Hurricane warnings for North Carolina for Category 3 Earl

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:21 PM GMT on September 01, 2010

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Hurricane warnings are flying for the coast of North Carolina, as Hurricane Earl chugs to the northwest at 17 mph. Earl has weakened some over the past day, thanks to an eyewall replacement cycle and some dry air that got wrapped into the core of the storm. Earl's eye made a direct hit on NOAA buoy 41046 at 4am EDT this morning. The buoy recorded a surface pressure of 943 mb, exactly what the Hurricane Hunters were estimating. The buoy measured winds in the eyewall of 76 mph, gusting to 96 mph. The peak winds of Earl were stronger than this, though, since the buoy only reported measurements once per hour, which is not a fine enough resolution to see the peak winds. The buoy is also located at a height of 5 meters, which is less than the standard ten meter height used to do wind measurements, so an additional upward adjustment needs to be made. Peak waves at the buoy were a remarkable 49 feet.

A recent microwave "radar in space" image (Figure 2) shows that dry air has spiraled into the core of Earl, knocking a gap into the southern eyewall. The latest 9am EDT report from the Hurricane Hunters confirmed that the southwest portion of the eyewall was missing. Top winds seen by the Hurricane Hunters were only Category 2 strength, and Earl may be weaker than the stated 125 mph winds in the 11am NHC advisory.


Figure 1. Image of Hurricane Earl taken by astronaut Douglas Wheelock aboard the International Space Station on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2010.

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Figure 2. Microwave "radar in space" image of Hurricane Earl taken at 6:45am EDT Wednesday, September 1, 2010. The southern portion of Earl's eyewall was missing, thanks to a slug of dry air (blue colors) that had spiraled into Earl's core.

Intensity forecast for Earl
Recent satellite loops show that upper level outflow is good to the north and east of Earl, but is poor on the southwest side. The latest SHIPS model forecast shows that this is because upper level winds out of the southwest are creating 15 - 20 knots of wind shear on Earl's southwest side. The winds are from a trough of low pressure to Earl's west. This trough is forecast to weaken and move to the west away from Earl, which should reduce the shear to 10 - 15 knots by Thursday morning. If true, the relaxation in shear may give Earl enough time to mix out the dry air it ingested and regain its previous 135 mph Category 4 intensity. Water vapor satellite loops, though, show there is still plenty of dry air on Earl's west side that could potentially wrap into the storm if there is enough wind shear to drive it into Earl's circulation. Ocean temperatures are still very high, a near-record 29.5 - 30°C, and very warm waters extend to great depth, resulting in a total ocean heat content favorable for intensification. It is likely Earl will be a Category 2 or 3 hurricane at its closest approach to North Carolina Thursday night and Friday morning, with a small chance it will be at Category 4 strength. By Friday night, when Earl will be making its closest approach to New England, wind shear will rise to a high 20 - 30 knots and ocean temperatures will plunge to 20°C, resulting in considerable weakening. Earl will still probably be a Category 1 or 2 hurricane on Friday night, when it could potentially make landfall in Massachusetts. Earl is more likely to be a strong tropical storm or weak Category 1 hurricane on Saturday morning, when it could potentially make landfall in Maine or Nova Scotia, Canada.

Impact of Earl on North Carolina
The latest set of computer models runs from 2am EDT (6Z) this morning are very similar to the previous set of runs. The NOGAPS model brings Earl closest to the coast, predicting the west eyewall of the the hurricane will hit the Outer Banks of North Carolina near 2am Friday. If this track verifies, a period of 40+ mph winds will affect coastal North Carolina for a period of 12 - 18 hours beginning at about 6pm EDT Thursday night. Earl's expected radius of hurricane-force winds of 60 miles to the west will bring hurricane conditions as far west as Morehead City and Elizabeth City in North Carolina. Earl's radius of tropical storm-force winds to the west, over land, will probably be about 150 miles, so locations from Wilmington to Norfolk could see sustained winds of 40 mph in this worst-case model scenario. Storm surge would not be significant along the North Carolina coast facing the open ocean, since winds would be offshore. However, a significant storm surge of 3 - 6 feet could occur in Pamlico Sound, due to strong west to north winds. Coastal Highway 12 out of the Outer Banks would likely be blocked by sand and debris or washed out, resulting in a multi-day period where everyone on the Outer Banks would be stranded. Is is possible that the NOGAPS scenario is not the worst case, and that Earl will strike farther west, resulting in the Outer Banks getting the fearsome maximum winds of the storm's right front quadrant. However, it is more likely that Earl will pass just offshore, resulting in North Carolina receiving the weaker west side winds. Since Earl's forward speed will be about 20 mph at that time, the winds on the hurricane's west side will be about 40 mph less than the right front quadrant on the east side. The NHC wind probability forecast is calling for a 23% chance of hurricane-force winds on Cape Hatteras, 7% for Morehead City, and 3% for Norfolk, Virginia.

Impact of Earl on New England
The NOGAPS model brings Earl closest to the coast of New England, predicting the west eyewall of the the hurricane will pass over Nantucket at about 2am Saturday morning, and the tip of Cape Cod a few hours later. If this track verifies, 40+ mph winds would affect southeastern Massachusetts for a period of 6 - 12 hours beginning at about 8pm EDT Friday night. Earl should be a weaker Category 1 or 2 hurricane then, with hurricane-force winds extending 30 miles to the left of its track. Hurricane conditions would then affect the eastern tip of Long Island, coastal Rhode Island, and Southeast Massachusetts. Earl's radius of tropical storm-force winds to the north, over land, will probably be about 150 miles, so locations from Central Long Island to southern Boston would experience sustained winds of 40 mph in this worst-case model scenario. A storm surge of 3 - 5 feet might occur in Long Island Sound, and 2 - 3 feet along the south coast of Long Island. A deviation to the left, with a direct hit on eastern Long Island and Providence, Rhode Island, would probably be a $10 billion disaster, as the hurricane would hit a heavily populated area and drive a drive a 5 - 10 foot storm surge up Buzzards Bay and Narragansett Bay. The odds of this occurring are around 5%, according to the latest NHC wind probability forecast. The forecast is calling for a 25% chance of hurricane-force winds on Nantucket, 8% in Providence, 6% in Boston, and 18% in Hyannis. Keep in mind that the average error in position for a 3-day NHC forecast is 185 miles, which is about how far offshore Earl is predicted to be from New England early Saturday morning.

Impact of Earl on Canada/Maine
Late morning Saturday, Earl is expected to make landfall somewhere between the Maine/New Brunswick border and central Nova Scotia. At that time, Earl should be a strong tropical storm or weak Category 1 hurricane. This won't be another Hurricane Juan, the 2003 Category 2 hurricane which made a direct hit on Halifax, Nova Scotia, causing over $200 million in damage. Earl's impact is likely to be closer to 2008's Hurricane Kyle, which hit near Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, as a Category 1 hurricane with 75 mph winds. Kyle produced a storm surge of 2.6 feet, and did $9 million in damage to Canada. The NHC wind probability forecast is calling for a 29% chance of hurricane-force winds in Yarmouth, 24% in Halifax, and 17% in Eastport, Maine.

Beach erosion
Regardless of Earl's exact track, the U.S. East Coast can expect a long period of high waves beginning on Thursday. Significant beach erosion and dangerous rip currents will be the rule, due to waves that will reach 10 - 15 feet in offshore waters. Beach erosion damage in the mid-Atlantic states will likely run into the millions, but will probably not be as bad as that suffered during Nor'easter Ida in November of 2009. That storm (the remains of Hurricane Ida that developed into a Nor'easter) remained off the coast for several days, resulting in a long-duration pounding of the shore that caused $300 million in damage--$180 million in New Jersey alone.

Record ocean temperatures off the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Coast
The period May - July was the hottest such 3-month period in history for the Northeast and Southeast U.S., according to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center. Most of the hurricane-prone states along the coast, including New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina had their hottest May - July in the 116-year record. These record air temperatures led to record ocean temperatures, according to an analysis I did of monthly average 5x5 degree SST data available from the UK Met Office Hadley Centre.. The region of ocean bounded by 35N - 40N, 75W - 70W, which goes from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to Central New Jersey, had the warmest July ocean temperatures since records began in 1875--a remarkable 2.12°C (3.8°F) above average. The year 2008 was a distant second place, with temperatures 1.5°C (2.7°F) above average. The ocean region off the Southeast U.S. coast, bounded by 30N - 35N, 80W - 75W, from the Georgia-Florida border to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, had its 4th warmest July ocean temperatures on record. Temperatures were 0.8°C (1.4°F) above average, which fell short of the record 1.1°C anomaly of 1944. The August numbers are not available yet, but will probably show a similar story.

All this warm water off the East Coast means it is much easier for a major hurricane to make landfall in the mid-Atlantic or Northeast U.S. Usually, ocean temperatures fall below the 26.5°C threshold needed to support a hurricane as soon as a storm pushes north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. This year, those temperatures extend all the way to the New Jersey coast (Figure 3.) Such warm ocean temperatures increase the odds of a major hurricane making it to the mid-Atlantic or New England coasts. Since record keeping began in 1851, there have been only 15 major hurricane in U.S. coastal waters north of the North Carolina/Virgina border--about one per decade. The last such storm was Hurricane Alex of August 6, 2004.


Figure 3. Water surface temperatures from AVHRR satellite data for the 6-day period ending August 31, 2010. Ocean temperatures of 26.5°C, capable of supporting a hurricane, stretched almost to Long Island, New York. Image credit: Ocean Remote Sensing Group, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

Fiona
Tropical Storm Fiona last night showed us why hurricane forecasting is such a difficult job. The storm made an unexpected slow-down in forward speed. This slow-down resulted in less wind shear affecting Fiona than expected, since the storm is farther from the upper-level outflow of Hurricane Earl. The wind shear analysis from the University of Wisconsin CIMSS group shows just a moderate 10 - 20 knots of shear affecting Fiona, which is low enough that the storm has been able to organize into a respectable 60 mph tropical storm. Martinique radar shows that the outer bands from Fiona are bringing heavy rain squalls to the same islands of the northern Lesser Antilles that were affected by Earl. Our wundermap shows that winds in the islands are all below 20 mph, but winds will increase to 30 - 40 mph later today as Fiona draws closer. Satellite loops show that heavy thunderstorm activity has decreased some in recent hours. This may be due to the fact that Fiona is currently crossing the cold water wake of Earl.

Forecast for Fiona
In the short term, moderate wind shear and dry air should keep Fiona from attaining hurricane status, though we do have several models that predict it could become a Category 1 hurricane. Fiona is likely to come close enough to Bermuda on Saturday or Sunday to pose a threat to that island, though it is possible high wind shear from Earl could kill the storm by then. The long term fate of Fiona remains unclear, with some models calling for dissipation this weekend, and other models calling for Fiona to be left behind by Earl to wander over the ocean near Bermuda early next week.


Figure 4. Morning radar image of Fiona from the Martinique radar. Image credit: Meteo France.

TD 9
Invest 98L gained enough heavy thunderstorm activity to be classified as Tropical Depression Nine this morning. This wil probably be Tropical Storm Gaston by tomorrow morning. The latest SHIPS model forecast predicts shear will remain moderate, 10 - 15 knots, for the next five days, and TD 9 could be a Category 1 hurricane five days from now, as predicted by the GFDL model. The storm will likely pose a threat to the northern Lesser Antilles Islands by Tuesday.

Next post
I'll have an update this afternoon.

Jeff Masters

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1773. unf97
Quoting FFtrombi:
Just want to point out to everyone that even though the excitement is about Earl and Gaston at the moment, Fiona is strengthening and the thunderstorm area is growing, looks to become a hurricane tonight or tomorrow. No clue on the steering with Earl smashing into the ridge, but one to watch, worry about Gaston later when it's closer to the caribbean.


Yeah, you beat me to it. Fiona is just below hurricane strength now, 997 mb at the latest advisory. This storm has been both tenacious and very tricky to analyze. It seems that Fiona is working very hard to remain a seperate entity. If Earl continues to get farther way from her, lots of variables would still be into play in terms of the long range forecast. We definitely have to pay attention to Fiona if she can continue to maintain her own over the next few days.
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Quoting StormW:
Pardon me, when does the season start?


I believe this will answer your question, sir!



LOL!
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Quoting angiest:


Accumulated Cyclone Energy. Broadly speaking, it is supposed to be an objective measure of how much energy tropical cyclones put out.


Much thanks! Appreciate it!

Man I hope the OBX don't get hit too hard, I love vacationing there...
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1770. Engine2
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
is this the 18z GFS?
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Quoting SeVaSurfer:


Our local mets. just said Virginia Beach has nothing to worry about "Not the Big One" Anyone want some extra water, ice and batteries? I will sell them real cheap! Stay in Sandbridge dude, we are gonna be fine.


Just looked on Google maps. Are you guys talking about that line of houses right along the beach?

Let me get this right. Cat 4 storm swells (even if it goes down to 2), hurricane/tropical storm force winds from the east if it goes to NC, beach facing west. Good luck with that.
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1768. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
Before the Hurricane
Develop a plan. Know your homes vulnerability to the threats above - surge, wind, and flooding. Check your supplies - water, batteries, food. For information on developing a Hurricane Supply kit, see our page on that topic. Know where you can evacuate to - friends, relatives, a hotel?

Know when to take action - Watch vs Warning
WATCH: Hurricane conditions are possible in the specified area of the WATCH, usually within 36 hours.
WARNING: Hurricane conditions are expected in the specified area of the WARNING, usually within 24 hours. Remember that there is no such thing as a "minor hurricane." Category 1 and 2 hurricanes still can do significant damage.

Prepare before a Watch or Warning is issued and be ready to evacuate when the Watch comes or earlier if so instructed.

An Approaching Storm
As a storm approaches, you should prepare your house and your yard. Some things to consider:

Turn down the temperature on your freezer and refrigerator as low as possible. This will buy you more time in the event of a power loss. 24 to 48 hours before will cool the food. Avoid opening them whenever possible. If you are evacuating.
Before you evacuate, call at least one person out of state to let them know your plans.
Ensure that your Hurricane Emergency Kit is fully stocked.
Charge electronic devices, for example, computers, cell phones, rechargeable batteries, razors, and the like.
Make extra ice, bag it - this will be useful to use and to keep the freezer cold.
If you have a generator, do NOT run it inside or near the house. But make sure you have fuel to run it.
Make sure your car has fuel.
Pick up yard debris - furniture, tools, decorative items, branches - anything loose that could become a missile. We have placed furniture in the pool upon occasion.
Secure boats, trailers, campers, RVs, and the like in the safest place you can find. Tie them down, anchor them, or however you can best secure them. But, take into account that there may be a storm surge.
Secure all doors and windows with locks, and shutters if available. Plywood, properly secured, can be effective. Don't forget your garage doors.
Move items that may be damaged by water to higher areas of your home if you can not take them with you if evacuating. Move them away from windows in case they are broken.
Huge items must even be secured in big storms. An engine block was found 40 or 50 feet up in a pine tree in the Homestead (actually Redlands) area after Andrew. Don't think that something is too big to be moved by the wind.
Re-check tie-downs.
Bring cars, bikes, scooters and anything like that into your garage if possible.
Bring in grills or other cooking items.
Bring in hoses, trash cans, hot tub covers, wind-chimes, plants.
Caulk and fill bathtubs - extra water comes in handy for toilets and more..
It may sound strange, but do your laundry, dishes, and take a shower. Why? Because if you lose power, having as much clean as possible will make a big difference.
Check if your pool pump should be on or off.
Close and fasten gates so they don't swing.
Close chimney flues.
Close/latch inside doors and cabinets.


If you have time, help your neighbors. Debris in their yards can easily impact your home and yard.

During a storm.


Stay inside, away from windows
Be alert for tornadoes
Stay away from flood waters and storm surge. It can be deceptively strong.
Be aware of the eye. It may be calm, but winds can and will pick up quickly and could catch you outside.
Un-plug electronic devices that are not in use to avoid surge damage.

After a Storm

Know power safety - avoid downed lines
Know food safety - what is good and for how long.
Chain saw safety is critical
Generator safety is important too
Water treatment - whether water needs to be boiled or not.
Listen to local officials
Use flashlights instead of candles
Inspect your home for damage.
Stay off roads as much as possible
You may need to super-chlorinate your pool

********************************************************
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Quoting Guiness:
Our power has just come back on after nearly 3 days due to Hurricane Earl - no water (electric pump) and no electricity is not fun - try washing with one gallon containers of water before work after having not slept due to the heat..puts me in a great mood for catching up with stuff in the office after 2 days with the office closed.

Tortola BVI here by the way.

Let me put it another way...before Earl came to say hello on Sunday / Monday I was excited to see my first Hurricane and I wanted it to pass over our island - believe me, I am not as excited about Gaston arriving next week...



Glad to hear things went okay, considering.
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T.D9 is now T.S. Gaston. One of the most conservative models(LGEM) indicates a strenghtening to a major hurricane before reach the Lesser Antillies.In September, the historical tracks of tropical systems puts in more danger the Eastern Caribbean.
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I've lived in the area for the past 27 years... trust me when I say this... never trust what the local met's say... their track-record has been horrible.
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1764. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
Direct Hit:
A close approach of a tropical cyclone to a particular location. For locations on the left-hand side of a tropical cyclone's track (looking in the direction of motion), a direct hit occurs when the cyclone passes to within a distance equal to the cyclone's radius of maximum wind. For locations on the right-hand side of the track, a direct hit occurs when the cyclone passes to within a distance equal to twice the radius of maximum wind. Compare indirect hit, strike.

Strike:
For any particular location, a hurricane strike occurs if that location passes within the hurricane's strike circle, a circle of 125 n mi diameter, centered 12.5 n mi to the right of the hurricane center (looking in the direction of motion). This circle is meant to depict the typical extent of hurricane force winds, which are approximately 75 n mi to the right of the center and 50 n mi to the left.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Didn't you get the memo StormW? There is no season this year. It's a bust. LOL
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Quoting StormW:
Pardon me, when does the season start?


Hah! You know storm!
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We might all be asking ourselves in about two weeks as to when the season will end.......
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 8785
Quoting TampaTom:
OK, I have to check out to talk my mom off the ceiling....

ROFLMAO!! Sorry, too funny.
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1759. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Quoting StormW:
Pardon me, when does the season start?

*jumping up and down waving hands* oooh I know!!!!
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Earl:



Fiona:



Gaston:

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Quoting StormW:
Pardon me, when does the season start?



hmmmm, funny storm....It has definitely picked up. What are your thoughts on Gaston?
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1754. surfmom
Quoting Relix:
Earl: Aiming at EC. If it passes 75W then it's game time. Hope people prepare well.

Gaston: Taking aim at Puerto Rico and the caribbean and I believe this could be the first major to impact PR since 1998. All pieces are finally in position for us to get it.


Let's hope not - there's two beaches that have my heart & and I love the folks there
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Quoting StormW:
Pardon me, when does the season start?


What are you talking about Fallinstorms said 2 more storms after Bonnie and that was that. Pay no attention to the thing with the eye. It is non tropical :p.
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Quoting StormW:
Pardon me, when does the season start?


in 7 to 10 days.......or so.
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Quoting StormW:
Pardon me, when does the season start?


Any day now I think there are a few clouds bubbling up in the Atlantic
Member Since: July 29, 2005 Posts: 21 Comments: 794
1749. angiest
Quoting StormW:
Pardon me, when does the season start?


Paging DestinJeff.
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1748. spdmom
Having lived in Nags Head in OBX this past winter and summer, we saw MUCH damage, just from the low depressions.. THERE IS NOTHING LEFT to take the impact of any storm, let alone this Earl. There is no wide beach, and no dunes to stop flooding, Hatteras is a sitting duck, along with the rest of the non-sand beaches. It will be sad when OBX gets hit.. The flooding from the Palmico sound on the westside and the ocean on the east will be devastating. Remember, OBX is only 3 feet ABOVE sea level.. that is it..2 inches of rain would causes flooding near the sound.. Just 2!! There is no drainage infrastructure in OBX, none.. the water sits.. I don't believe Earl will "pass by" OBX, but rather hit on, or nearby.. Hard to believe or imagine that computer models can predict mother nature to a tee.. There is always a margin of error. But for all the friends we met while living there? I hope I am wrong..
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1747. surfmom
NeverEver want to see a Cane cause destruction - but there are waves and surfers who follow them. Earl the BlackPearl is going to be churning the wave maker.
Below Surf report is from a Surfer's Perceptive.
AuraSurf/Micah Weaver
4pm Update: FLORIDA: Todo el mundo para el area este! Window has expanded a bit for the weekend warriors. Tomorrow: Solid surf cleaning up by late Thursday for the EC. Big, drifty waves. Boardwalk and RC's will probably see double Overhead. By Friday it's gotten smaller and cleaner still head high plus and classic with winds STR8 offshore. Saturday waist high leftovers but still fun. Sunday thigh high. Next week strong NE winds build across FL. I am out, see ya next Tuesday 9/7.
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1746. angiest
Quoting SeVaSurfer:


Our local mets. just said Virginia Beach has nothing to worry about "Not the Big One" Anyone want some extra water, ice and batteries? I will sell them real cheap! Stay in Sandbridge dude, we are gonna be fine.


Heh. Not like plenty of us haven't heard *that* one before.
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Quoting MagicSpork:
Hmmm, if Gaston manages to weave it's way through the Caribbean into the GOM, it might hit Texas on the same date as a certain presidential nicknamed storm two years ago


And if my grandmother had you know what she be my grandfather =}
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"ACE is, broadly speaking, a measure of the power of the hurricane multiplied by the length of time it existed, so storms that last a long time, as well as particularly strong hurricanes, have high ACEs"
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The interactive cone/track graphic on the NHC site is a good tool to use to see how much the cone/track has changed. You zoom/position to your area of interest and then change the advisory number at the top of the graphic.
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this is going to be fun. supposed to go to woods hole MA for a wedding this weekend. lol, at least it isn't my wedding, i'd be flipping out right now.

last time a decent sized 'cane hit there was bob and that part of the cape was without power for weeks.
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Quoting OBXNCWEATHER:
The 5pm track brings the coc 50 miles from me?!

I could potentially see the western eyewall of this monster?!


Not if you GTHO of there...
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1738. angiest
Quoting UpperLevelLOL:
Pardon the ignorance, but what is ACE?


Accumulated Cyclone Energy. Broadly speaking, it is supposed to be an objective measure of how much energy tropical cyclones put out.
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1737. will40
Quoting hurricanehanna:


Thanks Will.


u r welcome
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Just want to point out to everyone that even though the excitement is about Earl and Gaston at the moment, Fiona is strengthening and the thunderstorm area is growing, looks to become a hurricane tonight or tomorrow. No clue on the steering with Earl smashing into the ridge, but one to watch, worry about Gaston later when it's closer to the caribbean.
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1735. xcool
MoltenIce .yep.
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1734. Relix
Earl: Aiming at EC. If it passes 75W then it's game time. Hope people prepare well.

Gaston: Taking aim at Puerto Rico and the caribbean and I believe this could be the first major to impact PR since 1998. All pieces are finally in position for us to get it.
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Gaston:

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Quoting BaltOCane:
I'm getting a bit worried here in Baltimore... I'm a great distance away, but our beach town, Ocean City, is gonna receive a good bit of something from Earl.

I wasn't here during Isabel, but downtown flooded, bcuz the water was pushed up the bay.
So this is not good.


I have friends that are actually planning on beating Earl down to OC. The local mets are apparently saying some breeze and high seas, but not even any rain. You believe that?
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1731. o22sail
Quoting OBXNCWEATHER:
The 5pm track brings the coc 50 miles from me?!

I could potentially see the western eyewall of this monster?!


Not if you leave. ;-}
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Quoting Chapelhill:


What do YOU want to do?

I would leave.


Our local mets. just said Virginia Beach has nothing to worry about "Not the Big One" Anyone want some extra water, ice and batteries? I will sell them real cheap! Stay in Sandbridge dude, we are gonna be fine.
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My Predictions for this Hurricane Season (Posted on June 16,2010). 17-20 Named Storms 9-12 Hurricanes 5-8 Major Hurricanes
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1728. Brennen
How is the trough doing that is supposed to recurve Earl? Is it on time, slow, fast?
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Quoting Guiness:
Our power has just come back on after nearly 3 days due to Hurricane Earl - no water (electric pump) and no electricity is not fun - try washing with one gallon containers of water before work after having not slept due to the heat..puts me in a great mood for catching up with stuff in the office after 2 days with the office closed.

Tortola BVI here by the way.

Let me put it another way...before Earl came to say hello on Sunday / Monday I was excited to see my first Hurricane and I wanted it to pass over our island - believe me, I am not as excited about Gaston arriving next week...



Glad you made it through. And it really isn't as much fun as some might think. :(
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Quoting hurricanehanna:
Is Raleigh NC far enough inland to be spared?


It is very likely that Raleigh will have nice sunny days throughout the whole event. But...never say never...
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:




thanks for the visuals! :)
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Quoting xcool:
GASTON getting ready start you engine lots hothot sst
...and no shear from Earl to impede development.
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Quoting xCat6Hurricane:
i'm in cape hatteras and we're still under warnings, i'm not leaving though.


And you may end up regretting it!
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.