Hurricane Karl: first major hurricane ever in the Bay of Campeche; Bermuda eyes Igor

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:47 PM GMT on September 17, 2010

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Hurricane Karl explosively deepened into a dangerous Category 3 hurricane this morning, becoming the fifth major hurricane of this remarkably active 2010 Atlantic hurricane season. Karl is the first major hurricane on record in the Gulf of Mexico's Bay of Campeche--the region bounded by the Yucatan Peninsula on the east. There were two other major hurricanes that grazed the northern edge of the Bay of Campeche, Hurricane Hilda of 1955 and Hurricane Charley of 1951, but Karl is by far the farthest south a major hurricane has been in the Gulf of Mexico. Hurricane records go back to 1851, but Karl is a small storm and could have gotten missed as being a major hurricane before the age of aircraft reconnaissance (1945).


Figure 1. Tracks of all major hurricanes since 1851 near Mexico's Bay of Campeche. Karl is most southerly major hurricane on record in the Gulf of Mexico. Image credit: NOAA Coastal Services Center.

With Karl's ascension to major hurricane status, we are now ahead of the pace of the terrible hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005 for number of major hurricanes so early in the year. In 2005, the fifth major hurricane (Rita) did not occur until September 21, and in 2004, the fifth major hurricane (Karl) arrived on September 19. Wunderblogger Cotillion has put together a nice page showing all the seasons with five or more major hurricanes. The last time we had five major hurricanes earlier in the season was in 1961, when the fifth major hurricane (Esther) arrived on September 13. This morning we continue to have three simultaneous hurricanes, Hurricanes Igor, Julia, and Karl. This is a rare phenomena, having occurred only eight previous years since 1851. The last time we had three simultaneous hurricanes in the Atlantic was in 1998. That year also had four simultaneous hurricanes--Georges, Ivan, Jeanne and Karl--for a brief time on September 25. There has been just one other case of four simultaneous Atlantic hurricanes, on August 22, 1893. The year 2005 came within six hours of having three hurricanes at the same time, but the official data base constructed after the season was over indicates that the three hurricanes did not exist simultaneously.

Also remarkable this year is that are seeing major hurricanes in rare or unprecedented locations. Julia was the easternmost major hurricane on record, Karl is the most southerly major hurricane on record in the Gulf of Mexico, and Earl was the 4th strongest hurricane so far north. This unusual major hurricane activity is likely due, in part, to the record Atlantic sea surface temperatures this year.


Figure 2. Triple trouble, day two: From left to right, Hurricanes Karl, Igor, and Julia roil the Atlantic at 9:45 am EDT, September 17, 2010. Image credit: NASA/GSFC.

Karl
Hurricane Karl put on a burst of intensification this morning unprecedented in this part of the Atlantic, bottoming out as a Category 3 hurricane with a 957 mb pressure and winds of 120 mph. Karl's pressure dropped 10 mb between 1am EDT and 7 am EDT, but the pressure during the Hurricane Hunters' latest pass through the eye, at 10:12 am, had risen 12 mb, likely indicating that Karl's winds may weaken quickly in the next few hours. Karl is getting very close to land, and interaction with land will probably limit further intensification. Mexican radar out of Alvarado shows the eye is very close to the coast.


Figure 3. Radar image of Karl approaching landfall in Mexico. Image credit: Mexican Weather Service.

Impact of Karl on Mexico
Given that the Bay of Campeche coast has never experienced a hurricane as strong as Karl, its impact is likely to cause unprecedented damage to a 50-mile wide coastal area between Veracruz and Poza Rica. The strongest hurricanes in history to affect the region were Item in 1950, with 110 mph winds, Janet in 1955, with 100 mph winds, and Diana of 1990, with 100 mph winds. Flooding from Janet killed over 800 people in Mexico. and flooding from Diana killed at least 139 people. Fortunately, the Mexicans have one of the best disaster preparedness programs in the world, and it is likely that evacuations from the storm surge zone of Karl will greatly limit the loss of life from storm surge. The section of coast expected to receive Karl's maximum 12 - 16 foot storm surge is moderately populated, but is low-lying only in limited regions. Of greatest concern are Karl's torrential rains, since the region has high mountains near the coast that will experience extreme rainfall and flooding. Karl's high winds are also a major concern, and these winds are likely to damage thousands of buildings near the coast.

Igor
Hurricane Igor has slowly weakened over the past day, but remains a large and dangerous Category 3 hurricane with 120 mph winds. Igor passed just north of buoy 41044 last night, and the buoy recorded a lowest pressure of 942 mb. Top winds during Igor's passage were sustained at 74 mph, but this reading was on the weak left front side of the hurricane. The buoy recorded a significant wave height of 38 feet (the significant wave height is the average of the highest 1/3 of the waves.)


Figure 4. Morning satellite image of Igor.

Intensity forecast for Igor
Wind shear is low to moderate, 5 - 15 knots, and is expected to remain in this range through Saturday afternoon. Waters are warm, 29°C, and will remain 29°C through Saturday morning, then slowly decline. Igor is well armored against any intrusions of dry air for at least the next two days. These conditions should allow Igor to remain at major hurricane status through Saturday afternoon. It is possible the hurricane will undergo another eyewall replacement cycle, where the eyewall collapses and a new eyewall forms from an outer spiral band. This will weaken the hurricane by 10 - 20 mph if it occurs, but Igor may regain its lost intensity once the cycle is over, as it has done after its previous two eyewall replacement cycles. By Saturday afternoon, the trough of low pressure steering Igor northwestwards should bring moderate wind shear of 10 - 20 knots to the storm, potentially weakening it. The SHIPS models predicts shear will not rise to the high range, 20 - 30 knots, until the hurricane reaches the island, which may be soon enough to induce substantial weakening by perhaps 20 - 30 mph before Igor arrives at Bermuda. Igor will still probably be at least a Category 2 hurricane on its closest pass by Bermuda on Sunday night, and perhaps a Category 3. NHC is giving Bermuda a 29% chance of experiencing hurricane force winds from Igor, but this probability is likely too low. The Bermuda Weather Service is calling for Category 2 hurricane conditions for the island on Sunday, with 20 - 40 foot waves in the offshore waters, and 6 - 12 foot seas in the inland waters.

Igor's impact on Bermuda
The track forecast for Igor remains unchanged. Igor is moving northwest, in response to the steering influence of a broad trough of low pressure moving across the Western Atlantic. This trough will steer Igor to the northwest and north over the next three days, bringing the core of the storm very close to Bermuda late Sunday night. Igor is a huge storm, and tropical storm force winds extend out 290 miles to the north of its center. As the hurricane moves north, it will expand in size, as it takes advantage of the extra spin available at higher latitudes due to Earth's rotation. By Saturday night, Igor's tropical storm force winds are expected to extend outwards 320 miles from the center. Igor will be moving at about 11 - 13 mph during the final 24 hours of its approach to Bermuda, so the island can expect a period of 39+ mph tropical storm force winds to begin near midnight Saturday night--a full 24 hours before the core of Igor arrives. Igor will speed up to about 15 mph as it passes the island near midnight Sunday night, and Bermuda's battering by tropical storm force winds will not be as long as Igor moves away, perhaps 10 hours long. Hurricane force winds will probably extend out about 60 miles from the center when the core of Igor reaches Bermuda, and the island can expect to be pounded by hurricane force winds for up to 6 - 8 hours. In all, Bermuda is likely to suffer a remarkably long 36-hour period of tropical storm force winds, with the potential for many hours of hurricane force winds. Long duration poundings like this are very stressful for buildings, and there is the potential for significant damage on Bermuda. However, buildings in Bermuda are some of the best-constructed in the world, and damage on the island will be much lower than might otherwise be expected.

Bermuda's hurricane history
Igor is similar in strength and projected track to Hurricane Fabian of 2003. Fabian hit Bermuda as a Category 3 hurricane with 120 mph winds. It was the most damaging hurricane ever to hit the island, with $355 million in damage. Fabian's storm surge killed four people crossing a causeway on the island. These were the first hurricane deaths on Bermuda since 1926. The most powerful hurricane on record to strike Bermuda was the Category 4 Havana-Bermuda Hurricane, which hit on October 22, 1926, with 135 mph winds. The hurricane sank two British warships, claiming 88 lives, but no one was killed on the island. The deadliest hurricane to affect the island occurred on September 12, 1839, when a Category 3 hurricane with 125 mph winds and an 11-foot storm surge hit, tearing off the roofs of hundreds of buildings and wrecking several ships. An estimated 100 people were killed (source: Encyclopedia of Hurricanes, Typhoons, and Cyclones, by David Longshore.)

Igor's impact on the rest of the Atlantic
The models have been in substantial agreement over multiple runs that Igor will miss the U.S. and Canadian coasts--with the possible exception of southeast Newfoundland, which the ECMWF model predicts could see a close pass by Igor. The chief danger to the U.S. and Canada will come in the form of high waves. Large swells from Igor are pounding the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, and the Northern Lesser Antilles Islands, and will spread westwards to the U.S. East Coast today. By Saturday, much of the East Coast from northern Florida to Cape Cod Massachusetts can expect waves of 3 - 4 meters (10 - 13 feet), causing dangerous rip currents and significant beach erosion. These waves will continue through Sunday then gradually die down. The latest NOAA marine forecast for Cape Hatteras, North Carolina calls for 6 - 11 foot waves on Saturday night, and 9 - 13 foot waves on Sunday.

Julia
Strong upper level winds from big brother Igor are creating a high 20 - 30 knots of shear over Hurricane Julia this morning, and the hurricane is destined to weaken to a tropical storm soon. The high shear has eroded away the northwestern portion of Julia's heavy thunderstorms, and should be strong enough to destroy Julia by early next week. Julia is not expected to threaten any land areas.

Unusually quiet in the Pacific
The unusually quiet Western Pacific typhoon season has its 11th named storm of the season, Typhoon Fanapi. Fanapi, a Category 1 storm, is located 400 miles east of Taiwan, and is expected to intensify into a Category 2 storm before making landfall on the island Sunday. Ordinarily, the Western Pacific should be up to seventeen named storms by now. It has also been unusually quiet in the Eastern Pacific. On average, that ocean basin should have had 11 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes by now. This season, we've had about half the normal activity--just 6 named storms, 3 hurricanes, and 1 intense hurricane.

Elsewhere in the tropics
The ECMWF model develops a new tropical depression a few hundred miles off the coast of Africa 4 - 5 days from now. The GFS and NOGAPS models have backed off on their predictions of a Caribbean development late next week.

I'll have an update this afternoon.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting seflagamma:
I see post disappearing again.
I was not under the impression that the "-" sign made post disappear..

I thought the " " and "-"
helped determine if your post were shown on the "average or above average" viewing...

I thought only "!" were the ones that got admin's attention...

please tell me "!" are not being used to get all the comments removed????


and I think some people here let their egos get in the way...
We should agree to disagree...
and not have the "I'll take my ball and go home" attitude..

I've seen some here threaten to leave over and over and they come back..
their egos need the praise ...

but when you suck up and live off the praise you also must be thick skinned enough to take the punches you are bound to get.


Now will this comment disappear also???
I've never been "banned" from Dr Master's blog before..I've been banned from a few of the personal blogs but not this one.


anyway, I see poor Mexico is getting whalloped.. I hope they had time to prepared.
I am now worried more about those folks than Bermuda.. Bermuda has had over a week to see this coming.

Good afternoon everyone!


Agree. Bermuda should be as prepared as they can be by now. The models have been pointing in their general direction for many days now.
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870. TX2FL
How did Igor/Julia get pulled north and Karl is going due west? One would think with that, Karl would have been heading north in the Gulf also.
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Bermuda weather forecast at
http://www.weather.bm/index.asp


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Patrap, the plain text button has disappeared. It's supposed to be above the comment box, correct?
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Less the Gridded Map

18z Early Cycle NHC model tracks
Igor
Statistical/Simple Models (CLIPER,BAMs,LBAR,other Statistical Models)





Dynamic Models (More sophisticated models)











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Quoting pottery:
Good Post, StormJunkie.


Thanks pottery and good to see you. Maybe this will be my 1 in 20 posts that doesn't get whacked today :)

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Quoting CloudGatherer:
Igor starts to exact its price from the Bahamas:
A cruise ship set to depart Boston today for Bermuda will instead set its course for Florida and the Bahamas ahead of Hurricane Igor, company officials announced today.

As weather forecasters predicted Igor will slam into Bermuda this weekend, The Norwegian Cruise Line ship “Norwegian Spirit,” set to leave at 4 p.m. from Black Falcon Avenue port for the small island country, will instead hug the eastern seaboard, stopping in Port Canaveral, Fla. and Nassau, Bahamas.

Other cruise lines, including Royal Caribbean and MSC Cruises, have also rearranged some of their itineraries amid concerns about the Category 3 storm.


When it comes time to add up the economic damage from the storm, the loss of at least a week or two of cruise-line revenue and passengers - and if the port is damaged, or needed for relief operations, perhaps the whole season - will be a not insubstantial part of the whole. But the real damage here is reputational. The Bahamas thrives as an island of tranquility. Every time a storm like this ruins vacation plans, that image takes a hit.
Huh?

I'm not clear what u mean by this. I understand the economic impact bit, but not really clear which island you are saying will be hit by this.

Sounds like my country is going to benefit from Bermuda's misfortune. FYI, Bermuda is a British protectorate while The Bahamas (where Nassau is located) is an independent nation (since 1973). Additionally, The Bahamas is an archipelago of over 700 islands and keys filling the "L" of Florida and Cuba. Bermuda might be more likely to be considered one island. If u meant Bermuda, this makes sense. Otherwise, I'm really confused.
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IGOR Rainbow



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Quoting nrtiwlnvragn:


A NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE STORM SURVEY TEAM...IN PARTNERSHIP WITH
THE NYC OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT WILL CONDUCT A DAMAGE SURVEY
IN STATEN ISLAND...BROOKLYN AND QUEENS ON FRIDAY MORNING. ONCE ALL
DATA HAS BEEN COLLECTED...A DETERMINATION WILL BE MADE AS TO WHETHER
A TORNADO OR STRAIGHT LINE WINDS OCCURRED THURSDAY EVENING.


Link

They have not released the results of the survey yet, but check back with that link, it should be posted there when it is completed.


LOL, nrt. You beat me to it!
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Quoting StormSurgeon:
I accidentally hit the "rich text" button and it's got me all messed up, can't quote for example. Anyone know the fix. I can't find a button to switch it off.


I think if you use "settings" at the top of the page and set them to default that may work. You would then need to set them back to your preferences.
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854. flsky
Quoting RayRayfromLa:



try FLhurricane.com NO BS ALL INFORMATIVE, however they do not put up w/ BS. The site is moderated by meteoroligist.

Thanks for this link! I added it to my bookmarks. Still couldn't stay away from Dr M's blog entirely tho.
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Good Post, StormJunkie.
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Quoting StormSurgeon:
I accidentally hit the "rich text" button and it's got me all messed up, can't quote for example. Anyone know the fix. I can't find a button to switch it off.


Just click the Plain text one and you will default back to normal.
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849. Bonz
I knew when I mentioned my own place that someone would say just that, but my point in mentioning it was to show that I *did* have experience with trolls or inappropriate behavior (not necessarily the same thing.)

When the behavior starts overwhelming a place, one should act. I don't know why that is not the case here and it's unfortunate, but I don't like the inappropriate behaviors, on either side, and I see no reason why I must be obliged to either tolerate it or have to "blank it out" so that kiddies can have their fun.

I respect that others may disagree with my stance, but I am standing up for once and saying I'm tired of it.

Quoting SuperYooper:


Wait, you are talking about your own site. By all means, do what you must with yours. However, you are talking about the Docs site and he would have done something by now if he had a problem with it, don't you think? I'm sure nobody had emailed him complaining about "juvinile behaviour" yet.
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I accidentally hit the "rich text" button and it's got me all messed up, can't quote for example. Anyone know the fix. I can't find a button to switch it off.
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Hurricane Karl plows into Mexico mainland, weakens
By the CNN Wire Staff
September 17, 2010 2:43 p.m. EDT



Mexico City, Mexico (CNN) -- Hurricane Karl weakened Friday afternoon after making landfall, but the heavy rain and storm surge it spawned still could pose significant problems in the Mexican interior, forecasters said.

Karl was a Category 3 storm when it came ashore about 10 miles (15 kilometers) north of Veracruz, Mexico, CNN's satellite and radar estimates showed, but is now classified Category 2.

The storm delivered torrents of rain and fierce winds several hours before it arrived around 11:30 a.m. (12:30 p.m. ET).

Maximum sustained winds at landfall were near 110 mph (175 kph) with higher gusts, according to the National Hurricane Center. The hurricane was moving west at about 8 mph (13 kph), it said.

The homes of at least 3,000 families in central Mexico were damaged, the state-run Notimex news agency reported.


At 1 p.m. Karl was 15 miles (25 kilometers) west of Veracruz.

High winds and seas could be a threat to oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico, said CNN meteorologist Chad Myers.

"A dangerous storm surge will raise water levels by as much as 12 to 15 feet above normal tide levels along the immediate coast near and to the north of where the center makes landfall," the Hurricane Center said. "Near the coast, the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves."

Potentially dangerous rain also is forecast.

"Karl is expected to produce rainfall accumulations of 5 to 10 inches across the central and southern Mexican Gulf coast region with isolated amounts of 15 inches possible in the interior mountains," the center said. "These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mudslides."

Some local flooding had already been reported, the Mexican Interior Ministry said.

Officials closed some roads and urged evacuations for large areas.

Mexico's National System for Civil Protection issued a red alert, the highest level, for central and southern Veracruz. An orange alert was in place for northern Veracruz and the states of Hidalgo, Tlaxcala and Puebla. A yellow alert was issued for the states of Tamaulipas, San Luis Potosi and Oaxaca.

Mexican President Felipe Calderon also issued a warning Friday morning on his Twitter account.

"An alert for Hurricane Karl in the nation's central states," Calderon said. "(It) could convert to a Category 4. It will enter through Veracruz around midday."

Texas could be spared any major problems because a storm surge occurs only near the landfall location, said CNN meteorologist Sean Morris.

Coastal flood advisories have been issued for south Texas, which means forecasters expect a small amount of coastal flooding but nothing serious, Morris said.

A larger threat to south Texas will come from several inches of rain that could cause flooding and mudslides. The area could see as much as 4 inches by Sunday, with isolated amounts of up to 6 inches in far southern Texas.
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843. unf97
Quoting clwstmchasr:
What's with all of the comments being removed?


Well, it has become apparent that the blog administrators and Dr. Masters are very tightly policing this blog. I have been a member of Weather Underground for three years and I have never seen the blog get so out of hand with a bunch of silliness lately. This has always been in my view the very best place on the internet to see the latest developments about tropical weather. Now, it has degenerated into a bunch on nonsense and bickering among some of the bloggers on here. It is really taking away from the great forum and service that Dr. Jeff Masters has provided to us. It is really ashame and it is about high time that administrators enforce the rules of this blog for the ones on here who are not using proper etiquette!
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Afternoon all.

What's been going on today??? I've been having masses of hidden posts, plus many community standards violations. Is this new activity by trolls, or just Admin stepping up the surveillance? And what's this about StormW?

Quoting atmoaggie:
A little long, but I thought it was neat.

I agree; really cool loop of a landfalling hurricane. Thanks for sharing.

Any word on damage from the Veracruz area as yet? Also, I saw a link to a webcam earlier today. Anybody still have that link?
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Wow, this community is just turning on and devouring itself.

Shame on the trollers for making it get to this point, and shame on the cliquish community for allowing it to happen.
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Seems like she's hard to defeat... still fighting...


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Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:


You still do not get the point, DestinJeff. We, in the houston area, do not have Dr. Neal Frank any more. Dr. Neal Frank would field questions on air and give his fairly detailed insight on what he thinks will happen. Our local weather forecasters are good, but they do not go into the detail that Dr. Neal Frank would. CNN/Fox as a source is only gathering generic information and with no real topics open for discussion. I, as others here, come to see "the big picture" and what possibilities may lay ahead. There are only a few on here that will take the time to give knowledgeable information to those that seek it. Levi32 is one that will and I fell that Reed is an up and coming future star. There are some others as well. StormW and Levi32 are the stars worth paying serious attention to now and they will answers questions and concerns. You have done an excellent job, at times, with your maps and charts that I also find informative, if I knew how to read them. I am getting a grasp on doing so now, but it is becuase of people like Levi32 and StormW that I am finally learning how to interpret some of this information. Your style of humor is very enjoyable. Your attacks on the ones that seem to know considerably more than you is nothing more than a distraction. I am quite serious when I say that if you and the other "class clowns" open an act at Comedy Central I will pay to come see your antics. Please, continue with the humor, but delay the practice of attacking those that really are more knowledgeable than you on the tropics. When you have lost your home and all of its belongings to a hurricne, as I have, the "cuteness" becomes a little grating. Still, I like your humor and that of the other "class clowns". Just keep it funny and belay the attacks on those that provide SERIOUS information. .... I wonder how long you would last in a board meeting with your attempts at humor on a serious topic. Afterall, they are not bored meetings, even when they are boring.


Notice during this whole thing that NO ONE has attacked Levi...It is SW's on going ego trip that has dug his own grave for him. That and not being able to handle constructive criticism or someone that disagrees with his "analysis". There are plenty of people, including some of the comedians, on this blog that will share relevant information and help people learn. All SW did was regurgitate what the NHC, models, and professional mets had to say...With a little bit of Westcasting thrown in. Well, and he was always extra nice to the ladies.

I see posts are back in to falling in to never never land. That is a real shame. That is one of the two problems that are keeping this going. For one, I am not a fan of the censorship. You can come in and say how much better you think SW is than the Dr, or the NHC. I'm intelligent enough to overlook that or respond to it depending on what I want to do at the time. The major factor in this continuing ordeal is the disappearing posts. Admin should be the only ones that can make a post vanish. If they are deleting this many comments then some 24hr bans should be handed out. To myself included, if that is there choice.

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Just a reminder - right above where you type in your comment is the following text - under Admin Notice, immediately under the link to Rules of the Road:

"During active periods of hurricane season, these rules will be strictly enforced. Violations will be met with a minimum 24 hour ban."

Everyone here should know those Rules of the Road and comply with them. We are at the peak of hurricane season, and the one post that was skipped over because there were 4900 comments on that blog may have been the one to save a few lives. Think about that when advancing the notion that "humor" and socializing are essential components of this blog.
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Quoting atmoaggie:
A little long, but I thought it was neat.



I agree atmo! And still going on.
:)

Saw also the rainfall totals from Hermine you just posted. That's neat, too. Thing is, you look at something like that and realize the major rainfall isn't necessarily near the low center. That's something Hermine taught me when she crossed OK. So I'm wondering where Karl will dump the most rain.
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Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:


You still do not get the point, DestinJeff. We, in the houston area, do not have Dr. Neal Frank any more. Dr. Neal Frank would field questions on air and give his fairly detailed insight on what he thinks will happen. Our local weather forecasters are good, but they do not go into the detail that Dr. Neal Frank would. CNN/Fox as a source is only gathering generic information and with no real topics open for discussion. I, as others here, come to see "the big picture" and what possibilities may lay ahead. There are only a few on here that will take the time to give knowledgeable information to those that seek it. Levi32 is one that will and I fell that Reed is an up and coming future star. There are some others as well. StormW and Levi32 are the stars worth paying serious attention to now and they will answers questions and concerns. You have done an excellent job, at times, with your maps and charts that I also find informative, if I knew how to read them. I am getting a grasp on doing so now, but it is becuase of people like Levi32 and StormW that I am finally learning how to interpret some of this information. Your style of humor is very enjoyable. Your attacks on the ones that seem to know considerably more than you is nothing more than a distraction. I am quite serious when I say that if you and the other "class clowns" open an act at Comedy Central I will pay to come see your antics. Please, continue with the humor, but delay the practice of attacking those that really are more knowledgeable than you on the tropics. When you have lost your home and all of its belongings to a hurricne, as I have, the "cuteness" becomes a little grating. Still, I like your humor and that of the other "class clowns". Just keep it funny and belay the attacks on those that provide SERIOUS information. .... I wonder how long you would last in a board meeting with your attempts at humor on a serious topic. Afterall, they are not bored meetings, even when they are boring.



try FLhurricane.com NO BS ALL INFORMATIVE, however they do not put up w/ BS. The site is moderated by meteoroligist.
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Quoting StormChaser81:
NASA's CloudSat satellite captured a slice of Hurricane Karl's clouds at 07:59 UTC (3:59 a.m. EDT) Sept. 17. CloudSat shows clouds are over 8 miles high. The blue areas along the top of the clouds indicate cloud ice. The highest clouds in Karl at the time of the image were as cold as -40 Celsius (-40 Fahrenheit) to -60C (-76 Fahrenheit). That line disappears where there is strong rainfall exceeding 30mm/hr (1.18 inches/hour).



That is pretty wicked! Gives and idead of what you would look at 4 miles up. Scary!
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Igor creeping closer to Nfld.
Could be interesting as Julia swings into Igor and deepens baroclinically into an Extratropical Beast, east of Sable Island.
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Quoting StormChaser81:
NASA's CloudSat satellite captured a slice of Hurricane Karl's clouds at 07:59 UTC (3:59 a.m. EDT) Sept. 17. CloudSat shows clouds are over 8 miles high. The blue areas along the top of the clouds indicate cloud ice. The highest clouds in Karl at the time of the image were as cold as -40 Celsius (-40 Fahrenheit) to -60C (-76 Fahrenheit). That line disappears where there is strong rainfall exceeding 30mm/hr (1.18 inches/hour).


Great Image.
Thanks..
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829. flsky
Quoting StormChaser81:
NASA's CloudSat satellite captured a slice of Hurricane Karl's clouds at 07:59 UTC (3:59 a.m. EDT) Sept. 17. CloudSat shows clouds are over 8 miles high. The blue areas along the top of the clouds indicate cloud ice. The highest clouds in Karl at the time of the image were as cold as -40 Celsius (-40 Fahrenheit) to -60C (-76 Fahrenheit). That line disappears where there is strong rainfall exceeding 30mm/hr (1.18 inches/hour).


Hey! Incredible image!
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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