDT today as a Category 3 hurricane with 115 mph winds. Veracruz was on the weak (left) side of Karl's eyewall, and did not receive hurricane force winds, except perhaps at the extreme northern edge of the city. Winds at the Veracruz Airport, located on the west side of the city, peaked at sustained speeds of 46 mph, gusting to 58 mph, at 11:54am local time. Radar out of Alvarado shows that Karl has kept its eyewall intact well inland, even as the storm moves into the high mountains east of Mexico City. Karl was the first major hurricane on record in the Bay of Campeche--the region of the Gulf of Mexico bounded by the Yucatan Peninsula on the east. There were two other major hurricanes that grazed the northern edge of the Bay of Campeche, Hurricane Hilda of 1955 and Hurricane Charley of 1951, but Karl is by far the farthest south a major hurricane has been in the Gulf of Mexico. Hurricane records go back to 1851, but Karl is a small storm and could have gotten missed as being a major hurricane before the age of aircraft reconnaissance (1945).


Figure 1. Tracks of all major hurricanes since 1851 near Mexico's Bay of Campeche. Karl is most southerly storm on record in the Gulf of Mexico. Image credit: NOAA Coastal Services Center.

With Karl's ascension to major hurricane status, we are now ahead of the pace of the terrible hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005 for number of major hurricanes so early in the year. In 2005, the fifth major hurricane (Rita) did not occur until September 21, and in 2004, the fifth major hurricane (Karl) arrived on September 19. Wunderblogger Cotillion has put together a nice page showing all the seasons with five or more major hurricanes. The last time we had five major hurricanes earlier in the season was in 1961, when the fifth major hurricane (Esther) arrived on September 13. This morning we continue to have three simultaneous hurricanes, Hurricanes Igor, Julia, and Karl. This is a rare phenomena, having occurred only eight previous years since 1851. The last time we had three simultaneous hurricanes in the Atlantic was in 1998. That year also had four simultaneous hurricanes--Georges, Ivan, Jeanne and Karl--for a brief time on September 25. There has been just one other case of four simultaneous Atlantic hurricanes, on August 22, 1893. The year 2005 came within six hours of having three hurricanes at the same time, but the official data base constructed after the season was over indicates that the three hurricanes did not exist simultaneously.

Also remarkable this year is that are seeing major hurricanes in rare or unprecedented locations. Julia was the strongest hurricane on record so far east, Karl was the strongest hurricane so far south in the Gulf of Mexico, and Earl was the 4th strongest Atlantic hurricane so far north. This unusual major hurricane activity is likely due, in part, to the record Atlantic sea surface temperatures this year.


Figure 2. Hurricane Karl as seen by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite at 12:20 pm CDT on Thursday, September 16, 2010. Image credit: NASA.


Figure 3. Radar image of Karl at landfall in Mexico. Image credit: Mexican Weather Service.

Impact of Karl on Mexico
Given that the Bay of Campeche coast has never experienced a hurricane as strong as Karl, its impact is likely to cause major damage to a 50-mile wide coastal area beginning ten miles north of Veracruz. Fortunately, the coast is not heavily populated there, and is not particularly low-lying, so the 12 - 15 foot storm surge will not be the major concern from Karl. The main concern will be flooding from Karl's torrential rains. The region has been hit by three Category 2 hurricanes over the past 55 years, and two of these storms caused flooding that killed hundreds. The strongest hurricanes in history to affect the region were Item in 1950, with 110 mph winds, Janet in 1955, with 100 mph winds, and Diana of 1990, with 100 mph winds. Flooding from Janet killed over 800 people in Mexico. and flooding from Diana killed at least 139 people. Karl's high winds are also a major concern, and these winds are likely to extensive damage.

Igor
The Hurricane Hunters just left Hurricane Igor, and found that the hurricane has continued to slowly weaken. On their last pass through the eye of Igor at 1:49 pm EDT, an Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft found a central pressure of 947 mb. The eyewall was missing a chunk on its southwest side. Top winds at the surface as seen by their SFMR instrument were barely Category 1 strength, 76 mph, though the aircraft did see 117 mph winds at 10,000 feet, which suggests the surface winds were probably of Category 2 strength, 105 mph.


Figure 4. Hurricane Igor as seen by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite at 10:50 am EDT on Thursday, September 16, 2010. Image credit: NASA.

Igor's impact on Bermuda
Hurricane warnings are now flying for Bermuda, and tropical storm force winds will arrive at the island late Saturday night. Igor is a huge storm, and tropical storm force winds extend out 290 miles to the north of its center. As the hurricane moves north, it will expand in size, as it takes advantage of the extra spin available at higher latitudes due to Earth's rotation. By Saturday night, Igor's tropical storm force winds are expected to extend outwards 320 miles from the center. Igor will be moving at about 11 - 13 mph during the final 24 hours of its approach to Bermuda, so the island can expect a period of 39+ mph tropical storm force winds to begin near midnight Saturday night--a full 24 hours before the core of Igor arrives. Igor will speed up to about 15 mph as it passes the island near midnight Sunday night, and Bermuda's battering by tropical storm force winds will not be as long as Igor moves away, perhaps 10 hours long. Hurricane force winds will probably extend out about 70 miles from the center when the core of Igor reaches Bermuda, and the island can expect to be pounded by hurricane force winds for up to 6 - 8 hours. In all, Bermuda is likely to suffer a remarkably long 36-hour period of tropical storm force winds, with the potential for many hours of hurricane force winds. Long duration poundings like this are very stressful for buildings, and there is the potential for significant damage on Bermuda. However, buildings in Bermuda are some of the best-constructed in the world, and if Igor weakens to Category 2 strength, as appears likely, damage on the island may be just a few million dollars. According to AIR Worldwide, "Homes in Bermuda are typically one or two stories and constructed of 'Bermuda Stone,' a locally quarried limestone, or of concrete blocks. Roofs are commonly made of limestone slate tiles cemented together. Commercial buildings, typically of reinforced concrete construction, rarely exceed six stories. In both residential and commercial buildings, window openings are generally small and window shutters are common. These features make Bermuda's building stock quite resistant to winds, and homes are designed to withstand sustained winds of 110 mph and gusts of up to 150 mph."

Bermuda's hurricane history
Igor is similar in strength and projected track to Hurricane Fabian of 2003. Fabian hit Bermuda as a Category 3 hurricane with 120 mph winds. It was the most damaging hurricane ever to hit the island, with $355 million in damage. Fabian's storm surge killed four people crossing a causeway on the island. These were the first hurricane deaths on Bermuda since 1926. The most powerful hurricane on record to strike Bermuda was the Category 4 Havana-Bermuda Hurricane, which hit on October 22, 1926, with 135 mph winds. The hurricane sank two British warships, claiming 88 lives, but no one was killed on the island. The deadliest hurricane to affect the island occurred on September 12, 1839, when a Category 3 hurricane with 125 mph winds and an 11-foot storm surge hit, tearing off the roofs of hundreds of buildings and wrecking several ships. An estimated 100 people were killed (source: Encyclopedia of Hurricanes, Typhoons, and Cyclones, by David Longshore.)

Elsewhere in the tropics
A tropical wave off the coast of Africa, a few hundred miles south of the Cape Verdes Islands, is disorganized, but has the potential for some slow development over the next few days. The NOGAPS model develops this wave into a tropical depression 4 - 5 days from now. NHC is giving the wave a 10% of developing into a tropical depression by Sunday.

I'll have a new post on Saturday.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 1198 - 1148

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45Blog Index

1155. BobinTampa 2:31 PM MDT on September 16, 2010
Gotta get this off my chest:

I think it is safe to say that everyone who visits this blog benefits in some way - whether through education or entertainment. The blog is far from perfect but, overall, I'd say it has been pretty beneficial to us all.

So it kind of baffles me that some would use this site to try to recruit members to another site they are creating. That is in extremely poor taste in my opinion.

We all have the ability to create our own blogs on WUnderground. Why leave completely when you could simply relocate on the same site, OR better yet, strive to improve this blog??

That strikes me as a great show of disrespect to Dr. Masters. Maybe this is addition by subtraction. Who knows?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting BahaHurican:
Unfortunately, the downside of this blog is that it has always been very easy for detracters, naysayers and downright unappreciative people [even jealous or malicious ones, IMO] to "hijack" the blog conversation.

You correctly said the phrase "It has been very easy", and it is easy Because we react to them... That's what they want.... to disrupt the blog into personal fights.... We have to keep focused on Weather discussions, not on personal nonsense...
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9798
1195. pcola57
Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
Not much of an affect. Julia will likely continue to weaken. It will either dissipate due to Igor's outflow and the cooler SSTs, or it'll get absorbed by Igor after it makes an extratropical transition.

I appreciate your view point and taking time to respond.I had a thought of a tracking/forward movement disruption to Igor might be viable and the results of that may have crossed your mind.Thanks again MiamiHurricanes09.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CalTex:


I tried that, but the preview showed a box with an X where the image was supposed to be, and I'd copied the URL into the scripting box.

However, I'm using IE7 (with Vista Home Basic) and Kaspersky Internet Security, and sometimes my computer blocks stuff I'm trying to do.
There should be a link on the right hand side of the blog at the top explaining how to post a blog AND add pictures. That's the best way to learn how. IMO
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hello PI. Quoting oneself should occur infrequently, and, not be undertaken lightly. In this instance, I feel it to be apropos.
Quoting PSLFLCaneVet:
Well put. Many here have compassion for those in harm's way. Personal interaction is a major part of the WU community. I give you Portlight, as an example. The bonds made here, extend far beyond the banter of the blog. The human spirit is alive and well here.
We are all citizens of the Planet Earth. The depth and breadth of comments on the blog, should illustrate that sufficiently to all.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1191. angiest
Quoting fatlady99:


You seem to be ruler obsessed. I meanwhile will wait for an actual human to answer the honest question that I asked.


I seem to be ignoring flsky for some reason, but I get the impression this is related to my posts about my daughter's cf?
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 16 Comments: 4766
1190. Seawall
In the shipyard, our verification documents for some ballast, and marks come from Veracruz- it's the hot spot now for ABS officials. I hope and pray they are all doing OK as I have complete respect for their office and what they do for the ABS. American Bureau of Shipping.. the ones with the Maltese Cross.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
BahaHurican

Thankyou
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
The blog has problems tonight...Wunderground is going to be empty soon. Its a chain reaction...

Storm leaves -> Other people leave -> Other people leave

And so on...
Disagree completely. This blog went on apace for many years with StormW NOT posting - after all he DOES have a life outside the blog - and people manage to post, get and give information. Amazing thought, isn't it?

NO one blogger is the be-all and end-all of this blog. Haven't you noticed that even when Dr. Master's is gone the blog continues? [some would say, pls, Doc, go on vacation so we can have some storm activity.... lol]

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1186. pottery
Quoting PrivateIdaho:
Whats up Pottery...did you run out of ice? You and K-cubed let Karl slip by!

LOL.
When Karl (or his Initial Incarnation) was around here, he dropped 4.5" of rain on me, and caused the power to go out for a couple hours.
So I had to use the ice for 'something' else. Sorry about that...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting BahaHurican:
This happened on Monday night???? I didn't see anything?!?! I think I exchanged comments with StormW up until yesterday morning? Whuff! Well, I guess you never know what is going on with pple....

In any case, I have no intention of leaving this blog to follow any one other single blogger. It's been my view all along that the most valuable quality of this blog is the multiplicity of views, and even Doc Masters seems to agree with me, since he not only allows a wide range of pple to create their own blogs, but also quotes / refers to the blogs of WunderGround members in his own blogs. Obviously he is not afraid of competition or disagreement, and he obviously also sees the value of differing viewpoints.

Unfortunately, the downside of this blog is that it has always been very easy for detracters, naysayers and downright unappreciative people [even jealous or malicious ones, IMO] to "hijack" the blog conversation. This has been true at least since 2006, and almost every blog innovation regarding community management has been motivated by an attack of greater or lesser virulence on individual posters by other individuals or by a group.

I can't say whether the decision made by some of our bloggers to retire from the blog is good or bad. I do know we've lost some of our other respected bloggers in the past, for various reasons, and the blog has gone on. I for one have a lot of respect for StormW's abilities, and in many ways he is a good teacher. However, like everybody else here, he is not perfect. If he's found an effective way to continue doing what he does best, I wish him well in his endeavours. I will likely check out his forecast, as I did in the past, as one of my potential sources of information.

Meanwhile, Dr. Masters' blog goes on, and that's where I am.

YMMV.....

You know, I actually read a lot of what StormW posted in Doc Masters' blog. I remember him suggesting Igor would get a lot closer to 70W than expected before recurving. I never saw him state or even imply that a CONUS hit was expected or even likely. Maybe he gave that impression on his own blog. Now that I think about it, I don't think any of the bloggers I respect said Igor would hit the CONUS. I do think a lot of pple were thinking [hoping] it would get far enough west to avoid Bermuda before finally being picked up by a trough.

More pple need to learn, IMO.... isn't that why we blog, at least some of us? Then we pass that learning on to others. I've seen the lowliest newbie suck up info from pple who know how to explain stuff here. Then, when those pple are not around to explain for a new round of newbies, the former newbies are able to explain to the best of their ability, or at least point others in the right direction.

IMO, good forecasters are "a dime a dozen", so to speak. It's good TEACHERS we are short of. Unfortunately they don't pay the P. E. teachers and coaches the big bucks, only the players.

Frankly, I don't care if this gets swiped and wiped by the ADMIN. I wanted to get some stuff off my chest. I also figure that StormW made some very important contributions to the life and development of this blog, and while the circumstances surrounding his departure may not have been the auspicious ones we might have preferred, I believe he still deserves some respect for those contributions over the last few years. You don't have to agree with him or even like him. However, the snide comments and malicious "jokes" are not only low and vulgar, IMO, but also rather cowardly, since they are being made to all intents and purposes behind his back.

Once again, YMMV.

I feel ya bro! multiplicity of view! you are speaking my language....this blog is about communication and revolves around the weather and the PEOPLE on the blog. We are passionate about weather and about learning...in the words of Rodney King" can't we all just get along?"
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
At 162 hours (below), the Caribbean system is beginning to develop along the SW Caribbean.

Not very good time-line progression being depicted by the GFS thus far.

Member Since: September 2, 2009 Posts: 130 Comments: 21122
Evening Baha, and good to see you :)

I don't concur with all of it, but certainly most of it. Well stated and you make some very good points.
Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 26 Comments: 16348
Quoting flsky:

Just adding one short sentence to something inappropriate doesn't make it ok.


You seem to be ruler obsessed. I meanwhile will wait for an actual human to answer the honest question that I asked.
Member Since: September 4, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 410
I applaud all of you that earned your degree/degree's. You proved the point that you can pass tests! Whether or not you can excel if your particular field, remains to be seen!
Quoting StormJunkie:
Since we've had some math and education talk tonight...



Action: Quote | Ignore User
Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 26 Comments: 14005
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 1900hurricane:

Yeah, and this one is massive! It kinda reminds me of alot of my personal research I did on Super Typhoon Chaba from 2004:

Warning! This is a very long MIMIC loop, so be aware before you navigate to this page!
Very impressive. Another EWRC will expand the wind field furthermore which is bad news for Bermuda.
Member Since: September 2, 2009 Posts: 130 Comments: 21122
1178. texcane
Quoting StormJunkie:
I know this will get whacked...and I'm sorry, but maybe we can all have a little laugh...Not to mention, it's almost time to hand it over to the late shift, which has always sort of been my home around here for the past five years.

Who seriously calls their spare bedroom the "Palm Harbor Forecast Center"

His own ego got the best of him...Not these supposed "trolls"...whoever they are.


It would appear that your ego is beginning to get the best of you. Here you are criticizing a guy mercilessly because you didn't like his opinions, thoughts, whatever. The irony here is that you yourself are exceeding in your words and actions on this blog what you actually say you found fault with. Extremely contradictory behavior. With all of these insults, you are actually doing worse than anything I ever saw on here from him in the past four years. It makes one wonder who you will turn on next. Please drop it. You are just making yourself look bad. Quite frankly, it's pathetic. There is an old adage worth revisiting here: if you have nothing nice to say, then don't say it all.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting pcola57:


I wonder what effect Julia is going to make on him?
What's your take on this MiamiHurricanes09?
Not much of an affect. Julia will likely continue to weaken. It will either dissipate due to Igor's outflow and the cooler SSTs, or it'll get absorbed by Igor after it makes an extratropical transition.
Member Since: September 2, 2009 Posts: 130 Comments: 21122
1176. will40
Quoting StormJunkie:


See, that's is kind of what I thought it was doing about four days ago. Then the past couple days it seemed it was from the Atl area. Maybe this run will offer some clarification. General consensus was that it was the CATL area, but both sides have been debated.


the developement in the Carib was late in the run something like 200hrs i think
Member Since: September 19, 2005 Posts: 2 Comments: 4133
Quoting PrivateIdaho:
" crunch the numbers bro!


Crunch those numbers again sound bite  The Office - Broke sound bitesCrunch those numbers again sound bite

144hrs...

Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 26 Comments: 16348
Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CalTex:


Oh, you really don't want to go over all of that, trust me. Let's just say, a lot of snarkiness on both sides, which got way out of hand, including by some who should've known better. It's the 4th day and still we're talking about it, and meanwhile Igor is getting ready to rumble (and possibly strengthen again).
This happened on Monday night???? I didn't see anything?!?! I think I exchanged comments with StormW up until yesterday morning? Whuff! Well, I guess you never know what is going on with pple....

In any case, I have no intention of leaving this blog to follow any one other single blogger. It's been my view all along that the most valuable quality of this blog is the multiplicity of views, and even Doc Masters seems to agree with me, since he not only allows a wide range of pple to create their own blogs, but also quotes / refers to the blogs of WunderGround members in his own blogs. Obviously he is not afraid of competition or disagreement, and he obviously also sees the value of differing viewpoints.

Unfortunately, the downside of this blog is that it has always been very easy for detracters, naysayers and downright unappreciative people [even jealous or malicious ones, IMO] to "hijack" the blog conversation. This has been true at least since 2006, and almost every blog innovation regarding community management has been motivated by an attack of greater or lesser virulence on individual posters by other individuals or by a group.

I can't say whether the decision made by some of our bloggers to retire from the blog is good or bad. I do know we've lost some of our other respected bloggers in the past, for various reasons, and the blog has gone on. I for one have a lot of respect for StormW's abilities, and in many ways he is a good teacher. However, like everybody else here, he is not perfect. If he's found an effective way to continue doing what he does best, I wish him well in his endeavours. I will likely check out his forecast, as I did in the past, as one of my potential sources of information.

Meanwhile, Dr. Masters' blog goes on, and that's where I am.

YMMV.....

Quoting hunkerdown:
hell, some would have him half way to Miami by now, with all that, er, ahhh, never mind...
You know, I actually read a lot of what StormW posted in Doc Masters' blog. I remember him suggesting Igor would get a lot closer to 70W than expected before recurving. I never saw him state or even imply that a CONUS hit was expected or even likely. Maybe he gave that impression on his own blog. Now that I think about it, I don't think any of the bloggers I respect said Igor would hit the CONUS. I do think a lot of pple were thinking [hoping] it would get far enough west to avoid Bermuda before finally being picked up by a trough.

Quoting HaboobsRsweet:

that wont happen because there really is only about one or two people let that can actually talk weather properly and use something besides a model that they do not verify first.
More pple need to learn, IMO.... isn't that why we blog, at least some of us? Then we pass that learning on to others. I've seen the lowliest newbie suck up info from pple who know how to explain stuff here. Then, when those pple are not around to explain for a new round of newbies, the former newbies are able to explain to the best of their ability, or at least point others in the right direction.

IMO, good forecasters are "a dime a dozen", so to speak. It's good TEACHERS we are short of. Unfortunately they don't pay the P. E. teachers and coaches the big bucks, only the players.

Frankly, I don't care if this gets swiped and wiped by the ADMIN. I wanted to get some stuff off my chest. I also figure that StormW made some very important contributions to the life and development of this blog, and while the circumstances surrounding his departure may not have been the auspicious ones we might have preferred, I believe he still deserves some respect for those contributions over the last few years. You don't have to agree with him or even like him. However, the snide comments and malicious "jokes" are not only low and vulgar, IMO, but also rather cowardly, since they are being made to all intents and purposes behind his back.

Once again, YMMV.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 12, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6006
Quoting StormJunkie:


I would say there is about a 3% chance it makes 70 before turning and a .5% chance it makes 75. It is highly unlikely that it will bring anything but very high surf to most of the SE and then NE coast.
" crunch the numbers bro!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Small Eye of Igor...

Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9798
ok I'm out everyone have a Great Evening and I'll check back tomorrow....


Taco :o)
Member Since: July 7, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 3249
1164. angiest
Quoting 1900hurricane:

Yeah, and this one is massive! It kinda reminds me of alot of my personal research I did on Super Typhoon Chaba from 2004:

Warning! This is a very long MIMIC loop, so be aware before you navigate to this page!


Well, some of the models had been forecasting TS winds nearly all the way from North Carolina to Bermuda at one point.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 16 Comments: 4766
1163. will40
Quoting Want2learn:
Okay guys late night question, will Igor make 70W before it might turn? If it make 75W wouldn't the winds be hitting NC already?


no he would still be too far south before the turn
Member Since: September 19, 2005 Posts: 2 Comments: 4133
Quoting Want2learn:
Okay guys late night question, will Igor make 70W before it might turn? If it make 75W wouldn't the winds be hitting NC already?
I haven't looked at him lately but you have to remember its a big ocean and hurricanes are not symetrical nor of consistant wind speed so don't jump-the-gun on tropical storm force winds hitting NC. Despite what you read on the blog the NHC is right 80 to 90% of the time.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Want2learn:
Okay guys late night question, will Igor make 70W before it might turn? If it make 75W wouldn't the winds be hitting NC already?


I would say there is about a 3% chance it makes 70 before turning and a .5% chance it makes 75. It is highly unlikely that it will bring anything but very high surf to most of the SE and then NE coast.
Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 26 Comments: 16348
Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
Oh wow, another EWRC.

Yeah, and this one is massive! It kinda reminds me of alot of my personal research I did on Super Typhoon Chaba from 2004:

Warning! This is a very long MIMIC loop, so be aware before you navigate to this page!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1158. pcola57
Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
Oh wow, another EWRC.


I wonder what effect Julia is going to make on him?
What's your take on this MiamiHurricanes09?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1157. angiest
Quoting StormJunkie:


See, that's is kind of what I thought it was doing about four days ago. Then the past couple days it seemed it was from the Atl area. Maybe this run will offer some clarification. General consensus was that it was the CATL area, but both sides have been debated.


Several days ago it was developing it near the southern Leeward Islands. I'm not sure when it switched to the SW Caribbean (the area where Carla formed), sometime midweek when I was most sick and didn't watch it closely.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 16 Comments: 4766
Quoting fatlady99:
Aw c'mon guys, where's the night crew? No coffee? No Krispy Kremes??? Don't tell me they defected too?

And just when I brought my extra shorts so xcool couldn't get me with one of his Igor graphics...
Alot going on in the tropics,and people are reporting one another left and right.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting fatlady99:


(hand over heart, head silently bowed...)

Hey 'lady99, you adding a liberal arts education to what these science geeks think they know! lol!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting angiest:


I'm not sure. Recently GFS has been developing it out of the far southwest Caribbean (check my blog, I captured the frames where I think cyclogenesis occurred.)


See, that's is kind of what I thought it was doing about four days ago. Then the past couple days it seemed it was from the Atl area. Maybe this run will offer some clarification. General consensus was that it was the CATL area, but both sides have been debated.
Member Since: August 17, 2005 Posts: 26 Comments: 16348
Okay guys late night question, will Igor make 70W before it might turn? If it make 75W wouldn't the winds be hitting NC already?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 1900hurricane:
Check this out!

Oh wow, another EWRC.
Member Since: September 2, 2009 Posts: 130 Comments: 21122
Quoting StormJunkie:
00z GFS at 108hrs...The system in the central Atl is what eventually, supposedly ends up in the GOM correct?





Thanks CRS, and good evening to you.
You know SJ I want to say yes thats the one but I'm not sure sorry about that Bud.....


Taco :o)
Member Since: July 7, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 3249
1149. angiest
Quoting LiveToFish0430:


smart call on your part. i live in daytona beach and we lost power for over a week when charley came through. trying to do my breathing treatments and keep medicine cold was a nightmare


Not to mention... my kids don't like thunderstorms that are over in half an hour. I don't know how long Ike lasted here (an hour inland) but I really couldn't subject them to that, even if the loss of power wasn't an issue. And fortunately my neighborhood was one of the few that kept power.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 16 Comments: 4766
I taught public school for six years before I decided I had enough! I am presently in an occupation that doesn't require a degree. My salary now is between 2 to 3 times what I made as a teacher.

If anyone is interested (I know its not weather related) you should read "The Underground History of American Education" by John Taylor Gatto. He taught for 30 years in New York city public school system. He taught in some of the worst school, and he taught in some of the best schools in New York City.

He was named "Teacher of the Year" for the entire state of New York. He quit teaching the same year.

It took him 9 years of researching how formal or compulsory schooling came about in the United States. It is a book I feel every American should read, especially if you are considering becoming a teacher.

It can be read online.
Member Since: July 25, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 626

Viewing: 1198 - 1148

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
71 °F
Overcast