Colin takes aim at Bermuda; the Great Russian Heat Wave of 2010: 102°F in Moscow

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:45 PM GMT on August 06, 2010

Share this Blog
5
+

A reborn Tropical Storm Colin is taking aim at Bermuda, and should bring tropical storm force winds to the island by Saturday afternoon. Colin continues to pass through an unfavorable environment for development--an upper-level low pressure system with dry air and high wind shear. High wind shear of 20 - 25 knots has exposed the surface circulation to view, as seen in recent satellite imagery. Colin's heavy thunderstorm activity is all on the east side of the storm, and the associated rains can now be seen approaching the island on Bermuda radar.

Forecast for Colin
The latest SHIPS model forecast predicts that wind shear will drop to the low to moderate range, 5 - 15 knots, tonight through Saturday afternoon. This relaxation of shear prompts the intensity models to predict that Colin will strengthen to a 50 - 70 mph tropical storm by Sunday. With the forecast path of the storm predicted to take Colin just west of Bermuda, the island will be in the strong right front quadrant of the storm, and may see wind gusts in excess of hurricane force, 74 mph. After its encounter with Bermuda, Colin will head towards Newfoundland, and it is possible the storm could bring tropical storm force winds to the island on Monday. However, wind shear will be on the increase again beginning Saturday night, and it is unlikely Colin will be a hurricane when it makes it closest approach to Newfoundland.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Colin.

93L
A tropical wave (Invest 93) about 700 miles west of the Cape Verdes Islands off the coast of Africa is moving northwest at 10 mph. Wind shear is a moderate 10 - 20 knots over 93L, which is low enough to allow some slow development. This system currently does not appear to be a concern to any land areas over the next seven days. NHC is giving a 40% chance of this disturbance developing into a tropical depression by Sunday morning. The GFS and NOGAPS models predict 93L will become a tropical depression.


Figure 2. Smoke from fires in Russia on August 4 covers an area over 3,000 km (1860 miles) across. If the smoke were in the United States, it would extend approximately from San Francisco to Chicago. Visibility in Moscow dropped to 20 meters (0.01 miles) on August 4, and health officials warned that everyone, including healthy people, needed to take preventative measures such as staying indoors or wearing a mask outdoors. Image credit: NASA.

The Great Russian Heat Wave of 2010 continues
One of the most remarkable weather events of my lifetime is unfolding this summer in Russia, where an unprecedented heat wave has brought another day of 102°F heat to the nation's capital. At 3:30 pm local time today, the mercury hit 39°C (102.2°F) at Moscow's Domodedovo Airport. Moscow had never recorded a temperature exceeding 100°F prior to this year, and today marks the second time the city has beaten the 100°F mark. The first time was on July 29, when the Moscow observatory recorded 100.8°C and Baltschug, another official downtown Moscow weather site, hit an astonishing 102.2°F (39.0°C). Prior to this year, the hottest temperature in Moscow's history was 37.2°C (99°F), set in August 1920. The Moscow Observatory has now matched or exceeded this 1920 all-time record five times in the past eleven days, including today. The 2010 average July temperature in Moscow was 7.8°C (14°F) above normal, smashing the previous record for hottest July, set in 1938 (5.3°C above normal.) July 2010 also set the record for most July days in excess of 30°C--twenty-two. The previous record was 13 such days, set in July 1972. The past 24 days in a row have exceeded 30°C in Moscow, and there is no relief in sight--the latest forecast for Moscow calls for high temperatures near 100°F (37.8°C) for the next seven days. It is stunning to me that the country whose famous winters stopped the armies of Napoleon and Hitler is experiencing day after day of heat near 100°F, with no end in sight.

Thousands of deaths, severe fires, and the threat of radioactive contamination
The extreme heat has led to thousands of premature deaths in Russia. According to Yevgenia Smirnova, an official from the Moscow registry office, "We recorded 14,340 deaths in Moscow in July, that is 4,824 deaths more than in July, 2009." Undoubtedly thousands of additional premature deaths have occurred in the rest of Russia as a result of the heat. The heat has also caused the worst drought conditions in European Russia in a half-century, prompting the Russian government to suspend wheat exports. The drought has caused extreme fire danger over most of European Russia (Figure 3), and fires in Russia have killed at least 50 people in the past week and leveled thousands of homes. The fires are the worst since 1972, when massive forest and peat bog fires burned an area of 100,000 square km and killed at 104 people in the Moscow region alone. Smoke from the current fires spans a region over 3,000 km (1,860 miles) from east to west, approximately the distance from San Francisco to Chicago. Dozens of flights were canceled at Moscow's airports today, thanks to visibilities of 300 meters in smoke. Also of concern is fires that have hit the Bryansk region of western Russia, which suffered radioactive contamination from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in nearby Ukraine. There are fears that fires may burn through the contaminated area, releasing harmful radiation into the atmosphere.


Figure 3. Fire danger in Russia for August 5, 2010. Extreme fire danger (Category 5, red colors) was seen over much of the European portion of Russia. Image credit: Hydrometcentre, Russia.

Why has Russia's heat wave been so long and intense?
Dr. Rob Carver has done a detailed analysis of the remarkable Russian heat wave in his latest post, The Great Russian Heat Wave of July 2010. A persistent jet stream pattern has set up over Europe, thanks to a phenomena known as blocking. A ridge of high pressure has remained anchored over Russia, and the hot and dry conditions have created helped intensify this ridge in a positive feedback loop. As a result, soil moisture in some portions of European Russia has dropped to levels one would expect only once every 500 years.

Next update
I'll have an update on Saturday morning.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 1209 - 1159

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45Blog Index

Heading out now so will catch up with you all later.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
That news spot on Portlight is fantastic - Press was his usual articulate self, I see. LOL

Keep up the good work! Unfortunately there seems to be a good chance somebody will have need of Portlight's assistance this season....
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Quoting stormhank:
I read a low could form in northern gulf from tail end of cold front thats currently along east coast.. anyone have any info on this??


Marine Weather Discussion

Excerpt:

THE MODELS DIVERGE MOST SIGNIFICANTLY OVER THE NE GULF OF MEXICO SUN AND MON WHEN THE CMC..ECMWF...AND UKMET ALL CONTINUE TO PINCH OFF A MID LEVEL LOW FROM THE COLD FRONT THAT DIVES INTO THE SE TOWARD THE NE GULF OF MEXICO. THE GFS IS WEAKER WITH THE COLD FRONT AND DOES NOT PINCH OFF SUCH A LOW. THE TREND IN THE OTHER MODELS IS TOWARD THE EAST...DEVELOPING THE LOW EITHER OVER THE FLORIDA PENINSULA OR OVER THE FAR E GULF. THE 00Z/06 GFS ENSEMBLES ARE SHOWING SOME SUPPORT FOR A STRONGER SOLUTION...WITH STRONGER BEING RELATIVE IN THIS CASE AS THE ECMWF ONLY BRIEFLY SHOWS SOUTHERLY FLOW INTO THE LOW TO 20 KT OFF THE SW FLORIDA COAST ON TUE. THE FORECAST WILL SIDE TOWARD THE MODEL CONSENSUS AND DEPICT A WEAK LOW OVER THE EASTERN GULF MON AND TUE...BUT WILL NOT GO FOR WINDS AS STRONG AS THE ECMWF JUST YET.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The global northern heat wave of 2010 continues.

Mortality rate in Moscow increases by a third to 14,340 in July.

93L is just positively ginormous.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting weatherman12345:

PRESSURES ARE NOT FALLING
AND THERE ARE NO SIGNS OF A DEVELOPING SURFACE CIRCULATION. not saying anything bout yet


Which would make it difficult to even assign a center!
Member Since: April 1, 2010 Posts: 9 Comments: 2699
Quoting 7544:
hey taz i think ur right about 92l trying to form another center now

cool
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 115454
1203. 7544
hey taz i think ur right about 92l trying to form another center now
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
93L may be trying to consolidate near 16 N 37 W

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I read a low could form in northern gulf from tail end of cold front thats currently along east coast.. anyone have any info on this??
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Re 92L: Not saying cyclogenesis is impossible, but I have to go with the NHC on this one. Given the difficulty systems even in that area have been having in pulling themselves together, I'm not seeing the consolidation happening before landfall over Belize / Yucatan. From Alex on down, everything moving across the Yucatan into the S GOM has struggled this season. That may change, but I don't think it's going to change before the weekend is over.

It's not impossible to see a TD or TS out of this 92L, but I think it unlikely. Low probability.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Fleet of planes to buzz hurricanes
August 05, 2010|By Ken Kaye, Sun Sentinel


Should a hurricane threaten this summer, up to seven airplanes are ready to attack it — and no, they won't be dropping nuclear bombs in hopes of deflating it.

Rather, each plane will have a specific mission; some studying a storm for research purposes and others investigating it to fortify tropical advisories. Their overall goal: help the National Hurricane Center in Miami-Dade County develop the most accurate forecasts.

"The planes will send data back; we'll provide it to our hurricane specialists and then to the world," said meteorologist Warren Von Werne, who helps coordinate the flights.

Three government agencies and a research group hope to take advantage of what is predicted to be a busy hurricane season by buzzing as many storms as possible this year. The seven types of planes constitute the largest fleet to investigate hurricanes since the Air Force first sent a single-engine AT-6 Texan into the eye of a storm in 1943.
All the aircraft are loaded with sophisticated weather monitoring instruments. Many also will release "dropsondes," parachute-equipped devices that hold atmospheric sensors, in and around storms.

The Air Force Reserve WC-130 turboprop "hurricane hunters" make the most critical flights, feeding information on a storm's strength and structure, necessary for forecasters to issue advisories and tropical warnings.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will deploy a WP-3 Orion turboprop and a Gulfstream G-IV jet to study how storms intensify.

NASA will send three jets, a DC-8, a WB-57 and a Global Hawk, into storms to learn more about how tropical systems evolve and what triggers them to suddenly strengthen.

And the National Center for Atmospheric Research will dispatch a Gulfstream G-V to study how hurricanes form in the first place.

Ideally, scientists would like to monitor the full life cycle of a storm, said Robert Rogers, a research meteorologist for NOAA's Hurricane Research Division in Miami.

"We try to catch systems before they're hurricanes, like when they're tropical depressions or even pre-depression. You have to do that if you want to understand how they evolve," he said.

The National Hurricane Center coordinates all of the flights and each plane must provide the center with a detailed plan on how it intends to explore a storm. In general, hurricanes must be within 1,500 miles of land before the planes are dispatched.

The Federal Aviation Administration monitors the planes after they take to the air. To ensure no conflicts, each aircraft is assigned to fly in its own "block" of airspace, such as between 15,000 and 17,000 feet, said FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen.

"When necessary, we coordinate with foreign air traffic service providers, such as the Bahamas, Haiti, the Dominican Republic or Cuba, when the aircraft need to fly in to their airspace to complete the mission," she said.

During busy tropical stretches, planes might be assigned to investigate two or more storms at the same time, Von Werne said.

"It's likely several will fly into each storm," he said. "They'll have to talk to each other when they're out there."

Here is a rundown of the agencies, their planes and the missions:Air Force Reserve

Whenever a storm threatens land, the hurricane center will dispatch a rugged four-engine WC-130 turboprop to determine the system's exact location and strength.

Although just one "hurricane hunter" plane is flown into each storm, the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron, based at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Miss., has 10 of the planes in its fleet.

The planes fly between 1,000 and 10,000 feet above the ocean and have equipment to capture vital measurements, such as wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity and barometric pressure.

Their flights might last more than 14 hours because they can fly in and out of the storm's eye several times.

"They're the real workhorse of all the planes that fly into hurricanes," said Dennis Feltgen, hurricane center spokesman.

NOAA

The agency flies its planes into hurricanes mainly for research purposes. It operates three four-engine WP-3 Orion turboprops and a twin-engine Gulfstream G-IV high-altitude jet, all based MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa.

This year, the planes' main mission is to study the inner workings of storms and the atmosphere around them to better understand how tropical systems intensify, said Rogers, who also is NOAA's field program director for its Intensity Forecasting Experiment.

The idea is to gather more and better atmospheric observations for the computer models. That could help improve intensity forecasts, an area where the hurricane center still struggles, he said.

The WP-3 will fly between 5,000 and 12,000 feet above the ocean and use its sophisticated Doppler radar system to study the lowest levels of a storm, Rogers said.

"The Doppler radars play a vital role in measuring both winds and rain throughout much of the hurricane," he said.

The G-IV, meanwhile, samples the atmosphere around the upper fringes of a storm to better understand the steering currents.

"The combination of all that data is vital to see the structure of a hurricane and how that structure evolves," Rogers said.

NASA

The agency best known for its space endeavors plans to dispatch three jets in and around storms to study why some hurricanes suddenly intensify.The largest of those, a four-engine Douglas DC-8, will be based at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport as of mid- August. The one-time passenger jetliner, able to fly up to 41,000 feet, has been converted into a flying laboratory, allowing scientists to observe the inner workings of storms in real time.

A WB-57, a converted light bomber built in the 1950s, can fly as high as 60,000 feet and will have the ability to study the upper reaches of a storm. It will be based in Houston.

A Global Hawk, a turbine-powered unmanned vehicle, will be able to stay aloft for more than 30 hours, which might allow scientists to investigate storms from their earliest beginnings until landfall. The plane, able to fly 10,000 miles and up to 65,000 feet, will be remotely piloted from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in Palmdale, Calif.

Combined, the planes will have 15 instruments to study all climatic features of a hurricane.

National Center for Atmospheric Research

The non-profit research center, based in Boulder, Colo., will deploy a twin-engine Gulfstream G-V jet to study why some clusters of thunderstorms become hurricanes while many others don't.

In doing so, scientists hope to help the hurricane center extend its long-range forecasts from five to seven days. Like the other planes, it will be equipped with atmospheric measuring equipment as well as dropsondes. The plane will be based in St. Croix in the Virgin Islands.

"We hope the information we gather this summer will unlock some of the secrets of how hurricanes form and evolve," said Christopher Davis, a NCAR scientist and a principal investigator on the PREDICT project. "This is key information we all need to better protect lives and property from major storms."

Ken Kaye can be reached at kkaye@sunsentinel.com or 954-572-2085.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1198. 7544
colin wins another round

93l looks good now

92l still hanging in
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Look at this RAMSDIS loop of 92L and look off to the NW in the Gulf. Two things I want you to look for:

1) The flashing red numbers. Those numbers indicate the sea surface temperatures.

2) Look at the low clouds in the Gulf and how they are barely moving. That shows the steering in the vicinity of 92L has broken down temporarily and that 92L should slow its progression towards the Yucatan, which might give it just enough time to develop into a TD or weak TS before landfall. I'd put chances of that more around 30% considering the optimal conditions aloft and at the surface.

92L VIS Loop
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1196. Patrap
Presslord on TV tonight with the New Portlight Response Trailer and more.

Note the wunderground Logos too.



Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nrtiwlnvragn:


The ACE index is a wind energy index, defined as the sum of the squares of the maximum sustained surface wind speed (knots) measured every six hours for all named systems while they are at least tropical storm strength.

Link


Now you know why I don't mess with the calculation.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
They ran a story yesterday in the Sun-sentinel in Broward County about the amount of Hurricane related aircraft that they will be using for storms. Not just the regular hunter but 7 different planes. If I can find it, I will post it.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
how can a system run out of time if it isnt moving? lol

92L is basically stationary right now, which is why I think it could have a shot at development
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
This is how you calculate ACE:

Save the image if you like, since the words are small, the text is below.



The ACE is calculated by summing the squares of the estimated maximum sustained velocity of every active tropical storm (wind speed 35 knots or higher), at six-hour intervals. The numbers are usually divided by 10,000 to make them more manageable. The unit of ACE is 104 kt2, and for use as an index the unit is assumed. If any storms of a season happen to cross years, the storm's ACE counts for the previous year.



where vmax is estimated sustained wind speed in knots.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting earthlydragonfly:


Sorry Baha.... I got some coming next week... Ill be on the coast... Got a couple last night but nothing great. Got stuck in a bad position and a hill was blocking the main thunderhead but had to wait for my wife to come home to leave the house.... arghh
We've had rain, but nothing like the spectacular lightning from last year. I'm still trying for sunrise photos I promised myself, but nothing doing so far since I haven't been getting out in time in the mornings....
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Quoting Grothar:


Took a walk on the Strand, did we? Welcome back.


Thanks. Aye, indeed laddy LOL.

The Strand, Oxford Street , Knightsbridge, Rome, Paris, back to London and then my credit cards cried " Uncle ". Saw my son graduate from King's College with his law degree which made me very proud.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Dang, those Hurricane Hunter aircraft must be working overtime to keep up with all these tropical developments. Im guessing they must have to dispatch multiple aircraft daily(or midair refuel). Wouldnt that would be a cool job flying right down into the eye of these storms...well, maybe a little scary the 1st couple times, but what a rush. :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting kmanislander:


Hi there.

Took a trip to Europe but good to be back on " the rock " LOL.

The season has been suspiciously quiet so far and for now nothing of consequence out there.

Sooner or later something big is going to happen, probably sooner.

Great my family and I took a trip to Belize late May for week, also made a brief visit to Mexico , overall is was nice, (Belize is my wife's birthplace) September 7 will 25 years since been married and I hadn't visit her home country, figured it was about time, but definitely no place like "the rock".
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting kmanislander:


Could be NW based upon this:



Steering currents for the level 92L is located aren't that strong. The trof to the north and east has broken down the ridge and caused steering in the Gulf to collapse. If you look at visible loops of the Gulf, the low clouds are barely even moving.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
Kman,

Do you know how to calculate ACE?


The ACE index is a wind energy index, defined as the sum of the squares of the maximum sustained surface wind speed (knots) measured every six hours for all named systems while they are at least tropical storm strength.

Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1182. Grothar
Quoting kmanislander:


Hi there.

Took a trip to Europe but good to be back on " the rock " LOL.

The season has been suspiciosly quiet so far and for now nothing of consequence out there.

Sooner or later something big is going to happen, probably sooner.


Took a walk on the Strand, did we? Welcome back.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting txsweetpea:
Which direction is 92L moving once it crosses the yucatan or belize into the gulf ?


Could be NW based upon this:

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting thelmores:
ok, who screwed up the blog with the pop-up?

Enter username and password for http://www.hydromet.gov.bz
Sorry thel. Didn't realize it was happening until just now. I deleted.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Quoting weatherman12345:

As the NHC said in the TWO, there is nothing going on at the surface although it looks good on satilite.


Nothing going on at the surface..... YET!

Key term, tricky phrase! LOL
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting kmanislander:


Never bothered with it. If everywhere is getting thier butt kicked by tropical cyclones the ACE is high.
LOL!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Which direction is 92L moving once it crosses the yucatan or belize into the gulf ?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting thelmores:
92L is really winding up in my opinion...... were it not the proximity to land, I have no doubt this would be a tropical storm!

I believe it might be a TD now..... or very close!






LOL just cause you can draw a picture with an area of convection that looks like a tropical cyclone doesn't mean it is one. The pressures are high in the area, no indication of surface circulation, and proximity to land will really put a hamper on any development.

The NHC was right on in the TWO
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
Kman,

Do you know how to calculate ACE?


Never bothered with it. If everywhere is getting thier butt kicked by tropical cyclones the ACE is high.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Tazmanian:




wunder why the nhc hold 93L at 40% for
Maybe they noticed the competing circulations that kman mentioned....
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Link
Here you go
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting BahaHurican:
Hey dude! Any decent lightning photos lately? LOL



Sorry Baha.... I got some coming next week... Ill be on the coast... Got a couple last night but nothing great. Got stuck in a bad position and a hill was blocking the main thunderhead but had to wait for my wife to come home to leave the house.... arghh
Member Since: July 1, 2005 Posts: 10 Comments: 1683
Quoting MiamiHurricanes09:
You said it.


The highest shear in that stretch is 10kts. That is very very impressive.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Listen to this Hurricane song!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
anyone have any thoughts on possible low forming next week in northern gulf??
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Kman,

Do you know how to calculate ACE?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2. ALTHOUGH THE AREA OF CLOUDINESS AND THUNDERSTORMS OVER THE
NORTHWESTERN CARIBBEAN SEA ASSOCIATED WITH A TROPICAL WAVE IS
SHOWING SOME ORGANIZATION ON SATELLITE...PRESSURES ARE NOT FALLING
AND THERE ARE NO SIGNS OF A DEVELOPING SURFACE CIRCULATION. THIS
SYSTEM COULD GAIN SOME ADDITIONAL ORGANIZATION BEFORE MOVING OVER
THE YUCATAN PENINSULA AND BELIZE ON SATURDAY. THERE IS A LOW
CHANCE...10 PERCENT...OF THIS SYSTEM BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE
DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

Give me break, pressures fell here in Grand Cayman about 4mb in the last 5 hours and 92L aint going nowhere soon, jmo.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MississippiWx:
From the Central Atlantic all the way to the NW Caribbean has anticyclonic flow aloft. If this is the pattern that is supposed to persist throughout the meat of hurricane season, we are in deep, deep trouble.

You said it.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting stormpetrol:

Good Evening neighbor, How have you been, haven't seen you around , on well deserved vacation I guess! Well, finally a voice of reason on the blog , great to have your input as always.


Hi there.

Took a trip to Europe but good to be back on " the rock " LOL.

The season has been suspiciosly quiet so far and for now nothing of consequence out there.

Sooner or later something big is going to happen, probably sooner.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CybrTeddy:
I was right, 40% and 10%.


*hands you a cookie*
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
From the Central Atlantic all the way to the NW Caribbean has anticyclonic flow aloft. If this is the pattern that is supposed to persist throughout the meat of hurricane season, we are in deep, deep trouble.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Deep convection firing off on Colin.



Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 24575

Viewing: 1209 - 1159

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
29 °F
Overcast

JeffMasters's Recent Photos

Lake Effort Snow Shower Over Windsor, Ontario
Sunset on Dunham Lake
Pictured Rocks Sunset
Sunset on Lake Huron