Causes of the Russian heat wave and Pakistani floods

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:56 PM GMT on August 13, 2010

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The Great Russian Heat Wave of 2010 is one of the most intense, widespread, and long-lasting heat waves in world history. Only the European heat wave of 2003, which killed 35,000 - 50,000 people, and the incredible North American heat wave of July 1936, which set all-time extreme highest temperature records in fifteen U.S. states, can compare. All of these heat waves were caused by a highly unusual kink in the jet stream that remained locked in place for over a month. The jet stream is an upper-level river of air, between the altitudes of about 30,000 - 40,000 feet (10,000 - 12,000 meters). In July over Europe and Asia, the jet stream has two branches: a strong southern "subtropical" jet that blows across southern Europe, and a weaker "polar" jet that blows across northern Europe. The polar jet stream carries along the extratropical cyclones (lows) that bring the mid-latitudes most of their precipitation. The polar jet stream also acts as the boundary between cold, Arctic air, and warm tropical air. If the polar jet stream shifts to the north of its usual location, areas just to its south will be much hotter and drier than normal. In July 2010, a remarkably strong polar jet stream developed over northern Europe. This jet curved far to the north of Moscow, then plunged southwards towards Pakistan. This allowed hot air to surge northwards over most of European Russia, and prevented rain-bearing low pressure systems from traveling over the region. These rain-bearing low pressure systems passed far to the north of European Russia, then dove unusually far to the south, into northern Pakistan. The heavy rains from these lows combined with Pakistan's usual summer monsoon rains to trigger Pakistan's most devastating floods in history.


Figure 1. Winds of the jet stream at an altitude of 300 millibars (roughly 30,000 feet high). Left: Average July winds from the period 1968 - 1996 show that a two-branch jet stream typically occurs over Europe and Asia--a northern "polar" jet stream, and a more southerly "subtropical" jet stream. Right: the jet stream pattern in July 2010 was highly unusual, with a very strong polar jet looping far to the north of Russia, then diving southwards towards Pakistan. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

What caused this unusual jet stream pattern?
The unusual jet stream pattern that led to the 2010 Russian heat wave and Pakistani floods began during the last week of June, and remained locked in place all of July and for the first half of August. Long-lived "blocking" episodes like this are usually caused by unusual sea surface temperature patterns, according to recent research done using climate models. For example, Feudale and Shukla (2010) found that during the summer of 2003, exceptionally high sea surface temperatures of 4°C (7°F) above average over the Mediterranean Sea, combined with unusually warm SSTs in the northern portion of the North Atlantic Ocean near the Arctic, combined to shift the jet stream to the north over Western Europe and create the heat wave of 2003. I expect that the current SST pattern over the ocean regions surrounding Europe played a key role in shifting the jet stream to create the heat wave of 2010. Note that the SST anomaly pattern is quite different this year compared to 2003, which may be why this year's heat wave hit Eastern Europe, and the 2003 heat wave hit Western Europe. Human-caused climate change also may have played a role; using climate models, Stott et al. (2004) found it very likely (>90% chance) that human-caused climate change has at least doubled the risk of severe heat waves like the great 2003 European heat wave.


Figure 2. A comparison of the departure of sea surface temperature (SST) from average just prior the the start of the great European heat waves of 2003 and 2010. Temperatures in the Mediterranean Sea were up to 4°C above average in 2003, which has been implicated as a major cause of the Western European heat wave of 2003. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS.

References
Feudale, L., and J. Shukla (2010), "Influence of sea surface temperature on the European heat wave of 2003 summer. Part I: an observational study", Climate Dynamics DOI: 10.1007/s00382-010-0788-0

Stott, P.A., Stone, D.A., and M.R. Allen (2004), "Human contribution to the European heatwave of 2003", Nature 432, 610-614 (2 December 2004) | doi:10.1038/nature03089. (Here is a free version of the paper, presented at a conference.)

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has posted an analysis of the recent extreme weather events, concluding, "the sequence of current events matches IPCC projections of more frequent and more intense extreme weather events due to global warming."

See also my posts, The Great Russian Heat Wave of 2010: 102°F in Moscow and, Over 15,000 likely dead in Russian heat wave; Asian monsoon floods kill hundreds more.

Moscow sees real relief from the Great Russian Heat Wave of 2010
For the first time in more than a month, temperatures at Moscow's Domodedovo airport failed to exceed 30°C (86°F) today. Clouds and thunderstorms blew into the city this morning, keeping the high temperature down to just 29°C (84°F). This breaks a string of 35 straight days when the temperature reached 30°C. At Moscow's official observing site, the Moscow Observatory, this string was 30 days. Moscow's average high temperature for August 13 is 20°C (68°F), so today's temperatures were still well above normal. However, today's cool-down marks the beginning of the end for Russia's great heat wave. The latest forecast for Moscow calls for high temperatures below 30°C for the coming week, and Moscow may not exceed that threshold for the remainder of summer. Long range forecasts from the ECMWF and GFS models continue to suggest that a series of troughs of low pressure will attack the ridge of high pressure anchored over Russia, bringing cooler temperatures just 5°C (8°F) above average to Russia late next week. By ten days from now, the ECMWF model shows a strong trough of low pressure over Moscow, and a end to the Great Russian Heat Wave of 2010. Moscow still has to concern itself with smoke from the wildfires burning southeast of the city; winds are expected to shift early next week and bring the smoke towards the city again. However, the cooler weather should aid fire-fighting efforts, so the smoke problems should not be as bad as last week's nightmare.


Figure 2. Image from NASA's Aqua satellite of smoke from wildfires burning to the southeast of Moscow yesterday, August 12, 2010. Northerly winds were keeping the smoke from blowing over the city. Image credit: NASA.

The tropics are quiet
The remnants of Tropical Depression Five continue to bring heavy rain to portions of Southeast Louisiana today. Up to five inches of rain has fallen in regions near New Orleans. The GFS model predicts that the remains of TD 5 could move off the coast of Mississippi by the middle of next week and regenerate, but none of the other models is making this forecast. Both the GFS and ECMWF models are predicting that a tropical storm will develop off the coast of Africa by next Friday, August 20.

Donations urgently needed in Pakistan
The devastation wrought by the worst flooding in Pakistan's history requires a huge response by the international community. Wunderblogger Dr. Ricky Rood, author of our Climate Change Blog, has a friend working in Pakistan who underscored the desperate situation there:

This is the worst natural disaster in the history of Pakistan in terms of number of people and area affected. Although not as many people have been killed as in the 2005 earthquake, we have already nearly 900,000 displaced persons thus far just in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Crops are destroyed; shops, hotels, and other business have simply been swept away in Swat, which had just this year been cleared of Taliban and was on the way to recovery; and districts closer to Peshawar and parts of Peshawar district are still, or perhaps again after yesterday/today, under water. After the immediate emergency response, it will be years of rebuilding to replace what has been lost and to start to develop again. I know you have the power to control the weather, so if you cold give us a week or two without more rain at least we could keep the helicopters flying and give people a chance to go to their homes, recover what might still be there, set up tents if we can get enough to them, and start to clean up."

She gave the following recommendations for charities that do work in the flood-ravaged zone, and are effective at getting aid to those who need it the most:

Doctors Without Borders

The International Red Cross

MERLIN medical relief charity

The mobile giving service mGive allows one to text the word "SWAT" to 50555. The text will result in a $10 donation to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) Pakistan Flood Relief Effort.

She mentioned that it is better to send money to the organizations doing the relief work than to try to organize shipments of goods.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting stormpetrol:
Link


Is this the link to the 219 mph winds? I looked for that and couldn't find it, but I found this:

"Ivan's strength continued to fluctuate as it moved west on September 11, and the storm attained its highest winds of 170 mph (270 km/h) as it passed within 30 miles (48 km) of Grand Cayman..."

Weren't the highest sustained winds in Camille and Keith with winds of about 190 mph?
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I'm not sure how I'm going to get Ivan and Camille on there, since they both happened before the blog itself got started.... maybe some kind of honourable mention??
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972. JLPR2
Quoting palmasdelrio:


Anyway, let's hope that those waves that are ready to move exit Africa don't decide to give us a visit. It's too early in the season to start worrying about whether or not we'll get hit.


Agreed, that time is usually from early to mid September.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8499
X TD 5 looks good tonight
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Link
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Wisdom and experience are very much related.

If a Hurricane is approaching, and you are told to evacuate, do it!

Do not opt to see what some here have seen.

Electing to do so will leave scars that you will live with the rest of you life, as stated by some who elected to see what they did not really want to, but had no choice after their choice was made.

One should appreciate the sharing we have on this blog.

That sharing comes from life, and it is not in digital format, or able to be put in a graph folks. Just my take. >>>>> out>>>>>>
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Quoting stormpetrol:

#16 Sorry Baha , Hurricane Ivan 2004 , most underrated Tyrant Hurricane of all times, Winds guage at Owen Roberts Airport Grand Cayman broke at 219mph sustained , not gusts!!! #1 in power in my opinion , I know others beg to differ and they have the right!


Huh? When were the winds 219 sustained?
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I'm watching a great lightening show out of my back window! There are some storms over the everglades right now.
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Ivan was pretty bad. Mom lost power for five days and the flooding was pretty heavy here. Katrina was the scariest thing I ever watched on radar though. Maybe because I was living down here at that time and prior to that didn't pay all that much attention to 'canes. I was in the Midwest and more worried about Tornadoes back then.
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Quoting HurrikanEB:
1. Wilma 2005 "the definitive pinhole eye"
2. Katrina 2005 "StormTop said it would hit NOLA"
3. Felix 2007 "graupel in the guts"
4. Rita 2005 "I tried to evacuate"
5. Marco 2008 "World's Smallest 'cane or Largest Tornado"

*Initial reaction was to go woth StormTop andKatrina as a first pick, but on the third thought realized that, since wilma, at least one person always has to pull out the "pin hole eye card" once any storm really gets going
Gracias hurrikan.... I copied this to my blog.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Evening all.

This is a repost from the last page. Please feel free to participate!

Legends of the Wunderground Poll

If you want to participate in the poll, you can go to my blog and post your response. I'm going to be in and out today, so it'll be a lot easier for me to collate all the responses that way. I put guidelines below, and I've repeated them in my blog post.

--------------------------------

Legends of the Wunderground nominees in cronological order

1. Katrina 2005 "StormTop said it would hit NOLA"
2. Rita 2005 "I tried to evacuate"
3. Wilma 2005 "the definitive pinhole eye"
4. Chris 2006 "Sheared again. . . Naturally"
5. Ernesto 2006 "yes it is; no it's not"
6. Dean 2007 "is that cat 5 landfall????"
7. Felix 2007 "graupel in the guts"
8. Humberto 2007? "Talk about explosive cyclogenesis"
9. Karen 2007 "never say die"
10. Dolly 2008 "no closed low"
11. Fay 2008 "Florida vacation"
12. Gustav 2008 "I can fake u out"
13. Ike 2008 aka "Ike Jr."; "Beeline for South Florida! ... NOT"
14. Portlight 2008 formation "We are the Blog"
15. Marco 2008 "World's Smallest 'cane or Largest Tornado"

Now we are ready to vote on the top five legends of the blog. The main requirement is that each event has to have entered the "history" or collective memory of the blog as a notable event. This is beyond simply the fact that a storm was notable for breaking a record or causing a lot of damage.

List your top FIVE picks in order from most legendary to least. If you wish, you can add a comment that explains why you feel your top pick is the most legendary blog event.

The poll will close at midnight EDT [0400 UTC] and I will post results tomorrow morning.

Have fun!

#16 Sorry Baha , Hurricane Ivan 2004 , most underrated Tyrant Hurricane of all times, Winds guage at Owen Roberts Airport Grand Cayman broke at 219mph sustained , not gusts!!! #1 in power in my opinion , I know others beg to differ and they have the right!
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Quoting TexasHoosier:
StormW, thanks for the additional insight. I will study this some and get back to you. It is an interesting hypothesis.....

BahaHurican,

Here are my pick from lowest to highest (you will see why in a second):

#5 - Wilma 2005
#4 - Ike 2008
#3 - Gustav 2008
#2 - Katrina 2005

The Number 1 Spot is permanently retired for those of us old enough to remember the legend of yesteryear, the one and only, Camille.

Camille is like Secretariat (the only non-human in ESPN's ranking of the Top 50 Athletes of all time a few years ago; the horse was, I believe #32, situated ironically between two individuals who also were like mythical athletes, #33 was Mickey Mantle and #31 was Larry Bird); each could do things, that the legend surrounding them, well it gives them special, almost mythical status.

And if you were lucky to have seen the 1973 Belmont Stakes, live on TV or at the Belmont track, you probably saw something that was pretty much beyond belief or will never be approached by a thoroughbred horse. A horse that had a heart that upon examination during autosopy was found to be 250% larger then the normal thorougbred's heart.....

Let's hope that the same thing can be said of Camille; nothing like it will ever happen again....


I remember that race. Secretariat was an amazing horse.
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StormW, thanks for the additional insight. I will study this some and get back to you. It is an interesting hypothesis.....

BahaHurican,

Here are my pick from lowest to highest (you will see why in a second):

#5 - Wilma 2005
#4 - Ike 2008
#3 - Gustav 2008
#2 - Katrina 2005

The Number 1 Spot is permanently retired for those of us old enough to remember the legend of yesteryear, the one and only, Camille.

Camille is like Secretariat (the only non-human in ESPN's ranking of the Top 50 Athletes of all time a few years ago; the horse was, I believe #32, situated ironically between two individuals who also were like mythical athletes, #33 was Mickey Mantle and #31 was Larry Bird); each could do things, that the legend surrounding them, well it gives them special, almost mythical status.

And if you were lucky to have seen the 1973 Belmont Stakes, live on TV or at the Belmont track, you probably saw something that was pretty much beyond belief or will never be approached by a thoroughbred horse. A horse that had a heart that upon examination during autosopy was found to be 250% larger then the normal thorougbred's heart.....

Let's hope that the same thing can be said of Camille; nothing like it will ever happen again....
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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
LinkHere is a link that tells the story of this legend.
WOW!!! Thanks for that link, I think I got it mostly right, I watched that years ago, at nearly 46 my memory is pretty still intact :) at least for things that happens long ago , from one minute to the next, its pretty poor :(
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1. Wilma 2005 "the definitive pinhole eye"
2. Katrina 2005 "StormTop said it would hit NOLA"
3. Felix 2007 "graupel in the guts"
4. Rita 2005 "I tried to evacuate"
5. Marco 2008 "World's Smallest 'cane or Largest Tornado"

*Initial reaction was to go woth StormTop andKatrina as a first pick, but on the third thought realized that, since wilma, at least one person always has to pull out the "pin hole eye card" once any storm really gets going
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Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
Yes that is what the models say. Take a look at the GFS. It has it sitting over you guys with nonstop rain for almost 2 days.

Yes one model the GFS that has been out to lunch over and over again. While the low may follow that track I am looking outside and there is no punch with it. Moisture is not as high as the models say. You can even see that on water vapor. Rain is very drizzely. We had a few solid storms last night and only got about an inch of rain...by 8am everything was pretty dry.
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Quoting HaboobsRsweet:

Is that what the models say because they are not verifying therefore I do not trust them. Really do not see flooding an issue plus the bullseye of that rain is over the water. we get 5-8 inches in a day from solid fronts comign through and dont flood so I doubt we will for this.
Yes that is what the models say. Take a look at the GFS. It has it sitting over you guys with nonstop rain for almost 2 days.
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Quoting JLPR2:


Oh yes, you were right in the area of landfall, must have been bad, 115mph hurricane entering through your backyard is never good.
I'm more to the NE/N side of the island, in Carolina, almost San Juan.


Anyway, let's hope that those waves that are ready to move exit Africa don't decide to give us a visit. It's too early in the season to start worrying about whether or not we'll get hit.
Member Since: May 22, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 178
Very impressive outflow channels continuously being depicted by the GFS when ex-05L re-emerges into the Gulf of Mexico.

GFS 200mb Forecast, Day 4:
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Quoting stormpetrol:

I'm curious Have you ever watch Unsolved Mysteries years ago hosted by the late great Robert Stack, about the "Gray Man" It involved Hurricane Hugo in SC some Island I can't remember exactly, Pollys Island it sounded like or something like that , whoever the gray man appeared to their property and home would be spared , well it showed one home in which the gray man had appeared to , all other homes were damaged or destroyed and not even a towel left on the balcony was blown off, weird, Have you or anyone else here ever heard that story?
LinkHere is a link that tells the story of this legend.
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Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
Yeah, you guys haven't gotten much yet. However, the feature will be bringing a lot of moisture to you guys as it moves slowly westward. I will also likely be emerging near Pensacola in a couple of days.

Is that what the models say because they are not verifying therefore I do not trust them. Really do not see flooding an issue plus the bullseye of that rain is over the water. we get 5-8 inches in a day from solid fronts comign through and dont flood so I doubt we will for this.
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Pa
Quoting Patrap:
In times of great calamity,,those within the Bubble see things they carry for life.

Having been thru Betsy,Camille,Elena,Katrina..I thought I had seen it all.
But to be sure the Hurricane leaves a mark on the young and old.
We discuss the mechanics and drivers that form these furies of Nature,and those who have danced with a Major Eyewall always remeber those hours,and the tough days and weeks sometimes after.

Here on the wunderground we share the experiences many of us have been thru to help those who havent,understand that after the excitment and wind dies down.
The real work begins in ernest.

Many injuries and even deaths occur post storm from accidents due to generators,intersections without lights and other.

So I for one will always be ready to share that collective experience here.

Always good to see folks sharing their Storm stories here.

Its what this site is all about.



This should be repeated. Hurricanes are mean, nasty and the big ones are scary. Once that passes it is Hot and Humid with no power and a LOT of work to do. Employers expect you to come back to work, you have to rebuild fences, patch roofs, clear tree's and that is if you are lucky. All of this with no power makes it a huge PITA that just wears you down. The night Ike hit my neighbors asked me how long the power would be out and I told them a week at least. They did not believe me, then treated me like it was my fault it took 13 days to get power (And I think that was pretty good) Having been through 2 Really big ones, Alicia and Ike, Alicia was much nastier with a meaner punch. I was in the eye wall for both about 70 miles inland and Alica scared me. Ike was a little tamer for me but it was still a major impact on our lives and not fun at all. You have to devote an entire day to get gas for your generator and car...No traffic lights, very dark at night..You really don't want to go through that.
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Quoting charlestonscnanny:
Terrible damage and this is the first time I've seen that. I guess we were so concerned about SC that we didn't stop to think about the other devistated areas. Well, for myself, I didn't.


It's a lot easier now days to know what is happening somewhere else than it used to be even in 1989. I remember watching Ike coming for what seemed like forever. The jaw dropping five story wave in Cuba was just insane! All I think about with Ike is water!

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946. JLPR2
Quoting palmasdelrio:


For Georges and Jeanne I was in Humacao, so especially for Georges, I know what a bad hurricane is like. I hope I never have to experience another one.


Oh yes, you were right in the area of landfall, must have been bad, 115mph hurricane entering through your backyard is never good.
I'm more to the NE/N side of the island, in Carolina, almost San Juan.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8499
Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
Flooding will be an issue...a bad issue with ex-05L. IKE wanted rain...well now he's got it.


Not verifying well...I live in the southeast corner of MS and we are not near those totals and flooding not anywhere close to an issue. Plus there are big enough breaks in the rainfall that all the ditches and flood areas have time to drain between storms.
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944. flsky
Quoting stormpetrol:

Like they say "Its the angle of the dangle" but quite seriously its amazing , just this evening my son and I were driving through town in heavy rain and within a minute we were in sunlight with no rain at all and could watch the heavy down pour within a few hundred feet of us, amazing!

I've had this happen with the summer storms in ECF. Coming from CA, it was quite a sight!
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Quoting charlestonscnanny:
Terrible damage and this is the first time I've seen that. I guess we were so concerned about SC that we didn't stop to think about the other devistated areas. Well, for myself, I didn't.

I'm curious Have you ever watch Unsolved Mysteries years ago hosted by the late great Robert Stack, about the "Gray Man" It involved Hurricane Hugo in SC some Island I can't remember exactly, Pollys Island it sounded like or something like that , whoever the gray man appeared to their property and home would be spared , well it showed one home in which the gray man had appeared to , all other homes were damaged or destroyed and not even a towel left on the balcony was blown off, weird, Have you or anyone else here ever heard that story?
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Quoting JLPR2:


Ah well, Hugo was barely felt in Ponce, you would have had to be in the NE side of the island or Vieques and Culebra to know how bad it was.


For Georges and Jeanne I was in Humacao, so especially for Georges, I know what a bad hurricane is like. I hope I never have to experience another one.
Member Since: May 22, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 178
940. JLPR2
Quoting palmasdelrio:


I was in Ponce.


Ah well, Hugo was barely felt in Ponce, you would have had to be in the NE side of the island or Vieques and Culebra to know how bad it was.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8499
939. JLPR2
Quoting Caribbeanislands101:

lol,okay i was small for hugo, but i didn't live in puerto rico. So, you haven't seen hurricane as an adult? hnm... there's a generation here in PR that hasn't seen a hurricane. ironic right?


I was 7 and a half then but I remember it clearly, not even my mom, dad or older sister remember as well as me. XD
And well then, lets hope that generation doesn't have to see one then.
Member Since: September 4, 2007 Posts: 7 Comments: 8499
Ah, thanks Miami. I know they are calling for a continuation of the hit and miss tropical showers we've been getting.
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Quoting Kristina40:
Miami, Ike lives nears me and we haven't gotten that much rain from this system. It's been very patchy in this area. It might downpour for five minutes on one side of town and the other gets nothing. I just had to water my garden.
Yeah, you guys haven't gotten much yet. However, the feature will be bringing a lot of moisture to you guys as it moves slowly westward. I will also likely be emerging near Pensacola in a couple of days.
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Quoting JLPR2:


Were were you in PR since it seemed similar to what Hugo was like? XD


I was in Ponce.
Member Since: May 22, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 178
Wasn't a strange Jet Stream pattern what caused the freezing cold temps we had this winter here in Florida while Greenland was rather warm? I seem to remember reading it had to do with a Jet Stream anomaly.
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933. xcool
Member Since: September 26, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 15620
In times of great calamity,,those within the Bubble see things they carry for life.

Having been thru Betsy,Camille,Elena,Katrina..I thought I had seen it all.
But to be sure the Hurricane leaves a mark on the young and old.
We discuss the mechanics and drivers that form these furies of Nature,and those who have danced with a Major Eyewall always remeber those hours,and the tough days and weeks sometimes after.

Here on the wunderground we share the experiences many of us have been thru to help those who havent,understand that after the excitment and wind dies down.
The real work begins in ernest.

Many injuries and even deaths occur post storm from accidents due to generators,intersections without lights and other.

So I for one will always be ready to share that collective experience here.

Always good to see folks sharing their Storm stories here.

Its what this site is all about.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127559
I think one of the contributing factors to the quieter than expected season is that we lost the tri-pole a few months ago. Without the tri-pole, upward motion really isnt directed at one spot in the basin, instead rather many spots sporadically.

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Evening all.

This is a repost from the last page. Please feel free to participate!

Legends of the Wunderground Poll

If you want to participate in the poll, you can go to my blog and post your response. I'm going to be in and out today, so it'll be a lot easier for me to collate all the responses that way. I put guidelines below, and I've repeated them in my blog post.

--------------------------------

Legends of the Wunderground nominees in cronological order

1. Katrina 2005 "StormTop said it would hit NOLA"
2. Rita 2005 "I tried to evacuate"
3. Wilma 2005 "the definitive pinhole eye"
4. Chris 2006 "Sheared again. . . Naturally"
5. Ernesto 2006 "yes it is; no it's not"
6. Dean 2007 "is that cat 5 landfall????"
7. Felix 2007 "graupel in the guts"
8. Humberto 2007? "Talk about explosive cyclogenesis"
9. Karen 2007 "never say die"
10. Dolly 2008 "no closed low"
11. Fay 2008 "Florida vacation"
12. Gustav 2008 "I can fake u out"
13. Ike 2008 aka "Ike Jr."; "Beeline for South Florida! ... NOT"
14. Portlight 2008 formation "We are the Blog"
15. Marco 2008 "World's Smallest 'cane or Largest Tornado"

Now we are ready to vote on the top five legends of the blog. The main requirement is that each event has to have entered the "history" or collective memory of the blog as a notable event. This is beyond simply the fact that a storm was notable for breaking a record or causing a lot of damage.

List your top FIVE picks in order from most legendary to least. If you wish, you can add a comment that explains why you feel your top pick is the most legendary blog event.

The poll will close at midnight EDT [0400 UTC] and I will post results tomorrow morning.

Have fun!
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Miami, Ike lives nears me and we haven't gotten that much rain from this system. It's been very patchy in this area. It might downpour for five minutes on one side of town and the other gets nothing. I just had to water my garden.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:


The first one looks impressive too. Too bad it has to sacrifice itself, I dont think it will like that very much...lol.
It is a very vigorous wave, however it will be heading into hefty SAL and relatively cool SSTs. It will also be recurving. So it will sacrifice itself...LOL!
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Quoting JLPR2:


Didn't exist LOL!
I came around two years later.
Was around for Georges tho :)

lol,okay i was small for hugo, but i didn't live in puerto rico. So, you haven't seen hurricane as an adult? hnm... there's a generation here in PR that hasn't seen a hurricane. ironic right?
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Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
The vigorous tropical wave being developed by the models has reached western Africa. The mid-level circulation is stationed near 10N, and has just reached the Prime Meridian. At its current pace, it should be emerging in about 3-5 days, with the earlier day being the most likely.



The first one looks impressive too. Too bad it has to sacrifice itself, I dont think it will like that very much...lol.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31463

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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